Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours (A4I)

Overview  2019

ATAR

No Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Achievement of a specified ATAR will guarantee acceptance into a course or institution, subject to any non-ATAR criteria being met, such as a prerequisite study or English language proficiency.

:
See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 5 Years, up to a maximum of 11 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

ATAR

No Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Achievement of a specified ATAR will guarantee acceptance into a course or institution, subject to any non-ATAR criteria being met, such as a prerequisite study or English language proficiency.

:
See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 5 Years
Entry requirements

Location

This is a 5-year full-time degree course, offered on the Hobart campus only, which may also be studied part time.

These course rules and specifications apply to students commencing the course in 2018. For students who commenced prior to 2018, please refer to Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts (13I).

See course objectives for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts degree courses.

Upon completion of the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours (AQF Level 8) graduates will be able to:

  1. Acquire, consolidate, critically evaluate, reflect and synthesise advanced knowledge in one of the humanities and social sciences disciplines, and in one of the fine arts disciplines.
  2. Critically analyse and devise an appropriate response to a challenging complex or multi-faceted problem, identify research questions, design, plan and execute a project.
  3. Make evidence based decisions that take account of diverse contexts and constraints impacting on societies and environments.
  4. Communicate complex information effectively in written, visual and oral forms with a diverse range of stakeholders.
  5. Work effectively, responsibly, respectfully and safely in individual and/or team contexts.
  6. Demonstrate self-management, flexibility, initiative and resilience in readiness for diverse workplace demands.

Course structure

The combined degree requirements consist of:

  • A Major in each degree component of 8 units (100cp)
  • A Minor in the Arts component of 4 units (50cp), a minor in the Fine Arts component of 6 units (75cp)
  • Degree Core Knowledge units in the Arts component, 4 units (50cp)
  • Degree Electives units in the Fine Arts component, 2 units (25cp)
  • Honours Year (100cp)

Bachelor of Arts

In the Bachelor of Arts component, you choose a major, minor and degree core knowledge units. The BA major and minor must be in two different study areas.

Advanced speakers of a language are permitted to replace the 2 Introductory language units with Intermediate and/or Advanced level language units as approved by Arts Student Central. These students may complete the degree with 2 Introductory units minimum. If progressing with the language as a major or a minor, the student must complete the sequence and overall degree credit point requirements with additional Intermediate or Advanced level language units. Advanced speakers cannot later enrol in the replaced Introductory language units.

Bachelor of Fine Arts

In the Bachelor of Fine Arts component, you choose a major and degree electives. The Critical Practices minor is a compulsory minor for all students.

Level requirements are as follows:

  • Bachelor of Arts
    • 4 - 6 introductory level units
    • 4 - 8 intermediate level units
    • 4 - 8 advanced level units
    • *Please note, minimum and maximum level requirements are linked to your major and minor combination. In some scenarios you will be required to exceed the minimum level requirements as above.
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts
    • 6 introductory level units
    • 6 intermediate level units
    • 4 advanced level units

The Aboriginal Studies programme facilitates understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and societies, past and present relationships between indigenous Australians and other peoples (nationally and internationally) and the development of intercultural competence. Our guiding principal is to foster social inclusion while respecting and valuing cultural diversity. We aim to formulate and deliver a programme committed to student-centred learning, academic freedom, creativity, real world relevance, critical scholarship and rigour. We envisage continuing to develop as a broadly based cross-disciplinary enquiry that draws on contemporary theories and established traditions of the humanities and social sciences, situates local and national issues within international flows and frameworks (and vice versa), and engages with issues of sustainability and change

Complete two of the following Introductory level units (25cp)

Offers a general survey of Indigenous Australian societies and cultures from the earliest times until the mid-20th century. The unit explores some debates about aspects of Aboriginal social life before the British colonisation-for example, social and political structures, economies, religious…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a detailed introduction to contemporary Aboriginal socio-economic experience across Australia from the final decades of the 20th century. Issues addressed include the extent of Aboriginal disadvantage; the experience of racism; aspects of contemporary Aboriginal cultures; child welfare, health and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores concepts and issues relevant to, and the realities of, Indigenous Tourism. It delves into tourism in Australia's and New Zealand's colonial pasts, and also engages with contemporary ventures such as Indigenous dance, eco-tourism, pilgrimage to sacred sites,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Statistics generally indicate significant disparities between the health and well being of Indigenous people and the broader non-Indigenous population in Australia. This unit explores reasons for this situation, including a 'social determinants' approach examining socio-economic, cultural and political factors impacting…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides students with an understanding of the roles, functions and status of women in past and present Aboriginal societies from Aboriginal perspectives. It considers the influence of colonisation in shaping both western and Aboriginal perceptions of Indigenous women's…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a comprehensive exploration of Aboriginal art forms, particularly painting. Students develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal creative expression in traditional and contemporary Aboriginal cultures. Apparent changes in Aboriginal creative expression are examined, including those brought about by the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

For students with a demonstrable capacity for independent research who have a specific topic within the field of Aboriginal Studies that they wish to investigate. Entry to the unit is at the discretion of Head of Discipline. Students work closely…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores concepts and issues relevant to, and the realities of, Indigenous Tourism. It delves into tourism in Australia's and New Zealand's colonial pasts, and also engages with contemporary ventures such as Indigenous dance, eco-tourism, pilgrimage to sacred sites,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Statistics generally indicate significant disparities between the health and well being of Indigenous people and the broader non-Indigenous population in Australia. This unit explores reasons for this situation, including a 'social determinants' approach examining socio-economic, cultural and political factors impacting…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides students with an understanding of the roles, functions and status of women in past and present Aboriginal societies from Aboriginal perspectives. It considers the influence of colonisation in shaping both western and Aboriginal perceptions of Indigenous women's…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The social diversity that is increasingly a part of Australian society includes new religious groups and new immigrant groups, as they interact with established ethnic and religious groups, and Indigenous peoples. Social processes and sociologically informed social policy are key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The Ancient Civilisations major connects students with the histories, literatures, and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. ‘Ancient Civs’ is uniquely broad in its thematic range, reflecting the diverse body of evidence that survives from the ancient world. Our units include topics in mythology and religion, ancient drama, Roman social history, classical epic, and many others. As such, Ancient Civilisations is dynamic, rigorous, and multidisciplinary: it incorporates elements of ancient historiography, literary criticism, archaeology, and philosophical enquiry.

The teaching staff and curriculum of the Ancient Civilisations major encourage students to develop interpretive and analytical skills, as well as skills in written and oral communication. We foster critical thinking, research methods, and intercultural awareness. Our major prepares students for a range of professional careers, as well as for postgraduate study. Students might also wish to supplement their studies by studying Latin (HTL) and/or Ancient Greek (HTG). These complementary majors equip students with the skills to read ancient sources in their original languages.

The Ancient Civilisations major begins with a pair of introductory units which offer a broad survey of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures, and introduce skills for interpreting these. At the intermediate level, students have the opportunity to pursue a wide variety of interests ranging from love-poetry to Roman Republican history. At the advanced level, we offer a suite of capstone units which seeks to draw the major’s thematic threads together.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit provides a chronological and thematic overview of the history, literature, and culture of Ancient Greece, from the Dark Ages (c. 1200 BCE) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE). Examples of seminar topics include epic poetry…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a chronological and thematic overview of the history, literature, and culture of ancient Rome, from its foundation in 753 BCE to the reign of the emperor Domitian (81–96 CE). Examples of seminar topics include the Roman monarchy,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose four of the following Intermediate level units (50cp)

This unit explores the roles of spectacles and the spectacular in ancient Roman society through the study of literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and other heritage sources. Lecture and discussion topics include gladiatorial games, chariot races, animal hunts, military triumphs, theatrical shows,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines tragic and comic dramas of classical antiquity, which established the nature of western drama for later ages, including the works of Sophocles and Aeschylus, and the bawdy and irreverent Greek and Roman comedies. Particular attention will be paid to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is a study of the role of myth in Greek and Roman culture through literary texts and ancient art, including an exploration of the relationship between mythological narratives and religious ritual. This unit also traces developments in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Nero: misunderstood emperor, malevolent tyrant, or a monster of the middle order? This unit explores the enigmatic and transgressive literature produced during the reign of Nero (AD 54-68): the writings of the philosopher and tragic poet Seneca, the anarchic Satyricon…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines two of the most well documented periods in classical antiquity: the last century of the Roman Republic and the first century of the Roman Empire. The social, cultural, and political turmoil of this era is viewed through…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

War and the nature of heroism were the central subject of the ancient world's most prestigious literary genre, epic poetry. This unit explores the changing ways in which the experience of war and the character of the epic hero are…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Religion permeated all facets of life in ancient Greece and Rome. This unit examines the religious practices of these civilizations through the study of literary, epigraphic, and archaeological sources. Lecture and discussion topics include sacred places and spaces, festivals, ritual…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Nero: misunderstood emperor, malevolent tyrant, or a monster of the middle order? This unit explores the enigmatic and transgressive literature produced during the reign of Nero (AD 54-68): the writings of the philosopher and tragic poet Seneca, the anarchic Satyricon…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The study of ancient Greek is traditionally one of the core disciplines in the humanities. This is the language in which the fundamentals of western thought were argued out, in the sciences, philosophy and medicine, as well as in literature in the broadest sense. Students gain from the careful study of ancient texts a better understanding of the contemporary world, and analytical and linguistic skills, which are extremely valuable in a range of professions and pursuits. What the Greek curriculum offers is a rigorous intellectual training that can be put to use in any field. To this end we train students in the skills needed to read a range of ancient texts, and to be alert to cultural and linguistic nuance.

