Doctor of Health (M9G)

Overview  2019

Duration
Minimum 0 Not entered
Course rules
Course code
CRICOS: 091987J
Current students
View 2018 information
Hobart
Time-based Research Period 1, Time-based Research Period 2
Launceston
Time-based Research Period 1, Time-based Research Period 2
Cradle Coast
Time-based Research Period 1, Time-based Research Period 2
Rozelle - Sydney
Time-based Research Period 1, Time-based Research Period 2
Darlinghurst - Sydney
Time-based Research Period 1, Time-based Research Period 2

Professor Kim Walker has 40 years of experience in nursing. He now holds a joint position as Professor of Healthcare Improvement with the University of Tasmania and St Vincent’s Private Hospital in Sydney. Kim Walker's role is to close the evidence to practice gap.

The Doctor of Health is a professional doctorate consisting of higher degree coursework and research, designed specifically to meet the research needs of health industry and health professional groups.

The Doctor of Health fosters excellence in health professional practice by developing the capacity of individuals to conduct research within their professional contexts. It encourages close cooperation across the university/industry/professional interface and provides a framework for the integration of professional expertise and scholarly inquiry.

The course normally takes up to four years of full-time equivalent (EFT)* study and consists of coursework (30%) and research (70%) components. The research component of circa 60-80,000 words in English, can be presented as either a traditional thesis or a portfolio of published papers and a substantial integrated overview of the research.

This award is independently assessed by a minimum of two examiners external to the University on the successful completion of the dissertation or portfolio of published papers and  coursework components.

The campus of study will vary depending on the location of the candidate, the supervisor and the research field.

The research topic will reflect the interests of the candidate, their workplace and the expertise of their supervisors.  To find an expert in your field of interest, see the Web Access Research Portal (WARP) site.

To apply, see the Graduate Research site: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/graduate-research/future-candidates/how-to-apply for application information.

* A full time workload refers to a loading of 1.0, or an equivalent part time loading of 0.5

The Doctor of Health will provide experienced health professionals with the opportunity to make a significant contribution to knowledge and practice in their professional context and may formalise workplace-based research and development. Its interdisciplinary nature and opportunity for inter-professional research provides a  framework for the integration of professional expertise and scholarly enquiry.

The course aims to develop the research competencies of candidates by equipping them with the ability to evaluate different conceptual approaches to health related issues in the context of their own experience and workplace. The emphasis is on applied and translational research and associated organisational change, the contribution to knowledge, and dissemination of research findings through publication.

Candidates will acquire advanced specialist research training and provide evidence for independent thought and critical analysis, effective communication and expert knowledge of the discipline within a broader framework of knowledge in the international context.

At the University of Tasmania candidates are encouraged to demonstrate academic leadership, increasing independence, creativity and innovation in their research and are supported in their acquisition of a wide range of advanced and transferable skills.

Graduates will fulfil the skill requirements in the Australian Qualification Framework for this degree and the University of Tasmania expects all graduates of a Doctor of Philosophy to meet its Generic Attributes.

Graduates of a Doctoral Degree will have:

  • cognitive skills to demonstrate expert understanding of theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on that theory and practice
  • cognitive skills and use of intellectual independence to think critically, evaluate existing knowledge and ideas, undertake systematic investigation and reflect on theory and practice to generate original knowledge
  • expert technical and creative skills applicable to the field of work or learning
  • communication skills to explain and critique theoretical propositions, methodologies and conclusions
  • communication skills to present cogently a complex investigation of originality or original research for external examination against international standards and to communicate results to peers and the community
  • expert skills to design, implement, analyse, theorise and communicate research that makes a significant and original contribution to knowledge and/or professional practice

Knowledge

Graduates of a Doctor of Philosophy will be able to:

  • make an original and substantial contribution to knowledge of a subject within or across academic disciplines or areas of professional practice;
  • demonstrate a systemic and critical understanding of a substantial and complex body of knowledge of a subject within or across academic disciplines or areas of professional practice; and
  • demonstrate a detailed understanding of applicable techniques for research and advanced academic enquiry.

Skills

Graduates of a Doctor of Philosophy will be independent researchers able to:

  • evaluate the appropriateness and usefulness of various perspectives, methods and processes in research projects;
  • independently and systematically develop, adapt and implement research methodologies to extend and redefine existing knowledge or professional practice;
  • expert technical and creative skills applicable to the field of work or learning; and
  • critically analyse, evaluate and synthesise new and complex ideas;
  • work collaboratively in a team, recognising the need for and value of complementary expertise/skill sets, and work productively with other people; and
  • communicate orally and in written form sufficient to publish and present their work,  and communicate ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Application of Knowledge

Graduates of a Doctoral Degree will have the knowledge and skills to be able to:

  • undertake research with autonomy, authoritative judgement, adaptability and responsibility as an expert and leading practitioner or scholar.
  • understand and apply the social and ethical implications of research and appropriate professional behaviour consistent with the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research and other relevant guidelines.

