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Study with us

Take your passion for ideas further than you ever imagined.

We offer the opportunity to undertake a research degree within any of our disciplines and areas of research expertise. We provide a supportive, vibrant, and collegiate environment, rich in diversity, promoting a high-performance research culture. Your experience with us will be enriching and memorable with many opportunities to work with peers and academics on your areas of interest.

Our degrees offer a distinctive blend of theoretical and practice -based programs including industry-based partnerships, to equip students with higher-level conceptual and professional skills. Choose a research topic that reflects your interests and identify a supervisor from discipline staff with the expertise to guide you in your research. We supervise across a range of methodologies and conceptual/theoretical approaches, and encourage scholarship that draws on ideas from across diverse fields.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Closing dates for College of Arts, Law and Education (CALE) Scholarship Rounds
31st Oct 2018 and 1st March 2019

Featured Projects

Artfully decoding delicious imagery

Nathan Taylor is a PhD candidate at the School of Creative Arts, whose research is exploring contemporary food imaging.

Bringing seafood governance to the surface

Coco Cullen-Knox is a PhD candidate at the School of Social Sciences, whose research explores the roll of environmental campaigning and media in the governance of seafood.

Making forensic science easier for non-scientists to understand

Loene Howes completed a PhD at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES) in the School of Social Sciences. Loene came to the University of Tasmania because Forensic Studies is a key strength of research at TILES, and a unique program in Australia. Loene now works at the University as a researcher and lecturer.

Selling the land of extremes

Ever wondered how your perception of Antarctica has been shaped over the years? Influences are usually documentaries, advertising, or by reading books on the continent.

Hanne Nielsen is a PhD candidate at the School of Humanities, whose research is exploring how Antarctica has been used in advertising.

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

Since the publishing of Peter Singer’s seminal text Animal Liberation in 1975, Australia has played a significant role in the development of the Animal Studies (also known as Human-Animal Studies and including Critical Animal Studies) as an international field of enquiry and continues to do so.

Researchers from the University of Tasmania have been active in the contemporary development of Animal Studies, convening the second Australian Animal Studies conference, Considering Animals, in 2007 and publishing widely in the field. The recent development of Animal Studies as a Strategic Theme Area grouping within the College of Arts and Law further consolidates the importance of this rapidly growing field at UTAS.

Potential candidates working in the field of Animal Studies are invited to submit an application to undertake a PhD, with project proposals that reflect the radical rethinking of the nature of human-animal relations and its consequences for animal well being, empathy and ethical relations, species extinction, sustainability and climate change that underpin Animal Studies as a field of scholarship.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Yvette Watt for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

This project will examine existing STEAM Education and Art-Science Public Engagement models locally and globally to identify and test effective strategies for program delivery within a Tasmanian context. The project will also critically evaluate the role and value of creative arts in STEM and address the key challenges for implementing STEAM programs including how to create meaningful and critically engaged projects and implement, manage and sustain interdisciplinary collaborations across art and science disciplines.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Education training or experience
  • Previous experience working across art and science
  • Public programs development and project management skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Svenja Kratz or Dr Karen Hall for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

This practice-led project will focus on the development of Art-Science Projects and the delivery of linked STEAM Engagement Programs within a Tasmanian context. The project should engage with critical issues and thematic relevant to Art-Science, bio art and/or interdisciplinary practices across art, design, science, engineering and technology. This may include ecofeminism, the ethical, social, cultural and political implications of new and emerging technologies, critical and speculative interventions in the Anthropocene, sustainment and new ecological paradigms.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Previous experience working across art and science
  • Public programs development and project management skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Svenja Kratz or Dr Karen Hall for more information.

Closing Date

31 March 2019

The Research Project

This project supports discipline-based and interdisciplinary research in the creative and performing arts, and studies of aspects of various genres of Australian and British music. Doctoral candidates in performance, music composition and musicology studies are invited to submit a proposal for a specialized music project seeking new ways to understand, create, and perform including investigation of historical and contemporary performance practice.

Interdisciplinary projects that align with the research themes of the Creative Exchange Institute (CxI) are welcomed, which may include collaborations with other creative arts, humanities, Antarctic studies, social sciences, physical sciences or education. Research methodologies may be studio based, praxis-based or theoretical and may include performance, composition, or musicological studies.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Professional creative practice or relevant industry engagement
  • Prior publication of arts-practice research or musicological research
  • Excellent communication skills

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Anne-Marie Forbes for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

Artistic activity has a long history of radical and outsider behaviour. Through social action, political struggle and protest, and by creatively working through trauma, artists express opposition to hegemony and invent modes of resistance.

This project defines ways in which artistic practice interrogates and critiques ideas, institutions and authority within structures of governance and dominant modes of thinking. Moreover, the project explores creative modes of conflict resolution and constructing hope and shared social horizons. The project seeks expressions of interest in projects that engage with forms of creative critical resistance in order to forge new understandings and ways of seeing and being in the world.

The project may address areas such as:

  • Protest and activism
  • Alterity
  • Queerness
  • Feminism
  • Outsider art
  • Social crisis and conflict

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Demonstrated professional creative practice
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Applicants working cross-discipline are encouraged to apply
  • Projects may be theoretical, praxis or studio-based

More Information

Please contact Dr Megan Keating for more information.

Closing Date

31 March 2019

The Research Project

This project supports interdisciplinary research into the potential benefits of the use of creative arts (eg. visual arts, music, theatre, dance) for health and wellbeing outcomes in healthcare settings such as hospitals, community based facilities or aged care residential facilities.

A doctoral candidate is sought to contribute to research into impacts of creative arts programs and be involved in the delivery and evaluation of novel projects in one or more healthcare settings. Mixed method research methodologies will be employed to evaluate projects, which may include monitoring of physiological markers, data handling and bio statistics. Applicants may engage with areas such as image making and data visualization

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Professional creative practice
  • Experience in a health care environment
  • Police checks and registration to work with vulnerable people will be required

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Anne-Marie Forbes for more information

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

This project explores new creative ways to represent, image and intervene in place and environment. The project will engage with historical, cultural, scientific and creative practices as a means to develop new ways of understanding, seeing and engaging with place and the environment.

Research methodologies may be studio based, praxis-based or purely theoretical and may include visual arts, sound, design, media arts, performance and curation.

The project considers themes in the areas of:

  • Tasmanian contexts and Islandness
  • Natural and cultural heritage
  • Place and site specificity
  • Mapping and cartography
  • Environmental change, land use, and conservation
  • Ethics and cross-cultural encounter

The projects may engage with areas such as:

  • Image making, data visualization, pictorial analysis and critique
  • The politics of representation; participatory practice; aesthetics; art and activism
  • Environmental theory as well as all forms of creative practice

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Image making/pictorial analysis
  • Professional creative practice
  • Applicants working cross-discipline are encouraged to apply

More Information

Please contact Dr Megan Keating for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

The announcement in late 2016 of the proposed development of a multistakeholder site for the memorialisation of Tasmania’s Black Wars at Macquarie Point has amplified a longstanding debate over the capacity of visual arts to commemorate and engage with questions of memory, post-coloniality, and decolonisation. The possibility of recognising trauma and confronting, adapting, and engaging with sites of contention have seen a variety of visual, performative, and spatial responses.

More recently, this ground has been joined by coterminous concerns with the legacy and memorialisation of colonisation. Recent decolonising practices have considered the entanglement of aesthetics and world politics along with explorations of the archive, empathy and affect, pre-colonial practices and cross-cultural dialogues.

This practice-led project examines the possibility of engaging and adapting to a range of strategies that are pertinent to this subject. We encourage collaboration with histories, communities, and sites of trauma, loss, and possibility. This project calls for artists working in the arena of memory and decolonisation.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Professional creative practice

More Information

Please contact Dr Megan Keating for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

Mapping the musical and cultural impact of the performance of African American gospel music within other cultural contexts. Cataloging, analysing and describing the techniques employed by conductors, directors, arrangers, and composers in facilitating the effective and authentic performance of African American gospel and other African American inspired contemporary music forms on community and other ensembles outside of the originating musical culture.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Andrew Legg for further information.

Closing Date

30 November 2018

The Research Project

A doctoral candidate is sought specifically to contribute to ongoing research into impacts of creative arts programs for renal patients. The candidate would be involved in the design, delivery and evaluation of novel creative arts projects in Renal Dialysis Units associated with the Royal Hobart Hospital and groups of renal patients of different ages.   Mixed method research methodologies will be employed to evaluate projects, which may include monitoring of physiological markers.

The project considers themes in the areas of:

  • Creative arts, health and well being
  • Renal health and dialysis
  • Community health
  • Better ageing
  • Youth and chronic disease

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include the following criteria:

  • Professional creative practice
  • Experience in working in healthcare environments
  • Police checks and registration to work with vulnerable people will be required

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Anne-Marie Forbes for more information.

Closing Date

31 March 2019

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

This project studies the interaction of music and visual culture in Australia. It embraces the creation of new work as well as the study of existing work from the past and present, seeking to explore, understand and bring new knowledge to the ways in which music and visual culture interact in Australia.

Building upon the discipline of music iconography, the project is aligned with the scholarly interests of Association Répertoire International d’Iconographie Musicale (RIdIM)(ridim.org) through the University of Tasmania’s fostering of an Australian National RIdIM Centre and Working Group.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A high level of practical experience and skill as a visual artist and/or musician
  • Interdisciplinary experience
  • The ability to connect creative practice with scholarly enquiry
  • Knowledge of Musicology and/or Art History
  • Knowledge of Australian Cultural History
  • Experience in the field of Digital Humanities

More Information

Please contact Dr Arabella Teniswood-Harvey for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

In recent times, there has been a burgeoning of interest in the ways in which the body has been mediated by culture. This reflects the increasing centrality of the body in contemporary culture as a vehicle for defining both our individual and social identities.  This research project will seek to develop new ways of understanding, seeing and engaging with how the body is both shaped by, and in turn interacts with, cultural and social norms.  Research methodologies may be purely theoretical or studio based and may include visual arts, sound, design, media arts, performance, curation etc.