Complete two of the following Introductory level units (25cp)

Provides an introduction to Classical Greek, the language in which were laid down the foundations of western drama, philosophy and more. Intended for students who have no previous knowledge of the language, the unit is designed to provide a rapid…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the work undertaken in HTG101 and enables students to proceed to further studies in Greek. The unit is designed to continue a rapid survey of the Greek language sufficient to enable students to read selected passages…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Consists of a study of selected Ancient Greek texts. Selections in previous semesters have included Homer, Plato, the Attic tragedians, Aristophanes and Plutarch.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consists of a study of selected Ancient Greek texts. Selections in previous semesters have included Homer, Plato, the Attic tragedians, Aristophanes and Plutarch.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the study of the ancient Greek language undertaken in HTG101 and HTG102. In it, students will complete the JACT Reading Greek textbook, including the passages of unadapted poetry and prose (Homer, Plato and Herodotus).…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Complete the following four Advanced level units (50cp)

Consists of a study of selected Ancient Greek texts. Selections in previous semesters have included Homer, Plato, the Attic tragedians, Aristophanes and Plutarch.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consists of a study of selected Ancient Greek texts. Selections in previous semesters have included Homer, Plato, the Attic tragedians, Aristophanes and Plutarch.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit consists of a specialised study of an Ancient Greek author or aspect of Greek literature.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit consists of a specialised study of an Ancient Greek author or aspect of Greek literature.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary area of study that equips graduates with the skills, knowledge and conceptual understanding for employment engaged with the Asian region, either directly or indirectly. Students will develop a knowledge of the developments that have shaped - and continue to shape -the Asian region as well as an understanding of the diversity within and across countries in the region. Students will build up knowledge of Asian societies, cultures, beliefs, history, politics, media, cities and environments, and the connections between the peoples of Asia, Australia and the rest of the world within the overall framework of global competence and Asia literacy. Asian Studies students will also develop an understanding of the concept of ‘Asia’ and will be able bring a perspective informed by knowledge of Asia to major issues and challenges facing our world today. Asia Studies provides students with the skills and knowledge to effectively communicate and engage with Asia in order to live, work, and learn in the region.

Complete the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

What is ‘Asia’? Where is ‘Asia’? These seem like obvious questions but – as you will learn in this unit – the answers are not so straightforward.And what does ‘Asia’ mean to the many countries in the Asian region? In…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
PLUS one of the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Develops competence in beginners spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lectures, student- and teacher-led tutorials and speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Become better prepared to deal with the variety of culturally challenging situations you will encounter in whichever part of the world you live and work. Develop an appreciation of the personal and professional benefits which come from being more culturally…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following Intermediate level unit (12.5cp)

What does it mean to 'study Asia'? And how might we go about it? What are the important academic debates which shape our understanding of Asia today?In this unit, you will learn how to closely read and critically analyse some…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
PLUS one of the following Intermediate level units (12.5cp)

Cities serve as essential gateways for understanding how local and transnational forces have shaped particular built environments and urban cultures. This unit explores Asian cities by using the comparison of capital cities with port cities as its analytical principle. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How to understand the media, news, and reporting is one of the key challenges of the 21st century. At the same time, any analysis of the media needs to take into account reporting of Asia and from Asia.In this unit,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Australia's accelerating engagement with our neighbours in the Asia-Pacific requires an ability to empathise, relate to, and work with diverse cultures and places. You will have opportunities to learn about the Asia-Pacific region’s varied environments, cultures, political systems and ways…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose one of the following Advanced level units (12.5cp)

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How to understand the media, news, and reporting is one of the key challenges of the 21st century. At the same time, any analysis of the media needs to take into account reporting of Asia and from Asia.In this unit,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose three of the following Advanced level units (37.5cp)

Cities serve as essential gateways for understanding how local and transnational forces have shaped particular built environments and urban cultures. This unit explores Asian cities by using the comparison of capital cities with port cities as its analytical principle. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How to understand the media, news, and reporting is one of the key challenges of the 21st century. At the same time, any analysis of the media needs to take into account reporting of Asia and from Asia.In this unit,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit you will be introduced to many of the important factors that have shaped China in the 21st Century. You will learn about the dramatic changes that have occurred in China over the last 100 years. And you…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to deconstruct the monolithic perception of Japanese culture and to understand Japan in terms of its relationship with its near and more distant neighbours throughout Asia and the Pacific. Incorporating the approach of queer studies, which places…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The Chinese language program aims to develop students’ Chinese (Mandarin) linguistic capability in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; as well as to cultivate students’ cross-cultural communicative skills through the integration of relevant cultural knowledge in language learning.

Students are strongly encouraged to complete their studies in another discipline with a China-Asia focus such as Asian Studies and International Relations to complement their language study.

The Chinese language program also provides students with opportunities to study in country thereby fostering a global perspective and intercultural competence in their personal and future professional interactions.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Develops competence in beginners spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lectures, student- and teacher-led tutorials and speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Develops competence in beginners spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lectures, student- and teacher-led tutorials and speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

Develops competence in intermediate spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lecture, student and teacher-led tutorials in speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Develops competence in intermediate spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lecture, student and teacher-led tutorials in speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose one of the following Intermediate level units (12.5cp)

In this unit you will be introduced to many of the important factors that have shaped China in the 21st Century. You will learn about the dramatic changes that have occurred in China over the last 100 years. And you…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

An introduction to the most important themes and issues in the international relations of the China. Students will gain a basic understanding of how the major frameworks of international relations interpret the rise of China as a global power. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How to understand the media, news, and reporting is one of the key challenges of the 21st century. At the same time, any analysis of the media needs to take into account reporting of Asia and from Asia.In this unit,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Cities serve as essential gateways for understanding how local and transnational forces have shaped particular built environments and urban cultures. This unit explores Asian cities by using the comparison of capital cities with port cities as its analytical principle. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

Develops competence in advanced spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lecture, student and teacher-led tutorials in speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Develops competence in advanced spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lecture, student and teacher-led tutorials in speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose one of the following Advanced level units (12.5cp)

In this unit you will be introduced to many of the important factors that have shaped China in the 21st Century. You will learn about the dramatic changes that have occurred in China over the last 100 years. And you…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How to understand the media, news, and reporting is one of the key challenges of the 21st century. At the same time, any analysis of the media needs to take into account reporting of Asia and from Asia.In this unit,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Cities serve as essential gateways for understanding how local and transnational forces have shaped particular built environments and urban cultures. This unit explores Asian cities by using the comparison of capital cities with port cities as its analytical principle. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Criminology is the study of crime, criminality and criminal justice systems, focussing on criminalisation as a process, the causes of crime, the social context of offending, crime prevention, systems of social control, and the punishment and rehabilitation of offenders. Criminologists critically analyse the policies, practices, systems, cultures and relationships between key stakeholders (from an individual level to a societal level) to improve understanding, advance the evidence base, and develop new initiatives and agendas for change. Criminology involves study and intervention at local, national, regional and international levels, and engagement in issues of local through to global importance (e.g., assault, terrorism, eco-crime, human trafficking, cybercrime).

Criminology is not a discipline but a field, incorporating disciplinary expertise from areas such as sociology, psychology, law, history, politics, social work, philosophy and Indigenous studies. Its foundational disciplines are sociology and law, and criminology programmes are usually based in either a Law School or School of Sociology.

The Criminology Programme is mainly designed to cater to students and researchers who have an interest in pursuing a study programme that offers a grounded understanding and practical experience of criminology as an academic field. It is also intended to provide a platform for the professional development of practitioners working directly in the area of criminal justice and in allied fields (such as juvenile justice, youth and community work, crime prevention projects, social work, prisoner support, victim services and local government).

