English units

University of Tasmania
English Units - 1996


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English - Department of English at Hobart

The Department of English offers a wide range of units in English language, in British, Australian, American and related literature, and in literary criticism and theory. The aim throughout is to expand students' understanding and control of the language in which imaginative literature is written, and to develop skills in the close and informed reading of texts. These skills form the indispensable basis for what, in various ways, takes place in all units: the critical evaluation of texts and ideas, and the discussion of their wider cultural significance.
As well as their academic benefit, such skills provide lifelong training in inventive thinking and complex but clear argument. The English units also provide training in effective writing. Students' essays and classwork assignments receive detailed comment from staff, and this gives practical help to students whose writing skills need improvement. The Department offers specific courses to help with writing from first year on.
Students completing at least a minor in English (HEA100 and two units from the second- and third- year options) as part of their BA degree will be eligible to pursue the graduate DipEd course in the University's Department of Education.
Those completing the full major (HEA100 and at least four units taken at 200 and 300 level) will be eligible to undertake the coursework postgraduate degree of Master of Humanities (English) in years when it is offered, and may be eligible for admission to Honours.
Students gaining Credit level passes in a double major (HEA100 and seven units at 200 and 300 level) are eligible to enter the BA Honours (fourth) year.
Students gaining either of the Honours awards in English may be able to proceed to the research MA or PhD in English.

Change to regulations
Students who entered the BA before 1 January 1993 will be governed by departmental requirements which applied at that time, as published in the 1993 Undergraduate Handbook. The rules for the major, double major and minor apply to students who entered the department in 1993 and to all subsequent years.

Pass courses
The major in English, consisting of HEA100 (25%) and at least four units at 200 and 300 levels (total weighting 80%), is designed to provide a study of literary works, authors and forms from the later medieval period to the present day, including a substantial representation of Australian and American works, and to give students an opportunity to undertake work in related fields such as performance studies, cultural studies and language and writing.
The double major in English, consisting of HEA100 (25%) and seven or more units at 200 and 300 levels (minimum weight 140% in total), enables students to extend such study and, if they wish, to qualify with Credit average for admission to HEA498 or HEA499.
Prerequisites
The normal prerequisite for entry to units available at second-year and third-year levels is a pass in HEA100.

Honours courses
The complete BA Honours course in English comprises HEA100, either a Major in English with Distinction average or a Double Major with Credit average (including the necessary prerequisites), and HEA498 or HEA499.
Students enrol in the 'umbrella unit' HEA498 if full time, or HEA499 if completing the course over a period of two years. The actual course will then consist of three of the following units, plus the Honours long essay (HEA450):
HEA400Poets of the Late Fourteenth-Century (not available in 1996)
HEA401Penitential Literature of the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance
HEA410Reading Chaucer Otherwise
HEA425Author for Special Study: Thomas Hardy
HEA430Author for Special Study: Virginia Woolf
HEA435Fictocriticism
HEA465Fiction & Formbr>
HEA470Further Studies in Shakespeare
HEA474Condition of England Literature
Long essay is worth 40% and each unit 20%,
i.e. 3-hour exam (10%), 3,000-word essay (10%).

Honours prerequisites
Requirements for entry to Honours are:
either a double Major, with grade point average of 6.0 or higher, and the following prerequisite unit: HEA260/360, and at least two of the following: HEA211/311, HEA222 or HEA223 (a Shakespeare course), HEA250/350, HEA273/373
or a Major without prerequisites but with grade point average of 7.0 (Distinction) or higher.

Textbooks
Students should possess their own copies of all essential texts. Various explanatory and supplementary materials are provided by the department. The Library contains essential reference works.

Recommended reference books
For literary terms, see
Abrams MH, A Glossary of Literary Terms, 5th edn, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1988;
Hawthorn J, A Concise Glossary of Contemporary Literary Theory, Edward Arnold, London, 1992.
For a modern literary history, see the various volumes of the [p/b] History of Literature in the English Language, Sphere,
or The New Pelican Guide to English Literature, Penguin.

Students wishing to improve their English style will gain help from the department's 'Advice on Writing'.
Access to a good dictionary (e.g. Oxford English Dictionary, Macquarie, Collins Cobuild ),
to a dictionary of classical mythology (Oxford, Penguin) and
to an English translation of the Bible is essential.

Location and Notices
The department is situated on the top floor of the Humanities Building. The office of the Secretary, to whom enquiries should be directed in the first instance, is room 558. The main departmental notices are posted in the vicinity of these two rooms. In addition, the English Studio, room 566, is open for student use. Please do not hesitate to contact the department in person or by telephone (20 2347) if you have any questions about the departmental material in this Handbook. Staff may be consulted during their office hours, as posted.

Unit Descriptions

Unless students are told otherwise, texts will be lectured on in the order in which they appear in the following unit descriptions.


