English units 2

University of Tasmania
English Units - 1996


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Second- and third-year units in English

Students taking 200 or 300 level units in English are invited to make their own choice of 20% weight units from the following list.

There is a limitation to this choice. The department is committed to the view that its students should include the study of periods, including literature of at least one period before 1900. English major students (taking at least four 200/300 level units, minimum 80% weight) are required to include one of HEA211/311, HEA222/322, HEA223/323, HEA242/342, HEA243/343, HEA244/344 and one further unit from groups B, C, D, or E. The same rule applies to double majors.
Except for groups D, E and G, where each unit runs for a full year, the units are offered in the form of semester-length modules, two of which must be taken to complete one unit. In some groups, a choice of modules is available.
Except where indicated otherwise, the teaching pattern is two 1-hour lectures/seminars/tutorials per week.

Group A Language and Writing
HEA201/301 Creative Writing

Group B Chaucer & Medieval Literature
HEA211/311 Chaucer and Medieval Literature (sem 1) and/or
HEA212/312 Medieval Women Writers (sem 1)
and either:
Chaucer: Troilus and Criseyde; The Parliament of Fowls (sem 2), or
The Legend of King Arthur (sem 2) (not available in 1996)

Group C Drama, Film & Performance Studies
(i) HEA221/321 Performance Studies A: Dramatic Codes and Practices (sem 1) (may not be available in 1996) and/or
(ii) HEA222/322 Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies (sem 1) and/or
(iii) HEA223/323 Shakespeare: Comedy & Romance
(sem 2) (not available in 1996)
plus:
Performance Studies B: Modern Drama (sem 2) (may not be available in 1996) or
Elizabethan & Jacobean Tragedy (sem 2) (not available in 1996)
Comedy from Ben Jonson to Gay (sem 2)
Narrative into Film (sem 2) (also available in group H)

Group D English & American Literature: Period units
(Year-long units) - subject to availability
HEA242/342 Seventeenth-century Literature
HEA243/343 Augustans and Post-Augustans
HEA244/344 Romantics
HEA245/345 Nineteenth Century Literature
HEA246/346 Literature 1880-1920
HEA247/347 Modernism and After
HEA248/348 American Novel
HEA249/349 Postmodernism, Postcolonialism

Group E Australian Literature
(Year-long unit)
HEA250/350 Modern Australian Writing A (sem 1) (not available in 1996) and either:
Modern Australian Writing B (sem 2) or
Gender in Australian Writing (sem 2) (not available in 1996)

Group F Literary Criticism & Theory
HEA260/360 Twentieth Century Literary Criticism
(sem 1) and one of:
Practices and Problems in Literary Criticism: Classical to Modern (sem 2) or
After Postmodernism (sem 2) (see under Group D, HEA249/349) or
Language, Literature and Environment (sem 2) (not available in 1996) or
Gender in Australian Writing (sem 2) (not available in 1996)

Group G Textual Bibliography
(Year-long unit)
HEA273/373 Textual Bibliography

Group H Cultural Studies
HEA274/374 Australian Cultural Studies: An Introduction and one of
Modern Australian Writing B (sem 2) (see under Group E, HEA250/350) or
Narrative into Film (sem 2)

Group I Gender in Literature
HEA281/381 Gender in Literature (not available in 1996)

Assessment
Written work (essays/exercises) of up to 5,000 words (50% to 60%), and end-of-year exam (2 to 3 hours, 40% to 50%).
In the case of groups B, C, E, F, H, and I, class tests in first semester may be used as a mode of examination, as indicated in the description of each unit.

Group A: Language & Writing
Combines academic study of the English language with practical use of it by students in their writing, thus developing both knowledge and expertise.