The Programme as a whole will enhance student academic and professional skills, provide opportunities for careers in criminal justice and enhance movement through career pathways, and be relevant to the professional needs of those working in the fields of criminology and criminal justice. It will equip them with the skills and knowledge to eventually lead to more senior managerial, policy development or research positions.

Complete one of the following unit pairs (25cp)

This unit provides an introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include the historical context of psychology, research design, lifespan development, and abnormal psychology. Students are required to undertake independent reading to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a further introduction to major areas in psychology and to basic techniques for psychological investigations. Lecture topics include research methods, intelligence, social psychology and cross-cultural psychology. Students are required to undertake additional reading to extend their knowledge…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR 

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

To give students a "feel" for the study of the law. This includes understanding approaches to legal problems and issues, classification of various areas of the law, skills that need to be developed to study law, the scope and dynamics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
Hobart5 Week Session Nov
HobartIntensive Session Jun
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introductory overview of the interplay between the various legal systems which impact on our contemporary Australian legal regime. Specifically, the unit will consider the Aboriginal legal system (before and after white settlement), the reception and application…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonIntensive Session Jul
Cradle CoastIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

This unit provides an introduction to major theoretical areas in cognitive and biological psychology, and associated practical applications. Topics include biological psychology, sensation, perception and memory, language, thinking and reasoning, motivation and emotion, and states of consciousness. In practical exercises,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides an introduction to how theory and research in psychology can be applied to provide insight into human behaviour in a wide range of settings. Topics covered range from extreme sport to online behaviour, behaviour in organisations and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

OR

This unit provides students with an understanding of the contemporary nature of policing. Students will learn about the histories, governance, theories, and processes involved in policing work. It is recommended for those interested in pursuing a career in the police…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

OR

This unit provides students with an understanding of the the complex contexts of diversity that can inform policing practice in productive and unproductive ways. This unit follows on from HSP108 Introduction to Policing. It provides knowledge around contemporary ways of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following three Intermediate level units (37.5cp)

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and contributing to debates about: (i) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims and offenders, violent crime, white collar…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose one of the following Intermediate level units (12.5cp)

This unit provides a critical introduction to the philosophies, principles and practices of juvenile justice and child protection. The interface between juvenile justice and child protection is well established, institutionally, historically and in terms of shared clients, and an informed…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the emerging field of 'forensic studies'. While forensic science usually refers to technical and vocational expertise, forensic studies explores the 'forensic sciences' as a social phenomenon. The main emphasis of forensic studies is on…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary study of social justice. The unit draws on social sciences concepts and theories as well as a number of case studies from Australia and abroad to explore the forms of marginalization,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The unit focuses on understanding legal…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the newly emerging area of forensic criminology through an examination of the field of forensic investigation. The unit covers topics such as crime scene investigation, forensic science, e-forensics and cybercrime, forensic interventions in social…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the theory, methods, practical applications and analysis of particular crime and criminal justice topics in specific areas of concern. It is designed to provide an opportunity to examine diverse subject matter by drawing upon the specialist expertise…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is designed to introduce students to the issues and processes associated with working with offenders, particularly those under the authority of corrective services in prison and community corrections. The unit explores issues pertaining directly to how best to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Explores the nature of environmental crime and its social regulation. The unit has three main topical concerns. First, to investigate the nature of environmental crime from the point of view of legal, ecological and justice perspectives, with an emphasis on…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The aim of this unit is to give students an introduction to understanding different forms of violence against women. Students will examine the social and political underpinnings of violence against women in society, with particular attention to their gendered and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the representation of crime in the media and its role as a primary source of information for public discourse about crime, criminality and criminal justice in contemporary society. Students engage with key critical criminology and media and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In 2015, English was one of nine University of Tasmania subjects included in the QS World University Rankings by Subject. We offer a broad and dynamic program across the key areas of contemporary English studies: literary studies, screen studies, theatre studies, cultural studies, and creative writing. A major in English builds knowledge of literary and cultural histories and practices, develops highly valued and transferable skills in the analysis and writing of literary and non-literary texts, and fosters expertise in written and oral communication. An English major also trains students in research, so that graduates are able to locate, assess and use resources to construct coherent, persuasive arguments.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

How do short stories, poems, plays, novels and films generate meaning? This unit explores some of the strategies we can use to understand literary texts. It introduces students to the work of close reading, critical thinking, and academic writing. Students…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Why are certain texts regarded as classics within the English literary canon and how do we encounter them today? This unit considers the importance of tradition to the ways we value, understand and circulate popular and literary texts. Students who…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

How much of a tale is in the telling? This unit introduces concepts, terms and skills used in the analysis of literary narrative, and applies them to texts drawn from a wide range of genres, periods and nations. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers an opportunity to study canonical British literature from the nineteenth century. Students will explore the response of writers to cultural pressures and changes of the period, including urbanisation, industrialisation, Darwinism, imperialism and the position of women. They…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers students the opportunity to think critically about some of the most popular texts in Western culture. What makes a bestseller? What are the defining features of major popular genres and how have they changed over time? What…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This intermediate elective in English aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills to develop theoretically informed arguments in response to screen texts and genres. Students will explore key approaches and methodologies for analysing films and/or television series, develop…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit enables students to develop their proficiency in producing polished works of fiction and creative non-fiction. Students will be encouraged to identify aspects of writing craft that are especially relevant to their own creative practice, and to supplement the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Examines tragic and comic dramas of classical antiquity, which established the nature of western drama for later ages, including the works of Sophocles and Aeschylus, and the bawdy and irreverent Greek and Roman comedies. Particular attention will be paid to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit examines the development of literary theory from the middle of the twentieth century to the present. It aims to provide students with the skills to read theory critically and to develop informed arguments in response to critical, literary…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How does literature represent the past? This unit introduces students to key theoretical frameworks for interrogating the complex and contentious relationship between 'fiction' and 'history.' Students have the opportunity to discuss 'fictions of history' from a range of historical, cultural,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores how different worlds are imagined in speculative fiction, film, and critical theory. Taking an historical approach, the unit traces the trajectory of utopian/dystopian texts and theories through the last five hundred years, concentrating on the dystopian visions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides opportunity to study a selection of Shakespearean plays and their stage and screen performance afterlives. Starting from a close consideration of Shakespeare's dramatic language, the unit will consider the multiple possibilites the plays offer for realization in…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This advanced elective in English explores the history of modernism. Students will examine exemplary texts that are representative of key movements in the literature and culture of the modernist era. The writers and texts explored in this unit set the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit will consider major authors and texts, developments and trends in Australian Literature. It examines Australian literature as a regional, national, and international literature with a set of distinct and vibrant cultures. Students will consider the histories, preoccupations, and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit introduces prepares student writers to submit their works of fiction and creative non-fiction for publication. Lectures will focus on publishing outlets and opportunities, conditions in the contemporary publishing industry, publishers' expectations, layout, copy-editing and editorial polish. An assessment…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The study of French is traditionally one of the core disciplines in the humanities. Along with German, this is one of the principal languages in which the fundamentals of western thought were argued out, in the sciences, philosophy and medicine, as well as in literature in the broadest sense. The study of a second language helps students gain a sense of personal achievement and enhances insights into diverse cultural and linguistic practices. Students gain from the careful study of French texts a better understanding of the contemporary world, and analytical and linguistic skills, which are extremely valuable in a range of professions and pursuits. What the French curriculum offers is a rigorous intellectual training, which can be put to use in almost any field.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Places its main stress on the development of a sound basic knowledge of the structure of the language and on practice in the four basic language skills bringing students to a degree of linguistic competence equivalent at least to TCE…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Places its main stress on the development of a sound basic knowledge of the structure of the language and on practice in the four basic language skills bringing students to a degree of linguistic competence equivalent at least to TCE…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

Is an advanced post-TCE course which places its main emphasis on the development of a sound command of the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Is an advanced post-TCE course which places its main emphasis on the development of a sound command of the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

Builds on the competency achieved by students in HEF216, providing further training in selected topics in French grammar and in translation.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Builds on the competency achieved by students in HEF315, providing further training in selected topics in French grammar and in translation.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

Involves structured reading and writing on a topic approved by the head of school. Students are expected to employ the skills and conceptual knowledge acquired in earlier units to investigate an appropriate issue or topic over a one-semester period.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Involves structured reading and writing on a topic approved by the head of school. Students are expected to employ the skills and conceptual knowledge acquired in earlier units to investigate an appropriate issue or topic over a one-semester period.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This course is an introduction to reading and analysing literary works in French, with a special emphasis on works from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Major works are read either in complete form or excerpts and are placed in…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This is an advanced language unit which deepens students' French language competency. The four language skills are broadened and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and writing. Work with authentic material and videos supports this integrated…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an advanced language unit which deepens students' French language competency. The four language skills are broadened and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and writing. Work with authentic material and videos supports this integrated…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

