Bachelor of Economics and Bachelor of Laws (63D)

Overview  2018

ATAR

ATAR Clearly-In Rank

Clearly-in Rank

The Clearly-in Rank is the lowest score at which students were granted entry in the first offer round in 2015.

The Clearly-in rank should be used as a guide for entry. Note: entry to some courses requires a combination of criteria (ie. folio, interview, GMAT) not just ATAR alone.

:
See entry requirements & prerequisites

Duration

Part time only
Minimum 5 Years, up to a maximum of 11 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

  What is an ATAR
  Course rules
  Australian Qualification Framework level: 7

This course may not be available to international students. Please see the list of distance courses (i.e. online and taken outside Australia) that are offered to international students

This course is in teach-out, and will not be accepting new entrants after 2012. Please see new course 63K1 Bachelor of Economics-Bachelor of Laws.

This on-campus 5-year full-time course is offered by the Faculty of Business and the Faculty of Law and is available at Hobart. The first year only is also offered at the Launceston and Cradle Coast campus. This course may be studied part-time.

The objectives of the combined degree courses are those of the component degrees. Reference should be made to the Bachelor of Economics and Bachelor of Laws course entries.

Career outcomes

Graduates of combined degrees could expect to find open to them all the career paths that are open to graduates of the component degree courses.

Course structure

The Politics and Policy major teaches students to understand and analyse political, social, economic and organisational processes that shape politics, governance, public policy and public affairs. It aims to produce graduates who are informed and active citizens equipped to undertake varied roles in government agencies, political parties, non-governmental organisations and the private sector as researchers, policy analysts, activists, advisers and elected representatives. In doing so, the major develops students’ understanding of the contemporary political, policy, economic, social and environmental challenges faced by governments and how local, national and global institutions may respond to complex governance problems in an era of globalisation and change.

The major develops students’ understanding of the discipline though units on sub-fields including Australian and comparative politics, political ideas, governance and public policy, and environmental politics. In its teaching and assessment practices, it draws on case studies of local, national, regional and international political and policy issues to allow students to connect and critically analyse political science scholarship with respect to real word issues and events. Further, the program offers students the opportunity to undertake an internship unit with the Tasmanian Public Service or Tasmanian member of parliament (subject to student performance and available places). The Politics and Policy major program thus provides students with knowledge of the complex world of politics, governance and public affairs involving ideas, values, beliefs, interests and array of institutions with a focus on the role of governments and how they operate. Politics and Policy students are thus equipped with essential skills in research, reasoned argument, and in written and verbal communication.

Complete the following Introductory level unit (12.5cp)

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose one of the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

This unit aims to teach the fundamentals of good reasoning. You will learn how to construct, analyse, and critically evaluate arguments; how to identify and avoid common errors in reasoning; how to think logically and well; and how to communicate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consider yourself an ethical individual? Think you understand what is meant by social responsibility? We all know that ethical and value driven leaders are required in society and what this unit will do is challenge your current thinking and ask…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

We live in a world of sciences. From the pure physics of string theory to the applied sociology of interventions, from the study of nanoparticles to broadband strategies. Science, in its various forms, plays an important role in how we…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideologies focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative and other…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit examines why and how the state, bureaucracies, markets, interest groups, NGOs, communities and networks are evolving in response to complex public policy problems and general trends in 'governance'. Students will be introduced to theoretical lenses and models for…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit has two central goals. First, it aims to provide students with an introduction to comparative politics. Second, it seeks to provide students with advanced knowledge of politics in contrasting parts of the world. The unit consists of three…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit takes an environmental justice perspective in introducing students to the dynamics that shape contemporary environmental policy (including green politics) with broad appeal to students of politics and policy, justice studies, environmental studies and science. The roles of politics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Public participation has become an important component of contemporary politics and policy making. Globalisation and technology have also introduced new formulations of civic engagement such as 'cyber-participation' and 'hactivism'. This unit critically engages students with theories and debates that surround…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels. Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to American politics. The unit begins with an overview of United States political history, culture and institutions before focusing on the nature and impact of recent presidencies. It examines key issues which dominate contemporary…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement as part of their undergraduate studies. Internships vary across programs in the School of Social Sciences but may (for instance) be undertaken in a number of public sector agencies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement in the Parliament as part of their undergraduate studies. Students interested in an internship should contact the relevant course coordinator for details about which opportunities may be available in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociology is the study of human societies, focusing on the organisation of social life from individuals to social institutions. It examines people and other actors in their social contexts, and provides insights into the ways factors such as class, wealth, race, gender, ethnicity, age, sexuality, disability, and religion shape societies at the individual, group, and institutional levels. Central to the sociological endeavour is a critical perspective: sociologists question the popular explanations of social life, through the application of rigorous and systematic methods of enquiry, and examine the dynamics of power and inequality.

Sociology graduates are expected to exhibit an understanding of sociology as an academic discipline. Sociology includes a great diversity of areas of specialisation, objects of study, research methods and theoretical approaches. Sociological knowledge is often contested, provisional, and situated.

