Skip to content

Study with us

Take your passion for ideas further than you ever imagined.

We offer the opportunity to undertake a research degree within any of our disciplines and areas of research expertise. We provide a supportive, vibrant, and collegiate environment, rich in diversity, promoting a high-performance research culture. Your experience with us will be enriching and memorable with many opportunities to work with peers and academics on your areas of interest.

Our degrees offer a distinctive blend of theoretical and practice -based programs including industry-based partnerships, to equip students with higher-level conceptual and professional skills. Choose a research topic that reflects your interests and identify a supervisor from discipline staff with the expertise to guide you in your research. We supervise across a range of methodologies and conceptual/theoretical approaches, and encourage scholarship that draws on ideas from across diverse fields.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Closing dates for College of Arts, Law and Education (CALE) Scholarship Rounds
31st Oct 2018 and 1st March 2019

Featured Projects

Artfully decoding delicious imagery

Nathan Taylor is a PhD candidate at the School of Creative Arts, whose research is exploring contemporary food imaging.

Bringing seafood governance to the surface

Coco Cullen-Knox is a PhD candidate at the School of Social Sciences, whose research explores the roll of environmental campaigning and media in the governance of seafood.

Making forensic science easier for non-scientists to understand

Loene Howes completed a PhD at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES) in the School of Social Sciences. Loene came to the University of Tasmania because Forensic Studies is a key strength of research at TILES, and a unique program in Australia. Loene now works at the University as a researcher and lecturer.

Selling the land of extremes

Ever wondered how your perception of Antarctica has been shaped over the years? Influences are usually documentaries, advertising, or by reading books on the continent.

Hanne Nielsen is a PhD candidate at the School of Humanities, whose research is exploring how Antarctica has been used in advertising.

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

Since the publishing of Peter Singer’s seminal text Animal Liberation in 1975, Australia has played a significant role in the development of the Animal Studies (also known as Human-Animal Studies and including Critical Animal Studies) as an international field of enquiry and continues to do so.

Researchers from the University of Tasmania have been active in the contemporary development of Animal Studies, convening the second Australian Animal Studies conference, Considering Animals, in 2007 and publishing widely in the field. The recent development of Animal Studies as a Strategic Theme Area grouping within the College of Arts and Law further consolidates the importance of this rapidly growing field at UTAS.

Potential candidates working in the field of Animal Studies are invited to submit an application to undertake a PhD, with project proposals that reflect the radical rethinking of the nature of human-animal relations and its consequences for animal well being, empathy and ethical relations, species extinction, sustainability and climate change that underpin Animal Studies as a field of scholarship.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Yvette Watt for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project will examine existing STEAM Education and Art-Science Public Engagement models locally and globally to identify and test effective strategies for program delivery within a Tasmanian context. The project will also critically evaluate the role and value of creative arts in STEM and address the key challenges for implementing STEAM programs including how to create meaningful and critically engaged projects and implement, manage and sustain interdisciplinary collaborations across art and science disciplines.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Education training or experience
  • Previous experience working across art and science
  • Public programs development and project management skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Svenja Kratz or Dr Karen Hall for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This practice-led project will focus on the development of Art-Science Projects and the delivery of linked STEAM Engagement Programs within a Tasmanian context. The project should engage with critical issues and thematic relevant to Art-Science, bio art and/or interdisciplinary practices across art, design, science, engineering and technology. This may include ecofeminism, the ethical, social, cultural and political implications of new and emerging technologies, critical and speculative interventions in the Anthropocene, sustainment and new ecological paradigms.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Previous experience working across art and science
  • Public programs development and project management skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Svenja Kratz or Dr Karen Hall for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project supports discipline-based and interdisciplinary research in the creative and performing arts, and studies of aspects of various genres of Australian and British music. Doctoral candidates in performance, music composition and musicology studies are invited to submit a proposal for a specialized music project seeking new ways to understand, create, and perform including investigation of historical and contemporary performance practice.

