Courses & Units

Bachelor of Social Science (Police Studies) (13D)

The Bachelor of Social Science (Police Studies) builds on a strong social science foundation with specific knowledge and skills of policing.

The degree brings together a range of disciplines that relate to human experience and behaviour, such as policing, criminology, risk management, law, sociology and psychology, politics, and public policy through two study options:

  • The In-service pathway is an opportunity for serving police officers to build on their training and experience with a recognised University qualification, or
  • The Conventional pathway offers a comprehensive social sciences education with a specific focus on policing studies.

Whether you wish to work in policing, forensics,  intelligence, risk analysis, justice, legal or correctional services, the Bachelor of Social Science (Police Studies) is the perfect degree to provide you with the knowledge and expertise for policing solutions in the real world.

The Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management in Tasmania endorses these professional programs. The Tertiary Education Assistance Scheme (which involves Commissioner's scholarships and interest-free loans) is an incentive for eligible Tasmania Police officers to undertake study at the University of Tasmania.

Duration

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Minimum 3 Years

Up to a maximum of 7 Years

Location

Hobart, Launceston

ATAR

Clearly-in Rank

The Clearly-in Rank is the lowest score at which students were granted entry in the first offer round in 2015.

The Clearly-in rank should be used as a guide for entry. Note: entry to some courses requires a combination of criteria (ie. folio, interview, GMAT) not just ATAR alone.

See entry requirements below


Course intake

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school, Tasmania Police, Tasmania Police Intake 1
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school
Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school, Tasmania Police, Tasmania Police Intake 1
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school

Course rules

See full course rules and guidelines

Course contact

Phone: 1300 363 864
Email: Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online: Enquiries


You are currently viewing the course details for 2017.

View course details for 2016 ›

Duration

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Minimum 3 Years

Up to a maximum of 7 Years

Location

Hobart, Launceston

Academic Requirements

See entry requirements below

CRICOS

Code: 033204D


Course intake

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school, Tasmania Police, Tasmania Police Intake 1
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school
Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school, Tasmania Police, Tasmania Police Intake 1
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2, Summer school (early), Winter school (early), Spring school

Course rules

See full course rules and guidelines

Course contact

Phone:+61 3 8676 7017
Online: International enquiries


You are currently viewing the course details for 2017.

View course details for 2016 ›

Course objectives

The Bachelor of Social Science (Police Studies) is designed to provide students with high quality social science training together with specific knowledge and skills of policing. Graduates with this degree will have learned the following: to understand and analyse complex issues concerning policing practice in contemporary society; to understand the changing roles and expectations of police in the context of a changing society; to articulate the interaction between theory and practice in police studies; to develop a broad array of intellectual, practical and professional capabilities; to develop critical, analytical and communication skills; and to organise and conduct research projects.

Course structure

The University reserves the right to amend or remove courses and unit availabilities, as appropriate.

In the Bachelor of Social Science (Police Studies), you take 2 majors, a minor and 4 elective units. This degree consists of a total of 24 units comprising:

  • Two majors of 8 units each: each major consists of 2 introductory, 2 intermediate, 4 advanced units
  • A minor of 4 units: 2 introductory, 2 intermediate units
  • Four elective units:
    CONVENTIONAL PATHWAY - The elective units will consist of 2 breadth units and 2 student electives.  For the student electives, they may be chosen from this or any other subject area within the University, provided they meet the unit level requirements for the degree (see next point below), unit pre-requisites and quotas.  Please refer to this page for further information about breadth units.  
    IN-SERVICE PATHWAY: In the In-Service Pathway, Tasmania Police requirements are that students enrol in the four units specified in the student electives for this pathway.
  • Unit level requirements for the degree are: 
    • 8-10 units at introductory level, 
    • 6-10 units at intermediate level, and 
    • 8-10 units at advanced level.

In-Service Pathway (for students who are employed as a Tasmania Police Recruit):

  • Major 1 -  Police Studies (In-service)
  • Major 2 -  Public Policy (In-Service)
  • Minor -  Risk Management
  • Four student electives required by Tasmania Police

Conventional Pathway (for Police Officers who joined Tasmania Police before 2010 and for all other students who are qualified for entry):

  • Major 1 -   Police Studies (Conventional)
  • Major 2 -   Politics and Policy* or Sociology* (* Different Introductory units to the In-service Pathway)
  • Minor -   Aboriginal Studies or Gender Studies or History or Human Resource Management or Information Systems or Law or Philosophy or Psychology.
  • 2 student electives
  • 2 breadth units

Please note: students who have passed HSP107 Introduction to Policing and wish to continue on to the Bachelor of Social Sciences (Police Studies) -- Conventional Pathway are eligible to seek advanced standing for up to  25 credit points of introductory student electives.

In-Service Pathway

For students who are employed as Tasmania Police Recruit.