As a discipline, Sociology is characterised by empirically based social research and by carefully examined social theory. Sociology students develop skills in critical thinking, self-direction, collaboration and communication. Graduates of sociology programs are well equipped to go into a variety of careers across a range of government and non-government sectors, particularly those that require high level research and critical thinking skills

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

SAMS is a core unit for students completing a sociology major. It provides students with an understanding of the theoretical models and concepts developed by sociologists to explain the major social transformations of Western industrial democracies from the end of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The body is normally understood as exclusively biological, but it is also subject to competing social forces. For example, our bodies allow us to comprehend the world. It is also the site through which others come to identify and classify…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary study of social justice. The unit draws on social sciences concepts and theories as well as a number of case studies from Australia and abroad to explore the forms of marginalization,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit builds upon research strategies introduced in XBR212 Interdisciplinary Social Research. Students will develop social research skills in major qualitative and quantitative methods in the social sciences. Qualitative and quantitative research design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will enable students to understand how tourism and cultural industries have dramatically changed our lives. Cultural industries have grown significantly, with examples such as museums, regional festivals and wilderness adventures. At the same time, there is an increasing…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The social diversity that is increasingly a part of Australian society includes new religious groups and new immigrant groups, as they interact with established ethnic and religious groups, and Indigenous peoples. Social processes and sociologically informed social policy are key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to sociological theory and empirical research about a range of health and illness issues. These include the social distribution and patterning of health and illness, inequalities in health, expert and public knowledge about health and illness,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Uses a number of sociological concepts, such as (post)industrial society, democracy, individualism and modernity, as tools for understanding the changing character of Australian society. These tools are used to interpret new developments in such topical areas as class and work,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart5 Week Session Nov

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The aims of the subject are…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Criminology is the study of crime, criminality and criminal justice systems, focussing on criminalisation as a process, the causes of crime, the social context of offending, crime prevention, systems of social control, and the punishment and rehabilitation of offenders. Criminologists critically analyse the policies, practices, systems, cultures and relationships between key stakeholders (from an individual level to a societal level) to improve understanding, advance the evidence base, and develop new initiatives and agendas for change. Criminology involves study and intervention at local, national, regional and international levels, and engagement in issues of local through to global importance (e.g., assault, terrorism, eco-crime, human trafficking, cybercrime).

Criminology is not a discipline but a field, incorporating disciplinary expertise from areas such as sociology, psychology, law, history, politics, social work, philosophy and Indigenous studies. Its foundational disciplines are sociology and law, and criminology programmes are usually based in either a Law School or School of Sociology.

The Criminology Programme is mainly designed to cater to students and researchers who have an interest in pursuing a study programme that offers a grounded understanding and practical experience of criminology as an academic field. It is also intended to provide a platform for the professional development of practitioners working directly in the area of criminal justice and in allied fields (such as juvenile justice, youth and community work, crime prevention projects, social work, prisoner support, victim services and local government).

The Programme as a whole will enhance student academic and professional skills, provide opportunities for careers in criminal justice and enhance movement through career pathways, and be relevant to the professional needs of those working in the fields of criminology and criminal justice. It will equip them with the skills and knowledge to eventually lead to more senior managerial, policy development or research positions.

Complete one of the following Introductory level unit pairs (25cp)

This unit provides an introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include the historical context of psychology, research design, lifespan development, and abnormal psychology. Students are required to undertake independent reading to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a further introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include research methods, intelligence, social psychology and cross-cultural psychology. Students are required to undertake additional reading to extend their knowledge…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

AND Choose one of the following Introductory level units

This unit aims to teach the fundamentals of good reasoning. You will learn how to construct, analyse, and critically evaluate arguments; how to identify and avoid common errors in reasoning; how to think logically and well; and how to communicate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consider yourself an ethical individual? Think you understand what is meant by social responsibility? We all know that ethical and value driven leaders are required in society and what this unit will do is challenge your current thinking and ask…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

To give students a "feel" for the study of the law. This includes understanding approaches to legal problems and issues, classification of various areas of the law, skills that need to be developed to study law, the scope and dynamics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
Hobart5 Week Session Nov
HobartIntensive Session Jun
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introductory overview of the interplay between the various legal systems which impact on our contemporary Australian legal regime. Specifically, the unit will consider the Aboriginal legal system (before and after white settlement), the reception and application…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
Launceston8 Week Session Jul
Cradle CoastIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

This unit provides an introduction to major theoretical areas in cognitive and biological psychology, and associated practical applications. Topics include biological psychology, sensation, perception and memory, language, thinking and reasoning, motivation and emotion, and states of consciousness. In practical exercises,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to how theory and research in psychology can be applied to provide insight into human behaviour in a wide range of settings. Topics covered range from extreme sport to online behaviour, behaviour in organisations and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

This unit provides students with an understanding of the the complex contexts of diversity that can inform policing practice in productive and unproductive ways. This unit follows on from HSP1XX Introduction to Policing. It provides knowledge around contemporary ways…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following Intermediate level units (37.5cp)

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

AND choose one of the following Intermediate level units (12.5cp)