Interdisciplinary projects that align with the research themes of the Creative Exchange Institute (CxI) are welcomed, which may include collaborations with other creative arts, humanities, Antarctic studies, social sciences, physical sciences or education. Research methodologies may be studio based, praxis-based or theoretical and may include performance, composition, or musicological studies.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Professional creative practice or relevant industry engagement
  • Prior publication of arts-practice research or musicological research
  • Excellent communication skills

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Anne-Marie Forbes for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

Artistic activity has a long history of radical and outsider behaviour. Through social action, political struggle and protest, and by creatively working through trauma, artists express opposition to hegemony and invent modes of resistance.

This project defines ways in which artistic practice interrogates and critiques ideas, institutions and authority within structures of governance and dominant modes of thinking. Moreover, the project explores creative modes of conflict resolution and constructing hope and shared social horizons. The project seeks expressions of interest in projects that engage with forms of creative critical resistance in order to forge new understandings and ways of seeing and being in the world.

The project may address areas such as:

  • Protest and activism
  • Alterity
  • Queerness
  • Feminism
  • Outsider art
  • Social crisis and conflict

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Demonstrated professional creative practice
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Applicants working cross-discipline are encouraged to apply
  • Projects may be theoretical, praxis or studio-based

More Information

Please contact Dr Megan Keating for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project supports interdisciplinary research into the potential benefits of the use of creative arts (eg. visual arts, music, theatre, dance) for health and wellbeing outcomes in healthcare settings such as hospitals, community based facilities or aged care residential facilities.

A doctoral candidate is sought to contribute to research into impacts of creative arts programs and be involved in the delivery and evaluation of novel projects in one or more healthcare settings. Mixed method research methodologies will be employed to evaluate projects, which may include monitoring of physiological markers, data handling and bio statistics. Applicants may engage with areas such as image making and data visualization

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Professional creative practice
  • Experience in a health care environment
  • Police checks and registration to work with vulnerable people will be required

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Anne-Marie Forbes for more information

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project explores new creative ways to represent, image and intervene in place and environment. The project will engage with historical, cultural, scientific and creative practices as a means to develop new ways of understanding, seeing and engaging with place and the environment.

Research methodologies may be studio based, praxis-based or purely theoretical and may include visual arts, sound, design, media arts, performance and curation.

The project considers themes in the areas of:

  • Tasmanian contexts and Islandness
  • Natural and cultural heritage
  • Place and site specificity
  • Mapping and cartography
  • Environmental change, land use, and conservation
  • Ethics and cross-cultural encounter

The projects may engage with areas such as:

  • Image making, data visualization, pictorial analysis and critique
  • The politics of representation; participatory practice; aesthetics; art and activism
  • Environmental theory as well as all forms of creative practice

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Image making/pictorial analysis
  • Professional creative practice
  • Applicants working cross-discipline are encouraged to apply

More Information

Please contact Dr Megan Keating for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

The announcement in late 2016 of the proposed development of a multistakeholder site for the memorialisation of Tasmania’s Black Wars at Macquarie Point has amplified a longstanding debate over the capacity of visual arts to commemorate and engage with questions of memory, post-coloniality, and decolonisation. The possibility of recognising trauma and confronting, adapting, and engaging with sites of contention have seen a variety of visual, performative, and spatial responses.

More recently, this ground has been joined by coterminous concerns with the legacy and memorialisation of colonisation. Recent decolonising practices have considered the entanglement of aesthetics and world politics along with explorations of the archive, empathy and affect, pre-colonial practices and cross-cultural dialogues.

This practice-led project examines the possibility of engaging and adapting to a range of strategies that are pertinent to this subject. We encourage collaboration with histories, communities, and sites of trauma, loss, and possibility. This project calls for artists working in the arena of memory and decolonisation.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Professional creative practice

More Information

Please contact Dr Megan Keating for more information.

