Bachelor of Social Work with Honours (A4S)

Overview  2020

ATAR

No Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Achievement of a specified ATAR will guarantee acceptance into a course or institution, subject to any non-ATAR criteria being met, such as a prerequisite study or English language proficiency.

:
See entry requirements

Duration

mode.loadCategory not equal to Part Time
Minimum 4 Years, up to a maximum of 9 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

Hobart
Semester 1
Launceston
Semester 1
Cradle Coast
Semester 1

Commonwealth Supported places available

ATAR

No Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Achievement of a specified ATAR will guarantee acceptance into a course or institution, subject to any non-ATAR criteria being met, such as a prerequisite study or English language proficiency.

:
See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 4 Years
Entry requirements

Location

Hobart
Semester 1
Launceston
Semester 1
Now more than ever compassionate and engaged social workers are needed to help improve the life-chances and wellbeing of people and to combat societal inequality.

Contemporary social workers need contemporary skills to respond meaningfully to social problems. Our Bachelor of Social Work with Honours (Professional and Research Specialisations) has been redesigned after direct industry feedback to reflect current and emerging practice trends in the profession.

The newly updated honours-level course with specialisation options has been designed to exceed professional accreditation standards, and will give you key skills in ethical, innovative and collaborative social work practice.

The new curriculum will equip you with advanced knowledge of social work research principles and methods. It also includes 1,000 hours of supervised professional field education placement, and students are encouraged to take part in additional project and research work with communities and industry.

You will graduate as a creative and ethical communicator who respectfully uses knowledge to meet the needs of diverse social work client groups, communities and organisations. You will be able to respond to social justice and human rights challenges in ways that are culturally sensitive, principled, and effective.


Cradle Coast students should note they are required to attend a series of workshops in Launceston for two units: HGW312 and HGW424. The dates of these workshops will be available shortly.

Students who commenced the Bachelor of Social Work (13L) or the Bachelor of Social Work with Honours (R4B) in 2018 or earlier should refer to the entry for their relevant course code and year.

  1. Recommend improvements to services, policies and professional accountability in social work based on critical analysis, research, and culturally relevant knowledge.
  2. Combine decolonising social work knowledge and practices to address inequality and injustice in ways that promote sustainable social change.
  3. Adapt and respond to the communication needs and capacities of diverse social work client groups, communities, and organisations.
  4. Develop social work leadership approaches that are collaborative, cooperative and useful in micro, meso and macro contexts.
  5. Formulate ethical social work responses to local, national and global social justice and human rights challenges.
  6. Design interventions and strategies that can contribute to the decolonising agenda in social work by using creative, entrepreneurial, and relational approaches.

In your third and fourth years of study you will need to complete a minimum of 1000 hours of professional experience placement, equivalent to 2 x 14 weeks full-time. Depending on the organisation and where you are at in your degree, there will be opportunities of 5, 4 or 3 day per week placements.

The University will set up the agreement and match you to a suitable organisation. You will also have the opportunity to be provided with rural and remote experiences in the north and northwest.

Before you begin placement, you will need to attend preparation seminars and a placement interview. You will be allocated a field educator/social worker, with a minimum of 2 years full time equivalent post-graduation experience in the field. Your professional placement experience provides you with the opportunity to learn how to translate theories of social work into practice.

It is possible in some circumstances for students to complete a placement in their place of work.

Recognition of Prior Learning is possible for the first placement. Students who are given RPL for the first placement are unable to complete the final placement in their place of employment.

See more information and resources at Field Education Placements.

Career outcomes

The skills and expertise our Social Work graduates gain equips them for a diverse range of rewarding careers, including:

  • child safety practitioner
  • social worker
  • project manager
  • youth worker
  • mental health practitioner
  • researcher
  • policy analyst and advisor
  • community development worker
  • migrant and refugee settlement workers
  • case manager
  • drug and alcohol counsellor
  • palliative care social worker
  • relationships counsellor
  • disability advocate.

Professional Recognition

This is an Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) accredited course. It is an entry qualification into the social work profession and has been determined to meet the Australian Social Work Education and Accreditation Standards. As a new course, the degree meets the national standards for Provisional Accreditation.

