Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies (P3G)

Overview  2020

ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Achievement of a specified ATAR will guarantee acceptance into a course or institution, subject to any non-ATAR criteria being met, such as a prerequisite study or English language proficiency.

: 65

Duration

mode.loadCategory not equal to Part Time
Minimum 3 Years, up to a maximum of 7 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2

Commonwealth Supported places available

ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Guaranteed Entry ATAR

Achievement of a specified ATAR will guarantee acceptance into a course or institution, subject to any non-ATAR criteria being met, such as a prerequisite study or English language proficiency.

: 65

Duration

Minimum 3 Years
Entry requirements

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2

"I chose the University of Tasmania because the course was unlike any other environmental degree. The units are practical, applicable to the real world, and align with my interests. And as someone who loves the outdoors, what better place to be than Tasmania?"

Gemma Rushton
Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies student
A Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies gives you a broad, multi-disciplinary approach to understanding and tackling environmental issues, and develops your skills to build a better future for us all.

Nature, and especially wild nature, has become increasingly important for human mental and physical well-being. At the same time, it is fast being displaced, degraded and destroyed. An ability to think critically and creatively across disciplines, in the intersection between nature and human society, is vital for informing the management, protection, and use of the natural environment. People with this knowledge will work to protect and restore nature on our one planet.

There is no better place to study natural environments and wilderness than Tasmania. Our state is a living laboratory, with a fifth of it in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Areas, and 42% in protected areas, plus all accessible straight from the campus door. Tasmania also offers a vibrant variety of urban, social, and environmental enjoyments and issues to engage with, learn from, and live amongst.

This wide, interdisciplinary degree will enable you to contribute your skills and experience to a wide variety of occupations in a wide variety of places. Every nation, regardless of their level of development, has a natural environment which must be managed and protected.

This degree combines a breadth of environment-related disciplines plus gives you the option to widen your studies and include other approaches to the study of wilderness and natural environments.

It is a practical, field-focused degree, providing many options related to the management of the natural environment and environmental policy.

The structure of the degree ensures that you gain a broad cross-disciplinary understanding of the natural environments and wilderness, while being able to specialise in areas of interest. In addition to specialist knowledge and skills, this degree also develops a wide range of general abilities applicable to careers across any sector, including communication, data collection, fieldwork, analysis, information retrieval and presentation, planning and policy development.

Graduates will be able to draw on their multidisciplinary range of knowledge and skills as they seek to address complex socio-environmental problems that have no obvious solution, and often generate considerable public interest. For example, we know that communicating climate change science is only part of the challenge and that professionals working in this area need to be able to navigate politics and social values to effect change.

You could also look to address challenges where the solution involves an understanding of multiple disciplines such as ecology, planning, and environmental impact processes, and the ability to engage with a range of stakeholders who all have different views and experience levels based, such as helping maintain healthy populations of endangered species like eagles.

Graduates are forging their way into their dream jobs, traversing landscapes ranging from sheep farms to World Heritage areas to suburban bushland, where they work indoors and outdoors on challenges that are close to their hearts and move us into a kinder era of environmental stewardship.

  1. Gather, synthesise and critically evaluate information on natural environments and their relationships with people, by: demonstrating a capability to access information relevant to a problem; drawing out the major themes and connections; assessing the reliability and specificity of the information.
  2. Demonstrate a well‐developed knowledge of the physical geography, politics and management of natural environments and wilderness by: articulating aspects of this knowledge on short notice; writing about aspects of this knowledge on short notice.
  3. Professionally apply spatial, scientific and social science techniques and tools to answer questions related to the conservation and exploitation of natural environments by: demonstrating capability to produce publishable outcomes from research; demonstrating ability to produce professional documents; demonstrating ability to produce policy documents.
  4. Effectively communicate about natural environments with other professionals and the public by: communicating data, information or recommendations to a range of audiences, for a range of purposes, and using a variety of modes; listening to, evaluating, and responding appropriately to the views of others.
  5. Undertake and critique environmental assessments and formulate and critique natural environment management plans by: engaging in processes to produce environmental assessments in a realistic context; engaging in producing natural environmental management plans in a real world context.
  6. Work ethically, effectively, responsibly, respectfully and safely in natural environments by: being independent and self-directed learners; working effectively, responsibly and safely in an individual or team context; understanding the ethical responsibilities and regulatory frameworks relevant to working in the environmental science professions.