Closing date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project studies the interaction of music and visual culture in Australia. It embraces the creation of new work as well as the study of existing work from the past and present, seeking to explore, understand and bring new knowledge to the ways in which music and visual culture interact in Australia. Building upon the discipline of music iconography, the project is aligned with the scholarly interests of Association Répertoire International d’Iconographie Musicale (RIdIM) (ridim.org) through the University of Tasmania’s fostering of an Australian National RIdIM Centre and Working Group.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A high level of practical experience and skill as a visual artist and/or musician
  • Interdisciplinary experience
  • The ability to connect creative practice with scholarly enquiry
  • Knowledge of Musicology and/or Art History
  • Knowledge of Australian Cultural History
  • Experience in the field of Digital Humanities

Funding

An applicant whose expression of interest is accepted by the supervisors of this project will submit a full application to be considered in a competitive process.

Application Process

Applicants should first forward an expression of interest to the project leader, Dr Arabella Teniswood-Harvey consisting of:

  • Curriculum vitae
  • Responses to each of the selection criteria listed above
  • A statement on your interest in music iconography/the interrelationships between music and art
  • A writing sample (e.g. Honours thesis, journal article, or equivalent)
  • A sample of your creative work (e.g. audio file, visuals)

Selected applicants will then be interviewed, following which formal Scholarship and PhD candidature applications to the University of Tasmania will be requested.

For scholarships funded by an external grant:

Applicants should visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a [Insert title] living allowance scholarship.

More information

Please contact Dr Arabella Teniswood-Harvey for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

Mapping the musical and cultural impact of the performance of African American gospel music within other cultural contexts. Cataloging, analysing and describing the techniques employed by conductors, directors, arrangers, and composers in facilitating the effective and authentic performance of African American gospel and other African American inspired contemporary music forms on community and other ensembles outside of the originating musical culture.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Andrew Legg for further information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

A doctoral candidate is sought specifically to contribute to ongoing research into impacts of creative arts programs for renal patients. The candidate would be involved in the design, delivery and evaluation of novel creative arts projects in Renal Dialysis Units associated with the Royal Hobart Hospital and groups of renal patients of different ages.   Mixed method research methodologies will be employed to evaluate projects, which may include monitoring of physiological markers.

The project considers themes in the areas of:

  • Creative arts, health and well being
  • Renal health and dialysis
  • Community health
  • Better ageing
  • Youth and chronic disease

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include the following criteria:

  • Professional creative practice
  • Experience in working in healthcare environments
  • Police checks and registration to work with vulnerable people will be required

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Anne-Marie Forbes for more information.

Closing Date

31 March 2019

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

This project studies the interaction of music and visual culture in Australia. It embraces the creation of new work as well as the study of existing work from the past and present, seeking to explore, understand and bring new knowledge to the ways in which music and visual culture interact in Australia.

Building upon the discipline of music iconography, the project is aligned with the scholarly interests of Association Répertoire International d’Iconographie Musicale (RIdIM)(ridim.org) through the University of Tasmania’s fostering of an Australian National RIdIM Centre and Working Group.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A high level of practical experience and skill as a visual artist and/or musician
  • Interdisciplinary experience
  • The ability to connect creative practice with scholarly enquiry
  • Knowledge of Musicology and/or Art History
  • Knowledge of Australian Cultural History
  • Experience in the field of Digital Humanities

More Information

Please contact Dr Arabella Teniswood-Harvey for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project is one supported by academics from the Mathematics and Science Education Research Centre which comprises a group of strong researchers with a focus on STEM in education and is housed within the School of Education.

How do science teachers manage questions and topics that bridge science, philosophy, ethics, religion or spiritual beliefs? How do they build students' confidence and ability to ask important questions in this space? Questions such as these would form the basis of a research project. The research will be undertaken with initial teacher education students, to see how capable they feel in providing opportunities for students to grapple with cross-disciplinary ideas that assist us to understand what it means to Be Human. It will also explore the nuances of the nature of science, the stereotypical views of science, and the power and limits of science to explain what it means to be human. The research could utilise and build upon resources developed in the UK suitable to the Australian context, for use with students and teachers.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • If a scholarship is awarded, the candidate must enrol as a full-time student
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research or professional experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • The ability to understand and enact cross-disciplinary perspectives and collaboration

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Sharon Fraser for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

An eExam occurs when a candidate takes their own computer into a supervised and timed assessment. This study will build on a national eExam project to look at adoption of the technology across Australia and survey the impact on teaching practices. It takes the view that what is taught is only what can be assessed. If assessment is on paper, then many skills and attitudes are left untaught.