Career outcomes

In Australia and around the world, Professional Doctorate graduates are highly regarded as potential employees.

The Professional Doctorate is a demonstration of a graduate's ability to conceptualise and implement an independent program of research, manage a project, organise resources, work and cooperate with colleagues and communicate effectively in writing at a high level.

Professional Doctorate graduates have the opportunity to pursue diverse career paths across a broad spectrum of professions in the public and private sector. The Doctor of Health will provide experienced health professionals with a learning pathway to the benefit of the organisation across a range of health and health-related disciplines.

Graduates will become experts in their field and will be highly sought after.

Course structure

Coursework

The Doctor of Health consists of 7 coursework units undertaken alongside the research and preparation of a research thesis

Research Thesis Unit CAB901 or CNA902 in addition to the following compulsory units:

Introduction to Higher Degree by Research will introduce PhD and Masters candidates to higher degrees by research (HDR) study at the University of Tasmania.Candidates will be introduced to a range of topics including what it means to be an HDR…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartWinter school (late)
HobartSpring school (extended)
Hobart11 Week Session Feb
Hobart11 Week Session Apr
LauncestonWinter school (late)
LauncestonSpring school (extended)
Launceston11 Week Session Feb
Rozelle - Sydney11 Week Session Apr

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit commences with a broad historical view of the emergence of science, philosophy of science, logic and reasoning. It then focuses on the major research underpinnings such as: realist vs subjectivist perspectives, incorporating epistemology and ontology; abduction, induction and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Research Thesis Unit CAB901 or CNA902 in addition to the following compulsory units:

This unit equips students with an understanding of the research methods used in health services in order to interpret published research, and design research of their own. Unit content includes the theoretical underpinning of both qualitative and quantitative research methods,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on CNA920 and provides theory required in the design and practical application of methodologies and methods in practice. This unit will expose students to real world examples of the application of methods and methodologies in practice, exploring…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Research Thesis Unit CAB901 or CNA902 in addition to two electives from the list of approved electives below

Research Thesis Unit CAB901 or CNA902 in addition to one elective from the list of approved electives below

Research Thesis Unit CAB901 or CNA902

Research Thesis Unit CAB901 or CNA902

Approved Electives

In the 3rd and 4th year of candidature, a choice of electives can be made from the following list:

Management is ultimately about influencing the behaviour of others within an organisational context and in many ways the study of Organisational Behaviour is the reference point for all other areas of management education. The unit is structured around three key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The purpose of this unit is to promote the continuous enhancement of your professional practice in learning and teaching in health services settings. This is achieved primarily by helping you to apply knowledge of the principles underpinning critical reflection and…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit further explores key themes of public health practice in Australia and globally and has been developed in close collaboration with industry. An overview is provided of the core functions and essential services of public health nationally and internationally,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores the principles, theories and practice of epidemiology. Students are provided with a comprehensive introduction to the collection and interpretation of epidemiological data within the framework of health. The unit content covers the broad areas of disease distribution,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces the scope of public health practice in the 21st century and the social, political and economic context within which public health practitioners operate. The unit combines theoretical and practical material to assist students to understand the social…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a framework for understanding the links between knowledge and practice. It is also designed to encourage the development of the capacity of health service leaders to identify and evaluate emerging knowledge relevant to their practice, and to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
HobartSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Health LEADS Australia is a nationally-agreed leadership framework for health and human services. It is used as an organising concept within this unit to assist students to engage with and understand a broad range of contemporary leadership theories.Students will develop…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will provide a broad understanding of current environmental health concepts. Students undertaking this course will gain insight into how our health is influenced by our environments and ecology, and the likely impacts of climate change and benefits of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the theories behind, and practical application of needs assessment and evaluation of health programs. Students will be required to demonstrate the application of needs assessment and evaluation through assessment tasks…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the interrelationship between health law and ethics, strategic health planning and health policy development. It aims to help students develop a clear understanding of the dynamics of the healthcare environment and the importance of a…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit examines current concepts, trends and barriers in risk, risk management and governance including clinical governance. In particular it explores the content and relationship between medico-legal issues; clinical error; consumer rights and services; occupational health systems; quality of service…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Positive psychology addresses the conditions and processes that enable people, groups and institutions to flourish and function at an optimal level. The aim of this unit is to gain a clear understanding of the essential elements to leadership, and to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The aims of this unit are: to introduce fundamental concepts of biostatistics and provide a background in descriptive and analytical methods that are used to estimate association between variables. This unit covers statistical theory, data entry and manipulation methods, data…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores communicable diseases of humans from an epidemiological perspective. It provides an introductory overview of the basic biological knowledge needed to understand the interactions within and between populations of microbes, human and other animals. Students will learn to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds upon the courses CAM528 'Introduction to Epidemiology' and CAM625 'Introduction to Biostatistics'. It will consolidate and expand the knowledge on epidemiology and teach biostatistics in an applied manner. The goal is to introduce the realities of data…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to provide participants with a basic understanding of health economics, its value and limitations. It will familiarise participants with the application of economic theory to health and health care issues, and review and analyse policy and practice…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the nature of change within the broader environmental and organisational context. It will include exploration of current theories and research around issues relating to leading and managing change as well as diffusion of innovation. Strategies for successful…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Students completing this unit will have acquired knowledge of existing health service models, the internal and external factors that influence the delivery of quality services, and the best-practice models for quality service design.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Students completing this unit will have acquired knowledge about monitoring and measuring performance within a quality framework; apply knowledge of monitoring and measuring the quality of performance in complex simulated work contexts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Project Management for Health Professionals provides students with the foundational knowledge required to appreciate and implement practical approaches to project management in health sciences. Students will extend their skills in incorporating research evidence into health care practice through developing skills…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSpring school (extended)
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Qualitative Research Methods provides Honours and coursework Masters students and HDR candidates with grounding in qualitative research methodologies and associated methods. Students will develop abilities in framing research questions; developing, critiquing and applying qualitative research methodologies; defending method choice; and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides students with an understanding of research literature in health sciences. Scientific literature and related pharmaceutical literature including trade publications will be appraised. The principles and skills in evaluation and interpretation of the literature will be discussed and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Entry requirements