This unit provides a critical introduction to the philosophies, principles and practices of juvenile justice and child protection. The interface between juvenile justice and child protection is well established, institutionally, historically and in terms of shared clients, and an informed…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the emerging field of 'forensic studies'. While forensic science usually refers to technical and vocational expertise, forensic studies explores the 'forensic sciences' as a social phenomenon. The main emphasis of forensic studies is on…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary study of social justice. The unit draws on social sciences concepts and theories as well as a number of case studies from Australia and abroad to explore the forms of marginalization,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The aims of the subject are…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides an introduction to the newly emerging area of forensic criminology through an examination of the field of forensic investigation. The unit covers topics such as crime scene investigation, forensic science, e-forensics and cybercrime, forensic interventions in social…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores the theory, methods, practical applications and analysis of particular crime and criminal justice topics in specific areas of concern. It is designed to provide an opportunity to examine diverse subject matter by drawing upon the specialist expertise…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is designed to introduce students to the issues and processes associated with working with offenders, particularly those under the authority of corrective services in prison and community corrections. The unit explores issues pertaining directly to how best to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Explores the nature of environmental crime and its social regulation. The unit has three main topical concerns. First, to investigate the nature of environmental crime from the point of view of legal, ecological and justice perspectives, with an emphasis on…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The aim of this unit is to give students an introduction to understanding different forms of violence against women. Students will examine the social and political underpinnings of violence against women in society, with particular attention to their gendered and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the representation of crime in the media and its role as a primary source of information for public discourse about crime, criminality and criminal justice in contemporary society. Students engage with key critical criminology and media and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

A major or minor in Geography and Environment  enables students to develop interdisciplinary knowledge and skills relevant to the study of people-environment interactions. It also affords opportunities to develop specialist expertise across the physical, spatial and social sciences in the discipline of geography. Program content builds sequentially over the three years of the major and is informed by international, national and local research. Program teaching emphasises student-led, problem- based and field-based learning. The structure of the program provides a variety of enrolment pathways and learning experiences that prepare students for a diverse range of careers in such areas as environmental management, sustainability planning and policy, community development and nature conservation.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This introduction to geography and environmental studies integrates physical and social science inquiry. You study earth evolution, human development and their interaction, in light of questions about sustainability. You apply this knowledge to issues of vital importance around the world…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This foundation unit in Geography and Environmental Studies develops your knowledge of the ways in which people turn space into place, of how patterns of landforms, soils, plants and animals form on the surface of the earth, and how cultures,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Australia's accelerating engagement with Asia requires a capacity to understand our northern neighbours, empathise with them, and relate to and work with them.In this unit you will have opportunities to understand the nature of the physical environment of selected parts…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The physical and living aspects of the global environment interact to produce the extraordinary variety of landscapes, environments and species that occupy this planet. This unit highlights the interplay and conservation of these processes so that they continue to maintain…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Do you want to acquire the tools to better understand and transform the different, overlapping worlds we each inhabit individually and collectively? In this unit, you will explore the empirical concerns and disciplinary approaches of Human Geography as you analyse…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Effective management of the natural environment is one of the most important challenges of our time. This field-based unit develops the abilities to describe and assess the conservation status of natural terrestrial ecosystems. Through field data collection, lectures, and a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (late)
LauncestonSpring school (late)
Cradle CoastSpring school (late)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Society needs professional environmental managers who have the knowledge and skills to effectively tackle problems of sustainable resource use and biodiversity conservation. Environmental managers also play an important role in helping communities identify and move towards sustainable and just futures.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit comprises a one-semester geographical or environmental research project. It provides students with research experience in a study topic or area of their own choosing. Project design, data collection, data management and research presentation skills will be developed. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Political ecology is a diverse field of scholarship, activism and professional practice that brings together the goals of social justice and environmental sustainability. Analysing nature and society as one system, you will explore concerns about the scarcity, distribution, control and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Over six hundred million people live on the world's 43 island nation-states and on hundreds of sub-national island jurisdictions. The 'island-continent' of Australia comprises over 12,000 islands, islets and rocky outcrops, while the island-State of Tasmania is an archipelago of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Climate change is an immensely complex social and environmental problem with implications for knowledge creation, policy development, professional practice, technological advance and everyday life. This unit will help you to interpret and integrate a wide range of disciplinary perspectives and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartWinter school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human induced climate change is arguably the most serious problem currently facing our planet. Detection and attribution of human induced climate change requires an understanding of the mechanisms of natural climate variability as well as climate change. Earth's climate is…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Change occurs in modern landforms and sediments by means of landslides, river bank erosion, and coastal loss with sea level rise, and this unit focuses on understanding such change. Fieldtrips will visit real current situations, and you will learn field…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Conservation of geological features and landscapes is a global priority. This unit considers strategies to sample, understand, and address geoconservation issues. By way of a series of field-based and problem-based learning experiences, the following skills and knowledge will be developed…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

A unit essential for those working towards a career managing natural environments and people in protected areas. For those with other vocational interests, the unit is a way to learn about natural ecosystems and the principles of conservation management. Fire,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The conservation of nature needs to occur at the landscape scale as well as within protected areas. Landscapes can be wilderness areas, rural areas with highly varied land use or urban areas. Whatever their type, there are landscape processes, both…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit introduces students to the concept of place using the perspective of phenomenology. Because phenomenology promotes the particular over the generalized, and the insights of subjective experience over claims of objectivity, much recourse is made to the creative engagements…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides an introduction to legal, administrative, social and scientific aspects of environmental impact assessment, environmental auditing, environmental management systems and related environmental management tools. The unit emphasises the practical aspects of environmental management for Tasmanian, Australian and international…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
If you choose the Geography & Environment Major, 25 cp of your Experience and Engagement units must be undertaken at intermediate level (200). 