To understand Gender is to understand better human beings and our cultures. Because all human beings are gendered, and because many areas of study are focused on human beings – our histories, our social institutions and practices, our creative endeavours, the relations between different communities or nations, religion, ethics – because gender is implicated in all of these things, it is deeply useful to gain an awareness of what gender is and isn’t, of how it acts in and upon our lives, and of how various disciplines address the fact of sex and gender as a part of human life.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

How do assumptions about gender influence our understanding of what it means to be a human being? In this unit we explore a variety of different ways that human beings have been imagined and thought about across time in western…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Gender & World explores the shape(s) and impact(s) of gendered assumptions on human interactions in diverse areas of the world and in different historical periods. This unit focuses on how people have acted and do act on the basis of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit will explore feminist contributions to political philosophy, epistemology (the study of knowledge), ethics, and metaphysics (understandings of the nature of reality). We will examine whether and under what circumstances knowledge is gender-neutral, and whether (and when) the sex…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

An examination of the gendered elements within the sacred texts, rituals and practices of the world's major religions, with an emphasis on monotheistic traditions. We will analyse religious claims about the nature of woman and man and about the divine…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

What does masculinity mean, and why does it exist in so many different forms? In this unit we explore the meaning and manifestations of a variety of different masculinities. We query the cultural expectations regarding masculinity that accompany boyhood, adolescence,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Feminist philosophy, psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology and queer theory have raised stimulating questions about the body. This unit examines how the body is theorised, how it interacts with questions of culture and class, and explores the implications of our understanding of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We are all constantly faced with moral questions, but what are the foundations of morality? On what grounds do we, should we, base our moral decisions? What is it that makes some actions right and others wrong? What is moral…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The body is normally understood as exclusively biological, but it is also subject to competing social forces. For example, our bodies allow us to comprehend the world. It is also the site through which others come to identify and classify…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit will explore feminist contributions to political philosophy, epistemology (the study of knowledge), ethics, and metaphysics (understandings of the nature of reality). We will examine whether and under what circumstances knowledge is gender-neutral, and whether (and when) the sex…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

An examination of the gendered elements within the sacred texts, rituals and practices of the world's major religions, with an emphasis on monotheistic traditions. We will analyse religious claims about the nature of woman and man and about the divine…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

What does masculinity mean, and why does it exist in so many different forms? In this unit we explore the meaning and manifestations of a variety of different masculinities. We query the cultural expectations regarding masculinity that accompany boyhood, adolescence,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Feminist philosophy, psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology and queer theory have raised stimulating questions about the body. This unit examines how the body is theorised, how it interacts with questions of culture and class, and explores the implications of our understanding of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with an understanding of the roles, functions and status of women in past and present Aboriginal societies from Aboriginal perspectives. It considers the influence of colonisation in shaping both western and Aboriginal perceptions of Indigenous women's…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How can an understanding of history enhance our understanding of gender? How can an understanding of gender enhance our understanding of history? This unit investigates gender and society in a variety of historical contexts, including: classical Greece and Rome; medieval…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The study of German is traditionally one of the core disciplines in the humanities. Along with French, this is one of the principal languages in which the fundamentals of western thought were argued out, in the sciences, philosophy and medicine, as well as in literature in the broadest sense. The study of a second language helps students gain a sense of personal achievement and enhances insights into diverse cultural and linguistic practices. Since the English language has Germanic roots, the study of German also promotes awareness and confidence in the correct use of standard English. Students gain from the careful study of German texts a better understanding of the contemporary world, and analytical and linguistic skills, which are extremely valuable in a range of professions and pursuits. The German program at UTAS aims at developing a deep understanding of not only the language, but the society and culture behind it, through units that cover modern society, literature and popular culture.

Choose one of the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of German. While a key goal of this unit is the acquisition of communication skills in German, the unit centres on the study of the lives, interests…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of German. While a key goal of this unit is the acquisition of communication skills in German, the unit centres on the study of the lives, interests…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND complete the following Introductory level unit (12.5cp)

This is the continuation of HEG101 German 1A. It is an intensive beginners' unit, which in conjunction with HEG101 aims to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the main structures of the German language. During the four contact hours…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Employs a communicative method and a thematic approach to bring students to an intermediate level of competence in contemporary German. It gives equal weight to all four macroskills: listening, reading, speaking and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is the continuation of HEG207 German 2A. Employs a communicative method and a thematic approach to bring students to an intermediate level of competence in contemporary German. It gives equal weight to all four macroskills: listening, reading, speaking and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This third year language unit broadens students' German language competency. The four language skills are stressed and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and writing. Work with authentic material and videos supports this integrated approach to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is the continuation of HEG313German 3A. This third year language unit broadens students' German language competency. The four language skills are stressed and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and writing. Work with authentic material…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND Choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit provides an insight into German history since the First World War through a study of four short German novels and their film versions.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This is an advanced language unit which deepens students' German language competency. The four language skills are broadened and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and writing. Work with authentic material and videos supports this integrated…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is the continuation of HEG315 Advanced German A. It is an advanced language unit which deepens students' German language competency. The four language skills are broadened and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Beginning with the division of Germany after World War II, the unit traces the divergence of the two cultures through the study of representative works of literature. It continues with the main developments that distinguished East and West German society…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

History is the study of the past and its interpretation in the present. Historians make sense of the past using evidence from a wide range of sources. Using a range of theories and methodologies, they examine past events, processes and relationships, interpreting their origins, significance, and consequences. Historians accept that their interpretations are always provisional and subject to modifications as future historians ask new questions or revisit old ones, apply new methodologies, and add new interpretations.

Studying a major in History involves the study of places and periods, but it actually involves much more than this. Through completing a range of units covering multiple themes, geographies, and chronologies, students with a History major will develop both broad and detailed understanding of multiple historical contexts as well as fundamental and transferrable skills in historical analysis, historical research, and communication. Having studied a History major students will have a firm foundation for future pathways in postgraduate History study and also will be equipped to apply their skills, knowledge, and methods of enquiry in wide contexts, both consolidating and extending the range of contexts studied within the major.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

From the Italian Renaissance in the late Middle Ages to the rise of European nationalism in the nineteenth century, this unit explores the history of Early Modern Europe – a crucial period in shaping both Europe and the world we…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the dramatic changes in world history from 1500 to 1900. It examines how rising population levels, technological change, trade and warfare shaped the modern world. The unit employs a series of case studies to examine the impact…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose three of the following Intermediate level units (37.5cp)

Examines the history of the Australian people and culture from early European settlement to the federation of the colonies and the making of a nation. Explores the interaction between Imperial policy, Indigenous resistance and the political ideals and personal ambitions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

From the First World War to the fall of Nazi Germany in 1945, this unit explores European history in the tumultuous period 1914-1945. This was an age convulsed by total war, nationalism, revolution, totalitarianism, political violence and genocide. Democracy increasingly…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the creation of the United States of America by focusing on two significant conflicts. We begin by studying the origins and outcomes of the eighteenth century American War of Independence - an event that was both a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit we witness the birth of the Middle Ages, paying attention to the interactions between Barbarian warrior culture, Roman culture, and Christian culture. We examine the Franks, Anglo-Saxons, Huns, Vandals, Goths, Vikings, and other medieval peoples. Barbarians moved…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

It was said that ‘the sun never sets on the British Empire’. This unit explores the origins, growth, and difficult afterlife of the British Empire from the 18th century until the present. It has a particular focus on the colonisation…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This cornerstone unit is designed to prepare students for the multiple ways in which they might apply their History studies in the future. We will explore aspects of historical thinking, such as ideas about context and causation, methods of historical…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Choose three of the following Advanced level units (37.5cp)

Pick up the story in 1000 when the Vikings have given a kick-start to Europe's economy and the warrior mentality of the early Middle Ages is giving way to the rising aristocrats. From this starting-point, the unit will examine the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The late eighteenth century saw the beginning of revolutionary political, economic and cultural change that marked the emergence of modern nation states and cultures. France was site of the first modern political and social revolution, and came to dominate Europe…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines patterns of change and continuity, and conflict and consensus in Australia from federation to 2001. Topics include nation building to 1914; the first world war, progressivism in the 1920s; Australia and the world depression in the 1930s; the second…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines Australia's historical and political connections within the Pacific world. Taking an 'oceans connect' approach to world history the unit considers Australia within the dynamic regional spheres of the southwestern Pacific and trans-Tasman worlds, as well as the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Europe 1815-1914 provides an introduction to major developments and themes in European history from the end of the Napoleonic Empire to the beginning of World War 1. Students will become familiar with the inter-relationships between the major European nations (France,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How can an understanding of history enhance our understanding of gender? How can an understanding of gender enhance our understanding of history? This unit investigates gender and society in a variety of historical contexts, including: classical Greece and Rome; medieval…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit allows students to develop a broad knowledge of heritage issues from the perspective of History as a discipline and to develop analytical skills concerning local and global heritage issues. You will critically reflect on how heritage is ‘made’…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Learning a second language assists in developing and improving communication skills, and enhancing socio-cultural understanding. The study of a second language helps students gain a sense of personal achievement, enhances insights into diverse cultural and linguistic practices and also promotes awareness and confidence in the correct use of standard English. The Indonesian program at UTAS aims at developing a deep understanding of not only the language, but the society and culture behind it, through units that cover modern society, literature and popular culture.