HEA201/301 Creative Writing

Focuses on poetry, short fiction, script and ficto-critical genres. Special sessions are arranged where possible. Students also study the various postmodern styles and generic innovations of the set texts and are encourage to experiment with these in relation to their own writing.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr P Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - weekly 2-hour workshops with groups of up to 18 students
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment a body of creative writing (60%), exam/class tests (40%)
required texts, etc
(sem 1) Acker K, Great Expectations, Grove Weidenfeld, New York, 1989.
Carver R, Short Cuts, Harvill, London, 1993.
Kaplan A, French Lessons: A Memoir, Chicago University Press, Chicago, 1994.
(sem 2) Perec G, Life, a User's Manual, Harvill, Lond, 1987.
Sterling B (ed), Mirrorshades: the Cyberpunk Anthology, Harper Collins, London, 1994.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



Group B: Chaucer & Medieval Literature

Introduces in detail the scholarly study of Chaucer's poetry, and provides contexts for the understanding of English medieval literature, its relevance and value.



HEA211/311 Chaucer & Medieval Literature

(a) Chaucer's Poetry: An Introduction (sem 1)
Introduces Chaucer's major poetry, including selected Canterbury Tales and dream poems. These are read in the original, with attention to style and metre. Lectures provide historical, literary and cultural contexts and focus on issues of critical interpretation.
Sem 2 continuation as follows: either
(b) Chaucer and Love: Troilus and Criseyde and the Parliament of Fowls (sem 2)Involving a detailed reading of Chaucer's mature completed masterpiece, a long poem in five books about love and war, described by Caxton as 'this noble philosophical poem in English'. The unit provides historical and literary background needed for its interpretation while examining critical and cultural issues, such as medieval views of love, paganism and the religious elements of the poem. The Parliament of Fowls is used as an introduction to the use of rhetorical principles in discussion of love; or
(c) The Legend of King Arthur (sem 2) which is an introduction to the legend in medieval literature and beyond. The component focuses on Sir Thomas Malory's Arthuriad, the greatest work of English secular prose before the Renaissance. It looks at other medieval texts in the original language and in translation (including Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), and at the subsequent life of the Arthurian story, into the 19th century (Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee at the Court of King Arthur) and 20th century novels and films.

Special notes The Legend of King Arthur is usually available as a sem 2 continuation of HEA274/374, but is unavailable in 1996
teaching staff (Coordinator and components a and b) Dr John Wall, (c) Dr J Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites (components b and c) Chaucer's Poetry: An Introduction
corequisites
mutual exclusions (component c) HAC205/305
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays (50%), an exercise (10%), 3-hour exam (40%)
required texts, etc
(a and b) Robinson FN and Benson LD (ed),The Riverside Chaucer, 3rd edn, Oxford, 1988.
(c) Sir Thomas Malory,Works, Vinaver E (ed), Oxford Standard Authors.
Tennyson, The Idylls of the King

recommended reading Knight S, Arthurian Literature and Society, Macmillan, London, 1983.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA212/312 Women and Medieval Writing

Brings together a range of writings by and about women in the medieval period. These include political, epistolary and domestic texts, most of which come from the late medieval period; but the subject offers some trans-period examples including film. Students also read critical texts as essential texts in order to understand the apparent absence and then reappearance of women as authors and subjects in medieval writing. Some attention is piad to women scholars and critics who have written about this period. The unit aims to (i) understand 'women' as subjects and authors within contemporary historical and theoretical debates about the medieval period; (ii) become acquainted with the generic, discursive and historical range of writing by and about women; understand what becomes of 'women and medieval writing' in a trans-period context; and examine the role of some important women scholars and critics in the emergence of feminist and historicist criticism of the period.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr J Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,500-word essays (60%), class test and 2-hour end-of-year exam (40%)
required texts, etc
Geofrey Chaucer, The Book of the Duchess,
-, trans. of Boethius' De Consolatione,
Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies, 
The Book of Margery Kempe, The Paston Letters, The Book of the Knight of the Tower, The Return of Martin Guerre (book and film).

recommended reading Weedon C, Feminism and Poststructuralist Theory.
Semester 2 continuation - see HEA211/311 (b),(c).