History as a discipline walks a line between Humanities and the Social Sciences. History is the study of the past and its interpretation in the present. Historians make sense of the past using evidence from a wide range of sources. Using a range of theories and methodologies, they examine past events, processes and relationships, interpreting their origins, significance, and consequences. Historians accept that their interpretations are always provisional and subject to modifications as future historians ask new questions or revisit old ones, apply new methodologies, and add new interpretations.

The History units selected for the Bachelor of Social Science major all have a ‘real world’ focus, paying attention to priorities in the social sciences, such as national and international social and political issues and public policy.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

From the Italian Renaissance in the late Middle Ages to the rise of European nationalism in the nineteenth century, this unit explores the history of Early Modern Europe – a crucial period in shaping both Europe and the world we…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the dramatic changes in world history from 1500 to 1900. It examines how rising population levels, technological change, trade and warfare shaped the modern world. The unit employs a series of case studies to examine the impact…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose three of the following Intermediate level units (37.5cp)

Examines the history of the Australian people and culture from early European settlement to the federation of the colonies and the making of a nation. Explores the interaction between Imperial policy, Indigenous resistance and the political ideals and personal ambitions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

From the First World War to the fall of Nazi Germany in 1945, this unit explores European history in the tumultuous period 1914-1945. This was an age convulsed by total war, nationalism, revolution, totalitarianism, political violence and genocide. Democracy increasingly…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the creation of the United States of America by focusing on two significant conflicts. We begin by studying the origins and outcomes of the eighteenth century American War of Independence - an event that was both a…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Explores ways of knowing and relating to the past, what historians can learn from related disciplines, how historians communicate historical knowledge beyond academe to the wider community, and the way the wider community identifies with history. The unit examines a…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Choose three of the following Advanced level units (37.5cp)

Examines patterns of change and continuity, and conflict and consensus in Australia from federation to 2001. Topics include nation building to 1914; the first world war, progressivism in the 1920s; Australia and the world depression in the 1930s; the second…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The late eighteenth century saw the beginning of revolutionary political, economic and cultural change that marked the emergence of modern nation states and cultures. France was site of the first modern political and social revolution, and came to dominate Europe…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines Australia's historical and political connections within the Pacific world. Taking an 'oceans connect' approach to world history the unit considers Australia within the dynamic regional spheres of the southwestern Pacific and trans-Tasman worlds, as well as the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Europe 1815-1914 provides an introduction to major developments and themes in European history from the end of the Napoleonic Empire to the beginning of World War 1. Students will become familiar with the inter-relationships between the major European nations (France,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How can an understanding of history enhance our understanding of gender? How can an understanding of gender enhance our understanding of history? This unit investigates gender and society in a variety of historical contexts, including: classical Greece and Rome; medieval…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit provides you with an introduction to management concepts, functions and strategies. The unit outlines the key functions of management and then explores the context surrounding management functioning, including an analysis of the broad environment in which organisations operate,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the role and function of human resource management. Topics include the procurement, development, compensation, integration, and maintenance of human resources. It also considers the range of abilities and skills needed for dealing with change in the area…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
HobartSpring school (extended)
LauncestonSemester 2
Hong Kong Universal EdSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit provides you with an introduction to the management of human behaviour in organisational settings. Topics include individual differences, perception, attitudes, and motivation and their relationship to performance. It also considers topics such as teams and groups, leadership, power…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Hong Kong Universal EdSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit of study builds on foundational concepts introduced in Managing People at Work. You will be introduced to a range of theoretical perspectives that have influenced the development of the Human Resource Management (HRM) and Industrial Relations (IR) disciplines.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following four Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit takes an interdisciplinary perspective to prepare students for understanding, implementing and managing the process of change. The need to manage change is increasingly recognised as a critical success factor for organisations today. This unit provides students with the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The attraction, recruitment, selection, remuneration, performance management and, when necessary, termination of an organisation's human resources are now widely recognised as critical contributors to organisations achieving their objectives. Today's HR professionals are expected to have sound skills in these areas.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The development of an organisation's human resources is now widely recognised as a critical component in gaining competitive advantage in the global marketplace. Developing people's capabilities in diverse contexts is thus a vital role played by HR professionals, and one…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers you an opportunity to pursue advanced study in the discipline of industrial relations (IR). Upon completion of the unit, you will be able to explain the influence of culture in approaches to IR, plan and contribute to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The purpose of the International Relations (IR) major is to provide students with a solid grounding in the core theories, issues and debates in the discipline. This commences in first year with an introduction to key conceptual approaches (incorporating realism, neoliberalism, social constructivism and Marxist approaches). These approaches are then used to evaluate key contemporary issues such as globalisation, changing patterns of power, poverty and dependency, human rights and international justice, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, security and war, and the role of international institutions and regimes.