Choose one of the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following Introductory level unit (12.5cp)

Builds on HMN101. Emphasises interactive use of Indonesian language and an understanding of contemporary Indonesian society. Uses written text, audio, video and computers for language learning.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

This is an intermediate Indonesian unit. This unit will enable you to converse, read and write about more complex topics in Indonesian.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an intermediate Indonesian unit. This unit builds on HMN207. It will enable you to converse, read and write about more complex topics in Indonesian.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following four Advanced level units (50cp)

This is an advanced Indonesian unit. This unit enables students to read, understand, and produce more technical and formal Indonesian. The unit covers content such as articles from newspapers, excerpts from of novels, short stories, popular and academic journals and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This an advanced Indonesian unit builds on HMN313. This unit enables students to read, understand, and produce more technical and formal Indonesian. The unit covers content such as articles from newspapers, excerpts from of novels, short stories, popular and academic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The purpose of the International Relations (IR) major is to provide students with a solid grounding in the core theories, issues and debates in the discipline. This commences in first year with an introduction to key conceptual approaches (incorporating realism, neoliberalism, social constructivism and Marxist approaches). These approaches are then used to evaluate key contemporary issues such as globalisation, changing patterns of power, poverty and dependency, human rights and international justice, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, security and war, and the role of international institutions and regimes.

After completing their first year of study, students have the option of studying themes that encapsulate core sub--‐ disciplinary debates. These include the foreign policies of great powers, international political economy, order and justice in IR, the international politics of the Asia--‐Pacific, and international security. We have deliberately developed these units to provide pathways that allow students to focus either on national security issues or those that are more focused on global justice and rights. High achieving students then finish with a ‘capstone’ unit – HIR311 – with a more intensive theory--‐and--‐research focus.

The intention here is that our students can develop their own specialisation that matches the hiring profiles of agencies and organisations. These include government departments specialising in international affairs (such as DFAT, Defence, ASIO, ASIS, DIO, Immigration and others) as well as the United Nations, human rights and aid NGOs, and businesses working in a competitive global marketplace that frequently hire IR graduates.

If you wish to major and minor, or double major, in International Relations and Politics & Policy HIR101 and HPP101 cannot count to both and different introductory level units will be required. Please choose another minor that commences at first year and complete the 2 x introductory level units towards this discipline, eg Sociology HGA101 and HGA102. You will then commence your IR OR Politics & Policy major/minor from second year with the normal units as per schedule. 

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit is concerned with the study of ‘security’ in all the breadth that this notion has gained over the past decades. Starting from an analysis of the classical understanding of security which links state sovereignty with warfare we will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

An introduction to the most important themes and issues in the international relations of the China. Students will gain a basic understanding of how the major frameworks of international relations interpret the rise of China as a global power. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit is concerned with the question of the changing/evolving nature of violence in the international realm. Part one of the unit will trace the emergence of modern thought about violence through theoretical 'traditions' and the writings of Niccolo Machiavelli,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit looks at the diverse forms of international, global and transnational cooperation and asks critically how they have developed over time and space. It examines the structures of power and equality/inequality in international relations and how these are reflected…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit focuses on late-20th /early 21st Europe, analysing the degree to which pre-modern ideas of Europe continue to permeate its modern, institutional existence. Through introducing students to the rationale behind the establishment of the EU, the euro etc, this…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

IntroductionOffers a systematic study of various forms of `disorder` in the post-Cold War era, with a particular focus on terrorism. States are increasingly confronted with unpredictable, internal and trans-national threats to their security, for example: new and diverse forms of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The unit introduces students to the structure and operation of the global political economy. It introduces political science students to a limited number of important economic concepts to enable a better understanding of trade, investment, finance and monetary policy. Key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit examines the theory and practice of ‘sustainable development’ in countries in the ‘Global South’ in Africa, Asia and Latin America. While differing significantly from each other, these countries share a common syndrome, seeking to combat high levels of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels. Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This is a ‘capstone’ (highly recommended) third year unit for all students undertaking a major in Politics, Policy or International Relations. It surveys the most important theoretical perspectives of these three majors and explores how they can assist us to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The philosophy of this program is grounded in the assumption that all students have the capacity and should have the right to learn a second language, including a scripted language – specifically in this instance, Japan. Second language learning is imperative in terms of globalisation, with high levels of proficiency in Asian languages being a pre-requisite for Australia to take an effective role in the Asia-Pacific region and in the wider world. In 2016, Japan remains, behind China and ahead of both South Korea and the United States, Australia’s second largest two-way trade partner. In other words, an understanding of Japan and the Japanese language remains crucially important to Australia’s successful trade relations. Knowledge of both the language and the society of Japan will have a positive impact on future student employment in the case of those students who seek to engage in commercial exchange with East Asia.

The program aims to provide a full range of second language learning experiences for students, ranging from activities based on face-to-face teaching and conventional print materials through electronically supported language learning to in-country programs. Importantly, recognition is given to the necessity of providing students with opportunities for interaction with the language and speakers of the language outside the classroom and to equip students with the strategies necessary to use the language acquired in the UTAS learning environment in the natural socio-linguistic environment.

The program has a number of entry levels although the substantive major provides a language/sociocultural learning experience that structures students through beginner, intermediate and early advanced levels of language/sociocultural knowledge acquisition.

Through the promotion of in-Japan learning opportunities, the program also provides interested students with the opportunity for both short-term and long-term linguistic and sociocultural immersion experience that graduates high quality, work-place orientated graduates. In this way, the program draws on both issues of culture and creativity while overcoming the isolation that can be a factor of island learning to place students in the natural laboratory of the real-life Japanese social and language environment.

Furthermore, rather than presenting exit as an end-point learning, the program seeks to encourage a consciousness of the value of life-long learning among students and of the benefits of collaborative learning. In doing so, the program creates a community of practice in which participants can share a passion for learning while building a skill set of values for the future work-orientated world. On the other hand, the nature of language learning results in the high level of individual agency required of learners who will achieve success in the future world. This agency is particularly developed during the outward bound in-Japan study programs that are a feature of the major during which time students are required to act with integrity and independence in order to achieve success and thrive.

Choose one of the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND complete the following Introductory level unit (12.5cp)

Develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

Building on from HMJ102, the unit further develops basic grammatical knowledge and oral/aural skills. Students will learn to communicate orally in Japanese on a series of everyday life topics including foods and beverages, shopping, travel, and housing. Attention is also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Building on from HMJ204, the unit further develops basic grammatical knowledge and oral/aural skills. Students will learn to converse in Japanese on a series of everyday life topics including: transport, health, life and careers, communication and the media. Upon completion…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following Advanced level unit (12.5cp)

This unit aims to deconstruct the monolithic perception of Japanese culture and to understand Japan in terms of its relationship with its near and more distant neighbours throughout Asia and the Pacific. Incorporating the approach of queer studies, which places…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose three of the following Advanced level units (37.5cp)

This joint capstone unit builds on Japanese 2A and 2B to consolidate the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during students' study at the beginner-intermediate level. In addition to focusing on developing students' ability to read Japanese texts (through kanji…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Building on previous Japanese language study, this joint capstone unit aims to develop students' oral skills and production skills both in spoken and written formats. Students will develop conversation skills beyond everyday life situations through pair work and group work…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This joint capstone unit is designed as an extension of Japanese 3A and aims to equip students with sufficient skills to read and respond not only to the structured readings of a textbook but to a range of other primary…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

An introduction to translation practice across a range of genres including academic materials.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Designed for advanced students of Japanese to provide basic vocational training in the skills of interpreting from Japanese to English, and English to Japanese. Students are required to master specialised vocabulary, honorific expressions and the conventions of speech and behaviour…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit permits students to choose one of two strands. The first has a language emphasis and is designed for advanced students of Japanese and for native speakers of Japanese. Students will undertake structured reading (both Japanese and English sources)…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Choose two of the following Introductory level units (25cp)