Course structure

Completion of the Bachelor of Social Work requires 400 credit points including:

  • 100 credit points of Discipline Knowledge
  • 100 credit points of Degree Core Knowledge
  • 100 credit points of Experience and Engagement units
  • 100 credit points from the Research or Professional Honours pathway. Entry into the research pathway is by invitation only.

as per the schedule below.

Core

Complete all of the following units (50cp):

This unit uses the theoretical concept of 'Lifeworlds' to frame an exploration of the life worlds of Indigenous peoples globally: across cultural, social being and doing of Indigenous peoples at the local (palawa/pakana)Tasmania, national (Noongar), Western Australia and international (Navajo…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces you to the foundations of social work practice in human service organisations. You will develop critical analytical skills to explore historical and contemporary inequalities of power and privilege based on, for example, race, gender, sexuality, geographic location…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human behaviour is not universal. Why do individuals behave the way they do? Lecture content will introduce and explore theoretical descriptions of individual differences such as personality and intelligence that can impact behaviour in a variety of contexts, as well…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 

Studies of the Individual

Complete two of the following units (25cp)

How do assumptions about gender influence our understanding of what it means to be a human being? In this unit we explore a variety of different ways that human beings have been imagined and thought about across time in western…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In today’s information-rich world it is essential to be able to interpret and critically evaluate empirical and popular reports of psychological research, as well as research findings more broadly. We need to be able to recognise the characteristics of valid…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Brain and Behaviour is intended for students of Psychology, Medicine, Pharmacy, and allied science, medical and health professions and introduces major theoretical and empirical areas in psychology, biological bases of behaviour, and their associated practical applications. Lecture topics include nervous…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do humans perceive the world around them, learn, and make decisions? Under what conditions do we do these things well? When and why do things go a bit “pear-shaped”? How can we be better? This unit introduces the study…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 

Studies of Society

Complete two of the following units (25cp)

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Gender & World explores the shape(s) and impact(s) of gendered assumptions on human interactions in diverse areas of the world and in different historical periods. This unit focuses on how people have acted and do act on the basis of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a detailed introduction to contemporary Aboriginal socio-economic experience across Australia from the final decades of the 20th century. Issues addressed include the extent of Aboriginal disadvantage; the experience of racism; aspects of contemporary Aboriginal cultures; child welfare, health and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Offers a general survey of Indigenous Australian societies and cultures from the earliest times until the mid-20th century. The unit explores some debates about aspects of Aboriginal social life before the British colonisation-for example, social and political structures, economies, religious…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This introduction to geography and environmental studies integrates physical and social science inquiry. You study earth evolution, human development and their interaction, in light of questions about sustainability. You apply this knowledge to issues of vital importance around the world…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Core

Complete all of the following units (50cp)

Human Rights are fundamental human rights that are inherent in every individual on the basis of humanity. They are underpinned by concepts of human dignity and the essential equality of all people. This breadth unit takes an inter-disciplinary perspective to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart5 Week Session Feb A

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the philosophies, principles and practices of juvenile justice and child protection. The interface between juvenile justice and child protection is well established, institutionally, historically and in terms of shared clients, and an informed…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary study of social justice. The unit draws on social sciences concepts and theories as well as a number of case studies from Australia and abroad to explore the forms of marginalization,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Examines how social issues in contemporary Australia are constructed and interpreted across their social, cultural, political and moral dimensions. The unit examines the role of discourses in the construction of social issues, social groups and social arenas as social problems…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 

Studies of Society

Complete three of the following units (37.5cp)

Statistics consistently show that Aboriginal mortality rates far exceed those of setter-Australians, indeed some 50% of Aboriginal Australians die before they reach the age of 50. This unit explores the reasons for this situation, taking a social determinants approach that…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociological Analysis of Modern Society (SAMS) provides students with an understanding of the concepts and approaches developed by sociologists to explain major social changes in Western democracies from the end of the 18th century to the present. The unit is…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to introduce students to the issues and processes associated with working with offenders, particularly those under the authority of corrective services in prison and community corrections. The unit explores issues pertaining directly to how best to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We are all constantly faced with moral questions, but what are the foundations of morality? On what grounds do we, should we, base our moral decisions? What is it that makes some actions right and others wrong? What is moral…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is an introduction to political philosophy. Students will study influential political ideologies, including liberalism, libertarianism, communitarianism, feminism, and Marxism. They will engage with debates about the nature of political values, such as freedom, justice, equality, and democracy. These…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideologies focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative and other…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit helps you develop geographical tools to investigate and transform human worlds. The unit demonstrates the value of human geographical inquiry by exploring contemporary issues of equality, justice, conflict and cooperation. You will analyse case studies on topics including…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 