After completing their first year of study, students have the option of studying themes that encapsulate core sub--‐ disciplinary debates. These include the foreign policies of great powers, international political economy, order and justice in IR, the international politics of the Asia--‐Pacific, and international security. We have deliberately developed these units to provide pathways that allow students to focus either on national security issues or those that are more focused on global justice and rights. High achieving students then finish with a ‘capstone’ unit – HIR311 – with a more intensive theory--‐and--‐research focus.

The intention here is that our students can develop their own specialisation that matches the hiring profiles of agencies and organisations. These include government departments specialising in international affairs (such as DFAT, Defence, ASIO, ASIS, DIO, Immigration and others) as well as the United Nations, human rights and aid NGOs, and businesses working in a competitive global marketplace that frequently hire IR graduates.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit is concerned with the study of ‘security’ in all the breadth that this notion has gained over the past decades. Starting from an analysis of the classical understanding of security which links state sovereignty with warfare we will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

An introduction to the most important themes and issues in the international relations of the China. Students will gain a basic understanding of how the major frameworks of international relations interpret the rise of China as a global power. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit is concerned with the question of the changing/evolving nature of violence in the international realm. Part one of the unit will trace the emergence of modern thought about violence through theoretical 'traditions' and the writings of Niccolo Machiavelli,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit looks at the diverse forms of international, global and transnational cooperation and asks critically how they have developed over time and space. It examines the structures of power and equality/inequality in international relations and how these are reflected…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

AND choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit focuses on late-20th /early 21st Europe, analysing the degree to which pre-modern ideas of Europe continue to permeate its modern, institutional existence. Through introducing students to the rationale behind the establishment of the EU, the euro etc, this…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

IntroductionOffers a systematic study of various forms of `disorder` in the post-Cold War era, with a particular focus on terrorism. States are increasingly confronted with unpredictable, internal and trans-national threats to their security, for example: new and diverse forms of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to the workings of the global political economy by examining its trade, investment, financial, monetary and sustainability dimensions. Examines the global economic governance system, focusing on the World Trade Organization (WTO), bilateral and regional investment treaties, the G8/G20,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The unit examines the theory and practice of ‘sustainable development’ in countries in the ‘Global South’ in Africa, Asia and Latin America. While differing significantly from each other, these countries share a common syndrome, seeking to combat high levels of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is a ‘capstone’ (highly recommended) third year unit for all students undertaking a major in Politics, Policy or International Relations. It surveys the most important theoretical perspectives of these three majors and explores how they can assist us to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels. Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
If you choose the International Relations Major, 25 cp of your Experience and Engagement units must be undertaken at intermediate level (200). 
Choose two of the following Introductory level units (25cp)

We often hear that media industries are in decline. However, as this unit will demonstrate, what we are actually seeing is a profound reshaping of new and old media industries in response to shifts in the media landscape. In this…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces you to the complex and diverse relationships between media texts and audiences. You will engage with key theories in audience studies and explore a range of topics including media effects, citizen journalism, children’s media, and fan cultures.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces you to the theory and practice of media writing. You will learn techniques for news, feature, copy, online, script and media release writing, and will produce a package of practical work showcasing different writing styles. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces you to the principles, practices and theories of public relations and places the profession in its societal and media contexts. You will become familiar with public relations writing and develop skills in gathering, organizing and presenting information.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the music industry at a time of significant change. It considers the ways in which the music industry's focus is no longer on the sale of recorded music to consumers but on the licensing of music for…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides you with skills in news analysis and news writing. You will build your understanding of news by examining the practices and texts of news producers and the broader political, social, economic and organisational dynamics impacting on news;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit examines the representation of crime in the media and its role as a primary source of information for public discourse about crime, criminality and criminal justice in contemporary society. Students engage with key critical criminology and media and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sport is a major driver of media change. New media practices, technologies, platforms, policies and economies have developed to service the multi-billion dollar global sporting industry. Its stars are among our biggest media celebrities; sporting events attract massive advertising dollars;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the storytelling tactics and strategies associated with the design and communication of brand narratives. The unit addresses the ways in which, in the changing media environment, brand narratives are now communicated via social networks and key 'influencers'…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Media industries, companies and organisations have access to more data than ever before. Increasingly, we hear that production is data-driven; formulated for and by algorithms. But what does it truly mean to create and consume content in the era of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the media texts, communication strategies, and media and food industry relationships associated with food media and communications. It will consider media's intensified focus on food from two perspectives—the growth in popular food media (television cooking shows, cookbooks,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Building on first year screen analysis skills, this unit examines video games and virtual worlds from the perspective of text, industry, and audience. You will explore, analyse and discuss topics including: fandom and video game communities; storytelling and innovation in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
If you choose the Journalism, Media and Communications Major, 25 cp of your Experience and Engagement units must be undertaken at intermediate level (200). 

The Politics and Policy major teaches students to understand and analyse political, social, economic and organisational processes that shape politics, governance, public policy and public affairs. It aims to produce graduates who are informed and active citizens equipped to undertake varied roles in government agencies, political parties, non-governmental organisations and the private sector as researchers, policy analysts, activists, advisers and elected representatives. In doing so, the major develops students’ understanding of the contemporary political, policy, economic, social and environmental challenges faced by governments and how local, national and global institutions may respond to complex governance problems in an era of globalisation and change.