We often hear that media industries are in decline. However, as this unit will demonstrate, what we are actually seeing is a profound reshaping of new and old media industries in response to shifts in the media landscape. In this…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces you to the complex and diverse relationships between media texts and audiences. You will engage with key theories in audience studies and explore a range of topics including media effects, citizen journalism, children’s media, and fan cultures.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces you to the theory and practice of media writing. You will learn techniques for news, feature, copy, online, script and media release writing, and will produce a package of practical work showcasing different writing styles. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces you to the principles, practices and theories of public relations and places the profession in its societal and media contexts. You will become familiar with public relations writing and develop skills in gathering, organizing and presenting information.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides you with an opportunity to develop the media analysis skills gained in first year. Emerging Screen Practices investigates patterns and changes in the production and consumption of screen texts. Topics may include: cross-media narratives; ownership vs streaming;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides you with skills in news analysis, writing and production. You will build your understanding of news by examining the practices and texts of news producers and the broader political, social, economic and organisational dynamics impacting on news;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose four of the following Advanced level units (50cp)

This unit examines the representation of crime in the media and its role as a primary source of information for public discourse about crime, criminality and criminal justice in contemporary society. Students engage with key critical criminology and media and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Sport is a major driver of media change. New media practices, technologies, platforms, policies and economies have developed to service the multi-billion dollar global sporting industry. Its stars are among our biggest media celebrities; sporting events attract massive advertising dollars;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines the storytelling tactics and strategies associated with the design and communication of brand narratives. The unit addresses the ways in which, in the changing media environment, brand narratives are now communicated via social networks and key 'influencers'…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Media industries, companies and organisations have access to more data than ever before. Increasingly, we hear that production is data-driven; formulated for and by algorithms. But what does it truly mean to create and consume content in the era of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the media texts, communication strategies, and media and food industry relationships associated with food media and communications. It will consider media's intensified focus on food from two perspectives—the growth in popular food media (television cooking shows, cookbooks,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Building on first year screen analysis skills, this unit examines video games and virtual worlds from the perspective of text, industry, and audience. You will explore, analyse and discuss topics including: fandom and video game communities; storytelling and innovation in…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores the music industry at a time of significant change. It considers the ways in which the music industry's focus is no longer on the sale of recorded music to consumers but on the licensing of music for…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The study of Latin is one of the core humanist disciplines. Along with Ancient Greek, this is one of the principal languages in which the fundamentals of western thought were argued out, in the sciences, philosophy and medicine, as well as in literature in the broadest sense. Students gain from the careful study of ancient texts a better understanding of the contemporary world, and analytical and linguistic skills, which are extremely valuable in a range of professions and pursuits. The Latin curriculum offers a rigorous intellectual training that can be put to use in almost any field. To this end we train students in the skills needed to read a range of ancient texts, and to be alert to the expression of cultural nuance both in language and in written communication.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Intended for students who have no previous knowledge of the language. The unit is designed to provide a rapid survey of the Latin language sufficient to enable students to read selected passages of adapted Latin. It includes some historical and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the work undertaken in HTL101 and enables students to proceed to further studies in Latin. The unit is designed to continue a rapid survey of the Latin language sufficient to enable students to read selected passages…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the study of the ancient Latin language undertaken in HTL101 and HTL102. In it, students will complete the JACT Reading Latin textbook, including the passages of unadapted poetry and prose (Catullus, Cicero, Virgil, Horace).…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following four Advanced level units (50cp)

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consists of a specialised study of a Latin author or aspect of Roman literature.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit consists of a specialised study of a Latin author or aspect of Roman literature.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The Legal Studies major gives students an introduction to some of the essential techniques and knowledge applied by lawyers and a grounding in some of the major fields of law. With guidance from law school academics, students will develop the ability to read and interpret legal texts (statutes and case law), gain an understanding of some of the central policy issues in law and advance legal arguments orally and in writing.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

To give students a "feel" for the study of the law. This includes understanding approaches to legal problems and issues, classification of various areas of the law, skills that need to be developed to study law, the scope and dynamics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
Hobart5 Week Session Nov
HobartIntensive Session Jun
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introductory overview of the interplay between the various legal systems which impact on our contemporary Australian legal regime. Specifically, the unit will consider the Aboriginal legal system (before and after white settlement), the reception and application…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonIntensive Session Jul
Cradle CoastIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces students to the reasoning techniques used by judges and lawyers to deal with problems governed by statute and common law, taught how to replicate some of these techniques to solve legal problems and encouraged to consider why…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit aims to introduce students to the study of Public Law and to introduce major themes and ideas which are relevant to both Constitutional Law and Administrative Law. The course will be divided into 4 related modules:Module 1. Introduction…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Philosophy 1: Ethics introduces many of the major topics in ethics and political philosophy, and through an examination of past and current texts gives students a philosophical perspective on the contemporary social world. The unit explores foundational questions about ethics…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Philosophy 2: Mind and Metaphysics explores key philosophical questions about human identity and our place in nature. Through an examination of historical and contemporary philosophical texts, from Western and Eastern traditions, the unit explores the nature of persons and the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose four of the following Intermediate level units (50cp)

We are all constantly faced with moral questions, but what are the foundations of morality? On what grounds do we, should we, base our moral decisions? What is it that makes some actions right and others wrong? What is moral…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit surveys the main Western philosophical traditions from the Renaissance up to the 19th century. At the centre stand the metaphysical and epistemological systems of the Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz) and the Empiricists (Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume),…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Logic is the theory of good reasoning. This unit introduces students to some of the types of reasoning that are regularly used in every day life, in philosophy and in many other fields. Students will be introduced to a variety…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is an introduction to political philosophy. Students will study influential political ideologies, including liberalism, libertarianism, communitarianism, feminism, and Marxism. They will engage with debates about the nature of political values, such as freedom, justice, equality, and democracy. These…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Science is our most successful attempt to understand the world around us, and it plays an extremely important role in contemporary society. As such, we should not ignore the possibility that science may have something to contribute to traditional philosophical…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Continental philosophy encompasses a wide range of philosophical schools, including Existentialism, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Deconstruction, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thought, all of which have shaped our understanding of the human condition, not only in philosophy proper, but also in art, literature,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Metaphysics and epistemology are two, intimately related, core areas of philosophy. This unit introduces students to contemporary debates about both, and about the relation between our views on reality and what we can know about that reality. The metaphysical issues…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The philosophy of mind considers the nature of the mind and its relationship to the body, and the interrelations between our first personal perspective on the world and the picture of the mind developed in the emerging cognitive sciences. This…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Complete the following Advanced level unit (12.5cp)

Through a close examination of core philosophical texts from the late nineteenth century on, and making use of their skills in textual and argument analysis, students will examine the foundational methodological presuppositions of contemporary Western philosophical traditions. This unit completes…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose one of the following Advanced level units (12.5cp)

Sometimes philosophy can seem overly theoretical, and irrelevant to the concerns of non-philosophers. In recent decades, however, philosophy has undergone an "applied turn". Applied philosophers address the practical questions about individual conduct and public policy raised by contemporary social and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Continental philosophy encompasses a wide range of philosophical schools, including Existentialism, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Deconstruction, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thought, all of which have shaped our understanding of the human condition, not only in philosophy proper, but also in art, literature,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit will explore feminist contributions to political philosophy, epistemology (the study of knowledge), ethics, and metaphysics (understandings of the nature of reality). We will examine whether and under what circumstances knowledge is gender-neutral, and whether (and when) the sex…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Feminist philosophy, psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology and queer theory have raised stimulating questions about the body. This unit examines how the body is theorised, how it interacts with questions of culture and class, and explores the implications of our understanding of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to the principal traditions of Buddhist philosophy. The unit begins with an examination of the discourses of the Buddha in the Pali tradition and an examination of the common core of all Buddhist philosophical schools. It then studies…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The Politics and Policy major teaches students to understand and analyse political, social, economic and organisational processes that shape politics, governance, public policy and public affairs. It aims to produce graduates who are informed and active citizens equipped to undertake varied roles in government agencies, political parties, non-governmental organisations and the private sector as researchers, policy analysts, activists, advisers and elected representatives. In doing so, the major develops students’ understanding of the contemporary political, policy, economic, social and environmental challenges faced by governments and how local, national and global institutions may respond to complex governance problems in an era of globalisation and change.

The major develops students’ understanding of the discipline though units on sub-fields including Australian and comparative politics, political ideas, governance and public policy, and environmental politics. In its teaching and assessment practices, it draws on case studies of local, national, regional and international political and policy issues to allow students to connect and critically analyse political science scholarship with respect to real word issues and events. Further, the program offers students the opportunity to undertake an internship unit with the Tasmanian Public Service or Tasmanian member of parliament (subject to student performance and available places). The Politics and Policy major program thus provides students with knowledge of the complex world of politics, governance and public affairs involving ideas, values, beliefs, interests and array of institutions with a focus on the role of governments and how they operate. Politics and Policy students are thus equipped with essential skills in research, reasoned argument, and in written and verbal communication.