To undertake this project you will need some understanding of computers and empathy with their users. In addition, you will develop a breadth of knowledge of university curricula in a broad range of disciplines. The analysis techniques taught will be comparative and historical, as you map the nature of pre-eExam assessments to post-eExam. In some cases the eExam will be an option – in others it will facilitate post-paper assessment. Your study will uncover the pathways from one to the other.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Assessment skills
  • Computer competency

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Fluck for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This project is one supported by academics from the Mathematics and Science Education Research Centre which comprises a group of strong researchers with a focus on STEM in education and is housed within the School of Education.

While the acronym STEM has been around for some time, authentic teaching and learning experiences of STEM are still rare. In formal learning settings, school and university, students learn in subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) but may not be taught the explicit links between, and co-dependencies of, the STEM disciplines. Such understandings are essential to scientific research.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • The ability to understand and enact cross-disciplinary perspectives and collaboration

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Sharon Fraser for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

The percentage of Australian primary teachers who are male has noticeably decreased in the past thirty years. Concerned stakeholders, such as principals and parents, have called for increased male recruitment to, and retention in, the primary teaching profession. The recruitment-focused initiatives introduced in response to these calls have not been successful in raising male teacher numbers. This situation suggests that more focus needs to be placed on the retention of male primary teachers already in the profession.

Education research has identified numerous gender-related challenges faced by male primary teachers, and noted that men often leave the profession because of these challenges. However, researchers have spent much less time in investigating strategies to assist male primary teachers to cope with these challenges. This research aims to address this gap through the identification of practical coping strategies and supports these men can use to deal with the gender related challenges they face and persist within their profession. The influence of other factors such as coping efficacy will also be addressed.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Vaughan Cruickshank for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

International and Australian research on historical thinking and historical consciousness since the 1990s informed the development of the Australian Curriculum: History (ACH) and now underpins its practice. One of the stated aims of the ACH is for students to develop skills of higher order thinking in order to produce a critical perspective on received versions of the past.

The curriculum outlines a learning continuum within the General Capability of ‘Critical and Creative Thinking’ that comprises 4 key elements and 6 levels of achievement that relate to children’s ages and schooling years. However, this hierarchy of achievement contrasts with historical thinking research that argues that children can develop historical reasoning and higher-order historical thinking through structured teaching and learning, rather than at age-related stages. We are interested in exploring whether through exposure to constructivist pedagogy and guided inquiry learning, students of various ages and stages can achieve higher-order historical thinking.

This research will be situated in primary and secondary schools in Tasmania. It will employ quantitative and qualitative research methods to examine two key questions:

  • What does critical and creative thinking look like in history? 
  • How do we measure children’s capacity to achieve higher-order thinking in history?

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Louise Zarmati for more information.

Closing Date

31 January 2019

The Research Project

Increased sedentariness within our society is connected to a range of downstream, adverse health conditions. As governments have begun to recognise this growing concern, preventative approaches aimed to limit healthcare costs have become a national priority.

The UTAS Active Work Laboratory is at the forefront of this effort through its work developing and validating education strategies and e-health interventions to reduce sedentary behaviour and improve health throughout the lifespan.

The Active Work Lab research team has expertise in kinesiology, physiology, psychology, pedagogy, gaming and information technology.

Our current focus is on developing a gold-standard, field-based, randomised control trial using sensor technology to investigate changes in sedentary behaviour and the resulting short- and long-term health effects of an e-health intervention targeting sedentary behaviour exhibited by office-working adults.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Scott Pedersen for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

Tasmania needs to increase participation in higher education to develop an intelligent workforce, which will be capable of enterprise and contribute to economic growth in the State. Online learning is important to increasing participation. However, a large proportion of new online learning entrants, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds drop-out, often early in the course. Boosting participation by opening doors to previous non-participants is to little avail if it is a revolving door. Reducing attrition is the most likely way to increase participation.