Research

Complete one of the following units (12.5cp)

The field of psychology has an aim that, on the surface, appears straightforward: to understand human behaviour. However, human behaviour is varied and complex, and achieving this goal presents a considerable challenge. Researchers must be familiar with and adhere to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Core

Complete all of the following units (100cp)

This unit is offered while students are on first placement, and provides them with an awareness and understanding of the legal and organisational settings for social work, and their impact on practice. Key areas of legal and organisational theory and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Social workers confront ever-increasing impacts of social suffering arising from ever widening and deepening disparities of power and privilege in local and global contexts. This unit equips you with intersectional analysis skills, theoretical knowledge and practice skills to understand, confront…

Credit Points: 25

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Communication and Assessment Skills in Social Work provides a broad overview of human development theories and direct practice skills underpinning work with individuals. Additionally, you are taught communication skills to support assessment report and case note writing. Two key themes…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores how social work theory and practice inter-relate as a basis for defining the purpose and practice of social work. It presents a construct of social work as planned change, which is done with care, in consideration of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart5 Week Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Students are required to undertake a minimum of 500 hours of placement in a setting that is relevant to social work practice in order to experience a range of practice tasks. Field educators are allocated to each student and through…

Credit Points: 37.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In the fourth year, students are considered for either a Research Honours or Professional Honours specialisation 

Research Honours: Complete all of the following units (100cp)

The research pathway is by invitation only.

This unit builds on the knowledge gained in HGW309 Research and Policy for Change. It provides an opportunity for students to develop research knowledge and begin to implement a research proposal, in conjunction with the Honours Co-ordinator and their supervisor,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Social Work Research Practices examines research methodologies that are utilised by social workers in working towards a more just, humane and inclusive society. Themes of decolonisation, collaboration and sustainability create a focus for designing research processes that are participative and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the intersection between trauma and justice and is informed by a commitment to social justice and a political ethic of care. At a macro level, you will learn how social workers can promote policy, legislation and practice…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit extends understanding of what it means to initiate responses to social problems, take responsibility for enacting and leading these responses, and being a part of ventures that do the same. Collaborative and collective social work leadership approaches and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The final year Social Work Practicum is one of the capstone units in the Bachelor of Social Work with Honours. Students undertake 500 hours (minimum) of placement in a setting that is relevant to social work practice. Placements are undertaken…

Credit Points: 25

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart16 Week Session Jul
Launceston16 Week Session Jul
Cradle Coast16 Week Session Jul

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This capstone unit provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of your learning that was applied to design and implement interventions, including research, across your entire social work degree including a specific focus on your final placement. You…

Credit Points: 25

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 

Professional Honours: Complete all of the following units (100cp)

Social Work Research Practices examines research methodologies that are utilised by social workers in working towards a more just, humane and inclusive society. Themes of decolonisation, collaboration and sustainability create a focus for designing research processes that are participative and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit extends understanding of what it means to initiate responses to social problems, take responsibility for enacting and leading these responses, and being a part of ventures that do the same. Collaborative and collective social work leadership approaches and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This capstone unit provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of your learning that was applied to design and implement interventions, including research, across your entire social work degree including a specific focus on your final placement. You…

Credit Points: 25

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the intersection between trauma and justice and is informed by a commitment to social justice and a political ethic of care. At a macro level, you will learn how social workers can promote policy, legislation and practice…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 37.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
Hobart16 Week Session Jul
Launceston16 Week Session Jul
Cradle Coast16 Week Session Jul

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Entry requirements

If you are interested in studying the Bachelor of Social Work (Honours), you will need to meet at least one of the General Entrance Requirements of the University, and the following course-specific entry requirements:

If you are a Year 12 school leaver
  • An ATAR score of 65 or higher (or see Alternative entry pathways below).
If you are a non-school leaver
  • An equivalent ranking calculated by your previous qualifications and work experience.