The project considers themes in the areas of

  • Gendered constructions of the body
  • Racial constructions of the body
  • Fashion, adornment and the body
  • Body modification
  • Beauty and appearance
  • The impact of medical and/or digital technologies on our visualization of the body
  • The body in performance

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Llewellyn Negrin for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

The paradigmatic qualities of Arts Based Research (ABR) continue to evolve, as does the body of interest from academic communities in its possibilities and contentions. As an evolving paradigm for research, ABR can be interchangeably referred to as Arts informed research, Arts informed inquiry, and Arts based inquiry amongst other subtle variations (Cole & Knowles, 2008; Ewing, 2015). A shared understanding in relation to the ambitions of ABR is that Arts processes can be applied to enact meaningful systematic inquiry, and that the process and forms of researching and representation are informed by the Arts, rather than being based in them or even, perhaps, about them (Cole and Knowles, 2008).

The Faculty of Education boasts a diverse team of researchers within the Arts and Creativity Research Group. As a team, our methodological expertise relative to ABR includes, but is not limited to, narrative inquiry, autoethnography, performance based research and a/r/tography.

HDR candidates looking to articulate, apply and/or pioneer possibilities of what might be done in an educational research context through ABR are warmly invited to draw from the collective expertise of the Arts and Creativity Research Group.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • The project must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research and/or professional practice experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience (professional or emerging) in Arts practice, in any art form/medium
  • Demonstrated ability to apply traditional research methodologies in innovative and rigorous ways

More Information

Please contact Dr Abbey MacDonald for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

This project is one supported by academics from the Mathematics and Science Education Research Centre which comprises a group of strong researchers with a focus on STEM in education and is housed within the School of Education.

How do science teachers manage questions and topics that bridge science, philosophy, ethics, religion or spiritual beliefs? How do they build students' confidence and ability to ask important questions in this space? Questions such as these would form the basis of a research project. The research will be undertaken with initial teacher education students, to see how capable they feel in providing opportunities for students to grapple with cross-disciplinary ideas that assist us to understand what it means to Be Human. It will also explore the nuances of the nature of science, the stereotypical views of science, and the power and limits of science to explain what it means to be human. The research could utilise and build upon resources developed in the UK suitable to the Australian context, for use with students and teachers.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • If a scholarship is awarded, the candidate must enrol as a full-time student
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research or professional experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • The ability to understand and enact cross-disciplinary perspectives and collaboration

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Sharon Fraser for more information.

Closing Date

18 December 2018

The Research Project

An eExam occurs when a candidate takes their own computer into a supervised and timed assessment. This study will build on a national eExam project to look at adoption of the technology across Australia and survey the impact on teaching practices. It takes the view that what is taught is only what can be assessed. If assessment is on paper, then many skills and attitudes are left untaught.

To undertake this project you will need some understanding of computers and empathy with their users. In addition, you will develop a breadth of knowledge of university curricula in a broad range of disciplines. The analysis techniques taught will be comparative and historical, as you map the nature of pre-eExam assessments to post-eExam. In some cases the eExam will be an option – in others it will facilitate post-paper assessment. Your study will uncover the pathways from one to the other.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Assessment skills
  • Computer competency

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Fluck for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

This project is one supported by academics from the Mathematics and Science Education Research Centre which comprises a group of strong researchers with a focus on STEM in education and is housed within the School of Education.

While the acronym STEM has been around for some time, authentic teaching and learning experiences of STEM are still rare. In formal learning settings, school and university, students learn in subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) but may not be taught the explicit links between, and co-dependencies of, the STEM disciplines. Such understandings are essential to scientific research.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • The ability to understand and enact cross-disciplinary perspectives and collaboration

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Sharon Fraser for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

The percentage of Australian primary teachers who are male has noticeably decreased in the past thirty years. Concerned stakeholders, such as principals and parents, have called for increased male recruitment to, and retention in, the primary teaching profession. The recruitment-focused initiatives introduced in response to these calls have not been successful in raising male teacher numbers. This situation suggests that more focus needs to be placed on the retention of male primary teachers already in the profession.

Education research has identified numerous gender-related challenges faced by male primary teachers, and noted that men often leave the profession because of these challenges. However, researchers have spent much less time in investigating strategies to assist male primary teachers to cope with these challenges. This research aims to address this gap through the identification of practical coping strategies and supports these men can use to deal with the gender related challenges they face and persist within their profession. The influence of other factors such as coping efficacy will also be addressed.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Vaughan Cruickshank for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

International and Australian research on historical thinking and historical consciousness since the 1990s informed the development of the Australian Curriculum: History (ACH) and now underpins its practice. One of the stated aims of the ACH is for students to develop skills of higher order thinking in order to produce a critical perspective on received versions of the past.

The curriculum outlines a learning continuum within the General Capability of ‘Critical and Creative Thinking’ that comprises 4 key elements and 6 levels of achievement that relate to children’s ages and schooling years. However, this hierarchy of achievement contrasts with historical thinking research that argues that children can develop historical reasoning and higher-order historical thinking through structured teaching and learning, rather than at age-related stages. We are interested in exploring whether through exposure to constructivist pedagogy and guided inquiry learning, students of various ages and stages can achieve higher-order historical thinking.

This research will be situated in primary and secondary schools in Tasmania. It will employ quantitative and qualitative research methods to examine two key questions:

  • What does critical and creative thinking look like in history? 
  • How do we measure children’s capacity to achieve higher-order thinking in history?

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Louise Zarmati for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project is supported by academics from the Mathematics and Science Education Research Centre, a group of strong researchers with a focus on STEM in education, housed within the School of Education.

Inquiry based learning has been identified as a useful way of learning in the STEM disciplines (Kirkup, 2013) as it exemplifies the way scientists think and engage in research. The opportunity to work in a collaborative, cross disciplinary team to solve real world problems is also an aspect of inquiry-based learning. While inquiry-based learning is not new at the primary and secondary levels of education, it has not yet been utilised to any great extent at UTAS. Translating good practice guidelines and research into on the ground implementation would be an important next step.

Projects with this issue as a focus, could be undertaken across the faculties of Education and SET. Research would underpin the construction and implementation of professional learning materials and event(s) to assist academics to create cross-disciplinary, inquiry-based learning activities/units. Other researchable components would include the implementation of inquiry-based, experiential learning in existing units at all year levels, and trialling of a framework and guidelines for developing tertiary, cross-disciplinary, inquiry-based learning units.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • The ability to understand and enact cross-disciplinary perspectives and collaboration

More information

Please contact Associate Professor Sharon Fraser for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The aim of this project is the development of a model of the relationship between the beliefs of teachers of mathematics about the teaching and learning of mathematics, and the nature of the discipline, and their knowledge of both mathematics content and pedagogy.

Measures will include integrated instruments developed as part of the larger project of which this project is part. The focus of the project may be on teachers of mathematics in the primary (Years F-4), middle (Years 5-8), or secondary (Years 9-12) levels of schooling.

The candidate will be part of a small UTAS based team working on teachers' knowledge and affect (beliefs, attitudes, emotions) and collaborating with high profile international mathematics education researchers in relevant areas.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied statistics

More Information

Please contact Professor Kim Beswick for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Increased sedentariness within our society is connected to a range of downstream, adverse health conditions. As governments have begun to recognise this growing concern, preventative approaches aimed to limit healthcare costs have become a national priority.

The UTAS Active Work Laboratory is at the forefront of this effort through its work developing and validating education strategies and e-health interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour and improve health throughout the lifespan.

The Active Work Lab research team has expertise in kinesiology, physiology, psychology, pedagogy, gaming and information technology.

Our current focus is on developing a gold-standard, field-based, randomised control trial using sensor technology to investigate changes in sedentary behaviour and the resulting short- and long-term health effects of an e-health intervention targeting sedentary behaviour exhibited by office-working adults.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Scott Pedersen for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project will examine the effect of intensive computer integration across the curriculum for Year 6 classes. The objective will be to probe the extent to which children can comprehend and master very advanced concepts when supported by advanced data processing equipment. Previous projects such as Calculus for Kids and Science-ercise have shown such students can master integral calculus, quantum mechanics and special relativity. We now wish to extend such findings to other areas of the curriculum such as humanities, the arts and technology. A good candidate will also explore authentic real-world skills and knowledge made relevant to Year 6 students outside the confines of the pre-computer current curriculum.

If you see a disconnection between the adult world and what students learn in school, this project could be for you. There is a wonderful opportunity to enhance learning, and enhance lives through this research. Done well, it can provide a guide for re-conceptualisation of what schools teach, and probably the way in which they teach. Perhaps there could be focused time exclusively for socialisation if these quantum leaps of learning are successful

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Transformative teaching using computers

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Fluck for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Australia needs more higher education graduates and people with higher vocational education and training (VET) qualifications to meet the needs of the future workforce. Low levels of educational attainment in rural Australia will increasingly limit the opportunities of individuals of all ages to participate, particularly in careers requiring STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) capable tertiary graduates. Students who live in rural areas for work or other reasons generally depend on independent study and online, technology-dependent learning to access tertiary education.