Your study experience will be a combination of classroom, laboratory and in-the-field learning in the inspiring landscapes of Tasmania.

Tasmania is literally a living laboratory

The University of Tasmania has with six diverse ecosystems all within 30 minutes of the Sandy Bay campus, and the world’s second largest temperate rainforest only an hour away. We’re the gateway to Antarctica and, as the birthplace of the green movement, celebrate our biodiversity and environmental sustainability. Many of your classes will be conducted outside in this natural environment, and your proximity to a wide range of pristine, diverse environments, and the researchers who travel from around the world to work in them, give you unparalleled practical field experience while you study. Plus, it makes Tasmania an amazing place to live!

Learn from the best, and learn by doing

Our world-class teaching staff bring their cutting-edge findings and examples to your lessons. And not just in the laboratory and classroom, but outside doing real-world tasks such as environment management plans and heritage assessments. Research in scientific fields of agriculture, chemistry, earth sciences, ecology, environmental science and management, fisheries sciences, oceanography, physical geography, plant biology, and zoology is ranked well above world-class*, meaning that you’re learning from some of the best in the world in the same environment where they conduct their world-class research.

*Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) 2018 National Report

STEM Student Ambassadors

Students can also serve as STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Student Ambassadors. The goals of the program are to provide exceptional STEM education, outreach and community engagement in schools and elsewhere. The program provides opportunities and experiences that will lead to personal and professional growth for participants, particularly improving public speaking skills.

Study overseas at one of our partner institutions

Our international exchange program offers opportunities to study at universities around the world, and it counts towards your degree. Exchange can allow you to have an affordable educational and cultural experience in a foreign country for a semester, or a full year. To facilitate this, we offer a range of scholarships and financial assistance. You may also be eligible for OS-HELP Loans or scholarship funding to assist with their airfares, accommodation and other expenses.

Find out more about Student Exchange.

Units in this degree, including KGA331 Fire, Weeds and Ferals and KGA381 Environmental Impact Assessment involve you working with teams of students, undertaking intensive field work, and producing natural environment management plans. These plans are often utilised by the owners and managers of the land on which the students are assessing, providing direct benefit to the environment and community while you study.

Career outcomes

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The multi-disciplinary content of the Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies has provided an excellent basis for working with diverse groups on improving ecological management.

Dr Steve Leonard, Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies graduate

This interdisciplinary degree provides you with the knowledge and skills to gain employment in a wide variety of sectors related to natural environments and wilderness, vital as we continue to expand our presence on the earth and need to live in harmony with the natural environment to ensure our survival.

Opportunities include nature-based tourism, natural area management and natural area interpretation, across government, private and not for profit industries.

The broad nature of the degree also provides more general employability in the same way as the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. The skills you learn are applicable to industries and sectors all over the world. Anywhere there is interaction with the natural environment, your skills and knowledge can be utilised.

Career opportunities with natural environment and wilderness studies include:

  • Environmental protection
  • Environmental organisations and consultancies
  • Land and heritage management
  • Nature-based and eco-tourism
  • Parks planning and management
  • Resource-based industries such as forestry
  • Natural resource management

Course structure

The Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies usually takes three years to finish and requires the completion of 24 units.

Core units, combined with the Natural Environment and Wilderness major, give you a solid foundation in the relationships between people and the rest of nature and developing knowledge, experience and skills in natural environments and wilderness.

You can also customise your degree by selecting one minor from a range of environment related topics:

Ecology

Learn about the ways in which living things interact with their environment. You will study climate, soil, flora, fauna and geology, and have many opportunities to do fieldwork in a diversity of landscape. Our staff include Aboriginal Tasmanians who can give a deep perspective of place and value that is important for managing our environment. All these different skills and knowledge fit together to help make good decisions for maintaining landscape values, such as biodiversity (Hobart).

Earth Sciences

Learn how the rocks, sediments and soils that make up the surface of the earth have formed and how they can be conserved. The University of Tasmania is one of the few places that you can study geoheritage and learn to manage some of the non-living aspects of our natural environments. As well as an understanding of the earth and its processes, this is firmly situated in a management and conservation context (Hobart).