If you wish to major and minor, or double major, in International Relations and Politics & Policy HIR101 and HPP101 cannot count to both and different introductory level units will be required. Please choose another minor that commences at first year and complete the 2 x introductory level units towards this discipline, eg Sociology HGA101 and HGA102. You will then commence your IR OR Politics & Policy major/minor from second year with the normal units as per schedule. 

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We live in an uncertain era during which global issues increasingly affect our daily lives. Forces associated with globalisation and the rise of international institutions as important collective decision-making bodies have all undermined the sovereign state's position as the key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideologies focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative and other…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit examines why and how the state, bureaucracies, markets, interest groups, NGOs, communities and networks are evolving in response to complex public policy problems and general trends in 'governance'. Students will be introduced to theoretical lenses and models for…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit has two central goals. First, it aims to provide students with an introduction to comparative politics. Second, it seeks to provide students with advanced knowledge of politics in contrasting parts of the world. The unit consists of three…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

This unit takes an environmental justice perspective in introducing students to the dynamics that shape contemporary environmental policy (including green politics) with broad appeal to students of politics and policy, justice studies, environmental studies and science. The roles of politics…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Public participation has become an important component of contemporary politics and policy making. Globalisation and technology have also introduced new formulations of civic engagement such as 'cyber-participation' and 'hactivism'. This unit critically engages students with theories and debates that surround…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels. Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System;…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to American politics. The unit begins with an overview of United States political history, culture and institutions before focusing on the nature and impact of recent presidencies. It examines key issues which dominate contemporary…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement as part of their undergraduate studies. Internships vary across programs in the School of Social Sciences but may (for instance) be undertaken in a number of public sector agencies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement in the Parliament as part of their undergraduate studies. Students interested in an internship should contact the relevant course coordinator for details about which opportunities may be available in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is a ‘capstone’ (highly recommended) third year unit for all students undertaking a major in Politics, Policy or International Relations. It surveys the most important theoretical perspectives of these three majors and explores how they can assist us to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociology is the study of human societies, focusing on the organisation of social life from individuals to social institutions. It examines people and other actors in their social contexts, and provides insights into the ways factors such as class, wealth, race, gender, ethnicity, age, sexuality, disability, and religion shape societies at the individual, group, and institutional levels. Central to the sociological endeavour is a critical perspective: sociologists question the popular explanations of social life, through the application of rigorous and systematic methods of enquiry, and examine the dynamics of power and inequality.

Sociology graduates are expected to exhibit an understanding of sociology as an academic discipline. Sociology includes a great diversity of areas of specialisation, objects of study, research methods and theoretical approaches. Sociological knowledge is often contested, provisional, and situated.

As a discipline, Sociology is characterised by empirically based social research and by carefully examined social theory. Sociology students develop skills in critical thinking, self-direction, collaboration and communication. Graduates of sociology programs are well equipped to go into a variety of careers across a range of government and non-government sectors, particularly those that require high level research and critical thinking skills

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following two Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

SAMS is a core unit for students completing a sociology major. It provides students with an understanding of the theoretical models and concepts developed by sociologists to explain the major social transformations of Western industrial democracies from the end of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
AND choose one of the following Intermediate level units (12.5cp)

Examines how social issues in contemporary Australia are constructed and interpreted across their social, cultural, political and moral dimensions. The unit examines the role of discourses in the construction of social issues, social groups and social arenas as social problems…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The body is normally understood as exclusively biological, but it is also subject to competing social forces. For example, our bodies allow us to comprehend the world. It is also the site through which others come to identify and classify…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete three of the following Advanced level units (37.5cp)

This unit builds upon research strategies introduced in XBR212 Interdisciplinary Social Research. Students will develop social research skills in major qualitative and quantitative methods in the social sciences. Qualitative and quantitative research design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will enable students to understand how tourism and cultural industries have dramatically changed our lives. Cultural industries have grown significantly, with examples such as museums, regional festivals and wilderness adventures. At the same time, there is an increasing…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The social diversity that is increasingly a part of Australian society includes new religious groups and new immigrant groups, as they interact with established ethnic and religious groups, and Indigenous peoples. Social processes and sociologically informed social policy are key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to sociological theory and empirical research about a range of health and illness issues. These include the social distribution and patterning of health and illness, inequalities in health, expert and public knowledge about health and illness,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Uses a number of sociological concepts, such as (post)industrial society, democracy, individualism and modernity, as tools for understanding the changing character of Australian society. These tools are used to interpret new developments in such topical areas as class and work,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The unit focuses on understanding legal…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will enable students to reflect on, and address the forces of globalisation in their life, work and community. Global flows of knowledge, products, services, workers, investments, tourists and refugees have transformed local identities, ways of life, values and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The Aboriginal Studies programme facilitates understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and societies, past and present relationships between indigenous Australians and other peoples (nationally and internationally) and the development of intercultural competence. Our guiding principal is to foster social inclusion while respecting and valuing cultural diversity. We aim to formulate and deliver a programme committed to student-centred learning, academic freedom, creativity, real world relevance, critical scholarship and rigour. We envisage continuing to develop as a broadly based cross-disciplinary enquiry that draws on contemporary theories and established traditions of the humanities and social sciences, situates local and national issues within international flows and frameworks (and vice versa), and engages with issues of sustainability and change.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Offers a general survey of Indigenous Australian societies and cultures from the earliest times until the mid-20th century. The unit explores some debates about aspects of Aboriginal social life before the British colonisation-for example, social and political structures, economies, religious…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a detailed introduction to contemporary Aboriginal socio-economic experience across Australia from the final decades of the 20th century. Issues addressed include the extent of Aboriginal disadvantage; the experience of racism; aspects of contemporary Aboriginal cultures; child welfare, health and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Engages students in a detailed study of Indigenous experience of Australian legal and justice systems, and of the historical interaction between Indigenous and Australian law. Contexts in which these themes are explored include Land Rights and Native Title, criminal justice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores concepts and issues relevant to, and the realities of, Indigenous Tourism. It delves into tourism in Australia's and New Zealand's colonial pasts, and also engages with contemporary ventures such as Indigenous dance, eco-tourism, pilgrimage to sacred sites,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Statistics generally indicate significant disparities between the health and well being of Indigenous people and the broader non-Indigenous population in Australia. This unit explores reasons for this situation, including a 'social determinants' approach examining socio-economic, cultural and political factors impacting…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit provides students with an understanding of the roles, functions and status of women in past and present Aboriginal societies from Aboriginal perspectives. It considers the influence of colonisation in shaping both western and Aboriginal perceptions of Indigenous women's…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a comprehensive exploration of Aboriginal art forms, particularly painting. Students develop an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal creative expression in traditional and contemporary Aboriginal cultures. Apparent changes in Aboriginal creative expression are examined, including those brought about by the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The Ancient Civilisations major connects students with the histories, literatures, and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. ‘Ancient Civs’ is uniquely broad in its thematic range, reflecting the diverse body of evidence that survives from the ancient world. Our units include topics in mythology and religion, ancient drama, Roman social history, classical epic, and many others. As such, Ancient Civilisations is dynamic, rigorous, and multidisciplinary: it incorporates elements of ancient historiography, literary criticism, archaeology, and philosophical enquiry.

The teaching staff and curriculum of the Ancient Civilisations major encourage students to develop interpretive and analytical skills, as well as skills in written and oral communication. We foster critical thinking, research methods, and intercultural awareness. Our major prepares students for a range of professional careers, as well as for postgraduate study. Students might also wish to supplement their studies by studying Latin (HTL) and/or Ancient Greek (HTG). These complementary majors equip students with the skills to read ancient sources in their original languages.