MAJOR 1 - Compulsory

Year 1

This unit examines the roles that police play in society as a major agency of government responsible for the critical functions of order maintenance and law enforcement. Its purpose is to develop knowledge and skills in three broad areas of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the new harmonized national work, health and safety legislation, associated regulations and codes of practice and the roles that police play in their implementation. This includes interventions dealing with dynamic and formal risk assessments including hazard identification,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2

This unit provides an introduction to the field of forensic practice including crime scene investigation, forensic science, e-forensics, forensic interventions in social work; the sociology of forensic science and related ethical considerations. The unit provides an overview of the history…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines contemporary social issues relating to drug abuse and its policing- one of the most complex and controversial topics confronting today's society. The unit focuses on the demand for, and the supply of illicit and licit drugs.Policing policies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 3

This unit examines complex social issues concerning diversity and discrimination based on age, ethnicity, sexuality, gender and mental and physical disabilities. The challenges faced by police organisations, and by front-line officers in particular, in the provision of appropriate policing services…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides advanced level knowledge and direct practice skills used in police interventions to resolve conflictual situations with individuals and groups. Focus is placed on the appropriate use of restraint and control accoutrements including expandable batons, oleoresin capsicum spray,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Work in this unit represents the culmination of the learning by in-service Tasmania Police officers and is a key bridge to their on-going development as a professional police officer. These officers are part of the Tasmania Police Professionalisation Program. Students…

Credit Points: 25

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Please Note: HSP315 is 25% weighted.

MAJOR 2 - Compulsory

Year 1

This is a foundational unit of study for trainee police officers studying at the Tasmania Police Academy. The focus for the unit is on developing the legal knowledge and skills required of a graduate police constable performing general duties in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartTasmania Police
HobartTasmania Police Intake 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to teach the fundamentals of good reasoning. You will learn how to construct, analyse, and critically evaluate arguments; how to identify and avoid common errors in reasoning; how to think logically and well; and how to communicate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2

This unit is designed for constables participating in the first qualification process (QP1) for promotion to the rank of sergeant. It builds on the formal legal training provided at recruit level as well as practical experience gained since graduation. It…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides the opportunity for students to undertake study in an approved topic of special interest to them that is not covered in the Police Studies undergraduate program. Unit is taught at advanced, pre-Honours level and is normally restricted to students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 3

Supervised research involving the student undertaking a case study analysis of an operational incident or event to which he/she has responded. The case will be considered in the light of academic literature on the topic, governmental policies and operational procedures,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Supervised research involving the student undertaking a case study analysis of an operational incident or event to which he/she has responded. The case will be considered in the light of academic literature on the topic, governmental policies and operational procedures,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Examines the roles and functions that the police play as a major agency of governance in society. The structures and strategies of policing are analysed and the relationships between the police, other governmental institutions and the general public are discussed.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides the opportunity for students to undertake study in an approved topic of special interest to them that is not covered in the Police Studies undergraduate program. Unit is taught at advanced, pre-Honours level and is normally restricted to students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

MINOR - Compulsory

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

This unit examines complex social issues undermining public order and safety and the social, psychological and physical risks posed to individuals, groups and the community by disorderly behaviour. The management of these risks concerning such matters as alcohol and drug…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

One of the most risky activities anyone can undertake in contemporary society concerns road-use - travelling in or on a vehicle, or as a pedestrian. This unit examines the risks associated with road-use and the significant roles that police play…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate units

This unit examines complex social problems underlying interpersonal violence and the social, psychological and physical risks posed to individuals, groups and the community by this form of behaviour. The management of these risks concerning such matters as family violence, sexual…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the complex social problems concerning property loss, damage and misappropriation through theft, residential and business burglary, fraud and e-crime, arson and unlawful fire-setting and the significant social, psychological and physical risks posed to individuals, groups and the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Compulsory student electives

This unit explores two important aspects of policing related to investigations - (i) custody and dentention and (ii) coronial investigation. In regard to coronial investigation, the unit provides knowledge and skills in the roles police play in assisting the coroner…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the concepts, principles and practices of effective communication with focus on oral intervention tactics to de-escalate and resolve conflictual situations in a variety of contexts. It provides direct practice skills in negotiation and conflict management techniques appropriate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores investigative techniques used to identify, understand, manage and record social behaviour in a number of specific areas and settings relevant to policing practice. Investigative, evidence-based interviewing and conversation management techniques will be studied to develop core professional…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides knowledge and direct practice of operational conflict management strategies and defensive and restraining tactics used in police interventions to de-escalate and resolve conflictual situations in a variety of contexts. "Use of force" principles and concepts - including…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Conventional Pathway

For all other students who are qualified for entry together with Police members who joined Tasmania Police before 2010.

MAJOR 1 - Compulsory

Year 1
Choose 1 of the following pairs:

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate unit

Examines the roles and functions that the police play as a major agency of governance in society. The structures and strategies of policing are analysed and the relationships between the police, other governmental institutions and the general public are discussed.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose 1 intermediate unit from the following list:

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines major issues concerning contemporary policing practices including such topics as policing diversity, policing public order and dissent, policing illicit drug use, policing domestic violence, and the militarisation of policing. Crime management strategies and forensic practices will also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 3
Compulsory advanced unit

Examines major issues concerning contemporary policing practices, including: the policing of diversity, dissent, illicit drugs and domestic violence; and the militarisation of policing. Crime management strategies and forensic practices will also be examined. Case material will be drawn from Australian,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose 3 advanced units from the following list:

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The aims of the subject are…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to introduce students to the issues and processes associated with working with offenders, particularly those under the authority of corrective services in prison and community corrections. The unit explores issues pertaining directly to how best to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Explores the nature of environmental crime and its social regulation. The unit has three main topical concerns. First, to investigate the nature of environmental crime from the point of view of legal, ecological and justice perspectives, with an emphasis on…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is concerned with international security, primarily from a 'traditional' vantage point (which relates to the study of war, arms control, conflict management and a range of associated 'inter-national' issues). It examines the nexus between theory and practice in…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Offers a systematic study of various forms of `disorder` in the post-Cold War era, with a particular focus on terrorism. States are increasingly confronted with unpredictable, internal and trans-national threats to their security, for example: new and diverse forms of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Public participation has become an important component of contemporary politics and policy making. Globalisation and technology have also introduced new formulations of civic engagement such as 'cyber-participation' and 'hactivism'. This unit critically engages students with theories and debates that surround…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Provides the opportunity for students to undertake study in an approved topic of special interest to them that is not covered in the Police Studies undergraduate program. Unit is taught at advanced, pre-Honours level and is normally restricted to students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit seeks an understanding of the nature of crime, its incidence, explanations for it and society's response to it in its historical, social and political context. Studies cover: the phenomenon of crime, why some forms of conduct are criminalised;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

MAJOR 2 - Choose 1 from the following list:

Year 1
Compulsory introductory unit

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Choose 2 intermediate units from the following list:

This unit examines why and how the state, bureaucracies, markets, interest groups, NGOs, communities and networks are evolving in response to complex public policy problems and general trends in 'governance'. Adopting a case study approach comprising a broad range of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit puts the art of policy making into a political context and introduces students to theoretical tools for policy analysis. It examines the role and influence of values, power, governance, institutions and actors upon decision-making. Students are also introduced…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides a detailed account of the history, evolution and impact of political parties and political leaders across the world. It explores cases and examples from both democratic and authoritarian regimes, highlighting the different ways that political representation can…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideologies focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative and other…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the vitally important role that the media plays in our political system and in our society. Better understanding this relationship, which is often testy, will equip students with the skills to see past the sound-bites and spin,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Year 3
Choose 4 advanced units from the following list:

The unit provides an introduction to social research as practiced in the social sciences, particularly sociology. Students will be introduced to research methods that enable the collection and analysis of data relating to a range of social phenomena. They will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit focuses on late-20th /early 21st Europe, analysing the degree to which pre-modern ideas of Europe continue to permeate its modern, institutional existence. Through introducing students to the rationale behind the establishment of the EU, the euro etc, this…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is concerned with the question of the changing/evolving nature of violence in the international realm. Part one of the unit will trace the emergence of modern thought about violence through theoretical 'traditions' and the writings of Niccolo Machiavelli,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the evolution of Australian foreign policy, Australia's key partnerships and relationships both in its own region and beyond, as well as some of the emerging challenges that must…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Introduces students to the workings of the global political economy by examining its trade, investment, financial, monetary and sustainability dimensions. Examines the global economic governance system, focusing on the World Trade Organization (WTO), bilateral and regional investment treaties, the G8/G20,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines cooperation by states in international relations, focusing on political, economic, security and human rights regimes evident in international organisations, especially the United Nations, the European Community, the OSCE, NATO, ASEAN and APEC. The overall aim of the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The unit focuses on the problems experienced by the world's less and least developed countries. Such countries- in Africa, Asia and Latin America- are struggling to overcome high rates of infant mortality, malnutrition, poverty, illiteracy and environmental degradation in a…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the globalisation of environmental problems, broader governance approaches to global environmental policy, including the links between trade and environment. Students will gain an understanding of issues of international environmental governance, global political economy and ecology. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines why and how the state, bureaucracies, markets, interest groups, NGOs, communities and networks are evolving in response to complex public policy problems and general trends in 'governance'. Adopting a case study approach comprising a broad range of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit puts the art of policy making into a political context and introduces students to theoretical tools for policy analysis. It examines the role and influence of values, power, governance, institutions and actors upon decision-making. Students are also introduced…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit has two central goals. First, it aims to provide students with an introduction to comparative politics. Second, it seeks to provide students with advanced knowledge of electoral politics. The unit consists of three modules: Module one introduces students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the idea of 'sustainability' and the politics, policy and practices that transform the concept into reality on the ground. Divided into three modules, the unit commences with an exploration of the contested nature of sustainability as articulated…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Public participation has become an important component of contemporary politics and policy making. Globalisation and technology have also introduced new formulations of civic engagement such as 'cyber-participation' and 'hactivism'. This unit critically engages students with theories and debates that surround…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Provides students with a broad introduction to the increasingly intimate relationships between media and politics. The unit critically analyses key ideas on the role of the media in politics, including the democratic and propaganda models of media. It examines the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit introduces students to green politics and political parties; and the role of 'greens' in government. It traces in a comparative sense, green ideas, values and politics from grass roots inception, through to green political platforms and the policy…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels. Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to American politics. The unit begins with an overview of United States political history, culture and institutions before focusing on the nature and impact of recent presidencies. It examines key issues which dominate contemporary…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Provides the opportunity for students to undertake study in an approved topic of special interest to them that is not covered by the School at undergraduate level. Unit is taught at advanced, pre-Honours level and is normally restricted to students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSummer school
HobartWinter school
HobartSpring school
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2
LauncestonSummer school
LauncestonWinter school
LauncestonSpring school
Cradle CoastSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 2
Cradle CoastSummer school
Cradle CoastWinter school
Cradle CoastSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the role of women in politics and public decision-making. The unit will specifically address the issues of women as citizens and consumers of policy; women as public officials making and delivering policy; and women as politicians representing…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideologies focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative and other…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines the roles and functions that the police play as a major agency of governance in society. The structures and strategies of policing are analysed and the relationships between the police, other governmental institutions and the general public are discussed.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement as part of their undergraduate studies. Internships vary across programs in the School of Social Sciences but may (for instance) be undertaken in a number of public sector agencies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement as part of their undergraduate studies. Internships vary across programs in the School of Social Sciences but may (for instance) be undertaken in a number of public sector agencies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the vitally important role that the media plays in our political system and in our society. Better understanding this relationship, which is often testy, will equip students with the skills to see past the sound-bites and spin,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Refer to the Discipline website for further information on study options and pathways.