Natural Resource Management

Learn about resource economics and the conservation of nature in productive landscapes. From wood to wool production, you will learn in the field and from people who have close connections with primary producers, regulators and other land managers. This minor will appeal to a range of people who want to work to balance conservation with production (Hobart).

Marine Environments

Conservation of marine ecosystems is becoming more important as the climate changes and resources and environments are under increasing pressure. Learn how these ecosystems work and the challenging problems in their ongoing management. We tackle these issues from an integrated perspective that includes physical, regulatory and social – all of which are important for getting good environments outcomes (Launceston, Hobart).

Society and Culture

Learn about the ways that politics, social systems and cultural beliefs affect the nature of our environment, and our ability to successfully manage it around the world). You will explore a range of complex problems, such as food security, energy futures, and climate warming, using a variety of tools including fieldwork and case studies. There is a growing understanding that professionals who are skilled at engaging with a range of stakeholders to manage and plan for wicked problems are key for meaningful change (Launceston, Hobart).

Spatial Sciences and Statistics

Develop critically important skills in using statistics, mapping techniques and remote sensing to improve policy, best practice, environmental protection, and ultimately, create better environmental outcomes. Many environmental management professions require a familiarity with managing and displaying data, particularly in Geographic Information Systems where maps can convey so much valuable and accessible information. A range of challenges like bushfire and other emergencies require quantitative and mapping skills but planning for medium and longer term change also requires a sound evidence-base (Hobart).

In addition, you can choose over a third of your units from the rich variety of offerings in the university as a whole, potentially even a six-month exchange overseas if you are interested. This provides you with both a solid foundation of learning, plus the ability to customise with multi-disciplinary perspectives towards your desired career.

    

This introduction to geography and environmental studies integrates physical and social science inquiry. You study earth evolution, human development and their interaction, in light of questions about sustainability. You apply this knowledge to issues of vital importance around the world…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This foundation unit in Geography and Environmental Studies develops your knowledge of the ways in which people turn space into place, how different value positions filter our relationship with nature, and how social and environmental factors shape ecological patterns. Workshops,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Effective management of the natural environment is one of the most important challenges of our time. This field-based unit develops the abilities to describe and assess the conservation status of natural terrestrial ecosystems. Through field data collection, lectures, and a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (late)
LauncestonSpring school (late)
Cradle CoastSpring school (late)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

One from:

Australia's accelerating engagement with Asia requires a capacity to understand our northern neighbours, empathise with them, and relate to and work with them.In this unit you will have opportunities to understand the nature of the physical environment of selected parts…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit helps you develop geographical tools to investigate and transform human worlds. The unit demonstrates the value of human geographical inquiry by exploring contemporary issues of equality, justice, conflict and cooperation. You will analyse case studies on topics including…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

A unit essential for those working towards a career managing natural environments and people in protected areas. For those with other vocational interests, the unit is a way to learn about natural ecosystems and the principles of conservation management. Fire,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSummer school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to legal, administrative, social and scientific aspects of environmental impact assessment, environmental auditing, environmental management systems and related environmental management tools. We cover the practical aspects of environmental management for Tasmanian, Australian and international contexts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

     
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This unit comprises a one-semester geographical or environmental research project. It provides students with research experience in a study topic or area of their own choosing. Project design, data collection, data management and research presentation skills will be developed. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Political ecology is a diverse area of study, professional practice and activism that integrates issues of justice, sustainability and development. Political ecology seeks explanations of root causes and transformative solutions in relation to environmental problems. Analysing nature and society as…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Over six hundred million people live on the world's 43 island nation-states and on hundreds of sub-national island jurisdictions. The 'island-continent' of Australia comprises over 12,000 islands, islets and rocky outcrops, while the island-State of Tasmania is an archipelago of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Climate change is an immensely complex social and environmental problem with implications for knowledge creation, policy development, professional practice, technological advance and everyday life. This unit will help you to interpret and integrate a wide range of disciplinary perspectives and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartIntensive Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human induced climate change is arguably the most serious problem currently facing our planet. Detection and attribution of human induced climate change requires an understanding of the mechanisms of natural climate variability as well as climate change. Earth's climate is…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Catchment and coastal sedimentary landscapes change with erosion, landslides, river bank collapse, and coastal retreat with sea level rise, and this unit focuses on understanding processes and management. Vulnerability of different types of coastal systems to environmental change is explored,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Conservation of geological features and landscapes is a global priority. This unit considers strategies to sample, understand, and address geoconservation and geotourism issues. By way of a series of field-based and problem-based learning experiences, the following skills and knowledge will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The conservation of nature needs to occur at the landscape scale, as well as within protected areas, and involve landowners and the community. Landscapes can be wilderness areas, rural areas with highly varied land use or urban areas. Whatever their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, we will explore the nature of the Earth: its minerals, its rocks, its internal layering, and the record of the way the Earth has changed from its formation. We will examine the processes that drive our planet:…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit provides a broad understanding of the dynamic processes that are active on the surface of the Earth and is suitable for general science and arts students with an interest in the geological sciences. It introduces the nature and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