This research will investigate the relationship between student success in online-dependent study and distance from campus, and community capacity. An index of community capacity to support participation in tertiary education, including but not limited to technology access and community educational cultural capital (presence of role models, employer support, social support and community institutional support), will be developed. There is an opportunity to use GIS software to present the index and its component data. The research could be extended to include community capacity to support school educational outcomes. Outcomes of the research will assist in designing community-level interventions which will encourage the educational success of rural students.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Professor Sue Kilpatrick for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

One of the debates in statistics education today is about the approach that should be taken to the introduction of hypothesis testing at the senior secondary or early tertiary level. Cobb (2007) says that the traditional theoretical approach using t-tests and confidence intervals should be replaced by simulation techniques that randomise data to determine if an initial outcome is unusual or not. The availability of software such as Fathom and TinkerPlots provides an environment in which students can use their original data and observe the probability of reaching a similar conclusion after 100 or 1 000 or 10 000 trials. This process is recommended to replace the traditional p-value with an experimental likelihood without relying on theoretical statistics. Simulation is recommended in the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics in both Specialist Mathematics and Mathematics Methods; however, these courses are not uniformly taught across Australia. This project would be carried out within the state of residence of the candidate and would trial simulation techniques for the enhancement of student understanding of inferential reasoning related to the relevant subject within the state’s curriculum. This may involve CAS calculators as well as software. The study would be both qualitative and quantitative using a design-based methodology.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Teaching qualifications
  • Experience in senior secondary mathematics

More Information

Please contact Professor Jane Watson for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This study seeks to explore the ways in which the integration of the Arts and Science learning areas can impact upon teaching and student learning in any educational context from early childhood through to tertiary. This study will research innovative approaches to the integration of these two significant learning areas and the impact of these approaches on teacher and/or student. Expected outcomes could enhance our understanding of connections between these learning areas, such as through case studies or ethnographies.

The successful person could develop a related topic or address some of the following issues:

  1. Devising, trialling and evaluating pedagogical approaches with science and arts teachers that focus explicitly on taking advantage of the synergies between arts and sciences
  2. Exploring the learning gains for the Arts and Science, flowing from such pedagogies
  3. Identifying processes of teacher learning associated with establishing these approaches
  4. Developing a theoretical perspective that articulates student learning gains from this pedagogy

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Ability to stimulate teacher change in a long term productive arrangement

More Information

Please contact Dr Bill Baker for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2020

The Research Project

Tasmania needs to increase participation in higher education to develop an intelligent workforce, which will be capable of enterprise and contribute to economic growth in the State. Online learning is important to increasing participation. However, a large proportion of new online learning entrants, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds drop-out, often early in the course. Boosting participation by opening doors to previous non-participants is to little avail if it is a revolving door. Reducing attrition is the most likely way to increase participation.

That remote online learners are more likely to drop-out is entirely consistent with the theory that persistence is enhanced by social integration into the university community. However, the construct has largely been operationalized in terms of full-time on-campus students. There is a real need for qualitative research which seeks to better understand the issue from the perspective of remote online students. There is also a need to better understand the notion of academic integration for students who have not been high achievers and who come from backgrounds of low tertiary participation. It is not clear how school leavers can adjust to the very different learning approaches required for online learning. The project aims to seek a better understanding of the constructs of social and academic integration from the perspective of remote and online students and those from a disadvantaged background.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants who teach online

More Information

Please contact Professor David Kember for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2020

The Research Project

Tasmania needs to increase participation in higher education to develop an intelligent workforce, which will be capable of enterprise and contribute to economic growth in the State. Online learning is important to increasing participation. However, a large proportion of new online learning entrants, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds drop-out, often early in the course. Boosting participation by opening doors to previous non-participants is to little avail if it is a revolving door. Reducing attrition is the most likely way to increase participation.

That remote online learners are more likely to drop-out is entirely consistent with the theory that persistence is enhanced by social integration into the university community. However, the construct has largely been operationalized in terms of full-time on-campus students. There is a need to trial and evaluate pedagogical and curriculum initiatives which might result in online and remote students being better integrated socially and academically.

Projects can be developed based on a range of pedagogical and curriculum initiatives based on blended learning or the flipped classroom. Initiatives are likely to make online students feel part of a learning community.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants who teach online

More Information

Please contact the below staff for more information:

Closing Date

30 December 2018

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

Evidence shows that high quality early learning experiences benefit all children and improves education and life outcomes. We need to be committed to delivering strategies, services and programs to ensure our youngest learners have the best possible start in life. To enable this to occur, this research seeks to answer any of the following questions related to early childhood education:

  • What are the factors that enhance/deter Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parent engagement?
  • How do schools engage with parents from low SES communities?
  • How can we measure the impact of early years’ programs?
  • What are the community-level factors that impact on positive early childhood, schooling?
  • What are the components of an effective play-based learning program?
  • What are the most effective strategies to build leadership capacity and capability in the early years?
  • What factors support children to make a successful transition to school?

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience in early childhood education

More Information

Please contact Professor Karen Swabey for more information.

Closing Date

30 March 2019

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

Sport is often regarded as a functional and positive space for children. All athletes have a right to engage in ‘safe sport’, defined as an athletic environment that is inclusive, respectful and equitable. However, a recent study conducted by Mountjoy et al.(2016) revealed that children with a disability (e.g. Autism) are at highest risk of inequity, exclusion and non-accidental violence in sport. The promotion of an inclusive and safe sporting environment is an urgent task and part of the broader international imperative for good governance in sport. Awareness of the effects of autism (e.g. socially, learning) has increased in recent years, with 1 in 100 children in Australia now affected (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2015).

As such, there remains an urgent need for research to explore the sporting experiences of children with Autism at the individual, parent and club levels. The proposed project could therefore consider the perspectives of the following which to date are underrepresented in scholarly writing:

  • The perspectives of parents’ of children with Autism who participate in sport
  • The perspectives of coaches’ of athletes with Autism
  • Perspectives of athletes with Autism who participate in sport

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Teaching experience in primary, secondary contexts
  • An interest in inclusivity and Autism
  • Coaching and/or sporting background

More Information

Please contact Dr Jenny McMahon for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

As the only continent with no permanent human inhabitants, Antarctica has traditionally been considered the province of the sciences. Increasingly, however, researchers are recognising the importance of the humanities and social sciences in understanding our relationship with this unusual place. The University of Tasmania is at the forefront of this development, with a growing community of researchers working across the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and the College of Arts, Law and Education.

This project invites students trained in any humanities or social science discipline to investigate how social and cultural analysis provides insight into human engagement with the Antarctic, past, present or future. Depending on the student’s background and interests, the project could cover topics related (but not limited) to cultural history, heritage and museums; media studies; textual representation; responses from the visual and performing arts; tourism; critical geopolitics; national relationships with the Antarctic; the Antarctic Treaty System; Antarctic futures; climate change and the Anthropocene.

The Antarctic is taken broadly here to include the Southern Ocean and sub-Antarctic islands. This project is an excellent opportunity for a student to join an exciting new field and to make a contribution to understanding a region that is central to the future of our planet.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A background in any humanities or social science discipline
  • Prior experience or knowledge of the Antarctic

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Elizabeth Leane for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682 (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This PhD project invites candidates to engage critically or creatively with archives, to uncover new narratives and alternative histories - material or digital - in 21st century literary studies. What is the future of the archive for literary studies? How might we be enchanted by digital archives? Why, in the 21st century, has literary studies undergone an archival turn?

Literary scholars often engage in work in archives: engaging in minute and painstaking textual labour, seeking authority in manuscript papers and genetic criticism, or assisting in the opening up of texts as part of digital humanities projects. Archives are also sites of solid physical slog, and of a stabilising foundation in materiality, they also prompt dream-work. Manuscripts have aura; they are relics; they enchant us. Part of the enchantment of the archive emerges from its multiple narrative possibilities. Archive work at its most radical allows for the smooth surface of literary history to be reshaped & re-contested, uncovering strange new evidence of alternative interiorities, stories, and futures.

The PhD project could approach this topic from the perspective of creative writing, literary history, cultural heritage, digital humanities, genetic criticism, or the non-human turn, and may examine heritage archives available in Tasmania.  

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, writing, and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Naomi Milthorpe (Naomi.Milthorpe@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Type

A scholarship provides living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension

Value & Duration

This scholarship provides $26,682 p.a. (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. Further information is available on the Scholarships webpage.

Funding source

This scholarship is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project explores the production, dissemination, reception, and consumption of Australian writing, film, and/or media. The successful candidate(s) will offer new insights on Australian textual cultures of the past and/or present from a variety of historical, regional, and transnational theoretical perspectives. Applications are also welcome from potential candidates who wish to employ a mixed methodology including creative writing. Australian Textual Cultures is a significant project that will substantially further our understanding of the place of Australian literary culture and Australian writers in the world

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

More information

Please contact Dr Robert Clarke Robert.Clarke@utas.edu.au for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Australia is littered with “dark places”: marked by intense suffering, these sites hold the violent memories of colonialism and its postcolonial aftermath. Prisons, massacre sites, native settlements, internment camps, refugee processing centres: these places play a role in the establishment and legitimation of colonial and national hegemonies and identities. Increasingly such places are becoming the destinations for travelers and a focus for the travel industries. Dark Nation is the first project in Australia to comprehensively examine the textual cultures and performativities through which sites of dark travel are known, represented, and experienced. It is the first large-scale study of its kind to examine the role that such spaces play in the formation and reformation of local, regional, and national identities.