Admission Prerequisites

Admission to the Professional Doctorate is based on a demonstrated capacity to undertake significant research in the field of Health and Health Services. Applicants must be able to demonstrate significant Health sector experience (usually a minimum of 5 years) and demonstrate their level of competency against four skills areas:

  1. Conceptual and theoretical understanding/knowledge of the field;
  2. Research design, data collection and data management skills/ ability to undertake research;
  3. Analytical and interpretative skills (e.g. data analysis, critical analysis, problem solving); and
  4. Communication skills

Applicants may be eligible for entry through formal qualifications or an alternative pathway.

Prospective students must be employed in a relevant workplace and provide a letter of support from their employer. Overseas applicants should consult the Graduate Research Administration Officer for further advice.

Applicants should apply after finding a potential supervisor and discussing and agreeing on their proposed topic.

Applicants will be considered who have been awarded either:

  • a Bachelor's degree with second class Honours or better from a recognised tertiary institution;
  • a research Masters' degree with at least two-thirds of the degree comprising a thesis;
  • a coursework Masters' degree or graduate diploma which includes a research project or thesis of 10,000 to 20,000 words (must equate to a minimum 25% research component of the entire degree); or
  • a qualification at a level from another tertiary institution considered equivalent by the Dean of Graduate Research.

Qualifications must have been awarded within a 10 year period prior to the date of application for admission to HDR candidature.

The University recognises that people returning to university to undertake a Professional Doctorate may possess significant sector-based research or equivalent experience and/or professional qualifications, but often either lack suitable formal academic credentials, or a substantial length of time has passed since they obtained such qualifications. In these cases an application for equivalence through an alternative pathway can be made. The applicant should use their work and academic research experience to demonstrate their competence in the four skill areas listed above.

This should include information about the following:

  • Any journal publications you have authored – these are best if they are in academic journals but any publication that describes a research or work related project may be relevant;
  • Conference presentations given, include details of the conference name, date and location;
  • Work related projects that you have been involved in, particularly the evaluation of these;
  • Government or organisational reports that you have been involved in writing;
  • Research projects that you may have contributed to; and
  • Data analysis that may be undertaken in your work.

These applications should be constructed in consultation with their proposed supervisors and the Graduate Research Coordinator. Please contact the GRAO at Research.domain@utas.edu.au for advice in the first instance.

International applicants must also meet the University's English language requirements for admission: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/graduate-research/future-candidates/how-to-apply/admission-requirements

Please see the University of Tasmania's Admission Requirements for further information.

Fees & scholarships

Domestic students

Domestic students will be provided with a Research Training Program (RTP) Fees Offset scholarship of AUD $22,000- $33,000. This scholarship is provided to individual students to offset their tuition fees.

These funds are provided by the Commonwealth Government as a contribution to the University towards the direct costs of a student’s research training (supervision, access to resources or facilities at the University, costs associated with fieldwork, training in techniques and necessary coursework undertaken outside the School/Institute).

International students

2019 Annual Tuition Fee (international students): $35,190 AUD.

* Please note that this is an indicative fee only.

Scholarships

Higher Degree by Research Candidates may apply for a variety of scholarships to assist with the cost of living, tuition fees and other research costs. For a full list of scholarships available to domestic and international candidates please visit the Graduate Research website.

How can we help?

Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

Domestic
1300 363 864
International
+61 3 8676 7017
Email
Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online
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