Cultural Studies units

University of Tasmania
Cultural Studies Units - 1996


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Cultural Studies - Departments of English and Sociology at Hobart.


Coordinator: Dr S Crook

The aim of the major in Cultural Studies is to allow students to engage in a cross-disciplinary exploration of the cultural field drawing on a body of scholarship which belongs properly and paradoxically to both Sociology and English but which cannot successfully be studied within the confines of either discipline.

The direction of Cultural Studies is not so much interdisciplinary as antidisciplinary, marked by: a desire to bring personal and social experience into the foreground; a linking of the economic, the ethnographic and the political in an account of diverse modes of cultural production; a challenge to oppositions of high and popular, public and private, self and subject; a critique of theory and resistance to totalising narratives; an exploration of the problematic of social identity and cultural difference, and a focus on minorities and the marginal.

Prerequisite for all units is a pass in any of the following - HEA100 English 1, HGA100 Sociology 1, FSA100 Fine Arts 1, FST100 Art Theory 1 (for BFA students).

Students wishing to complete a major in Cultural Studies must take units with a combined weight of 80% at the 200 and 300 levels (i.e. passes in any eight units at 10% chosen from the following list of Cultural Studies options). Units to a minimum value of 20% must be chosen from each of List 1 and List 2.

Students may complete a minor in Cultural Studies by taking units with a combined weight of 40% at 200 and 300 level.

As these units are also constituents of majors and minors in other disciplines they may not be counted twice as constituents of two different disciplines. Students who have already completed any of these units (which may have been named differently), or who are enrolled in any of these units as part of another discipline, must choose other units to make up their Cultural Studies percentages.

Cultural Studies units offered in 1996

List 1semesterweight
HAC201/301 Australian Cultural Studies[1]10
HAC203/303 Postmodernism, Postcolonialism[1]10
HAC204/304 Twentieth Century Literary Criticism[1]10
HAC205/305 The Legend of King Arthur[2]10
HAC206/306 Narrative into Film[2]10
HAC207/307 American Cultural Studies[2]10

List 2
HAC221/321 Social & Cultural Changein Contemporary Society[1]10
HAC222/322 Religion & Society[1]10
HAC224/324 Information & Society[1]10
HAC230/330 Globalisation & Culture[1]10
HAC225/325 Popular Culture & Mass Media[2]10
HAC228/328 Sport, Leisure & Tourism[2]10
HAD232/332 Modernity to Postmodernity[2]20
HAC231/331 Understanding Other Cultures[fy]20

List 3
HAC241/341 Postmodern Politics[1]10
[fy]=full year unit

Unit descriptions




HAC201/301 Australian Cultural Studies: An Introduction

Surveys the theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of Cultural Studies in its local, national and international contexts, including the contentious origins of Cultural Studies in relation to Literary Studies.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr P Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 1-hour lecture and 1-hour tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (50%), 1.5-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Jimmy Chai, Bran Nue Dae
Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life
Frow and Morris (eds), Australian Cultural Studies: a Reader
Gray A and McGuigan J, Studying Culture: An Introductory Reader
Dick Hebdidge, Subcultures: the Meaning of Style
George Miller, Mad Max
Mudrooroo, Doctor Wooreddy's Prescription for Enduring the Ending of the World.
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, see HEA274/374

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC202/302 Performance Studies



Special notes not available in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading



Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC203/303 Postmodernism, Postcolonialism

Postmodernism frequently works to expose the ways in which knowledge and cultural authority are experienced as constructions; while postcolonial critique works to open up questions of race, ethnicity, nationalism and the effects of imperialism.


Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr J Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HEA249/349
method of assessment 2x2,500-word essays (60%), written exam (40%)
required texts, etc see HEA249/349 for the list of required reading.
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, see HEA249/349

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC204/304 Twentieth Century Literary Criticism

Offers an introductory survey of structuralism, semiotics and some aspects of post-structuralism as they pertain to the study of literary texts. There is a particular focus on developments in narrative theory, including the work of one of the most influential theorists in this area, Roland Barthes.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HEA260/360
method of assessment essay (50%); class-test (50%)
required texts, etc
Lodge D (ed), Modern Criticism and Theory, Longmans
Toolan MJ, Narrative: a Critical Liguistic Introduction, Routledge
Sontag S (ed), Barthes: Selected Writings, Fontana
James Joyce,Dubliners, Penguin.

recommended reading Jefferson A and Robey D (eds), Modern Literary Theory: a Comparative Introduction

For a fuller description of this unit, see HEA260/360

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC205/305 The Legend of King Arthur

Is an introduction to the legend in medieval literature and beyond. The component focuses on Sir Thomas Malory's Arthuriad, the greatest work of English secular prose before the Renaissance. It looks at other medieval texts in the original language and in translation (including Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), and at the subsequent life of the Arthurian story, into the 19th century (Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee at the Court of King Arthur) and 20th century novels and films.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr J Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment essay (50%), exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Sir Thomas Malory, Works, Vinaver E (ed), Oxford Standard Authors.
Tennyson, The Idylls of the King

recommended reading Knight S, Arthurian Literature and Society, Macmillan, London, 1983.