Applications are welcome from candidates in the fields of literary, cultural, media, and tourism studies, history and sociology.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Dr Robert Clarke Robert.Clarke@utas.edu.au for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

In an era of environmental change, the Environmental Humanities has emerged as a key interdisciplinary paradigm for examining human environmental impact from a range of socio-cultural perspectives. As the only University in a state with a long history of environmental activism and debate, which is now the site of a large Wilderness World Heritage Area, UTAS is internationally recognised for its rich concentration of qualitative social and cultural research on the nonhuman world. We are looking for projects in the following areas: animal studies; extinction; space and place; environmental history; cultural geography; the Anthropocene; environmental philosophy; environmental ethics; multi-species studies; energy humanities; ecocriticism; blue humanities; sustainability; the history of science.

Eligibility

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants should first forward an expression of interest to the project leaders, Hannah Stark or Elizabeth Leane consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Responses to each of the selection criteria listed above
  • A statement on your interest in the environmental humanities
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)

Selected applicants will then be interviewed, following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Hannah Stark or Dr Elizabeth Leane for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2016 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

‘Fictions of Extinction’
We live in an era in which species are becoming extinct at a rate never before experienced by humans. This project engages with how cultural texts (such as literature and/or film) grapple with the ethical and political questions raised by extinction in the Anthropocene. Theoretically engaged projects in the areas of extinction studies, animal studies, affect theory, biopolitics, or new materialism are particularly encouraged.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Hannah Stark Hannah.Stark@utas.edu.au for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The history of food safety resonates along complex global trade networks, and this project looks to locate that history within colonialism and through print culture connections of empire. This project will explore the ways in which worrying about food safety in a globalised food system happened earlier than currently and popularly conceived. Taking a cultural history approach to food safety the project will consider how food safety creates – materially, symbolically and experientially – a set of ways of thinking and acting, resulting in knowledge that is embedded in institutional practices and discourses. This knowledge — contextual, contested, and changing — shapes discourses and practices around the perception and regulation of food safety across colonial settings.

Projects may focus on a specific geographical exemplar (such as Australia, India) or on connections between points with an empire (as in Malaya and India) or on a specific issue across an empire (as in milk adulteration in the British empire). Projects that focus on the regimes of knowledge, both global and local, that shape how people fear getting sick from food, are particularly encouraged.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Dr Nicki Tarulevicz (nicole.tarulevicz@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

Scholarships provides $27,082 (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project will provide new insights into the cultural impact of climate change through an analysis of climate fiction, one of the most significant yet critically neglected trends in twenty-first-century literary fiction. Against the backdrop of the Anthropocene and the current and profound critique of anthropocentrism, this project will examine what literature reveals about what it means to be human in a new geological era. It tracks how we understand and respond to human impact and responsibility for climate change at a time when scholarly, public and policy debates about the environment are intensifying at an unprecedented pace.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates;
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills in applied statistics and programming will be ranked highly.

Application Process

Applicants should send an expression of interest to Dr Hannah Stark consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae;
  • Responses to each of the eligibility criteria listed above;
  • A statement on your interest in the proposed PhD project;
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent).

Selected applicants will then be interviewed following which formal PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Hannah Stark or Dr Elizabeth Leane for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682 pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The student will complete a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge in one of the areas of Asian philosophy in which UTAS has expertise. These include: Buddhist philosophy: Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Sautrantika, Vaibhasika; Indo-Tibetan Metaphysics, Epistemology, Ethics, Philosophy of Mind; Chinese Philosophy: Philosophical Taoism, Philosophical Zen, Philosophical Confucianism.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants should first forward an expression of interest to the project leader, Dr Richard Corry (Richard.Corry@utas.edu.au) consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)
  • A thesis proposal
  • Evidence of appropriate background knowledge and skills (e.g. reading knowledge of German for a project on Heidegger or Ancient Greek for a project on Neoplatonism)

Selected applicants will then interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Richard Corry for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682 pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The student will complete a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge in one of the areas in which UTas Philosophy has internationally regarded expertise. These include: Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, Hermeneutics and Phenomenology (especially Husserl and Heidegger), 20th century analytic philosophy.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants should first forward an expression of interest to the project leader, Dr Richard Corry (Richard.Corry@utas.edu.au) consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)
  • A thesis proposal
  • Evidence of appropriate background knowledge and skills (e.g. reading knowledge of German for a project on Heidegger or Ancient Greek for a project on Neoplatonism)

Selected applicants will then interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Richard Corry for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

This scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

It is widely recognised that philosophy has an important contribution to make to the challenge of dealing with climate change. Until recently, however, philosophical engagement with the issue has come almost exclusively from the fields of ethics and political philosophy, despite the fact that many of the questions involved turn on issues from other traditional fields of philosophy, such as metaphysics, epistemology, and aesthetics. The University of Tasmania is leading a project to expand the engagement of philosophy with the issue of climate change. The project seeks to clarify issues important to public debate and public policy. It will also shed light on theoretical positions in philosophy.

We are looking for a PhD student who can contribute to this project by either (i) researching the theoretical linkages between epistemology and Ethics using the climate change debate as an example; or (ii) researching the concepts of causation appropriate for the assigning of responsibility for harms related to climate change.

The candidate will be part of a small research team in Philosophy at UTAS, but will benefit from established links with leading philosophers in Australia and the UK, and with scientists in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Sciences at UTAS.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates;
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates with a background in philosophy are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills in epistemology and/or metaphysics will be ranked highly.

Application Process

Applicants should send an expression of interest to Dr Richard Corry consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae;
  • Responses to each of the eligibility criteria listed above;
  • Statement of your interest in the proposed PhD project;
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent).

Selected applicants will then be interviewed following which PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Richard Corry or Dr David Coady for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project aims to examine the role of print culture in constructing, sustaining and challenging police legitimacy, authority and consent in Britain, Ireland and the Australian and New Zealand colonies during a key period of police reform and resistance, 1825-1918. It expects to generate new knowledge in criminal justice history by using an interdisciplinary and comparative methodological approach to explore the relationship between policing, print and cultural exchange. Expected outcomes: (i) the first historically-informed theoretical framework on media-police representations and interactions (ii) an historical appreciation of contemporary problems surrounding ethical issues in police-media relations and police news coverage

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

More information

Please contact Professor Stefan Petrow Stefan.Petrow@utas.edu.au for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

This scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

There is a burgeoning international scholarly interest in all things oceanic within the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences, but the focus is rarely on the Southern Ocean or other bodies of water in the southern hemisphere, such as the Tasman Sea or Bass Strait. Depending on the candidate’s background and interests, this project will focus on a southern oceanic region, examining it as a site of cultural connection, mobility, exchange and/or global change. Any disciplinary approach within the humanities, creative arts and social sciences will be considered, contingent on supervisorial capacity and availability. This project offers an opportunity to benefit from, enhance and expand the University of Tasmania’s existing strengths in marine, Antarctic and maritime studies, island studies, and regional studies.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds within the humanities, arts and social sciences are encouraged to apply. Previous engagement with or knowledge of the marine and Antarctic domains will be an advantage.

Funding

This PhD is funded by the University of Tasmania.

More information

Please contact Assoc. Prof. Penny Edmonds (penny.edmonds@utas.edu.au) or Assoc. Prof. Elizabeth Leane (elizabeth.leane@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682 (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This PhD project invites candidates to engage critically with the politics and poetics of gardening in literary and material cultures of the Anglophone world in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Gardening and gardens involve a diversity of places, spaces, practices, and actors. Gardens are liminal spaces, private zones, and contested sites, mobilized against foreign invaders whether human or nonhuman. They are gendered, and in place and practice revelatory of shifting, contingent, and multiple modes of national, cultural, racial, class, gender and sexual identity: idealized, yet ever-incomplete, utopian sites, places of production and consumption, of nature and culture in contest.

Applicants are invited to submit proposals to explore texts and contexts of their choosing. Depending on the student’s background and interest, the project could approach the topic from the perspective of, for example: literary history, cultural heritage, environmental humanities, or the non-human turn. Applicants could consider working on Tasmanian gardens where appropriate.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, writing, and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Naomi Milthorpe (Naomi.Milthorpe@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Scholarship Type

Living allowance scholarship (RTP) or candidature only, selected through a competitive process

Value & Duration

If successful in applying for an RTP scholarship, a scholarship provides $27,082pa (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Funding Source

This scholarship is funded by University of Tasmania.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Southeast Asia’s importance is due to its strategic location, between China and India, its increasing economic prosperity and the role played the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The region is politically, economically and culturally diverse and fragmented. This diversity is also reflected in research on the region. This research project is committed to identify trends in political and social change in the region via single-case country studies or comparative studies of ASEAN countries. The aim is to understanding the social and political dynamics of change. Candidates interested in one or more of the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • Elections and Political Parties
  • Political Islam
  • Social Media and Politics
  • Democratisation
  • Politics of the Middle-class
  • Corruption and Governance Issues
  • Asean and Regional Security
  • Human Rights and Citizenship

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Following discussions with the research team, full on-line Applications must be received prior to the closing date.

More information

Applicants are encouraged to visit the following academics websites for details about the research team:

For further information please contact Prof James Chin.

Scholarship Type

Living allowance scholarship (RTP) or candidature only, selected through a competitive process

Value & Duration

If successful in applying for an RTP scholarship, a scholarship provides $27,082pa (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Funding Source

This scholarship is funded by University of Tasmania.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The late Republic and early Principate (c. 133 BCE-138 CE) offer an abundance of rich source material for new studies in ancient Roman culture. Literary texts written during this period both reflect and reflect upon the political, social, cultural, and intellectual developments of their time, making them key windows into contemporary Roman life and thought. This project invites candidates to make an original contribution to research on the culture of the late Republic and early Principate through the study of ancient texts. Applicants are invited to submit proposals to explore relevant texts and contexts of their choosing. This project could approach the topic from a variety of scholarly perspectives; some possibilities include ancient emotion studies, gender & sexuality studies, textuality/intertextuality, rhetoric & performativity, classical reception studies.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Following discussions with the research team, full on-line Applications must be received prior to the closing date.