Enables students to recognise and interpret Earth materials and their history. This unit is aimed at students with a professional interest in the Earth. The unit commences a week before semester starts with a field trip to northeast Tasmania which…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit is focused on developing skills which are required for understanding geological forces which shape Earth's surface, methods for mapping the geology of the surface and upper crust, and geological process which operate near the Earth's surface. This unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the techniques used in geophysical exploration with emphasis on the practical aspects, and a practical overview of the application of computer technology in geology. Topics covered include gravity and magnetics, seismic refraction and reflection…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Marine geoscience is an integration of the disciplines of geology, geophysics and geochemistry. The aim of this course is to provide a broad understanding of the ocean basins and their structure with particular emphasis on the evolution of the oceans…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores central sociological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides a detailed introduction to contemporary Aboriginal socio-economic experience across Australia from the final decades of the 20th century. Issues addressed include the extent of Aboriginal disadvantage; the experience of racism; aspects of contemporary Aboriginal cultures; child welfare, health and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

Statistics consistently show that Aboriginal mortality rates far exceed those of setter-Australians, indeed some 50% of Aboriginal Australians die before they reach the age of 50. This unit explores the reasons for this situation, taking a social determinants approach that…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sociological Analysis of Modern Society (SAMS) provides students with an understanding of the concepts and approaches developed by sociologists to explain major social changes in Western democracies from the end of the 18th century to the present. The unit is…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary study of social justice. The unit draws on social sciences concepts and theories as well as a number of case studies from Australia and abroad to explore the forms of marginalization,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

One from:

Biology of Plants is a 1st year core unit for students specialising in plant science, biotechnology, and marine science. In Biology of Plants we introduce you to the origin, diversity, structure and internal processes of plants. In lectures and practical…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides an introduction to the scientific study of animals. Students are introduced to animal diversity through studying the major invertebrate and vertebrate phyla with an emphasis on Australian examples. We consider the structural and functional characteristics of each group from…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

AND

A series of lectures and associated practical classes introduces fundamental concepts in ecology of both plants and animals. It also introduces behavioural and evolutionary ecology and experimental methods. There is a strong emphasis placed on developing skills in practical ecology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This core unit provides a broad training in fundamental aspects of population and community ecology and (with other core units in the School of Biological Sciences) forms an essential basis for specialist studies at third year level. This unit focuses…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

One from:

Plants in Action is a core unit for BSc students interested in specializing in plant science. The unit explores the interaction of plants with the environment at the organism, organ, tissue and cellular levels. We examine the processes of photosynthesis,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This core unit provides a broad training in fundamental aspects of zoology, and with KZA211 (the other core unit), forms an essential basis for specialist studies in Zoology at level 3. This unit focuses on developing students' understanding of functional…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

Practical, public policy-orientated lectures and tutorials will explore a range of topics such as the management of water in a dry county, climate change, energy and biodiversity. Building on the knowledge gained in BEA111, this unit explores the concepts and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Principles of Economics 1 enables you to improve your decision-making in all domains of your life. The unit will enable you to better understand aspects of the microeconomic policy environment in which you operate, and to apply the key economic…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonAccelerated Study Period 1
LauncestonAccelerated Study Period 3
Cradle CoastSemester 1
Hong Kong Universal EdSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides you with an introduction to management concepts, functions and strategies. The unit outlines the key functions of management and then explores the context surrounding management functioning, including an analysis of the broad environment in which organisations operate,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonAccelerated Study Period 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Unravelling and understanding the linkages between many different components of the systems that comprise tourism is the major task of this unit. Areas of study include, understanding tourism as a series of systems, appreciating the role of government in tourism…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit explores human population growth and the impending global food crisis by introducing agriculture as a managed ecosystem, from the earliest shifting cultivation systems to the most intensive systems currently practiced today. The ecological, economic and social sustainability of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