That remote online learners are more likely to drop-out is entirely consistent with the theory that persistence is enhanced by social integration into the university community. However, the construct has largely been operationalized in terms of full-time on-campus students. There is a real need for qualitative research which seeks to better understand the issue from the perspective of remote online students. There is also a need to better understand the notion of academic integration for students who have not been high achievers and who come from backgrounds of low tertiary participation. It is not clear how school leavers can adjust to the very different learning approaches required for online learning. The project aims to seek a better understanding of the constructs of social and academic integration from the perspective of remote and online students and those from a disadvantaged background.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants who teach online

More Information

Please contact Professor David Kember for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

Tasmania needs to increase participation in higher education to develop an intelligent workforce, which will be capable of enterprise and contribute to economic growth in the State. Online learning is important to increasing participation. However, a large proportion of new online learning entrants, particularly those from disadvantaged backgrounds drop-out, often early in the course. Boosting participation by opening doors to previous non-participants is to little avail if it is a revolving door. Reducing attrition is the most likely way to increase participation.

That remote online learners are more likely to drop-out is entirely consistent with the theory that persistence is enhanced by social integration into the university community. However, the construct has largely been operationalized in terms of full-time on-campus students. There is a need to trial and evaluate pedagogical and curriculum initiatives which might result in online and remote students being better integrated socially and academically.

Projects can be developed based on a range of pedagogical and curriculum initiatives based on blended learning or the flipped classroom. Initiatives are likely to make online students feel part of a learning community.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants who teach online

More Information

Please contact the below staff for more information:

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

As the only continent with no permanent human inhabitants, Antarctica has traditionally been considered the province of the sciences. Increasingly, however, researchers are recognising the importance of the humanities and social sciences in understanding our relationship with this unusual place. The University of Tasmania is at the forefront of this development, with a growing community of researchers working across the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and the College of Arts, Law and Education.

This project invites students trained in any humanities or social science discipline to investigate how social and cultural analysis provides insight into human engagement with the Antarctic, past, present or future. Depending on the student’s background and interests, the project could cover topics related (but not limited) to cultural history, heritage and museums; media studies; textual representation; responses from the visual and performing arts; tourism; critical geopolitics; national relationships with the Antarctic; the Antarctic Treaty System; Antarctic futures; climate change and the Anthropocene.

The Antarctic is taken broadly here to include the Southern Ocean and sub-Antarctic islands. This project is an excellent opportunity for a student to join an exciting new field and to make a contribution to understanding a region that is central to the future of our planet.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A background in any humanities or social science discipline
  • Prior experience or knowledge of the Antarctic

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Elizabeth Leane for more information.

Closing date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

The Research Project

This cross-disciplinary research program focuses upon regulation, prevention and support of work-related psychological injury. In today’s employment and regulatory landscapes, both employers and employees have legal responsibilities and liabilities related to work-related psychological injury. These have complex implications for workers, organisations, legislators and legal practitioners. However, little is known about how managers, employees, human resource management professionals and legal practitioners navigate these complexities. For example, in law, employers are not liable to pay worker’s compensation for psychological injury arising from ‘reasonable management action’. But what constitutes ‘reasonable management action’? How can managers and organisations ensure their actions are ‘reasonable’?  How can workers determine if they are not?

Potential PhD projects in this program include (but are not limited to):

  • examination of judicial interpretations of relevant legislation and case law
  • exploration of what constitutes ‘reasonable management action’ under law and in management practice
  • investigation of human resource management approaches to support the prevention and oversight of work-related psychological injury; and exploration of the ways in which legal practitioners, human resource management professionals, line managers and workers engage with and contribute to psychological safety climates that prevent and support psychological injury in the workplace

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Expressions of interest are invited from potential candidates with:

  • qualitative research experience in business, management or law
  • highly developed written and communication skills
  • a previous research qualification (Honours or Masters by Research) in a social science discipline, preferably Business or Law

More information

Please contact Dr Olivia Rundle or Dr Megan Woods for further information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

‘Climate intervention’ refers to deliberate human intervention in the earth system to lessen human induced climate change. Solar radiation management is a form of climate intervention that might be used at various scales to increase the planet’s albedo and thereby reduce temperature increase. Prominent proposals include marine cloud brightening and using marine based reflective agents to lessen coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Governance of research, testing and implementation of climate intervention at domestic and international levels are at a very early stage. However, over the past sixty years Australia and the United States have used law to govern weather modification activities, such as cloud seeding, aimed at increasing regional or local rainfall patterns.