The Ancient Civs major begins with a pair of introductory units which offer a broad survey of the ancient Greek and Roman cultures, and introduce skills for interpreting these. At the intermediate level, students have the opportunity to pursue a wide variety of interests ranging from love-poetry to Roman Republican history. At the advanced level, we offer a suite of capstone units which seeks to draw the major’s thematic threads together.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit provides a chronological and thematic overview of the history, literature, and culture of Ancient Greece, from the Dark Ages (c. 1200 BCE) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE). Examples of seminar topics include epic poetry…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a chronological and thematic overview of the history, literature, and culture of ancient Rome, from its foundation in 753 BCE to the reign of the emperor Domitian (81–96 CE). Examples of seminar topics include the Roman monarchy,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

This unit explores the roles of spectacles and the spectacular in ancient Roman society through the study of literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and other heritage sources. Lecture and discussion topics include gladiatorial games, chariot races, animal hunts, military triumphs, theatrical shows,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines tragic and comic dramas of classical antiquity, which established the nature of western drama for later ages, including the works of Sophocles and Aeschylus, and the bawdy and irreverent Greek and Roman comedies. Particular attention will be paid to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is a study of the role of myth in Greek and Roman culture through literary texts and ancient art, including an exploration of the relationship between mythological narratives and religious ritual. This unit also traces developments in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Nero: misunderstood emperor, malevolent tyrant, or a monster of the middle order? This unit explores the enigmatic and transgressive literature produced during the reign of Nero (AD 54-68): the writings of the philosopher and tragic poet Seneca, the anarchic Satyricon…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines two of the most well documented periods in classical antiquity: the last century of the Roman Republic and the first century of the Roman Empire. The social, cultural, and political turmoil of this era is viewed through…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The study of ancient Greek is traditionally one of the core disciplines in the humanities. This is the language in which the fundamentals of western thought were argued out, in the sciences, philosophy and medicine, as well as in literature in the broadest sense. Students gain from the careful study of ancient texts a better understanding of the contemporary world, and analytical and linguistic skills, which are extremely valuable in a range of professions and pursuits. What the Greek curriculum offers is a rigorous intellectual training that can be put to use in any field. To this end we train students in the skills needed to read a range of ancient texts, and to be alert to cultural and linguistic nuance.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Provides an introduction to Classical Greek, the language in which were laid down the foundations of western drama, philosophy and more. Intended for students who have no previous knowledge of the language, the unit is designed to provide a rapid…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the work undertaken in HTG101 and enables students to proceed to further studies in Greek. The unit is designed to continue a rapid survey of the Greek language sufficient to enable students to read selected passages…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Choose two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Consists of a study of selected Ancient Greek texts. Selections in previous semesters have included Homer, Plato, the Attic tragedians, Aristophanes and Plutarch.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consists of a study of selected Ancient Greek texts. Selections in previous semesters have included Homer, Plato, the Attic tragedians, Aristophanes and Plutarch.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the study of the ancient Greek language undertaken in HTG101 and HTG102. In it, students will complete the JACT Reading Greek textbook, including the passages of unadapted poetry and prose (Homer, Plato and Herodotus).…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The Asian Philosophy minor represents a significant step forward in the internationalisation of the Humanities curriculum. In addition, this is a course of study whose natural, but not inevitable culmination, is overseas study. No other Philosophy program in the nation affords students the opportunity to complete studies in Asian Philosophy with this breadth and depth. In addition, we have an overseas study unit taught across the summer to serve as its capstone. This unit has enrolment limits because of our agreement with the Central University for Tibetan Studies, so it will still be possible for students to complete the minor even if they can’t journey to India.

Please note, if you choose this minor you will enrol in 25cp of Degree Core Knowledge units at introductory level in your first year of study and begin your minor in your second year. 
 
Complete two of the following Introductory level units (25cp)

This unit will discuss the doctrines and concepts central to two different, but related traditions: Zen Buddhism and Taoism. It will examine the historical rise and development of these traditions through a critical study of the classics of Bodhidharma, Lao…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Examines the nature and philosophical foundations of Buddhist ethical practice. Particular emphasis is given to the theory of nonviolence as developed in the classical Buddhist tradition as well as its development in other traditions, and a range of other issues,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

An intensive introduction to Buddhist philosophy, Tibetan Buddhist hermeneutics and Tibetan history and culture.Students study at the Central University of Tibetan Studies (CUTS) and are taught by staff of that institute. Lectures on Tibetan politics, art, music and medicine are…

Credit Points: 25

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (extended)
LauncestonSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to the principal traditions of Buddhist philosophy. The unit begins with an examination of the discourses of the Buddha in the Pali tradition and an examination of the common core of all Buddhist philosophical schools. It then studies…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is intended as an introduction into a select group of central topics in Indian philosophy. Questions of a very general kind, such as: What is reality? How do we know what we know? Can we trust our judgement…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary area of study that equips graduates with the skills, knowledge and conceptual understanding for employment engaged with the Asian region, either directly or indirectly. Students will develop a knowledge of the developments that have shaped - and continue to shape -the Asian region as well as an understanding of the diversity within and across countries in the region. Students will build up knowledge of Asian societies, cultures, beliefs, history, politics, media, cities and environments, and the connections between the peoples of Asia, Australia and the rest of the world within the overall framework of global competence and Asia literacy. Asian Studies students will also develop an understanding of the concept of ‘Asia’ and will be able bring a perspective informed by knowledge of Asia to major issues and challenges facing our world today. Asia Studies provides students with the skills and knowledge to effectively communicate and engage with Asia in order to live, work, and learn in the region.

Complete the following Introductory level unit (12.5cp)

What is ‘Asia’? Where is ‘Asia’? These seem like obvious questions but – as you will learn in this unit – the answers are not so straightforward.And what does ‘Asia’ mean to the many countries in the Asian region? In…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
PLUS one of the following Introductory level units (12.5cp)

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Develops competence in beginners spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lectures, student- and teacher-led tutorials and speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Become better prepared to deal with the variety of culturally challenging situations you will encounter in whichever part of the world you live and work. Develop an appreciation of the personal and professional benefits which come from being more culturally…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Complete the following Intermediate level unit (12.5cp)

What does it mean to 'study Asia'? And how might we go about it? What are the important academic debates which shape our understanding of Asia today?In this unit, you will learn how to closely read and critically analyse some…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
PLUS one of the following Intermediate level units (12.5cp)

Cities serve as essential gateways for understanding how local and transnational forces have shaped particular built environments and urban cultures. This unit explores Asian cities by using the comparison of capital cities with port cities as its analytical principle. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

How to understand the media, news, and reporting is one of the key challenges of the 21st century. At the same time, any analysis of the media needs to take into account reporting of Asia and from Asia.In this unit,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Australia's accelerating engagement with our neighbours in the Asia-Pacific requires an ability to empathise, relate to, and work with diverse cultures and places. You will have opportunities to learn about the Asia-Pacific region’s varied environments, cultures, political systems and ways…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The units in the Australian History minor are about the Australian people and their history. From the Aboriginal past in deep time to convicts and British colonisation, the creation of a nation in 1901, world wars, and expanding citizenship in the late twentieth century, units in this minor examine a history constantly in flux. This suite of units are central to understanding Australia’s place in the world because they examine Australia’s global connections past and present: with Asia, British and other European empires, and with Pacific neighbours. They explore Australia’s defensiveness as well as openness through time, and moments of conflict as well as political, economic, and cultural achievements. The minor demonstrates how historians interpret the past using a wide range of evidence and approaches in order to comprehend change over time. Students may study the nation’s built heritage, of which half is located in Tasmania. The Australian History minor is particularly helpful for students because it provides strong pathways to careers in teaching and public service and is aligned to the National History Curriculum

Please note, if you choose this minor you will enrol in 25cp of Degree Core Knowledge units at introductory level in your first year of study and begin your minor in your second year.  
 
Complete two of the following Intermediate level units (25cp)

Examines the history of the Australian people and culture from early European settlement to the federation of the colonies and the making of a nation. Explores the interaction between Imperial policy, Indigenous resistance and the political ideals and personal ambitions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

It was said that ‘the sun never sets on the British Empire’. This unit explores the origins, growth, and difficult afterlife of the British Empire from the 18th century until the present. It has a particular focus on the colonisation…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This cornerstone unit is designed to prepare students for the multiple ways in which they might apply their History studies in the future. We will explore aspects of historical thinking, such as ideas about context and causation, methods of historical…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

 
Complete two of the following Advanced level units (25cp)

Examines patterns of change and continuity, and conflict and consensus in Australia from federation to 2001. Topics include nation building to 1914; the first world war, progressivism in the 1920s; Australia and the world depression in the 1930s; the second…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines Australia's historical and political connections within the Pacific world. Taking an 'oceans connect' approach to world history the unit considers Australia within the dynamic regional spheres of the southwestern Pacific and trans-Tasman worlds, as well as the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit allows students to develop a broad knowledge of heritage issues from the perspective of History as a discipline and to develop analytical skills concerning local and global heritage issues. You will critically reflect on how heritage is ‘made’…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The Chinese language program aims to develop students’ Chinese (Mandarin) linguistic capability in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; as well as to cultivate students’ cross-cultural communicative skills through the integration of relevant cultural knowledge in language learning.

Students are strongly encouraged to complete their studies in another discipline with a China-Asia focus such as Asian Studies and International Relations to complement their language study.

The Chinese language program also provides students with opportunities to study in country thereby fostering a global perspective and intercultural competence in their personal and future professional interactions.

Complete the following two Introductory level units (25cp)

Develops competence in beginners spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). Unit includes grammar lectures, student- and teacher-led tutorials and speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International studen