The goal of this unit is to provide a thorough understanding of key topics in environmental and natural resource economics. While the emphasis is on the economic approach to issues and debates on environmental and resource problems, you are provided…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Sustainable development is one of the most important elements of planning in a variety of industry sectors. Tourism is no exception. This unit investigates the practical application of sustainable development by examining tourism businesses in Tasmania. It also covers the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Provides students with a basic knowledge of microbiology including bacteria, fungi, protozoans and viruses. The unit considers the place of microorganisms in the evolution of life on earth, their structure, chemistry, biology and ecology, and consideration of their role in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit provides an introduction to the formation of key Tasmanian soil types, their parent materials and their land use potential. Soil fertility and key nutrient cycles (N, P and K), soil morphology and salinity will be examined in lectures,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Microorganisms, though invisibly small, collectively make up the majority of the living matter on Earth and have profound influences on many aspects of our lives. This unit will draw on contemporary and real-world examples to explore the influence and impact…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

Introduces the management and interpretation of quantitative information. A 'hands-on' course, developed using data which is drawn from disciplines of relevance to the students. Topics include: collecting, processing and presenting quantitative information; descriptive statistics for summarising data; data exploration techniques;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Satellite images and aerial photographs are used to observe the earth and its atmosphere. These images are used for mapping and monitoring our natural and human environment. Remote sensing is an exciting field that is constantly changing with regular launches…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used in a wide range of disciplines to investigate and display characteristics of data that vary with location. Producing a map to present spatial information is a skill that is itself valuable to scientists in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

This unit is designed to extend the knowledge of statistical data analysis. It builds on the concepts of regression and ANOVA introduced in Data Handling & Statistics 1 and introduces analyses using multiple explanatory variables, mixed-effects models and generalized linear…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on KGG102 GIS: Introduction and will give you more advanced skills in the analysis and presentation of spatial data. As more businesses and scientists get to grips with the advantages of using GIS to manage and interpret…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the theory and skills of KGG103 Remote Sensing: Introduction and focuses on advanced aspects of remotely sensed image analysis. These additional remote sensing analysis skills are highly valued by employers in the spatial industry. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

KSA101 will provide a background to the science and management of the seas with focus on Antarctic and Southern Ocean. On the completion of this unit, students will demonstrate a knowledge and comprehension of the contemporary issues facing Antarctic, marine…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the science disciplines underpinning the study of marine and Antarctic environments and the application of science to solve problems in marine and Antarctic disciplines. It provides the foundational skills and knowledge for students in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Provides an introduction to the scientific study of animals. Students are introduced to animal diversity through studying the major invertebrate and vertebrate phyla with an emphasis on Australian examples. We consider the structural and functional characteristics of each group from…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Cell biology, genetics and evolution are fundamental to an understanding of the processes of life. In this unit, we examine the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including a discussion of the energy flow in photosynthesis, respiration and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Two from:

Microbiology is the study of single-celled organisms and viruses, which are ubiquitous on Earth and which are intimately involved in our lives, with both good and bad effects. General Microbiology is an introductory unit that gives students an overview of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Marine geoscience is an integration of the disciplines of geology, geophysics and geochemistry. The aim of this course is to provide a broad understanding of the ocean basins and their structure with particular emphasis on the evolution of the oceans…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The purpose of the unit is to provide students with an introduction to the oceans, its environments and how they function, including a history of oceanography and its early development; basic properties of the oceans; physical processes of the ocean…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to expose students to the diversity of views about the state of the marine environment and the impact of extractive industries such as fishing. Students will gain experience exploring relevant questions using a variety of methodological…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In Marine and Antarctic Ecosystems you will be introduced to coastal and open ocean ecosystems from the tropics to the poles, covering water-column and benthic communities including reefs and the deep sea. The unit will cover the fundamental processes of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Contemporary media is saturated with images of extreme weather events, hunger, poverty, conflict, pollution, austerity, and financial crisis. Mounting evidence suggests the 21st century will be defined by unprecedented challenges related to environmental instability, economic inequality and risks to social…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