More information

Please contact Dr Jayne Knight or Dr Jonathan Wallis for more information.

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.  The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Climate change is projected to have profound effects on the marine and coastal environment, through warming waters, changes to ocean currents, coastal inundation and ocean acidification. Species distributions will change dramatically. For some their range will expand, for others it will contract. The interactions between these new species assemblages is difficult to assess and the impacts even harder to address in the dynamic marine context. A growing body of work has investigated the adequacy of terrestrial conservation policies and laws to address the threats from climate change. By contrast, there is little understanding of how well current approaches to regulating the coastal and marine environment - in Australia or elsewhere - address the imperatives of climate change adaptation.

This project would compare approaches to marine resource conservation law internationally to identify reform priorities for Australian coastal, fisheries, and biodiversity laws.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI).  Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System.  Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.  

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Prof Jan McDonald for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

E.g. A scholarship provides $27,082 p/a (2018 rate) for three years.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Next generation sequencing techniques have increased the likelihood of researchers and test providers discovering incidental results. These results, commonly known as ‘incidental’ or secondary findings provide information that extends beyond the aims and objectives of sequencing. For example, tests for carriers of an eye disease gene may actually discover another pre-disposition to a disease, such as cancer. These incidental findings may have health implications for consumers or research participants. Patient/participant and provider expectations surrounding incidental findings are not always clear and may be situationally dependent. There is also the potential for expectations to conflict and require balancing competing interests to resolve these issues.

The management of return of incidental findings is a key challenge in genomics, giving rise to complex and rapidly evolving legal and ethical issues in both clinical and research contexts. It is also central to research translation for projects including genetic eye disease.

This PhD scholarship is linked with the NHMRC funded Centre of Research Excellence, ‘From Discovery to Therapy in Genetic Eye Diseases’ (2016-2020) led by Professor David Mackey. One of the aims of this research program is to develop world-leading models for genetic risk prediction and for the feedback of genetic results to patients and research participants. The project provides an opportunity for a PhD candidate to undertake legal, bioethical, and/or empirical scholarship with input from the interdisciplinary team working on genetic eye disease, and legal experts from the Centre for Law and Genetics, with the aim of guiding the development of protocols for feedback of results to patients and their families including the return of incidental findings.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

E.g. Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Health law and/or bioethics
  • Legal services delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in-depth interviewing
  • Genetics and/or other biological sciences
  • Applied statistics
  • High level writing and analytical skills evidenced by prior publications

Funding

This PhD scholarship is funded by the NHMRC funded Centre of Research Excellence, ‘From Discovery to Therapy in Genetic Eye Diseases’ (2016-2020) led by Professor David Mackey.

Application Process

Please download an Expression of interest form.

Applicants should forward their expression of interest form to Professor Margaret Otlowski along with:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • A statement on your interest in ethical, legal and/or social issues related to genetics
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)

Selected applicants will be interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Professor Margaret Otlowski for more information.

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships web page.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Elder abuse is currently a topic of considerable concern and in many ways and for many reasons difficult to investigate and tackle. A pilot project is currently being undertaken on a cross-disciplinary basis by Law, Sociology and Health Sciences to investigate existing regulatory and policy frameworks that deal with elder abuse. It is proposed to develop this work into a wide ranging analysis of key agencies' responses to elder abuse, the extent to which they have linked responses and whether and how their responses might be developed to achieve systemised integrated approaches. PhD opportunities in this area include investigations of:

  • Whether and how an integrated response across government and non-government agencies might be developed to tackle elder abuse;
  • Evaluation of models that have been developed outside Australia to tackle elder abuse and whether any of those models might be developed for the Australian environment;
  • Assessment of the current legislative and policy framework across Australia, what are their lacunae and how might they be improved from a practical and practitioner perspective;
  • Whether legislative and policy frameworks developed to tackle other forms of abuse and exploitation of vulnerable people (including family violence) might be developed or usefully extended to tackle elder abuse;
  • Whether policies developed by different agencies to tackle elder abuse are actually implemented;
  • Whether cultures within institutions tasked with caring for elderly people or with responding to elder abuse, undermine or over-ride legislation and policies relating to elder abuse.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships web page.

More information

Please contact Terese Henning for more information.

Supervisory team for this topic:

The supervisory team comprises researchers from Law, Humanities and Health Sciences. It comprises Dr Suanne Lawrence (Health Sciences) who has obtained research funding in this area and whose research interests focus on aged-care policy and health service planning. Dr Lawrence is currently facilitating the development of a gerontological nurse 'special interest group' through the Australasian Assoc. Gerontology; Dr Susan Banks, is a lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at UTAS. She is also collaborating with researchers in the Menzies Institute for Medical Research, the Faculty of Health and the School of Law at UTAS. Her PhD examined the intersection of meaning and practice in the delivery of aged care and disability support. She brings a sociologist perspective to bear on the problem of elder abuse; Terese Henning, Director of the Tasmania Law Reform Institute, who has a legal background and has published and researched in the area of vulnerability, access to justice, sexual offences law reform and reforms to the law of evidence and procedure. A number of her recommendations for law reform of both the substantive and adjectival law have been enacted at a State and national level; Dr Valerie Williams, who has extensive experience and scholarship in the area of mental health and law, with particular focus on competing paradigms and concepts, values and principles that give rise to the complexities, contradictions, vagaries and inconsistencies which provide fertile ground for the propagation of stigma and discrimination.

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Nature’s aesthetics have been an important driver of environmental law historically, providing a rationale for laws to protect scenic landscapes and charismatic species. But aesthetics have also become seemingly less important to contemporary environmental law, which focuses more on economic rationales, scientific evidence and human rights considerations. This PhD research project will explore the role of aesthetics in environmental law, with the aim to develop new theoretical insights into how aesthetics can play a stronger role in shaping environmental decisions. The project will also involve analysis of existing environmental laws in Australia and / or other countries, to understand the evolving role of aesthetics in environmental decisions. Ecological reconciliation and ecological restoration may also be researched as frameworks for engaging human communities with their natural surroundings in order to better appreciate its aesthetic dimensions. Socially engaged art, such as climate change activist art, is also relevant to this topic in assessing the role of the visual arts in mobilising public support for new environmental policies and laws.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Professor Benjamin J Richardson for more information at b.j.richardson@utas.edu.au or +61 3 62266902.

The supervision team for this research will be led by Professor Ben Richardson, with other academics from the University Tasmania as co-supervisors.

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

People with complex communication needs (including children, people with cognitive, physical and mental impairments and people with language impairments) face significant barriers in obtaining equal access to justice in both civil and criminal jurisdictions. A number of special measures have been implemented across Australia to enhance these people’s participation in the justice process, including pre-trial recording of their evidence, the use of communication assistants, enabling them to have a support person with them while testifying and transmitting their evidence via CCTV so that they do not need to testify in court. Most of these measures apply only in the criminal jurisdiction at trial. There is a dearth of measures available during civil trials and tribunal proceedings and to assist people in interacting with lawyers and the police. There are many issues that arise in this context that provide opportunities for post-graduate research including:

  • Cross-jurisdictional comparative analysis of the different models implemented in Australia to assist people with complex communication needs in navigating the justice system. There is considerable diversity between the current schemes on offer;
  • Whether and how models adopted in some Scandinavian countries, like the Barnehus, might be implemented in Australia;
  • How an integrated approach to dealing with the problems faced by people with complex communication needs might be developed for Australian jurisdictions;
  • Whether it is necessary to abandon altogether the adversarial approach in enabling people with complex communication needs to participate on a more equal footing in the justice system;
  • Cross-jurisdictional research on the different models operating in Australia and key stakeholder responses to them, including those of judges, lawyers, the police and witness support agencies.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Terese Henning for more information.

Supervisory team for this topic:

Terese Henning is the Director of the Tasmania Law Reform Institute. She has published extensively in the area of access to justice for people with communication difficulties. She gave expert evidence before the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse on this matter. She has been granted research funding to review the Tasmanian law for the Tasmanian Government via the Tasmania law Reform Institute on the feasibility of establishing a Communication Assistant/Intermediary scheme for people with complex communication needs. She has also published and researched in the area of vulnerability, access to justice, sexual offences law reform and reforms to the law of evidence and procedure. A number of her recommendations for law reform of both the substantive and adjectival law have been enacted at a State and national level.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

E.g. A scholarship provides $27,082 p/a (2018 rate) for three years.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

We are currently experiencing unprecedented growth in genomic data sharing. The genome era, which triggered expansion of multi-centre and international research collaborations, creation of more efficient genetic analysis platforms and a sharp decline in the cost of whole genome sequencing has led to the creation of large, diverse and complex genomic datasets. Sharing of data is crucial to expedite scientific progress.

Genomic information can be linked to information in other public records including electronic health records. Storage may be locally managed ‘in the cloud’. Any number of variations of these storage, linking and sharing activities may take place in an array of jurisdictions. Hence, any number of legal and quasi-legal regimes are encountered when data moves from one custodian to another.

There are high-level international guidelines relating to data sharing but they are not necessarily reflective of national regulatory regimes, which can considerably inhibit genomic data sharing. Data transfers are increasingly becoming more formalised between private and public institutions, necessitated by increased sharing. Other organisations formalising transfers include data storage and sharing providers. Much formalisation is employed to mitigate institutional risk and it may also be a grab for intellectual property or right to data or commercial opportunity. On the other hand, many disciplines which have always promoted data sharing, such as bioinformatics, operate within a culture of open access and sharing. The implications of open sharing and formalised transfer and sharing impose an added layer of complexity over the already unclear journey that genomic data is subject to in the context of multi-party international collaboration.