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate units

SAMS is a core unit for students completing a sociology major. It provides students with an understanding of the theoretical models and concepts developed by sociologists to explain the major social transformations of Western industrial democracies from the end of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit provides an introduction to social research as practiced in the social sciences, particularly sociology. Students will be introduced to research methods that enable the collection and analysis of data relating to a range of social phenomena. They will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 3
Choose a total of 4 advanced units from the list(s) below.
Choose 3 minimum - 4 maximum advanced units from the following list:

The unit provides an introduction to social research as practiced in the social sciences, particularly sociology. Students will be introduced to research methods that enable the collection and analysis of data relating to a range of social phenomena. They will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit considers how culture and social structures shape reproduction. We will examine the contested meanings of reproduction, including how individuals plan for and experience reproduction, how social meanings influence biological understandings of reproduction, and social understandings of who should…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Families are often seen in contradictory terms: as a natural unit and one that is in crisis. Family and intimate relationships are at the same time both intensely personal and political social entities. In this unit you will explore the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit will enable students to understand how the creative and cultural industries have dramatically changed how we relate to economic, social, cultural, aesthetic, natural, scientific and technical domains of our lives. While culture grew significantly as an industry and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Focuses on the sociological analysis of contemporary religion and spirituality in Australia and other societies. There is a particular emphasis on the New Age, Paganism, Indigenous religions, and the renewal of formal religion through processes such as fundamentalism and Pentecostalism.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Examines how social issues in contemporary Australia are constructed and interpreted across their social, cultural, political and moral dimensions. The unit examines the role of discourses in the construction of social issues, social groups and social arenas as social problems…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit applies a sociological lens to the terrain of racial and ethnic relations in Australia. It introduces theories of race, ethnicity, Indigeneity and whiteness and applies these to historical and contemporary race relations and the empirical research on Australian…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The body is normally understood as exclusively biological, but it is also subject to competing social forces. For example, our bodies allow us to comprehend the world. It is also the site through which others come to identify and classify…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Teaches students how to conduct qualitative research focusing on techniques of observation, in-depth interviewing and data analysis. The unit has a practical orientation, students will actually engage in interviewing, participant observation, transcription and data analysis during the course. Assignments are…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit enables students to take a specialist elective in an area of sociology not covered in the three streams of the new sociology major. It makes it possible to draw on the knowledge and expertise of the staff group,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Health and illness are culturally salient topics in contemporary Australia. This unit provides a sociological analysis of a number of key issues and debates from the sociology of health and illness. The unit identifies and analyses a range of issues…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to the sociology of nature and provides a solid understanding of human relations with the natural world. The unit covers three broad areas. First, global variations in human relations with the natural world, including cultural, religious and mythic…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Explores the changing patterns of social hierarchy (income, power and status) and exclusion (prejudice and discrimination) within contemporary societies and globally, with a particular focus on Australia. The unit examines theoretical debates on causes and consequences and inequalities, and empirical…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Uses a number of sociological concepts, such as (post)industrial society, democracy, individualism and modernity, as tools for understanding the changing character of Australian society. These tools are used to interpret new developments in such topical areas as class and work,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Choose 0 minimum-1 maximum advanced non-Sociology unit from the following list:

This unit examines the representation of crime in the media and its role as a primary source of information for public discourse about crime, criminality and criminal justice in contemporary society. Students engage with key critical criminology and media and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

MINOR - Choose 1 from the following list:

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

Offers a general survey of Indigenous Australian societies and cultures from the earliest times until the mid-20th century. The unit explores some debates about aspects of Aboriginal social life before the British colonisation-for example, social and political structures, economies, religious…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a detailed introduction to contemporary Aboriginal socio-economic experience across Australia from the final decades of the 20th century. Issues addressed include the extent of Aboriginal disadvantage; the experience of racism; aspects of contemporary Aboriginal cultures; child welfare, health and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Choose 2 intermediate units from the following list:

For students with a demonstrable capacity for independent research who have a specific topic within the field of Aboriginal Studies that they wish to investigate. Entry to the unit is at the discretion of Head of Discipline. Students work closely…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit considers the challenges facing Australia's Aboriginal peoples as they strive for economic viability. It analyses past approaches, current trends and the theories underpinning community development. International experience in community development and how it informs and influences Australian policy…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores concepts and issues relevant to, and the realities of, Indigenous Tourism. It delves into tourism in Australia's and New Zealand's colonial pasts, and also engages with contemporary ventures such as Indigenous dance, eco-tourism, pilgrimage to sacred sites,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit considers Tasmanian Aboriginal societies before European contact through to the end of the twentieth century. Topics explored include pre-contact Tasmanian Aboriginal societies and the contact histories between Tasmanian Aborigines and the French then the British. The impacts of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Statistics consistently show that Aboriginal mortality rates far exceed those of setter-Australians, indeed some 50% of Aboriginal Australians die before they reach the age of 50. This unit explores the reasons for this situation, taking a social determinants approach that…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit will begin with an overview of prehistory and archaeology in a global context, before focusing on the Aboriginal presence in Australia and internal developments until the late eighteenth century. Megafaunal extinctions, land management practices (including the impact of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit focuses on Indigenous warfare across the Australian continent and in comparative contexts such as New Zealand. Its initial emphasis is on Indigenous warfare prior to colonial contact. The complexities of frontier warfare will then be considered, with attention…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides students with an understanding of the roles, functions and status of women in past and present Aboriginal societies from Aboriginal perspectives. It considers the influence of colonisation in shaping both western and Aboriginal perceptions of Indigenous women's…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a comprehensive exploration of Aboriginal art forms, particularly painting. Students develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal creative expression in traditional and contemporary Aboriginal cultures. Apparent changes in Aboriginal creative expression are examined, including those brought about by the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit engages with a broad range of Indigenous life writing, particularly from New South Wales, Tasmania, and Western Australia. Indigenous perspectives on topics as diverse as mission life, inner city ghettoes, the Redfern riot, cross-cultural liaisons, and the Government…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

At its height, the British Empire was the most extensive of all the European empires. In this unit, you will learn about the rise and fall of the Empire, and how it operated across a range of diverse locations around…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Explores ways of knowing and relating to the past, what historians can learn from related disciplines, how historians communicate historical knowledge beyond academe to the wider community, and the way the wider community identifies with history. The unit examines a…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit students investigate the cultural traditions associated with the marine environment in various countries by comparing and contrasting different indigenous world views on marine ecology, marine conservation and marine resource use. Students discuss the concepts of indigenous rights,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Note: The minor must contain one 200 level HAF coded unit and one 200 level cross-listed elective, and the major must contain one 200 level HAF coded unit and one 200 level cross-listed elective plus two 300 level HAF coded units and two 300 level cross-listed electives.
Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

How do assumptions about gender influence our understanding of what it means to be a human being? In this unit we explore a variety of different ways that human beings have been imagined and thought about across time in western…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Gender & World explores the shape(s) and impact(s) of gendered assumptions on human interactions in diverse areas of the world and in different historical periods. This unit focuses on how people have acted and do act on the basis of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Choose 1 intermediate unit from the following list:

In the first half of this unit we will study the work of a thinker who has had a significant influence on contemporary feminist thought. For example, we might focus on the work of Simone de Beauvoir or Hannah Arendt…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit students select a topic in negotiation with the Coordinator of the Gender Studies Program or other relevant Gender Studies staff. Students undertake research, a guided reading program and meet regularly with the relevant staff member.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit will explore feminist contributions to political philosophy, epistemology (the study of knowledge), ethics, and metaphysics (understandings of the nature of reality). We will examine whether and under what circumstances knowledge is gender-neutral, and whether (and when) the sex…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

An examination of the gendered elements within the sacred texts, rituals and practices of the world's major religions, with an emphasis on monotheistic traditions. We will analyse religious claims about the nature of woman and man and about the divine…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

At present different bodies are legally and socially regulated in various ways. This unit assesses those forms of regulation in relation to the goal of justice. It poses the question of how it is possible for us to not merely…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

What does masculinity mean, and why does it exist in so many different forms? In this unit we explore the meaning and manifestations of a variety of different masculinities. We query the cultural expectations regarding masculinity that accompany boyhood, adolescence,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Feminist philosophy, psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology and queer theory have raised stimulating questions about the body. How important are our bodies to our identity? Can I change my gender? Do men and women experience the world differently? Can there be an…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How is gender represented and communicated through television, film, magazines, and other channels in popular culture? This unit explores different conceptions of representation, drawing on film theory, cultural studies, media studies, and contemporary gender theory. We will analyse the ways…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Choose 1 intermediate non-Gender Studies unit from the following list:

In contemporary Western culture, great emphasis is placed on physical appearance as a vehicle for defining who we are. For this reason it has become an important area of investigation by both social theorists and artists.This unit focuses on the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Questions concerning the body and how it is imaged have become central to contemporary discussions about identity. It is a prominent theme in much recent art practice where the body appears not just in the form of visual representations but…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides students with an understanding of the roles, functions and status of women in past and present Aboriginal societies from Aboriginal perspectives. It considers the influence of colonisation in shaping both western and Aboriginal perceptions of Indigenous women's…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The aims of the subject are…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit considers how culture and social structures shape reproduction. We will examine the contested meanings of reproduction, including how individuals plan for and experience reproduction, how social meanings influence biological understandings of reproduction, and social understandings of who should…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Families are often seen in contradictory terms: as a natural unit and one that is in crisis. Family and intimate relationships are at the same time both intensely personal and political social entities. In this unit you will explore the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The body is normally understood as exclusively biological, but it is also subject to competing social forces. For example, our bodies allow us to comprehend the world. It is also the site through which others come to identify and classify…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