Talk to us on 1300 363 864 or enquire online about your eligibility.

If you are an international student

Visit International Future Students or enquire online about your eligibility.

Police Record Check

Students will need to obtain a Tasmania Police Schedule 1 National Police Record Check and Working with Vulnerable Persons and Children Check to meet pre-practicum requirements.

Safety in Practice Compliance

Students will also need to complete a Safety in Practice Agreement to meet practicum prerequisite requirements.

See more information and resources at Field Education Placements.

In order to be eligible for entry to Year 2 of the course applicants must either:

  • have completed the equivalent of at least one-year full-time study (100 credit points of units) in a Bachelor degree or one-year full-time study (100cp of units) in a degree program, excluding foundation units. It is expected that students will have undertaken at least 1 x 12.5% unit in Aboriginal studies. It is preferred students will have undertaken at least 4 x 12.5% units in study areas relating to studies of society and studies of the individual.

OR

  • have successfully completed the Diploma of Social Science (Community Services), or its equivalent, in the TAFE (or equivalent) sector. Students will be given advanced standing for 1 year of the BSW(Hons). They will be required to complete 8 x 12.5% units of the BSW(Hons), which includes 4 required 200 level units (Discipline and Degree Core Knowledge units) and 4 electives (Experience and Engagement units) that include at least one unit with a focus on studies of the individual/behavioural science.

OR

  • have completed an undergraduate degree (or equivalent). It is expected that students will have undertaken at least 1 x 12.5% unit in Aboriginal studies in their previous degree. It is preferred students will have undertaken at least 4 x 12.5% units in study areas relating to studies of society and studies of the individual in their completed degree. They will be required to complete 8 x 12.5% units of the BSW(Hons), which includes 4 required 200 level units (Discipline and Degree Core Knowledge units) and 4 electives (Experience and Engagement units) that include at least one unit with a focus on studies of the individual/behavioural science.

The English proficiency requirement for entry to the BSW(Hons) by International Students will be an IELTS overall score of 7 with each band no less than 6.5.

In order to be eligible for entry to Year 3 of the course, candidates must either:

  • have completed the equivalent of at least two years full-time study (200 credit points of units) in a Bachelor degree or two years full-time study (200cp of units) in a degree program, excluding foundation units. It is expected that students will have undertaken at least 1 x 12.5% unit in Aboriginal studies. It is required students will have undertaken at least 8 x 12.5% units in study areas relating to studies of society and studies of the individual.

OR

  • have completed an undergraduate degree (or equivalent) in a non-related field. It is expected that students will have undertaken at least 1 x 12.5% unit in Aboriginal studies in their previous degree. It is required that students will have undertaken at least 8 x 12.5% units of the BSW(Hons), which includes 4 required 200 level units (Discipline and Degree Core Knowledge units) and 4 electives (Experience and Engagement units) that include at least one unit with a focus on studies of the individual/behavioural science.

The English proficiency requirement for entry to the BSW(Hons) by International Students will be an IELTS overall score of 7 with each band no less than 6.5.

How to apply for a credit transfer

Find out more information about how to apply for a credit transfer/advanced standing at Recognition for Prior Learning.

Talk to us on 1300 363 864 or enquire online about your credit transfer.

Fees & scholarships

Domestic students

Domestic students enrolled in a full fee paying place are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the fees you pay for each unit you enrol in. Full fee paying domestic students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Domestic students enrolled in a Commonwealth supported place will be charged a fee based on the number of units they enrol in. In 2020, this fee is $46.20 per unit (of 12.5 credit points). In 2020, the maximum charge for full time students is $308.

International students

2020 Total Course Fee (international students): $128,475 AUD*.

Course cost based on a rate of $30,481 AUD per standard, full-time year of study (100 credit points).

* Please note that this is an indicative fee only.

International students

International students are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the annual rate. International students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Scholarships

For information on general scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.

How can we help?

Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

Domestic
1300 363 864
International
+61 3 6226 6200
Email
Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online
Online enquiries

Next steps