The legal implications of formalisation impact on sharing and the progression of science need to be examined in the broadest sense. Formalisation has the potential to impact drastically on particular open-sharing areas as well as more generally on the rights of researchers. Finally, in the case of genomic data sharing, the formalisation may also have an effect on patients and participants who contribute samples and data. These issues all require careful consideration in deciding the appropriate role for formalisation.

The Centre for Law and Genetics (CLG) has been award funding for a four-year Discover Project by the Australian Research Council. This PhD presents an opportunity to join the team of legal, health and genetic experts to investigate a discrete area within formalisation of data transfer in the context of genomic data sharing.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills, including high level writing and analytical skills evidenced by prior publications.

Funding

This PhD scholarship is funded by the ARC Discovery Project DP180100269 ‘Genomic data sharing: issues in law, research ethics and society’ (2018-2022) led by Professor Dianne Nicol.

Application Process

Please download an Expression of interest form.

Applicants should forward their expression of interest form to Professor Dianne Nicol.

  • Curriculum vitae
  • A statement on your interest in ethical, legal and/or social issues related to genetics
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)

Selected applicants will be interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Professor Dianne Nicol for more information.

Type

PhD scholarship

Value & Duration

TGRS and RTP scholarships and their equivalents provide $27,082pa (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6-month extension. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

In addition to living allowances, tuition fees, reasonable relocation and travel costs and some thesis allowances will usually be covered.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Rapid innovations in genomic technology, combined with a dramatic decline in sequencing cost, have yielded a massive amount of genomic data. Widespread genomic data sharing (GDS), including across national borders, is becoming an essential component of clinical and research practice. There is already evidence that this new wave of genomic data accumulation and sharing is improving clinical care, with precision medicine offering targeted treatments tailored to the individual patient’s genetic characteristics and medical history.

In Australia and elsewhere, legal requirements (e.g., privacy laws and formalised data transfers), and quasi-legal requirements (e.g., research ethics obligations), are potentially constraining free and open GDS. At the same time, these requirements may collectively provide the assurances necessary to protect donors, encourage research and innovation, and promote ongoing public trust in GDS activities. Finding an appropriate balance is crucial.

The Centre for Law and Genetics (CLG) has been conducting research into the ethical, legal and social implications of genomics and other personalised medicines for the past three decades. Members of the CLG have recently been awarded funding from the Australian Research Council (ARC) for a Discovery Project to investigate the optimal regulatory framework for GDS. This project aims to map the legal and quasi-legal facilitators and barriers to globalised GDS, and to assess the role of these elements in promoting public trust.

The project team includes Professor Dianne Nicol, Professor Margaret Otlowski, Professor Don Chalmers, Dr Jane Nielsen, Dr Lisa Eckstein and Dr Rebekah McWhirter from the CLG and Professor Christine Critchley from Swinburne University, who brings social psychology expertise to the project. The project team is in the process of recruiting a number of PhD candidates to work with them on this project. Although the project will primarily be undertaken through the University of Tasmania, Professor Christine Critchley will be leading the social psychology component of the project through Swinburne University, and it will be possible for one or more PhD candidates to be enrolled at that university.

This PhD scholarship presents an opportunity to join the project team and to contribute to this project. The successful applicant will undertake research focusing on one component of the regulatory environment relevant to GDS.

Relevant regulatory foci might include privacy laws, contract and intellectual property laws, research ethics. There are a number of lenses through which PhD study can be undertaken, including regulatory theory, legal doctrine, socio-legal analysis, bioethics, legal policy and evidence based law reform, using qualitative and quantitative research methods.

Although it is not necessary to have studied biomedicine, individuals with a scientific background are particularly encouraged to apply.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis, preferably based in Hobart, Tasmania, or, for candidates enrolled at Swinburne University, in Melbourne. In exceptional circumstances, it may be possible for part of the candidacy to be undertaken externally;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications in Law or a related discipline (depending on the focus of the candidate’s PhD thesis), or relevant and substantial research experience in Law or another appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

The project is funded by Australian Research Council Discovery Project DP180100269, Genomic Data Sharing: Issues in Law, Research Ethics and Society, led by Professor Dianne Nicol. Living allowances for PhD candidates will be funded from the project, or through a TGRS or APA scholarship, or from other external sources.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact one of the potential supervisors listed below to register an expression of interest (EOI) in the form of:

  • Curriculum vitae;
  • Responses to each of the selection criteria listed above;
  • A statement on your interest in the topic area; and
  • A sample of your writing (Honours thesis, journal article of equivalent

To determine eligibility for admission to the University of Tasmania PhD program, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. If you are seeking funding from the TGRS or APA programs, please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a TGRS or RTP living allowance scholarship. Information about these scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Please contact Professor Critchley at the email listed below if you are seeking admission to the PhD program at Swinburne University.

More information

Please contact a member of the research team for more information.

For applicants wishing to study at the CLG in Tasmania:

And, for applicants wishing to study at Swinburne University:

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

International Fisheries Law including Regional Fishery Management Organisations

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI).  Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.  

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Gail.Lugten@utas.edu.au for more information.

Supervisory team for this topic: TBA

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

E.g. A scholarship provides $27,082 p/a (2018 rate) for three years.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

  • Explosion of multi-centre research
  • Increasing and wider international research collaborations
  • Creation of more efficient genetic analysis platforms, and
  • Reduced cost of whole genome sequencing

Sharing of data has huge potential to expedite scientific progress and positive implications for human health. However, it is not without complications which challenge traditional regulatory protections for participants and the public generally.

Genomic information can also be linked to information in other public records, improving their potential usefulness for research and treatment, whilst simultaneously creating increased privacy concerns. Sharing and access arrangements have implications for patients/participants whose information is shared.

Storage often occurs in the cloud and any number of storage and dissemination activities may take place in an array of jurisdictions. Likewise, in the course of navigating this path, any number of legal and quasi-legal regimes are encountered.

The critical question is how might regulatory frameworks be shaped to promote genomic data sharing whilst also reflecting public values. There are high-level international guidelines relating to data sharing but they are not necessarily reflective of legal and quasi-legal national regimes, which can considerably delay or forestall genomic data sharing altogether.

A particular area of interest within the regulatory bounds is how participant/patient privacy is protected whilst promoting sharing for the benefit of the public generally. The surrender of individual interests for the common good, is often a key consideration, however this research project provides an opportunity for the candidate to explore how we might manage these competing interests more equitably for the good of society in the context of genomic data sharing.

The Centre for Law and Genetics (CLG) has been award funding for a four-year Discover Project by the Australian Research Council. This PhD presents an opportunity to join the team of legal, health and genetic experts to investigate a discrete area within the privacy implications of genomic data sharing. With data continuing to be produced all the time, and technology only improving, this project provides an exciting opportunity.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills including high level writing and analytical skills evidenced by prior publications

Funding

This PhD scholarship is funded by the ARC Discovery Project DP180100269 ‘Genomic data sharing: issues in law, research ethics and society’ (2018-2022) led by Professor Dianne Nicol.

Application Process

Please download an Expression of interest form.

Applicants should forward their expression of interest form to Professor Dianne Nicol.

  • Curriculum vitae
  • A statement on your interest in ethical, legal and/or social issues related to genetics
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)

Selected applicants will be interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Professor Dianne Nicol for more information.

Type

PhD scholarship

Value & Duration

TGRS and RTP scholarships and their equivalents provide $27,082pa (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6-month extension. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

In addition to living allowances, tuition fees, reasonable relocation and travel costs and some thesis allowances will usually be covered.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Today’s biomedical research and clinical environments are fast-paced and ever-evolving. New technologies are transforming the way we perceive personalised health care. For instance, genome editing technology permits accurate modification of DNA, that may in some cases be entirely personalised. The pairing of biological drugs with diagnostic tools permits tailored drug therapies and is being increasingly used in cancer treatment. Bioprinting of skin, bone and other tissues is becoming increasingly feasible, and at some stage in the future it may be possible to print whole organs.

Regulatory responses to these new technologies are often slow and ad hoc. Regulating for safety, efficacy, utility, affordability and access in the face of rapid technological change presents great challenges. The presence of intellectual property rights over relevant products and processes complicates matters further.

The Centre for Law and Genetics (CLG) has been conducting research into the ethical, legal and social implications of genomics and other personalised medicines for the past three decades. Members of the CLG have recently been awarded funding from the Australian Research Council (ARC) for a Discovery Project to investigate the regulation of innovative health technologies. The overarching aim of the project is to examine optimal methods for dealing with difficult regulatory spaces, and how regulation might effectively allow technological development to proceed while ensuring patient access and safety.

The project team includes Professor Dianne Nicol, Dr Jane Nielsen and Dr Lisa Eckstein from the CLG and Professor Cameron Stewart from Sydney University. The project team is in the process of recruiting a number of PhD candidates to work with them on this project. Although the project will primarily be undertaken at the University of Tasmania, it will be possible for one or two PhD candidates to be based in Sydney.

This PhD scholarship presents an opportunity to join the project team and to contribute to this project. The successful applicant will undertake research focusing on one component of the regulatory environment in respect of one particular innovative medical technology.

Relevant regulatory foci might include the requirements for clinical trials, the registration system for therapeutic goods, the pharmaceutical benefits scheme, the patents system, data exclusivity or others. There are a number of lenses through which PhD study can be undertaken, including regulatory theory, legal doctrine, socio-legal analysis, bioethics, patent landscaping and legal policy.