China's national minorities occupy eight percent of its total population. Although few in number, they are spread over around 60 percent of China's territory, including some of the largest provinces such as Xinjiang, Tibet and Inner Mongolia. This unit is…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit aims to deconstruct the monolithic perception of Japanese culture and to understand Japan in terms of its relationship with its near and more distant neighbours throughout Asia and the Pacific. Incorporating the approach of queer studies, which places…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Today it is not uncommon for people to consider themselves 'global citizens' - all of us residents in a global village, all of us increasingly connected. What are our opportunities and responsibilities as global citizens? How can any of us…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Feminist philosophy, psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology and queer theory have raised stimulating questions about the body. How important are our bodies to our identity? Can I change my gender? Do men and women experience the world differently? Can there be an…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Public participation has become an important component of contemporary politics and policy making. Globalisation and technology have also introduced new formulations of civic engagement such as 'cyber-participation' and 'hactivism'. This unit critically engages students with theories and debates that surround…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the role of women in politics and public decision-making. The unit will specifically address the issues of women as citizens and consumers of policy; women as public officials making and delivering policy; and women as politicians representing…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is a study of the role of myth in Greek and Roman culture through literary texts and ancient art, including an exploration of the relationship between mythological narratives and religious ritual. This unit also traces developments in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Explores Greek and Roman conceptions of gender and sexuality in the most popular and least prestigious of ancient literary forms, prose fiction. Central to most of these novels is an erotic relationship tested by a series of remarkable adventures which…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Covers Classical Greek History from the period of Greek expansion in the Mediterranean in the 6th century BC until the Battle of Leuctra in 371, which saw a dramatic shift in the destiny of the ancient Greek city-state. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How can an understanding of history enhance our understanding of gender? How can an understanding of gender enhance our understanding of history? This unit investigates gender and society in a variety of historical contexts, including: classical Greece and Rome; medieval…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

This unit explores the political, social, cultural and economic history of Europe between c.1660 and 1815. Europe's 'long eighteenth century' was a crucial period in shaping both modern Europe and the world. The unit explores both western and eastern Europe,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the dramatic changes in world history from 1500 to 1900. It examines how rising population levels, technological change, trade and warfare shaped the modern world. The unit employs a series of case studies to examine the impact…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Choose a total of 2 intermediate units from below.
Choose 1 minimum to 2 maximum intermediate unit(s) from the following list:

Examines the history of the Australian people and culture from early European settlement to the federation of the colonies and the making of a nation. Explores the interaction between Imperial policy, Indigenous resistance and the political ideals and personal ambitions…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines patterns of change and continuity, and conflict and consensus in Australia from federation to 2001. Topics include nation building to 1914; the first world war, progressivism in the 1920s; Australia and the world depression in the 1930s; the second…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

A political, social and economic study of Europe in the era of the Cold War, from the end of the Second World War to the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. Topics include: post-war reconstruction and the Marshall Plan;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

From the First World War to the fall of Nazi Germany in 1945, this unit explores European history in the tumultuous period 1914-1945. This was an age convulsed by total war, nationalism, revolution, totalitarianism, political violence and genocide. Democracy increasingly…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores European and American experiences of war in the twentieth century. Students are introduced to New Military History and encouraged to critically engage with how war has been experienced, represented, remembered, imagined and commemorated by participants, the public,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Pick up the story in 1000 when the Vikings have given a kick-start to Europe's economy and the warrior mentality of the early Middle Ages is giving way to the rising aristocrats. From this starting-point, the unit will examine the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the way expanding scientific knowledge influenced the development of modern attitudes toward religion, magic, education, race, gender, 'progress', the natural environment, and the origin of life. The unit focuses on the way people grappled with changing ideas…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examining the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries, this unit focuses on the Renaissance and the Reformation, two separate yet related historical periods (and historical constructs) which represent a major break between medieval and modern Europe. The unit examines the remarkable dynamism…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The late eighteenth century saw the beginning of revolutionary political, economic and cultural change that marked the emergence of modern nation states and cultures. France was site of the first modern political and social revolution, and came to dominate Europe…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Spanning more than 500 years, from the Middle Ages to the present, this unit will explore the financial and economic history of the Western world and seek to explain the processes of economic growth and its impact on ordinary people.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the creation of the United States of America by focusing on two significant conflicts. We begin by studying the origins and outcomes of the eighteenth century American War of Independence - an event that was both a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Explores the interaction between human beings and the natural environment in Australian history. The unit first examines the Aboriginal relationship to the flora and fauna of the continent and then reviews the impact of European settlement on the land and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines Australia's historical and political connections within the Pacific world. Taking an 'oceans connect' approach to world history the unit considers Australia within the dynamic regional spheres of the southwestern Pacific and trans-Tasman worlds, as well as the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The personal dramas and political machinations of the Tudor and Stuart dynasties bulk large in popular histories and historical fiction. Yet, while they are interesting and important, there is much more to this period than the doings of kings and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Between the 4th and 15th centuries AD medieval Europe saw great variety in religious practices: hermits living in the desert and forests, popes in Rome, monks and nuns in monasteries, new religious orders such as the Knights Templar and mendicants,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit we witness the birth of the Middle Ages, paying attention to the interactions between Barbarian warrior culture, Roman culture, and Christian culture. We examine the Franks, Anglo-Saxons, Huns, Vandals, Goths, Vikings, and other medieval peoples. Barbarians moved…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Europe 1815-1914 provides an introduction to major developments and themes in European history from the end of the Napoleonic Empire to the beginning of World War 1. Students will become familiar with the inter-relationships between the major European nations (France,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How can an understanding of history enhance our understanding of gender? How can an understanding of gender enhance our understanding of history? This unit investigates gender and society in a variety of historical contexts, including: classical Greece and Rome; medieval…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Choose 0 minimum to 1 maximum intermediate non-History unit from the following list:

This unit considers Tasmanian Aboriginal societies before European contact through to the end of the twentieth century. Topics explored include pre-contact Tasmanian Aboriginal societies and the contact histories between Tasmanian Aborigines and the French then the British. The impacts of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will begin with an overview of prehistory and archaeology in a global context, before focusing on the Aboriginal presence in Australia and internal developments until the late eighteenth century. Megafaunal extinctions, land management practices (including the impact of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit focuses on Indigenous warfare across the Australian continent and in comparative contexts such as New Zealand. Its initial emphasis is on Indigenous warfare prior to colonial contact. The complexities of frontier warfare will then be considered, with attention…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

At its height, the British Empire was the most extensive of all the European empires. In this unit, you will learn about the rise and fall of the Empire, and how it operated across a range of diverse locations around…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Explores ways of knowing and relating to the past, what historians can learn from related disciplines, how historians communicate historical knowledge beyond academe to the wider community, and the way the wider community identifies with history. The unit examines a…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit focuses on late-20th /early 21 st Europe, analysing the degree to which pre-modern ideas of Europe continue to permeate its modern, institutional existence. Through introducing students to the rationale behind the establishment of the EU, the euro etc,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This course will involve students participating in a highly structured role-play game that focuses on India on the Eve of its independence. We will begin by thinking about what empire is. We will briefly trace the establishment and scope of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Concentrates on the rise of Macedon and its expansion under King Philip II and his son Alexander the Great. The unit examines the means employed to acquire and maintain empire and gives special attention to the life and conquests of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Covers the Roman Republic from the period of Roman expansion in the Mediterranean to the end of the civil wars. The unit will concentrate on the political and social structures underlying this process, with particular emphasis on the Roman aristocracy,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines the institutions, organisation and society of the Roman Empire during the first century AD to the middle of the second century. The approach to the period will be primarily through literary sources in translation, as well as archaeological, numismatic…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Analyses the archaeological material of central Roman Italy. The chief theme of the course is the evolution of urbanised culture through the extant archaeological evidence in the urban centres of Rome, Pompeii, Ostia and their suburban hinterlands. The impact of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the society of the ancient Celts in Britain during the first century BC until the 4th Century AD. This encompasses the upheaval that occurred with the onset of the Roman invasion and how this affected the social…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Covers Classical Greek History from the period of Greek expansion in the Mediterranean in the 6th century BC until the Battle of Leuctra in 371, which saw a dramatic shift in the destiny of the ancient Greek city-state. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

This unit provides students with an introduction to management concepts, functions and strategies. The unit outlines the key functions of management and then explores the context surrounding management functioning, including an analysis of the broad environment in which organisations operate,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the role and function of human resource management. Topics include the procurement, development, compensation, integration, and maintenance of human resources. It also considers the range of abilities and skills needed for dealing with change in the area…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
HobartSpring school (extended)
LauncestonSemester 2
Hong Kong Universal EdSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate units

This unit provides an introduction to the management of human behaviour in organisational settings. Topics include individual differences, perception, attitudes, and motivation and their relationship to performance. It also considers topics such as teams and groups, leadership, power and politics,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Hong Kong Universal EdSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit of study builds on foundational concepts introduced in Managing People at Work. You will be introduced to a range of theoretical perspectives that have influenced the development of the Human Resource Management (HRM) and Industrial Relations (IR)…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

This unit will raise students' awareness of the social impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems on society at global, local and personal levels. Students will gain an appreciation of the massive and positive impact that ICT has had…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with an introduction to management concepts, functions and strategies. The unit outlines the key functions of management and then explores the context surrounding management functioning, including an analysis of the broad environment in which organisations operate,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate unit

This online unit focuses on the information needs of organisations, groups and individuals, and the ways in which ICT-based systems support them. The unit provides both a theoretical and a practical understanding of methods for evaluating the structure, policies, operations…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose 1 intermediate unit from the following list:

This unit provides both a theoretical and practical overview of project management as it relates to technology-oriented projects. Specifically, this unit will introduce project management principles, techniques and tools that can be used to guide traditional business-oriented ICT projects, as…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartIntensive Session Feb A
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonIntensive Session Feb A

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit discusses social, legal and ethical aspects of the computing industry and exposes students to existing standards of professional behavior. It also covers the principles, techniques and tools of project management and focuses on the aspects of software documentation…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

To give students a "feel" for the study of the law. This includes understanding approaches to legal problems and issues, classification of various areas of the law, skills that need to be developed to study law, the scope and dynamics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
Hobart5 Week Session Nov
HobartIntensive Session Jun
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introductory overview of the interplay between the various legal systems which impact on our contemporary Australian legal regime. Specifically, the unit will consider the Aboriginal legal system (before and after white settlement), the reception and application…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate units

Criminal law is a necessary cornerstone of a law student's legal education because there are few areas of law that do not incorporate criminal offences as one of the arms of regulation of conduct. Criminal Law A provides an introduction…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on Criminal Law A. It continues the study of general principles of the criminal law. The following crimes are studied in some depth: homicide, drug offences, serious driving offences and property offences. As with Criminal Law A,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 1

Philosophy 1: Ethics introduces many of the major topics in ethics and political philosophy, and through an examination of past and current texts gives students a philosophical perspective on the contemporary social world. The unit explores foundational questions about ethics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Philosophy 2: Mind and Metaphysics explores key philosophical questions about human identity and our place in nature. Through an examination of historical and contemporary philosophical texts, from Western and Eastern traditions, the unit explores the nature of persons and the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Choose a total of 2 intermediate units from below.