This project will analyse the history of weather modification law in Australia and the United States to identify what lessons might be drawn for the governance, public participation and social acceptability of proposals for regional climate intervention.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Environmental law
  • Environmental governance
  • Environmental management

More Information

Please contact Professor Jan McDonald or Dr Jeff McGee for more information.

Further details can also be found here: http://marinesocioecology.org/weather-modification-in-australia-and-the-united-states-what-lessons-for-governing-regional-climate-intervention/

Closing Date

1 March 2019

The Research Project

This PhD scholarship is linked with the NHMRC funded Centre of Research Excellence, ‘From Discovery to Therapy in Genetic Eye Diseases’ (2017-2021) led by Professor David Mackey. One of the aims of this research program is to develop world-leading models for genetic risk prediction and for the feedback of genetic results to patients and research participants.

The advent of next generation sequencing (whole exome sequencing or whole genome sequencing) has increased the likelihood of ‘incidental’ or secondary findings (i.e. information that extends beyond the aims and objectives of sequencing). Management of return of such findings is a key challenge in genomics, giving rise to complex and rapidly evolving legal and ethical issues in both clinical and research contexts. These issues are central to this research translation project for genetic eye disease.

The project provides an opportunity for a PhD candidate to undertake legal, bioethical, and/or empirical scholarship with input from an interdisciplinary team, with the aim of guiding the development of protocols for feedback of results to patients and their families including the return of incidental findings.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Health law and/or bioethics
  • Legal services delivery
  • Qualitative research  methods, particularly in depth interviewing
  • Genetics and/or other biological sciences
  • Applied statistics
  • High level writing and analytical skills evidenced by  prior publications

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Professor Margaret Otlowski for more information.

Closing Date

1st March 2019

The Research Project

The Tasmania Law Reform Institute in the Law Faculty has accepted a reference from the LGBTIQ community to undertake a reference on conversion therapy (also known as ‘reparative’ or ‘ex-gay’ therapy).

The practice has been described by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights as “unethical, unscientific and ineffective, and may be tantamount to torture”. In March 2018, Fairfax Media revealed that conversion practices remain prevalent in Australia, hidden in clinical settings, faith-based counselling, and online courses.¹ The practice continues to be undertaken surreptitiously in Tasmania, highlighting the need for a legal response.

This project proposes to examine existing laws in Tasmania and elsewhere to determine what legislative measures can be implemented to prevent conversion therapy from being conducted in Tasmania, particularly in relation to minors. In order to understand the prevalence of conversion therapy in Tasmania, the harm caused by the practice, and potential reforms, the project will involve extensive consultation with the medical profession, medical and psychology organisations, faith groups, and the Tasmanian community, with a focus on the LGBTIQ community. Expected outputs include:

Scoping study

The Institute invites a LLM student to conduct a study, under supervision of the Director of the Institute. The study will outline:

  • The extent to which conversion therapy continues to be practised in Tasmania
  • Literature regarding the impact on mental health of conversion therapy
  • Existing legal regulation of the practice of conversion therapy, including the regulation of the provision of purported health and counselling services
  • Analysis of initiatives to prevent or regulate the practice of conversion therapy, including in the USA, Europe, recent reforms in Victoria and calls by the Queensland and ACT Health Ministers for a national approach to ban the practice.²

Thesis

This work can be used as the basis of the community consultation a Final Report for the Government and/or as the basis for an LLM Thesis.