Although it is not necessary to have studied biomedicine, individuals with a scientific background are particularly encouraged to apply.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications in Law or a related discipline, or relevant and substantial research experience in Law or another appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

The project is funded by ARC Discovery Project DP180101262 ‘Reforming the regulatory environment for innovative health technologies’ led by Professor Dianne Nicol. Living allowances for PhD candidates will be funded from the project, or through a TGRS or APA scholarship, or from other external sources.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact one of the potential supervisors listed below to register an expression of interest (EOI) in the form of:

  • Curriculum vitae;
  • Responses to each of the selection criteria listed above;
  • A statement on your interest in the topic area; and
  • A sample of your writing (Honours thesis, journal article of equivalent

To determine eligibility for admission to the University of Tasmania PhD program, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. If you are seeking funding from the TGRS or APA programs, please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a TGRS or RTP living allowance scholarship. Information about these scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Please contact Professor Stewart at the email listed below if you are seeking admission to the University of Sydney PhD program.

More information

Please contact a member of the research team for more information.

For applicants wishing to study at the CLG in Tasmania:

And, for applicants wishing to study in Sydney:

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Today’s medical research environment is fast-paced and ever-evolving. Regulating for patient safety in the face of rapid technological change presents great challenges. This is most apparent in the context of innovative (and often customised) medical technologies which are transforming the way we perceive personalised health care. For instance, genome editing technology permits accurate repair of damaged DNA. The pairing of biological drugs with diagnostic tools permits tailored drug prescription and is being increasingly used in cancer treatment. Regulatory responses to new technologies are often slow and ad hoc. The presence of intellectual property over relevant products and processes complicates matters further.

This project will provide funding to enable a successful applicant to undertake an evaluation of one aspect of the regulatory environment governing a particular innovative medical technology. Relevant regulatory foci include the requirements for clinical trials, the registration system for therapeutic goods, the pharmaceutical benefits scheme, the patents system, data exclusivity and others. The research will feed into a larger project examining optimal methods of dealing with difficult regulatory spaces, and how regulation might effectively allow technological development to proceed unhindered while ensuring patient access and safety.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications in Law or a related discipline, or relevant and substantial research experience in Law or another appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding:

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below to register an expression of interest (EOI) in the form of:

  • Curriculum vitae;
  • Responses to each of the selection criteria listed above;
  • A statement on your interest in the topic area; and
  • A sample of your writing (Honours thesis, journal article of equivalent

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a TGRS or APA living allowance scholarship.  

Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Dr Jane Nielsen for more information.

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The legal services industry is dynamic and there are significant changes occurring on an international scale in the way lawyers interact with their clients. This is largely driven by corporate client demand for more efficient and effective legal services, greater participation in dispute resolution, and a breakdown in the elite status of the legal profession. In Tasmania the legal services market is primarily comprised of small to medium sized firms who represent individuals and small to medium sized businesses. This could mean that lawyers tend to be in a powerful position as compared to their clients, and that there has not been as much pressure to alter traditional methods and manners of client engagement as has occurred in large multinational corporate legal environments. This project seeks to identify and analyse the ways that Tasmanian legal practitioners have traditionally interacted with their clients, consider whether that relationship is changing, or whether it must respond to changes in the market, law and society. This will be informed by the contemporary and future needs of the profession, clients and the administration of justice in Tasmania. Ideally the project will obtain the client as well as lawyers’ perspective on the lawyer-client relationship.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Dr Olivia Rundle for more information Olivia.Rundle@utas.edu.au

The supervision team for this project will be led by Dr Olivia Rundle. See Olivia's profile regarding her work in relation to the nature of legal services (particularly within the context of dispute resolution).

Scholarships

There is a competitive process of scholarship application applicable at UTAS. A typical scholarship provides $27,082p.a. (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The Faculty of Law also provides to candidates some operational funds to support the PhD research project. Further information may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

Therapeutic (problem solving) approaches have been adopted in a number of jurisdictions to tackle particularly intransigent forms of offending and offending that does not appear to be susceptible to traditional responses, including drug related offending, recidivist drink driving, family violence and offending arising from mental and cognitive incapacities.

There are a number of possibilities for PhD research in this arena including:

  • Participation in the establishment of a pilot therapeutic approach to recidivist drink driving and evaluation of the pilot from offender, court and service provider perspectives.
  • Comparative analysis of the operation of therapeutic courts – how legal participants, including judicial officers, interact with offenders; the extent to which they comply with the key requirements of the therapeutic approach to offending.
  • Comparative analysis of the therapeutic approaches in relation to different targeted areas including family violence, drug related offending and/or mental health related offending;
  • Evaluation of the impact on recidivism and re-integration of problem solving approaches in relation to family violence, drug related offending and/or mental health related offending;
  • Investigation of community responses to a therapeutic approach to this type of offending.
  • Attitudes of law enforcement agencies and personnel to therapeutic responses.
  • There are opportunities to develop cross-disciplinary research projects particularly with the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies, and in particular, in relation to research understandings of therapeutic responses.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to these scholarships:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Funding

The competitive PhD scholarship programme is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants requiring more information, or who are interested in this specific project, should firstly contact the Supervisor listed below.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI). Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.

Self-funded applications are welcome at any time. Information about scholarships, and scholarship round deadlines, may be found on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Terese Henning for more information.

Supervisory team for this topic:

Terese Henning is the Director of the Tasmania Law Reform Institute. She has supervised a number of post–graduate candidates and is currently supervising research at the post-graduate level in this field of research. She has obtained two research grants to investigate the feasibility of a Therapeutic Response to Recidivist Drink Driving and has participated in the developments of an offender profile of recidivist drink drivers in Tasmania. She has published and researched in the area of vulnerability, access to justice, sexual offences law reform and reforms to the law of evidence and procedure. A number of her recommendations for law reform of both the substantive and adjectival law have been enacted at a State and national level.

Closing date

Ongoing

The Research Project

This cross-disciplinary research program focuses upon regulation, prevention and support of work-related psychological injury. In today’s employment and regulatory landscapes, both employers and employees have legal responsibilities and liabilities related to work-related psychological injury. These have complex implications for workers, organisations, legislators and legal practitioners. However, little is known about how managers, employees, human resource management professionals and legal practitioners navigate these complexities. For example, in law, employers are not liable to pay worker’s compensation for psychological injury arising from ‘reasonable management action’. But what constitutes ‘reasonable management action’? How can managers and organisations ensure their actions are ‘reasonable’?  How can workers determine if they are not?

Potential PhD projects in this program include (but are not limited to):

  • examination of judicial interpretations of relevant legislation and case law
  • exploration of what constitutes ‘reasonable management action’ under law and in management practice
  • investigation of human resource management approaches to support the prevention and oversight of work-related psychological injury; and exploration of the ways in which legal practitioners, human resource management professionals, line managers and workers engage with and contribute to psychological safety climates that prevent and support psychological injury in the workplace

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Expressions of interest are invited from potential candidates with:

  • qualitative research experience in business, management or law
  • highly developed written and communication skills
  • a previous research qualification (Honours or Masters by Research) in a social science discipline, preferably Business or Law

More information

Please contact Dr Olivia Rundle or Dr Megan Woods for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

‘Climate intervention’ refers to deliberate human intervention in the earth system to lessen human induced climate change. Solar radiation management is a form of climate intervention that might be used at various scales to increase the planet’s albedo and thereby reduce temperature increase. Prominent proposals include marine cloud brightening and using marine based reflective agents to lessen coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Governance of research, testing and implementation of climate intervention at domestic and international levels are at a very early stage. However, over the past sixty years Australia and the United States have used law to govern weather modification activities, such as cloud seeding, aimed at increasing regional or local rainfall patterns.

This project will analyse the history of weather modification law in Australia and the United States to identify what lessons might be drawn for the governance, public participation and social acceptability of proposals for regional climate intervention.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Environmental law
  • Environmental governance
  • Environmental management

More Information

Please contact Professor Jan McDonald or Dr Jeff McGee for more information.

Further details can also be found here: http://marinesocioecology.org/weather-modification-in-australia-and-the-united-states-what-lessons-for-governing-regional-climate-intervention/

Type

Candidature only or RTP scholarship through competitive process.

Value & Duration

If successful in applying for an RTP scholarship, a scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project will explore lessons learned from Disaster Victim Identification as it has unfolded in mass casualty incidents since 2001. This includes; Bali bombings, 2002 and 2005; Thailand tsunami, 2004; Victorian bushfire, 2009 and MH17 plane disaster in the Ukraine, 2004. Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) is the formal process whereby multiple individuals who have died as a result of a single incident have their identity established through the application of scientifically proven techniques. The processes and procedures involved are meticulous and time consuming as they follow set guidelines based on Interpol standards.  These mass fatality events are very emotional and stressing times for families of victims for whom the scientific processes may seem unnecessarily bureaucratic. Recent mass casualty incidents in various countries have brought to public attention the tensions that can arise between victims’ families and the scientific and investigative processes that are followed. This project will explore these tensions through qualitative research design, framed within a human rights perspective, that involve interviews with police, forensic scientists and victim services. The challenges associated with respecting the cultural and religious practices of victims and their families will be a key focus of the project.  