The major develops students’ understanding of the discipline though units on sub-fields including Australian and comparative politics, political ideas, governance and public policy, and environmental politics. In its teaching and assessment practices, it draws on case studies of local, national, regional and international political and policy issues to allow students to connect and critically analyse political science scholarship with respect to real word issues and events. Further, the program offers students the opportunity to undertake an internship unit with the Tasmanian Public Service or Tasmanian member of parliament (subject to student performance and available places). The Politics and Policy major program thus provides students with knowledge of the complex world of politics, governance and public affairs involving ideas, values, beliefs, interests and array of institutions with a focus on the role of governments and how they operate. Politics and Policy students are thus equipped with essential skills in research, reasoned argument, and in written and verbal communication.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideologies focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative and other…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit examines why and how the state, bureaucracies, markets, interest groups, NGOs, communities and networks are evolving in response to complex public policy problems and general trends in 'governance'. Students will be introduced to theoretical lenses and models for…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit has two central goals. First, it aims to provide students with an introduction to comparative politics. Second, it seeks to provide students with advanced knowledge of politics in contrasting parts of the world. The unit consists of three…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

AND choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit takes an environmental justice perspective in introducing students to the dynamics that shape contemporary environmental policy (including green politics) with broad appeal to students of politics and policy, justice studies, environmental studies and science. The roles of politics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Public participation has become an important component of contemporary politics and policy making. Globalisation and technology have also introduced new formulations of civic engagement such as 'cyber-participation' and 'hactivism'. This unit critically engages students with theories and debates that surround…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels. Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to American politics. The unit begins with an overview of United States political history, culture and institutions before focusing on the nature and impact of recent presidencies. It examines key issues which dominate contemporary…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement as part of their undergraduate studies. Internships vary across programs in the School of Social Sciences but may (for instance) be undertaken in a number of public sector agencies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement in the Parliament as part of their undergraduate studies. Students interested in an internship should contact the relevant course coordinator for details about which opportunities may be available in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
If you choose the Politics & Policy Major, 25cp of your Experience and Engagement units must be undertaken at intermediate level (200). 
Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit provides an introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include the historical context of psychology, research design, lifespan development, and abnormal psychology. Students are required to undertake independent reading to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a further introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include research methods, intelligence, social psychology and cross-cultural psychology. Students are required to undertake additional reading to extend their knowledge…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces students to experimental design, methodology, and data analysis in psychological research. Lectures will present students with a systematic overview of major principles and issues of the scientific method, research design and methodology and hypothesis testing to facilitate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The lectures examine aspects of overt social behaviour, such as two-person encounters, behaviour in small and large groups, and intergroup relations. Research in social cognition, which studies people's perceptions and interpretations of the social world, will also be presented. Lecture…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following Advanced level unit (12.5cp)

Research methods lectures extend studies in experimental design and analysis to the use of analysis of variance, planned and post hoc comparisons, analysis of interactions, and repeated measures designs. Students are also introduced to regression and trend analysis, two factor…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following three Advanced level units (Hobart based) for the accredited pre-honours sequence

Provides coverage of human development over the lifespan (infancy to old age) including cognitive and social-emotional domains of development. The major periods of development are examined, including infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, emphasising predominant developmental aspects for different periods of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to introduce students to a range of psychiatric disorders including psychological symptoms, theoretical models, assessment and evidence-based treatments. Consideration is given to a range of cognitive-behavioural strategies employed by the clinical psychologist in the treatment of various…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The series of lectures in psychological assessment provides a comprehensive coverage of psychological assessment, with an emphasis on the assessment of adults. The lectures aim to promote an understanding of fundamental concepts in assessment and an awareness of issues in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following three Advanced level units (Launceston based) for the accredited pre-honours sequence

Provides coverage of human development over the lifespan (infancy to old age) including cognitive and social-emotional domains of development. The major periods of development are examined, including infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, emphasising predominant developmental aspects for different periods of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to introduce students to a range of psychiatric disorders including psychological symptoms, theoretical models, assessment and evidence-based treatments. Consideration is given to a range of cognitive-behavioural strategies employed by the clinical psychologist in the treatment of various…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides an advanced coverage of two core areas: individual differences in intelligence and personality, and the assessment of these characteristics and other psychological characteristics such as cognitive style and anxiety. Lectures in psychological assessment focus on the assessment of adults…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

OR choose three of the following Advanced level units for the non-accredited standard pathway