1 Introductory (100) level Breadth unit.  For a list of breadth units see: http://www.utas.edu.au/students/lead-achieve/breadth-units/offerings
2 Student Elective units

The physical and living aspects of the global environment interact to produce the extraordinary variety of landscapes, environments and species that occupy this planet. This unit highlights the interplay and conservation of these processes so that they continue to maintain…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Society needs professional environmental managers who have the knowledge and skills to effectively tackle problems of sustainable resource use and biodiversity conservation. Environmental managers also play an important role in helping communities identify and move towards sustainable and just futures.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

1 Breadth unit (100, 200 or 300-level).  For a list of breadth units see: http://www.utas.edu.au/students/lead-achieve/breadth-units/offerings
1 Student Elective unit (100, 200 or 300-level)
2 Student Elective units (200 or 300-level)
2 Student Elective units (300-level)

Entry requirements

If you're interested in studying this degree, you'll need to meet the University General Entry Requirements, and any course-specific requirements.

If you are a Year 12 school leaver

An ATAR score of 65 or higher (or see Alternative entry pathways below)

If you are a non-school leaver

An equivalent ranking calculated by your previous qualifications and work experience.

You will also be required to meet the pre-requisites listed above via the completion of foundation units, or by demonstrating equivalent qualification or knowledge.

Even if you don’t need to meet a prerequisite, foundation units are a great way to refresh your knowledge and give you the best preparation possible for staring your Bachelor level studies.

If you are an international student

All international applicants will need to meet the International General Entrance Requirements.

You will also need to meet any course specific requirements with recognised qualifications, or equivalent experience.

You may be eligible for advanced standing (i.e. credit points) in this degree if you:

  • Have completed an award such as a Diploma or Advanced Diploma from TAFE or another institution;
  • Are currently studying another Bachelor degree at the University or at another institution;
  • Have completed a Bachelor degree at the University or an equivalent award from another institution.
How to apply for a credit transfer

You can apply for a credit transfer/advanced standing as part of the standard online application process for this degree.

For more information on credit transfers, contact us on on 1300 363 864 or enquire online.

This degree does not formally articulate from another degree. See Credit transfer for information on advanced standing from other qualification and experience, or Alternative entry pathways for pathway options into this degree.

Successful completion of this degree meets the entry requirements for the Bachelor of Natural Environment and Wilderness Studies with Honours

If you successfully complete this course, you may be also be eligible to apply for a range of other postgraduate courses including Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas and Masters by coursework and research. Filter the Course list by Postgraduate to view the current courses available.

If you do not meet the minimum ATAR you should consider enrolment in the Diploma of University Studies (Science Specialisation) as a pathway to this degree:

If you do not meet the University General Entry Requirements, you should consider enrolment in the Diploma of University Studies (Science Specialisation) or the University Preparation Program.

In all cases, contact us to discuss an option best suited to your needs.

Fees & scholarships

Domestic students

Domestic students enrolled in a full fee paying place are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the fees you pay for each unit you enrol in. Full fee paying domestic students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Domestic students enrolled in a Commonwealth supported place will be charged a fee based on the number of units they enrol in. In 2020, this fee is $46.20 per unit (of 12.5 credit points). In 2020, the maximum charge for full time students is $308.

International students

2020 Total Course Fee (international students): $102,717 AUD*.

Course cost based on a rate of $33,068 AUD per standard, full-time year of study (100 credit points).

* Please note that this is an indicative fee only.

International students

International students are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the annual rate. International students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Scholarships

Scholarships for domestic students

Each year, the University offers more than 900 awards to students from all walks of life, including: those who have achieved high academic results, those from low socio-economic backgrounds, students with sporting ability, students undertaking overseas study, and students with a disability.

For information on all scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.

Applications for most awards commencing in Semester 1 open at the beginning of August and close strictly on 31 October in the year prior to study.

Scholarships for international students

There are a huge range of scholarships, bursaries and fee discounts available for international students studying at the University of Tasmania. For more information on these, visit the Tasmanian International Scholarships (TIS) website.

How can we help?

Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

Domestic
1300 363 864
International
+61 3 6226 6200
Email
Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online
Online enquiries

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