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to a possible scholarship for this project:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Criminology, Police Studies or Forensic Science
  • Social research skills (qualitative and/or quantitative)
  • Experience working with criminal justice agencies (e.g. police)

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application for an RTP scholarship to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact the project leader, Associate Professor Roberta Julian (Roberta.Julian@utas.edu.au)

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

In most countries around the world, the population is ageing. As of 2016, 3.7 million Australian residents are 65 years of age or older, comprising 15 per cent of the total population. This percentage will continue to grow in the coming century. These changes are particularly acute in Tasmania, which has the oldest population in Australia (Council of Ageing Tasmania 2013). In economic and political discourses, this social change is often presented as ‘problematic’ and ‘burdensome’ to younger generations, while additionally positioning older age as a time of withdrawal and decline. These perspectives fail to appreciate the diversity of ageing and how understandings of ageing are socially generated. Importantly, the growth of the older population highlights the importance of ensuring and enhancing the quality of life and personal wellbeing for older people, including the crucial need to address ageism. This PhD project will focus on ageing, as experienced through and examining how, it is understood by individuals across various age groups, which includes consideration of ageism. The project will assist in identifying dynamics of ageing that are often overlooked or marginalised in policy debates.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A background in sociology with an interest in ageing, or a background in a community-based role that supports older people
  • Knowledge and experience in applying qualitative research methods would be highly valued

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisor/s of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants are encouraged to look at the following websites for details about the project leader: Peta Cook profile and PetaCook Academia

More information

Please contact Dr Peta Cook (Peta.Cook@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project will explore how the global success of East Asian, transnational, media such as Japanese animation offers a model for understanding how media and culture are changing in the twenty-first century.

With a focus on East Asian models of cultural innovation such as Japan’s ‘media-mix’, this project will explore case studies of cross-media entertainment which integrate the entertainment experience across a range of different media platforms such as film, television, video games, anime (animation), manga (comics books) toys, music, and spaces (both real and virtual) including tourism, theme parks and Alternate Reality Games.

Building upon previous research which has included mapping emergent, centre-periphery flows of media culture from, and within Asia, such as the media pilgrimages to Tasmania’s Ross Bakery by Japanese fan’s of the anime Kiki’s Delivery Service, we are seeking a PhD candidate who can work within a team developing a theoretical framework for understanding how storytelling works in this new environment with a particular emphasis upon ways in which consumers and producers converge to reshape, recontextualise and recirculate this popular entertainment.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Dr Craig Norris Craig.Norris@utas.edu.au for more information.

Type

Living allowance scholarship (RTP) or candidature only, selected through a competitive process

Value & Duration

If successful in applying for an RTP scholarship, a scholarship provides AUD$27,082 per annum (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project examines the profound changes in media texts and industries that are occurring as a result of transformations to the media business models, regulatory contexts, audience engagement, and professional practices in domestic and global media industries. We are looking for a PhD student to investigate how these changes are affecting media industries in local, regional and/or digital contexts. Candidates interested in one or more of the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • Local and regional news industries and practices, including in the Tasmanian context;
  • Digital content production;
  • Audience engagement and analysis;
  • Impacts of regulatory frameworks;
  • Impacts of media transformation on the quality and diversity of news and media.

Successful candidates will have an opportunity to work with world class researchers in journalism and media studies, and to establish invaluable academic networks with Australian and international researchers during their candidature.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates with a disciplinary background in journalism studies, media studies or communications, and/or significant relevant professional experience, are encouraged to apply.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will need to submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants should first forward an expression of interest to the project leader, Dr Claire Konkes, consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Responses to each of the selection criteria listed above
  • A statement on your interest in the project area
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)

Selected applicants will then interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Donald Reid or Dr Claire Konkes for more information.

Type

E.g. Living allowance

Value & Duration

If successful in applying for an RTP scholarship, a scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This research will contribute to the growing focus on materiality and memory in media studies. Although media objects and hardware are typically understood to evolve from one format to the next, the presence of media such as vinyl demonstrates the persistence of the analogue in our digital present. What media do people keep? How might the study of what is discarded and what is collected, augment our understanding of media waste? This project will be informed by existing work in media archaeology and format studies, looking at the intersection between media, materiality and memory.

The overarching aim of this project is to contribute to debates around the influence of objects and materiality over media consumption, circulation and production. Tracking media consumption (particularly disuse and reuse) can influence policy and process in media technology industries. We are seeking a PhD candidate who is interested in contributing new knowledge about media use, and complicating dominant understandings of the relationships between technology and use. Candidates who are interested in developing ethnographic skills are particularly encouraged to apply.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to international candidates;
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants should send an expression of interest to Dr Kathleen Williams consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Responses to each of the eligibility criteria listed above
  • A statement on your interest in the proposed PhD project
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)

Selected applicants will then be interviewed following which formal PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Dr Kathleen Williams for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

TGRS or RTP scholarships provide AUD $26,682 per annum (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project invites critical exploration of the field of public sociology. It welcomes applications from candidates keen to examine a topic of sociological significance that can expand disciplinary knowledge across theory, methods, empirical sites or contexts in Australian sociology. The overarching aim of the project is to provide new knowledge about the complexity of the relationships between theory and practice (praxis) that can reframe conceptual, methodological and practice-based debates in sociology. For this reason, the empirical focus is relatively open and will be refined between the candidate and supervisor.

We are seeking a PhD student who can use qualitative methods such as interviewing, focus groups and ethnography to engage with broad debates in sociology. The candidate will be a part of a small team of leading researchers at UTAS and will have the opportunity to establish an invaluable academic network with world-class researchers from Australia and abroad during the candidature.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates;
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates with a background in sociology, human geography, public policy, criminology or related fields are encouraged to apply. Candidates with knowledge and skills in qualitative methods will be ranked highly.

Funding

This PhD scholarship is funded by the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants should send an expression of interest to Professor Catherine Palmer (Catherine.Palmer@utas.edu.au) consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae;
  • Responses to each of the eligibility criteria listed above;
  • Statement on your interest in the proposed PhD project;
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent).

Selected applicants will be interviewed following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

More information

Please contact Professor Catherine Palmer (Catherine.Palmer@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Type

Candidature only or RTP scholarship through competitive process.

Value & Duration

If successful in applying for an RTP scholarship, a scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

This project aims to explore the role of forensic science in policing, intelligence and counterterrorism. It builds on research previously conducted at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES) that examined the effectiveness of forensic science in the criminal justice system. Through a focus on counterterrorism policing, this project extends the existing research in ‘critical forensic studies’ within TILES into the field of contemporary and emerging security challenges. The significance of both ‘technology’ and ‘community’ in counterterrorism policing raises tensions around the role of police and strategies for effective policing (e.g. intelligence and surveillance vs community/democratic policing) that require a critical examination. Identifying the current and potential role of forensic science in national and international security challenges provides an opportunity to analyse the contours and nuances of the ‘scientific turn’ in contemporary policing. The specific research questions and methodology for this project will depend on the disciplinary background, knowledge and skills of the PhD candidate. The research design will be developed in consultation with the candidate and in collaboration with research advisers and relevant industry stakeholders.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to a possible scholarship for this project:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Criminology, Police Studies or Forensic Science
  • Social research skills (qualitative and/or quantitative)
  • Experience working with criminal justice agencies (e.g. police)

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application for an RTP scholarship to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact Associate Professor Roberta Julian (Roberta.Julian@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Type

Living allowance

Value & Duration

A scholarship provides $26,682pa (2017 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

The Research Project

The ‘success’ of aged care policy in Australia relies heavily on the unpaid work of informal carers, especially families. While there is a wealth of research regarding family carers more generally, we know relatively little about the experiences of the ‘sandwich generation’: the growing number of adult children (mainly daughters) who provide care for one or more parents while often juggling paid work and the care of their own children or grandchildren. This research project will explore how ‘sandwich generation’ carers experience and manage these often competing demands in everyday life. More broadly, it will consider what kinds of workplace and societal arrangements might contribute to a more caring society.

We are looking for a PhD student who can contribute to this project by using qualitative and/or quantitative methods to examine the experiences of ‘sandwich generation’ carers. Candidates with experience in applying social research methods/methodologies and an interest in critical perspectives are especially encouraged to apply.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

More information

Please contact anthea.vreugdenhil@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2018

Research Theme

  • Creativity, Culture and Society

The Research Project

This project examines the media coverage of Antarctica in order to understand the cultural, environmental and political impact of Antarctica in public discourse. We are looking for a PhD student to investigate how the presence of Antarctica in the news media is drawn upon to make sense of scientific and environmental change, and governance of the region.

Successful candidates will have an opportunity to work with world class researchers in journalism and media studies, and environmental communication, and to establish invaluable academic networks with Australian and international researchers during their candidature.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Strong disciplinary background and industry familiarity in journalism, media and communications

Candidates interested in the following areas are encouraged to apply:

  • How has reporting of Antarctica changed in the modern era, and what factors have influenced these changes?
  • How does the reporting of Antarctica reflect exploration and scientific advancement?
  • How does access, governance and the nation state impact upon what is reported and how?
  • What messages are delivered to and via the news media from scientists, governing organisations, and other relevant groups?

More Information

Please contact Professor Libby Lester for more information.

http://www.utas.edu.au/profiles/staff/journalism-media-communications/libby-lester

Closing Date

31 October 2018

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

If science is to be influential in informing environmental management through policy change, it requires effective engagement between scientists and the public. While there is some knowledge of how well the public understands science, there is little knowledge of scientists’ understanding of their public, which plays out in examples of poorly targeted and ineffective communication about important environmental issues.

This project will be jointly supervised by the University of Tasmania (Professor Elizabeth Lester) and CSIRO’s Land and Water (Dr Libby Pinkard) and will develop approaches for bridging the communication gap between scientists and the wider community.

Applicants who are successful in being awarded a living allowance scholarship through UTAS can also apply for a CSIRO Postgraduate Scholarship which includes a Top-Up scholarship of AUD$7000pa and an operating budget of AUD$10,000pa.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Knowledge/expertise/partnerships in the area of landscape management/land use intensification

More Information

Please contact Professor Elizabeth Lester for more information.