Honours courses
The complete BA Honours course in English comprises HEA100, either a Major in English with Distinction average or a Double Major with Credit average (including the necessary prerequisites), and HEA498 or HEA499.
Students enrol in the 'umbrella unit' HEA498 if full time, or HEA499 if completing the course over a period of two years. The actual course will then consist of three of the following units, plus the Honours long essay (HEA450):
HEA400Poets of the Late Fourteenth-Century (not available in 1996)
HEA401Penitential Literature of the Late Middle Ages and Early Renaissance
HEA410Reading Chaucer Otherwise
HEA425Author for Special Study: Thomas Hardy
HEA430Author for Special Study: Virginia Woolf
HEA435Fictocriticism
HEA465Fiction & Formbr>
HEA470Further Studies in Shakespeare
HEA474Condition of England Literature
Long essay is worth 40% and each unit 20%,
i.e. 3-hour exam (10%), 3,000-word essay (10%).

Honours prerequisites
Requirements for entry to Honours are:
either a double Major, with grade point average of 6.0 or higher, and the following prerequisite unit: HEA260/360, and at least two of the following: HEA211/311, HEA222 or HEA223 (a Shakespeare course), HEA250/350, HEA273/373
or a Major without prerequisites but with grade point average of 7.0 (Distinction) or higher.

Textbooks
Students should possess their own copies of all essential texts. Various explanatory and supplementary materials are provided by the department. The Library contains essential reference works.

Recommended reference books
For literary terms, see
Abrams MH, A Glossary of Literary Terms, 5th edn, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, 1988;
Hawthorn J, A Concise Glossary of Contemporary Literary Theory, Edward Arnold, London, 1992.
For a modern literary history, see the various volumes of the [p/b] History of Literature in the English Language, Sphere,
or The New Pelican Guide to English Literature, Penguin.

Students wishing to improve their English style will gain help from the department's 'Advice on Writing'.
Access to a good dictionary (e.g. Oxford English Dictionary, Macquarie, Collins Cobuild ),
to a dictionary of classical mythology (Oxford, Penguin) and
to an English translation of the Bible is essential.

Location and Notices
The department is situated on the top floor of the Humanities Building. The office of the Secretary, to whom enquiries should be directed in the first instance, is room 558. The main departmental notices are posted in the vicinity of these two rooms. In addition, the English Studio, room 566, is open for student use. Please do not hesitate to contact the department in person or by telephone (20 2347) if you have any questions about the departmental material in this Handbook. Staff may be consulted during their office hours, as posted.

Unit Descriptions

Unless students are told otherwise, texts will be lectured on in the order in which they appear in the following unit descriptions.



HEA100 English 1

Introduces students to English Studies and teaches key skills of critical reading and writing. Three modules emphasise the development of students' skills in writing and interpretation, and include some Australian writing.
Module (a) Reading Poetry Critically includes specific lectures on sound in poetry, and on imagery, diction and tone, as well as close study of selected poems and poets from Chaucer to modern times.
Module (b) Introduction to Narrative develops an understanding of the nature of narrative. Texts are drawn from fictional and non-fictional writing in prose, including examples of the novel, the short story and non-fictional narrative. Through discussions of the texts students consider aspects of narrative discourse such as: story; narration; myth in narrative; the relationships between author, narrator and reader; focalisation and point of view; the creation of characters/personae; the function of description.
Module (c) Shakespeare: Print, Stage and Screen - a study of four plays by William Shakespeare and of modern plays and films which draw inspiration from them.

Special notes
teaching staff all members of the English Department contribute to the teaching of HEA100
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [25%]
teaching pattern full year - lectures on Tues, Thurs, Fri at 2.00 p.m., a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x750-word exercises and 1 class test (sem 1), 3x100-word essays (sem 2) (total 50%), 3xend-of-year exams (50%)
required texts, etc
(a) Leonard (ed), Seven Centuries of Poetry in English, latest edn, Oxford University Press.

(b) Aphra Behn, Oroonoko
Charles Dickens, Bleak House
Anthony Trollope, The Warden
Thomas Hardy, Far From the Madding Crowd
EM Forster, A Passage to India (novel and film)
Italo Calvino, If on a Winter's Night a Traveller
Jim Ker Conway, The Road from Coorain
Robert Dessaix, A Mother's Disgrace
Julian Barnes,A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters
John Tranter, The Floor of Heaven

(c) Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing
-, Hamlet
Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
Shakespeare, Macbeth
Richard Nelson, Two Shakespearean Actors
Shakespeare, The Tempest.
Films to be considered in this unit include:
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead; 
Derek Jarman, The Tempest
Peter Greenaway, Prospero's Books
Roman Polanski, Macbeth
Branagh, Much Ado About Nothing
Olivier, Hamlet.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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