Provides coverage of human development over the lifespan (infancy to old age) including cognitive and social-emotional domains of development. The major periods of development are examined, including infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, emphasising predominant developmental aspects for different periods of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Cognitive neuroscience utilises a range of scientific techniques to examine the link between the neural organisation of the brain and various cognitive functions, such as how we think, feel and act. This unit builds on the intermediate material covered in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to introduce students to a range of psychiatric disorders including psychological symptoms, theoretical models, assessment and evidence-based treatments. Consideration is given to a range of cognitive-behavioural strategies employed by the clinical psychologist in the treatment of various…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will provide an introduction to psychology and law. The progression of lecture topics in this unit will roughly follow the course of an investigation and trial of a criminal case, covering issues such as eyewitness memory; false memories;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the processes underlying skill acquisition and human performance. Skilled performance across many tasks involves the coordinated processes of perception, cognition and action. Of particular interest are the substantial changes in these processes that occur as people gain…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit introduces students to the field of organisational and industrial psychology. This is an applied field that draws on core theories and ideas from psychology and applies them to organisational and work contexts. The unit will be taught…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The series of lectures in psychological assessment provides a comprehensive coverage of psychological assessment, with an emphasis on the assessment of adults. The lectures aim to promote an understanding of fundamental concepts in assessment and an awareness of issues in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students are introduced to the most important and hotly debated issues in the psychology of language. Lecture topics include the distinctive features of human language as a system of communication, current theories of how children acquire language,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This 13-week blended unit provides third year students with an overview of counselling concepts and skills. Students will be introduced to theories of counselling and basic communication skills. Multicultural counselling and an awareness of some of the ethical and professional…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Extreme environments are so named due to the unique challenges they pose to human performance compared to more routine environments. This 13-week online unit provides an introduction to factors influencing human performance in extreme environments including Polar Regions, Outer Space,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Provides an advanced coverage of two core areas: individual differences in intelligence and personality, and the assessment of these characteristics and other psychological characteristics such as cognitive style and anxiety. Lectures in psychological assessment focus on the assessment of adults…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit covers the main areas in contemporary Health Psychology. The unit will focus on health psychology, its origins and history, the contexts within which it can be applied, and the methods used to study it. Health Psychology will be…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Psychological factors are recognised as having an important part to play in the attainment of success in all achievement contexts. Increasingly, there is a demand for health professionals to deliver non-clinical programmes designed to complement and integrate with other health…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
If you choose the Psychology Major, 25cp of your Experience and Engagement units must be undertaken at intermediate level (200). 

Sociology is the study of human societies, focusing on the organisation of social life from individuals to social institutions. It examines people and other actors in their social contexts, and provides insights into the ways factors such as class, wealth, race, gender, ethnicity, age, sexuality, disability, and religion shape societies at the individual, group, and institutional levels. Central to the sociological endeavour is a critical perspective: sociologists question the popular explanations of social life, through the application of rigorous and systematic methods of enquiry, and examine the dynamics of power and inequality.

Sociology graduates are expected to exhibit an understanding of sociology as an academic discipline. Sociology includes a great diversity of areas of specialisation, objects of study, research methods and theoretical approaches. Sociological knowledge is often contested, provisional, and situated.

As a discipline, Sociology is characterised by empirically based social research and by carefully examined social theory. Sociology students develop skills in critical thinking, self-direction, collaboration and communication. Graduates of sociology programs are well equipped to go into a variety of careers across a range of government and non-government sectors, particularly those that require high level research and critical thinking skills

Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

SAMS is a core unit for students completing a sociology major. It provides students with an understanding of the theoretical models and concepts developed by sociologists to explain the major social transformations of Western industrial democracies from the end of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

AND choose two of the following Introductory level units (25cp)

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The body is normally understood as exclusively biological, but it is also subject to competing social forces. For example, our bodies allow us to comprehend the world. It is also the site through which others come to identify and classify…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary study of social justice. The unit draws on social sciences concepts and theories as well as a number of case studies from Australia and abroad to explore the forms of marginalization,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit builds upon research strategies introduced in XBR212 Interdisciplinary Social Research. Students will develop social research skills in major qualitative and quantitative methods in the social sciences. Qualitative and quantitative research design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will enable students to understand how tourism and cultural industries have dramatically changed our lives. Cultural industries have grown significantly, with examples such as museums, regional festivals and wilderness adventures. At the same time, there is an increasing…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The social diversity that is increasingly a part of Australian society includes new religious groups and new immigrant groups, as they interact with established ethnic and religious groups, and Indigenous peoples. Social processes and sociologically informed social policy are key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to sociological theory and empirical research about a range of health and illness issues. These include the social distribution and patterning of health and illness, inequalities in health, expert and public knowledge about health and illness,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Uses a number of sociological concepts, such as (post)industrial society, democracy, individualism and modernity, as tools for understanding the changing character of Australian society. These tools are used to interpret new developments in such topical areas as class and work,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart5 Week Session Nov

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The aims of the subject are…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The Bachelor of Social Science with Honours brings together disciplines that relate to human experience and behaviour, exposure to how contemporary organisations work and an understanding of national and international social and political issues.

The degree core knowledge units you take will establish the attributes, knowledge and skills that are at the centre of Social Science study. You need to complete 5 (five) degree core knowledge units from the list below.