See alsoHEA211/311

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC206/306 Narrative into Film

Modern techniques for analysing narrative enable us to read films as text. The unit provides an introduction to linguistic and semiotic analysis, and applies it to the study of prose texts, plays and films. Students study Australian novels and the films made of them, and at some film versions of Shakespeare (including Kurosawa's Ran). They also look at the narrative structures of silent movies, and at the differences between the conventions of Hollywood story-telling and those of European cinema.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr J Mead
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HEA221/321
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Rimmon-Kenan S, Narrative Fiction: contemporary poetics, London, Methuen 1983.
Monaco J, How to Read A Film, revised edn, New York, Oxford 1981.
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, see '(sem 2) Narrative into FilmHEA223/323

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC207/307 American Cultural Studies

Considers ways in which a range of works of prose fiction reflect some special characteristics, formal and thematic, of writing in prose in the United States.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr R Blair
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hours a week
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HEA248/348
method of assessment essay (50%); exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Henry James, The Europeans, Oxford
Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita
Saul Bellow, Mr Sammler's Planet, Penguin
Louise Erdrich, The Beet Queen
Toni Morrison, Beloved, Penguin
Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club.
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHEA248/348

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC209/309 Language, Literature and Environment

Examines a selection of contemporary fictions from the perspective of current thinking about environmental issues. The works of fiction examined portray a variety of interactions between people and environments and demonstrate a range of attitudes towards the 'natural' environment as an economic and spiritual 'resource'. Reading is informed by some key works in recent environmental theory and in relevant critical theory and is directed towards an understanding of the way in which fiction both reflects and helps to shape attitudes and awareness in the community. It also contributes to framing questions about the idea of 'nature'.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

See also HEA260/360

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC221/321 Social and Cultural Change in Contemporary Society

Examines the course and likely consequences of processes of social change in advanced societies.

Special notes not offered after 1996 
teaching staff Dr S Crook
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites HGA201 Theories of Modern Society (see 1995 h/bk)
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA205/305, not to be taken with HGA257/357, HAC232/332
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHGA205/305

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC222/322 Religion and Society

Is an examination of the major sociological and anthropological theories of religion including an analysis of religious institutions from a comparative perspective.


Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof G Easthope, Dr N Cook
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA219/319
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

HGA219/319

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC223/323 Science, Technology & Contemporary Society



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA220/320
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC224/324 Information and Society

Examines the institutional changes resulting from the development of mass media, information systems and the expanding use of micro-computers.


Special notes
teaching staff Mr R Volpato
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA222/322
method of assessment essay (40%) final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHGA222/322

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC225/325 Popular Culture and the Mass Media

Reviews sociological conceptions of culture, considers variants of 'mass culture theory' and seeks to identify major forms of contemporary popular culture.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr S Crook
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA225/325
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHGA225/325

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC226/326 Migrants in Australian Society

HAC227/327 Language and Social Order

Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC228/328 Sport, Leisure and Tourism

Investigates the prominent positions that sport, leisure and tourism occupy in contemporary society.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr A Franklin
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA251/351
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHGA251/351

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC229/329 Cultures and Societies of Southeast Asia



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC230/330 Globalisation & Culture

Is an examination of social processes that tend to break down the boundaries between national societies.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr T Scrase
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA255/355, HAS 218/318
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHGA255/355

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC231/331 Understanding Other Cultures

Examines the diversity of the world's cultural forms, and the classical and contemporary concepts and theories that anthropologists have developed to understand them, especially with respect to the impact of postmodernity on other cultures.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr N Cook, Dr A Franklin
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA256/356
method of assessment 2 assignments (50%), final exam (50%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHGA256/356

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC232/332 Modernity to Postmoderity

Traces the processes of modernisation and postmodernisation that have shaped the major institutions and practices of contemporary advanced societies.


Special notes
teaching staff Dr S Crook, Assoc Prof J Pakulski
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 4 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA257/357, not to be taken with HGA205/305, HAC221/321
method of assessment class test (10%), 3,000-word assignment (30%), final 3-hour exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, see HGA257/357

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HAC241/341 Postmodern Politics

Begins with a brief overview of the political ideas of modernist thinkers from Kant to Marx, as well as Nietzsche who marks the turn toward postmodern critiques. The unit then introduces re-interpretations of ideas on freedom, power, rights, democracy and political action in the work of such key postmodern/poststructuralist thinkers as Derrida, Foucault, Lyotard, Deleuze and Guattari.


Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff Dr T Narramore
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HSA216/316
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (45%), tutorial participation (15%), 2-hour exam in Nov (40%)
required texts, etc
Rabinow P (ed),The Foucault Reader, Penguin Books, 1991.
recommended reading

For a fuller description of this unit, seeHSA216/316

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)






Coordinator: Dr S Crook
Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

To continue with Women's Studies units