We are all constantly faced with moral questions, but what are the foundations of morality? On what grounds do we, should we, base our moral decisions? What is it that makes some actions right and others wrong? What is moral…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit surveys the main Western philosophical traditions from the Renaissance up to the 19th century. At the centre stand the metaphysical and epistemological systems of the Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz) and the Empiricists (Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume),…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Logic is the theory of good reasoning. This unit introduces students to some of the types of reasoning that are regularly used in every day life, in philosophy and in many other fields. Students will be introduced to a variety…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In the first half of this unit we will study the work of a thinker who has had a significant influence on contemporary feminist thought. For example, we might focus on the work of Simone de Beauvoir or Hannah Arendt…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will explore feminist contributions to political philosophy, epistemology (the study of knowledge), ethics, and metaphysics (understandings of the nature of reality). We will examine whether and under what circumstances knowledge is gender-neutral, and whether (and when) the sex…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to the principal traditions of Buddhist philosophy. The unit begins with an examination of the discourses of the Buddha in the Pali tradition and an examination of the common core of all Buddhist philosophical schools. It then studies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is intended as an introduction into a select group of central topics in Indian philosophy. Questions of a very general kind, such as: What is reality? How do we know what we know? Can we trust our judgement…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is an introduction to political philosophy. Students will study influential political ideologies, including liberalism, libertarianism, communitarianism, feminism, and Marxism. They will engage with debates about the nature of political values, such as freedom, justice, equality, and democracy. These…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Sometimes philosophy can seem overly theoretical, and irrelevant to the concerns of non-philosophers. In recent decades, however, philosophy has undergone an "applied turn". Applied philosophers address the practical questions about individual conduct and public policy raised by contemporary social and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Science is our most successful attempt to understand the world around us, and it plays an extremely important role in contemporary society. As such, we should not ignore the possibility that science may have something to contribute to traditional philosophical…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit surveys the writings of the philosophers who stand at the origin of the Western philosophical tradition. This will include works by the philosophers of the Classical period (the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle), as well as the schools of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Continental philosophy encompasses a wide range of philosophical schools, including Existentialism, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Deconstruction, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thought, all of which have shaped our understanding of the human condition, not only in philosophy proper, but also in art, literature,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Metaphysics and epistemology are two, intimately related, core areas of philosophy. This unit introduces students to contemporary debates about both, and about the relation between our views on reality and what we can know about that reality. The metaphysical issues…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The philosophy of mind considers the nature of the mind and its relationship to the body, and the interrelations between our first personal perspective on the world and the picture of the mind developed in the emerging cognitive sciences. This…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 1
Compulsory introductory units

This unit provides an introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include the historical context of psychology, research design, lifespan development, and abnormal psychology. Students are required to undertake independent reading to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a further introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include research methods, intelligence, social psychology and cross-cultural psychology. Students are required to undertake additional reading to extend their knowledge…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Year 2
Compulsory intermediate units

This unit introduces students to experimental design, methodology, and data analysis in psychological research. Lectures will present students with a systematic overview of major principles and issues of the scientific method, research design and methodology and hypothesis testing to facilitate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The lectures examine aspects of overt social behaviour, such as two-person encounters, behaviour in small and large groups, and intergroup relations. Research in social cognition, which studies people's perceptions and interpretations of the social world, will also be presented. Lecture…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The degree provides a sound academic base for those considering careers in policing. For serving police officers, the acquisition of tertiary qualifications is clearly becoming advantageous for career advancement.

Applicants are expected to meet the normal requirements set by the University for entry to degree courses. These include several categories of special admission. Entry to the course occurs normally in February, and there may be limited entry in July.

In-Service pathway: Applicants must be employed as a Tasmania Police Recruit/Serving Police Officer.

Conventional pathway: For Police Officers who joined Tasmania Police before 2010 and for all other applicants who are qualified for entry under the University Rules of Admission.

Credit Transfer and Articulation

Tasmania Police Sergeants Course graduates are eligible to receive 12.5% credit at level 200 or level 300 towards the degree for studies completed since 1998. Tasmania Police Inspectors Course graduates are eligible to receive 25% credit at level 200 or level 300 towards the degree for studies completed since 1998 and before 2012.

A student who has completed or partly completed another degree from this University or another approved institution can apply for credit for their previous study towards the BSocSc(PoliceStudies) degree.

Fees

Fees for domestic students are based on individual unit selections. Please refer to the fees section of each unit description to work out an indicative annual cost.

International students should refer to the International Students course fees page to get an indicative course cost.

Scholarships

For information on general scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.