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



Group C: Drama, Film & Performance Studies

The aim of units in this group is to enable students to extend their knowledge of a wide range of dramatic texts and different approaches to their realisation, theoretical and practical.



HEA221/321 Performance Studies

(Sem 1) Performance Studies A: Dramatic Codes and Practices is an introduction to modern performance studies and the semiotic analysis of drama. It combines theoretical work on modern methods of analysing and interpreting texts with practical work on directing and acting, including regular workshops. Students have the opportunity to mount a production for performance. Workshops begin with such questions as: what do directors and actors do? Is the director necessary, or a patriarchal redundancy? Students then divide into small groups to run exercises for both directors and actors drawn from Stanislawski, Artaud, American Method Schools, Brook, Marowitz, Grotowski etc. These exercises and their outcomes function as examples in more theoretical classes.
Sem 2 continuation - any one of the Group C modules listed below.

Special notes may not be available in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment (sem 1) practical work (30%), assignment (20%), (sem 2) essay (20%), 2-hour exam (30%)
required texts, etc
Elam K, The Semiotics of Theatre and Drama, London, 1980.

recommended reading Hilton J, Performance, Methuen, London, 1987
Case S-E, Feminism and Theatre, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, 1988.
Bennett S, Theatre Audiences: A Theory of Production and Reception, Routledge, London, 1990.
Dario Fo, Accidental Death of an Anarchist.
Franca Rame, The Same Old Story.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA222/322 Shakespeare: Histories & Tragedies

(Sem 1) Shakespeare: Histories & Tragedies is a study of selected Shakespearian histories and tragedies with some consideration of the implications of genre and of the plays' political and cultural contexts. The unit emphasises the many possible ways of viewing and producing Shakespeare's work.
Sem 2 continuation - any one of the Group C modules listed below.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr J Wall
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (50%), 2-hour end-of-year exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Shakespeare's
Richard II
Richard III
Henry IV, Part One
Antony and Cleopatra
King Lear.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA223/323 Shakespeare: Comedy and Romance

(Sem 1) Shakespeare: Comedy and Romance is an examination of Shakespeare's achievement in comedy through the study of selected texts from the early, middle and late phases of his career. The unit considers the contemporary relevance of the comedies and includes the study of performance history as well as an introduction to the range of critical responses to Shakespeare's work.
Sem 2 continuation - any one of the Group C modules listed below.

Special notes not available in 1996
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr R Gaby
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays or equiv (50%), class tests (20%), 2-hour exam (30%)
required texts, etc
Shakespeare's
The Taming of the Shrew
The Merchant of Venice
Twelfth Night
Measure for Measure
The Winter's Tale.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



Group C second semester modules


(Sem 2) Performance Studies B: Modern Drama continues the study of performance with a focus on modern drama. Teaching includes workshops and lectures.
Performance Studies A is not a prerequisite.
Enrol as HEA221/321 or HEA222/322 or HEA223/323. Note, however, Performance Studies B is not available in 1996 Dr R Gaby; (sem 2 - 2 hrs a week for 13 weeks)
Harold Pinter, The Birthday Party
Joe Orton, Entertaining Mr Sloane
-, Loot
Caryl Churchill, Cloud Nine 
Tom Stoppard ,The Real Inspector Hound
Mike Leigh, Abigail's Party
Sam Shepard, Fool For Love 
Timberlake Wertenbaker, Our Country's Good
Ionesco, The Bald Prima Donna.
Staff of the Department of English


(Sem 2) Elizabethan and Jacobean Tragedy

During the Renaissance the native tradition of English tragedy reached a peak of popularity and achievement. Many playwrights besides Shakespeare essayed the art of tragedy, producing poetic dramas which are full of passion, action, and violence, but which also embody the questioning spirit of the age. This module focuses on major works by some of Shakespeare's contemporaries, paying particular attention to the contradictions and complexities of the tragic form.
Enrol as HEA221/321, or as HEA223/323. Not available in 1996 
Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy
Christopher Marlowe, Doctor Faustus 
Thomas Middleton, The Revenger's Tragedy 
John Webster, The Duchess of Malfi
Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, The Changeling.
Staff of the Department of English