¹ Tomazin, F. 9 March 2018. “I am profoundly unsettled': inside the hidden world of gay conversion therapy”. Sydney Morning Herald https://www.smh.com.au/national/i-am-profoundly-unsettled-inside-the-hidden-world-of-gay-conversiontherapy-20180227-p4z1xn.html
² See, for example, Preventing Harm, Promoting Justice: Responding to LGBT conversion therapy in Australia. This report on the Victorian experience will provide important background for the Tasmanian project.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery

Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing and community engagement

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Terese Henning for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019

The Research Project

Elder abuse is currently a topic of considerable concern and in many ways and for many reasons difficult to investigate and tackle. A pilot project is currently being undertaken on a cross-disciplinary basis by Law, Sociology and Health Sciences to investigate existing regulatory and policy frameworks that deal with elder abuse. It is proposed to develop this work into a wide ranging analysis of key agencies' responses to elder abuse, the extent to which they have linked responses and whether and how their responses might be developed to achieve systemised integrated approaches. PhD opportunities in this area include investigations of:

  • Whether and how an integrated response across government and non-government agencies might be developed to tackle elder abuse;
  • Evaluation of models that have been developed outside Australia to tackle elder abuse and whether any of those models might be developed for the Australian environment;
  • Assessment of the current legislative and policy framework across Australia, what are their lacunae and how might they be improved from a practical and practitioner perspective;
  • Whether legislative and policy frameworks developed to tackle other forms of abuse and exploitation of vulnerable people (including family violence) might be developed or usefully extended to tackle elder abuse;
  • Whether policies developed by different agencies to tackle elder abuse are actually implemented;
  • Whether cultures within institutions tasked with caring for elderly people or with responding to elder abuse, undermine or over-ride legislation and policies relating to elder abuse.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Terese Henning for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019

The Research Project

People with complex communication needs (including children, people with cognitive, physical and mental impairments and people with language impairments) face significant barriers in obtaining equal access to justice in both civil and criminal jurisdictions. A number of special measures have been implemented across Australia to enhance these people’s participation in the justice process, including pre-trial recording of their evidence, the use of communication assistants, enabling them to have a support person with them while testifying and transmitting their evidence via CCTV so that they do not need to testify in court. Most of these measures apply only in the criminal jurisdiction at trial. There is a dearth of measures available during civil trials and tribunal proceedings and to assist people in interacting with lawyers and the police. There are many issues that arise in this context that provide opportunities for post-graduate research including:

  • Cross-jurisdictional comparative analysis of the different models implemented in Australia to assist people with complex communication needs in navigating the justice system. There is considerable diversity between the current schemes on offer;
  • Whether and how models adopted in some Scandinavian countries, like the Barnehus, might be implemented in Australia;
  • How an integrated approach to dealing with the problems faced by people with complex communication needs might be developed for Australian jurisdictions;
  • Whether it is necessary to abandon altogether the adversarial approach in enabling people with complex communication needs to participate on a more equal footing in the justice system;
  • Cross-jurisdictional research on the different models operating in Australia and key stakeholder responses to them, including those of judges, lawyers, the police and witness support agencies.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal  service delivery
  • Qualitative  research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Terese Henning for more information.

Closing Date

1 March 2019

The Research Project

Therapeutic (problem solving) approaches have been adopted in a number of jurisdictions to tackle particularly intransigent forms of offending and offending that does not appear to be susceptible to traditional responses, including drug related offending, recidivist drink driving, family violence and offending arising from mental and cognitive incapacities.

There are a number of possibilities for PhD research in this arena including:

  • Participation in the establishment of a pilot therapeutic approach to recidivist drink driving and evaluation of the pilot from offender, court and service provider perspectives.
  • Comparative analysis of the operation of therapeutic courts – how legal participants, including judicial officers, interact with offenders; the extent to which they comply with the key requirements of the therapeutic approach to offending.
  • Comparative analysis of the therapeutic approaches in relation to different targeted areas including family violence, drug related offending and/or mental health related offending;
  • Evaluation of the impact on recidivism and re-integration of problem solving approaches in relation to family violence, drug related offending and/or mental health related offending;
  • Investigation of community responses to a therapeutic approach to this type of offending.
  • Attitudes of law enforcement agencies and personnel to therapeutic responses.
  • There are opportunities to develop cross-disciplinary research projects particularly with the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies, and in particular, in relation to research understandings of therapeutic responses.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Legal service delivery
  • Qualitative research methods, particularly in depth interviewing

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor.

Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Terese Henning for more information.

.

Closing Date

1 March 2019 (NOTE: a full Application and Referee Reports must be received by the closing date)

Research Themes

  • Creativity, Culture & Society
  • Better Health

The Research Project

The project examines the experience of same-sex attracted workers in government funded faith based social service providers, such as social welfare organisations and schools. Faith based social service providers employ large numbers of people. The Catholic Church, for example, employs roughly 2% of the Australian workforce.

Same-sex attracted workers (as well as students and social service recipients) can be legally discriminated against by government funded faith based social service providers. There is currently a push to extend this right to discriminate more broadly, allowing discrimination in commercial services on the basis of conscientious objection. There are very few studies of the experiences of same-sex attracted workers in these situations in Australia, and a great need for ethical guidance in the face of social conflict.

The candidate will undertake empirical and/or analytical research into the experience of same-sex attracted workers in faith based service providers. The candidate may consider: What is the effect of the legal right to discriminate on the workers, on their work, and on their colleagues? What social policy responses to the growth of cultural diversity should be undertaken? How may we maintain social cohesion in the context of social conflict regarding queer and religious identities (or similar.)?

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Sociology
  • Religion Studies
  • Gender Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Legal Studies

More Information

Please contact Professor Douglas Ezzy or Dr Louise Richardson-Self for more information.

Closing Date

1st March 2019

Research Themes

  • Data, Knowledge & Decisions
  • Better Health

The Research Project

The Anticipatory Care Action Learning Project is a significant, new research collaboration that seeks to understand what forms of anticipatory care are available in Tasmania, the enablers and barriers that exist in accessing them and to contribute to the development of a best practice model suitable for scaled up implementation.

This PhD project will involve research into innovative programs which target Tasmanian populations experiencing or at risk of chronic health conditions and the organisations that support and service these populations. The wider project will focus on four communities determined by the Department of Health, which will allow for comparison of different models and learnings to be applied from one community to another, and to communities not involved in the study. The four community sites will also have an opportunity to develop the breadth of their chosen anticipatory care program/s during the life of the project, allowing the research team the opportunity to examine these changes as they develop.

The precise focus of the PhD project will be negotiated with the successful candidate but is likely to focus on the sustainability and longer term efficacy of the Anticipatory Care Action Learning Project.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Social and/or health policy
  • Qualitative research methodologies
  • Quantitative data analysis
  • Knowledge of preventive and primary care health systems
  • Systems and place-based policy approaches

More Information

Please contact Dr Susan Banks for more information.

Closing Date

12 December 2020

Research Themes

  • Data, Knowledge & Decisions
  • Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

This project aims to contribute to the effective communication of forensic science. Within the scope of the project is the communication of forensic science at various stages of the criminal justice process – at major incident scenes, during investigations, and in trials and inquests.

The project builds upon research previously conducted at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES), which examined communication with police, lawyers and judges via expert reports and related interactions. Focusing on meeting practitioners’ information needs at different stages of the process, this project extends the existing research in ‘critical forensic studies’ within TILES into the burgeoning domain of ‘forensic intelligence’ and proposes closer examination of innovative and developing communication strategies that aim to prioritise understanding while maintaining scientific accuracy.

The role of forensic science in achieving justice raises important questions about the nuances, ambiguities and tensions inherent in the public understanding of science, the nature of expertise, and the institutional structure of the criminal justice system. The specific research questions and methodology of the project will depend on the disciplinary background, knowledge and skills of the PhD candidate. The research design will be developed with the candidate in collaboration with research advisers and relevant industry stakeholders.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Criminology,  Forensic Studies, Law,  Police Studies, Psychology,  Sociology
  • Social research skills (qualitative  and/or quantitative) 
  • Experience working with criminal justice agencies

More Information

Please contact Dr Loene Howes (Loene.Howes@utas.edu.au) or Professor Roberta Julian (Roberta.Julian@utas.edu.au) for more information.