Please note:

 If you intend to take Sociology as a major you must take HGA101 Sociology A and HGA102 Sociology B as two of the three required introductory degree core knowledge units

 If you intend to take Politics and Policy as a major you must take HPP101 Introduction to Politics and Policy as one of the three required introductory degree core knowledge units

Choose three of the following Introductory level units (37.5cp)

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces a sociological perspective on health and illness. The focus will be on how social and cultural processes shape both the distribution of health and illness, and the experience of illness. Health issues such as obesity, smoking, depression,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Examines how social issues in contemporary Australia are constructed and interpreted across their social, cultural, political and moral dimensions. The unit examines the role of discourses in the construction of social issues, social groups and social arenas as social problems…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following units (25cp)

This unit aims to teach the fundamentals of good reasoning. You will learn how to construct, analyse, and critically evaluate arguments; how to identify and avoid common errors in reasoning; how to think logically and well; and how to communicate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consider yourself an ethical individual? Think you understand what is meant by social responsibility? We all know that ethical and value driven leaders are required in society and what this unit will do is challenge your current thinking and ask…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human Rights are fundamental human rights that are inherent in every individual on the basis of humanity. They are underpinned by concepts of human dignity and the essential equality of all people. This breadth unit takes an inter-disciplinary perspective to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart5 Week Session Feb B

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete one additional Experience and Engagement units (12.5cp)

Unit may be chosen from any discipline offering at the University, OR chosen from the list below

Leadership and Service: Developing Skills That Enhance Your Employability will provide you with opportunities to identify and develop your leadership skills through engagement with guided resources, group and individual activities, web and face-to-face workshops and a self-selected volunteering or service…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Contemporary media is saturated with images of extreme weather events, hunger, poverty, conflict, pollution, austerity, and financial crisis. Mounting evidence suggests the 21st century will be defined by unprecedented challenges related to environmental instability, economic inequality and risks to social…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Do you want to make a difference to something in the world you care about? Would you like some time and space to consider, develop and test your approaches in a safe environment, supported by experts? Following Bruce Mau's 'design…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Become better prepared to deal with the variety of culturally challenging situations you will encounter in whichever part of the world you live and work. Develop an appreciation of the personal and professional benefits which come from being more culturally…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Asia and Australia: Bound by Sea takes an innovative approach to exploring connections and engagement between Australia and various places in Asia by focusing on the movement of peoples, materials, technology, resources, ideas and aspirations to demonstrate the sea's ongoing…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Who owns art: the artist, the purchaser or the culture that it represents? How does art reflect our cultural identity? Why is art a priority victim of war, invasion and the black market?Students undertaking this breadth unit will examine art,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

What constitutes evidence, what should we believe, and what should we do, given we only have knowledge that is partial and uncertain? Being able to deal with uncertainty is key not only to the physical and social sciences, but also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of 'Lifeworlds' to frame an exploration of the life worlds of Indigenous peoples globally: across cultural, social being and doing of Indigenous peoples at the local (palawa/pakana)Tasmania, national (Noongar), Western Australia and international (Navajo…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of German. While a key goal of this unit is the acquisition of communication skills in German, the unit centres on the study of the lives, interests…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

English Writing introduces students to, and consolidates their knowledge of, the conventions of English grammar and composition. The unit focuses on fashioning the skills required of an academic writer. The unit covers:* the processes and mechanics of academic writing;* grammar,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit gives students the opportunity to build skills essential to crafting and communicating effective arguments. Every academic discipline and profession values the ability to articulate a clear argument and to support it with logical reasons and persuasive evidence. Achieving…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This second-year unit Working with Communities will give students in a range of professional disciplines the skills to work effectively with diverse communities in their professional practice. The focus is on understanding the concept of 'community', cultural differences among, and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Cradle CoastWinter school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to Big History, with a special focus on Tasmania. Big History is an evolving interdisciplinary field that investigates human history within the historical time scales of geological and biological history. It does so to understand how…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the emerging field of 'forensic studies'. While forensic science usually refers to technical and vocational expertise, forensic studies explores the 'forensic sciences' as a social phenomenon. The main emphasis of forensic studies is on…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is focused around the questions about resilience and how we can apply the concept within emergencies and beyond that to other aspects of life. Currently the frequency and scale of emergencies is increasing, eroding the very resilience we…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit draws on popular culture texts – such as anime and film – and related discourses from the sciences and the ethico/legal field to investigate and question the fundamentals of being human. Ideas from multiple disciplines - humanities,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart5 Week Session Feb A
HobartIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Tasmania has a growing reputation as a gourmet paradise, with high quality primary products and a growing fermented food and drink industry. In this unit, students will learn about the full production life cycle for fermented food and drink, from…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Entry requirements

Students must pass the first year of their BEc degree, including the units LAW121 Introduction to Law and LAW122 Legal Systems, available at Hobart, Launceston and the Cradle Coast Campus, or the academic equivalent.

There is a quota on places in theBachelor of Economics-Bachelor of Laws degree and the assessment of applications will be based on academic merit, taking into consideration previous university studies.

The three methods of entry are:

Direct Entry (for Year 12 leavers only)
To be qualified for University entry with a TER score of 90 or above (limited places available in this entry category); or

Alternative Entry
A first year in another faculty, which includes the units LAW121 Introduction to Law and LAW122 Legal Systems (or the academic equivalent); or

Graduate Entry
An Australian bachelor degree or equivalent.

Fees & scholarships

Domestic students

Fees for Domestic students are based on individual unit selections. Please refer to the fees section of each unit description to work out an indicative annual cost.

Annual Tuition Fee is inclusive of the compulsory Student Services and Amenities (SSA) fee. The SSA fee for 2017 is $294 AUD.

International students

International students should refer to the International Students course fees page to get an indicative course cost.

Scholarships

For information on general scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.

How can we help?

Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

Domestic
1300 363 864
International
+61 3 8676 7017
Email
Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online
Online enquiries

Next steps