(Sem 2) Comedy from Ben Jonson to Gay

Is an examination of the changing face of comedy in England during the 17th and early 18th centuries. The civil war and Cromwell's suppression of theatrical activity radically altered the shape of English drama, yet many comic traditions endured the crisis. Comedies by English and Irish dramatists working over several decades before and after the Interregnum are considered with reference to the social and political upheavals which encircle their work.
Enrol as HEA221/321, or as HEA223/323 Dr RS Gaby
Ben Jonson, The Alchemist
Thomas Middleton, The Roaring Girl
William Wycherly, The Country Wife
William Congreve, The Way of the World
George Farquhar, The Beaux's Strategem
John Gay, The Beggar's Opera.

Staff of the Department of English


(Sem 2) Narrative into Film

Modern techniques for analysing narrative enable us to read films as text. This module provides an introduction to semiotic and narrative analysis and applies it to a variety of films. Students study some Australian films, the films and conventions of Hollywood and those of European cinema, the work of some specific directors and they are encouraged to make comparisons between films. The module is topic-based, rather than film-based, and is likely to include all or some parts of the films listed below (subject to availability).
Dr J Mead; (sem 2)
Monaco J, How to Read a Film, rev edn, Oxford, New York, 1981.
Bordwell D, Making Meaning
Kaplan A, Psychoanalysis and Cinema
Copjec J (ed), Shades of Noir
Doane M et al (eds), Re-Vision.
Citizen Kane
The Seventh Seal
The Philadelphia Story
The Postman Always Rings Twice (Carey Wilson)/ Double Indemnity (Joseph Sistrom)
The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover
Blade runner (both versions)
Natural Born Killers
Romper Stomper
Pulp Fiction
'Shakespeare' films by A Kurosawa, D Jarman, R Polanski, K Branagh, L Olivier.
Mystery Train
The Three Colours - Blue
Sammy and Rosie Get Laid.
Films of Yvonne Rainer, Tracey Moffatt, Rachel Perkins
India Song

Staff of the Department of English


Group D: English & American Literature: Period Units

(Year-long units)
The aim of this group is the extended study of the literature of particular periods, and of the cultural and social conditions in which it was produced.



HEA242/342 Seventeenth-Century Literature

The cultural ferment of the seventeenth century both occasioned and required exuberant activity in philosophy, religion and the natural sciences. Ceaseless argument and speculation expressed with elegant, flexible technique reached a spectacular height in Milton's Paradise Lost. Authors of prose and poetry to be studied include Jonson; Mary Wroth and Bacon; Donne and Herbert; Margaret Cavendish; Bunyan, Milton and Marvell; Dryden.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr J Wall
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern 2x2,000-word essays (50%), end-of-year exam (50%)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Abrams (ed), The Norton Anthology of EnglishLiterature, Vol 1, 5th edn, 1986
Salzman (ed), An Anthology of Seventeenth-century Fiction, Oxford World's Classics.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA243/343 Augustans & Post-Augustans

The 18th century produces the most trenchant satire in English, a refreshment of classical literary models and values, and what is probably the last body of poetry confidently to speak to the mass of people who could read and write. In the first quarter of the 18th century there also emerges the new literary form of the novel. The post-Augustan poets present work that is interesting both in itself and for its looking forward to the Romantics. The unit examines these three main developments, paying attendtion to the strong associations that existed between several of the autors, and to the oppositions and innovations in the culture, especially those made by women. Teaching begins with Pope, Swift, Johnson and women poets, studied through the Norton and Lonsdale anthologies.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Mr JL Winter
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,00-word essays (50%), 3-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Abrams (ed), The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol 1, 5th edn.
Lonsdale (ed), Eighteenth Century Women Poets, Oxford.
Samuel Richardson, Pamela, ed. Sabor, Penguin
Henry Fielding, Tom Jones
Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy
Fanny Burney, Evelina
William Cowper, Selected Poems, ed. Rhodes, Carcanet Press.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA244/344 Romantics

Provides a study of English literary Romanticism focusing on the first generation of Romantics in sem 1 and the second generation in sem 2. The unit examines the innovations in artistic practice and critical theory brought about by these writers, influenced as they were by the French Revolution and German philosophy. Although the central concentration throughout is on poetry, some prose will be studied, including Dorothy Wordsworth's Grasmere Journal and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, which initiate discussion of feminist contributions to recent critical reassessments of Romanticism.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr JS Livett
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern 2x2,000-word essays (50%), 3-hour end-of-year exam (50%)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
William Blake
William Wordsworth
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Dorothy Wordsworth, The Grasmere Journal
Mary Wollstonecraft
William Godwin, Caleb Williams 
Thomas de Quincey
Byron
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein 
Keats
Austen, Northanger Abbey
Abrams (ed), The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol 2, 6th edn.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA245/345 Nineteenth-Century Literature

Two novels in the first half of this unit allow a study of some aspects of Romanticism at the beginning of the century. Following works show how this influence was modified by new pressures as various as evangelicalism, utilitarianism, and rapid industrial expansion during Victoria's reign. Both fiction and poetry in the second half of the century present a variety of responses to philosophical crises brought about by developments in science, religion, and social theory.

Special notes not available in 1996
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr JS Livett
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays (50%), 3-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park, Oxford World's Classics
Sir Walter Scott, The Heart of Midlothian, Oxford World's Classics
Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, Oxford World's Classics
Tennyson
Browning
Dickens, Dombey and Son,Oxford World's Classics
George Eliot, Middlemarch, Oxford World's Classics
Poetry of: Arnold, Clough, the Pre-Raphaelites
Trollope, The Way We Live Now, Oxford World's Classics
Hardy, A Pair of Blue Eyes, Oxford World's Classics
Conrad, Lord Jim, Norton
Abrams (ed), The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol 2, 6th edn.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA246/346 Literature 1880-1920

Examines a period of rapid transition in literature from the waning of Victorianism to the upheaval and aftermath of the First World War. The unit seeks to problematize such issues in the culture as the interest in European literary innovations; aestheticism; the crises in religious and moral thought; decadence and anti-decadence; the representation of the lives of women; the apprehension of the turn from one century to the next; the prophesying of war; the changing conditions of publishing; and the many ways in which the literature examines and projects images of England. The close associations that existed between some of the writers in this period are also emphasised. All of the following essential texts are treated in classes and are examinable. Students may, however, exercise some personal choice over which texts they may concentrate on for their individual study, within guidelines that will be stated in the printed outline of the course that is distributed in the first class.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Mr JL Winter
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays (50%), 3-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Rose Macaulay, Told by an Idiot 
Victoria Glendinning, Electricity, Hutchinson
Samuel Butler, The Way of All Flesh, Oxford World's Classics
R.L. Stevenson, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Oxford World's Classics
Richard Jefferies, After London, Oxford World's Classics
H.G. Wells, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Everyman
Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady, Oxford World's Classics
George Moore, Esther Waters, Oxford World's Classics
Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Oxford World's Classics
F.M. Mayor, The Rector's Daughter
Joseph Conrad, The Secret Agent, Oxford World's Classics
Arnold Bennett, The Old Wives' Tale, Oxford World's Classics
Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier, Oxford World's Classics
Hynes S (ed), Thomas Hardy, Oxford Poetry Library
Silkin J (ed), The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry
Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier, Virago
Dorothy Richardson, Pilgrimage 1, Virago.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA247/347 Modernism & After

In literature as in other arts of Europe and America the first thirty years of the 20th century brought startling changes in techniques and subject matter. The experiemental impetus of that Modernist movement is still forceful today, but not all writers indulge it. The unit investigates Modernist writers and their influence on some later writing.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr RM Blair
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 1,250-word exercise (10%), 2,500-word essay (50%), 3-hour end-of-year exam (40%)
required texts, etc
(Sem 1) Poetry
TS Eliot, Collected Poems 1909-1962
-, The Cocktail Party
WH Auden, Selected Poems, ed. Mendelson
WB Yeats, Selected Poetry, ed Jeffares
(sem 2) Prose
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
DH Lawrence, The Rainbow
Virginia Woolf, The Waves
Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea
Iris Murdoch,A Fairly Honourable Defeat
Patrick White, The Aunt's Story.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA248/348 American Fiction

Considers ways in which a range of works of prose fiction reflect some special characteristics, formal and thematic, of writing in prose in the United States. The first semester is devoted to examining the idea of 'the American Romance', from the nineteenth century through to the present. In the second semester, works studied turn around the theme of 'Coming to America' - migration and cross-cultural encounter.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC207/307
method of assessment Two essays of 2,000 words (50%); 3-hour exam(50%)
required texts, etc
Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter and other Tales, Penguin
Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, Oxford
Wolff CG (ed), Four Stories by American Women, Penguin
Toni Morrison, Beloved, Penguin
Don de Lillo, White Noise
Henry James, The Europeans, Oxford
Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita
Saul Bellow, Mr Sammler's Planet, Penguin
Louise Erdrich, The Beet Queen
Amy Tan, The Joy Luck Club.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA249/349 Postmodernism, Postcolonialism

Engages with some versions of postmodernism and some versions of postcolonial critque. Postmodernism frequently works to expose the ways in which knowledge and cultural autority are experience as constructions; while postcolonial critique works to open up questions of race, ethnicity, nationalism and the effects of imperialism. The unit opens a dialogue between these texts and practices and the students who are working with them. The selection of texts exemplifies the ways in which both postmodernism and postcolonial critique have operated as globalised ultural practices that have had local applications.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr J Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC203/303
method of assessment 2x2,500-word essays (60%), written exam (40%)
required texts, etc
Thomas Docherty, Postmodernism, A Reader
Michel Foucault, Power/Knowledge
John Frow, What was postmodernism?
Jim Jarmisch, Night Train
Don de Lillo, White Noise
Amanda Lohrey, The Reading Group
Meaghan Morris, The Pirate's Financée
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park
Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre
JM Coetzee, Foe
James Ivory, Shakespeare Wallah
Mudrooroo, Dr Wooreddy's Prescription for Enduring the End of the World
Jean Rhys, Wild Sargasso Sea
William Shakespeare, The Tempest
Sara Suleri, Meatless Days

recommended reading
Homi K Bhabha, Nation and Narration
Edward Said, Culture and Imperialism
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, In Other Worlds.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
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Group E: Australian Literature

The aim of this group is to develop critical reading of Australian writing, both historical and modern, and to engage with the culture that produces it. Students are given the opportunity to meet with some of the authors whose work is set for the course, and to discuss their writing with them.



HEA250/325 Modern Australian Writing

(a) (sem 1) Modern Australian Writing A
comprises a study of four Australian writers of the 20th century: Christina Stead, Patrick White, Mudrooroo and Brian Castro. The study is framed by theoretical questions about authorship and literary production and by national-cultural questions about the inflections of modernism and postmodernism in Australia. Students are encouraged to read the work of an individual author in some depth and to investigate the construction of authorship across a number of generic forms, including fiction, criticism, biography and autobiography. The set texts are supplemented by a course reader of critical, interview, biographical, theoretical and bibliographical material; Not available in 1996; but see HEA274/374 for alternative first-semester component; and
(b) (sem 2) Modern Australian Writing B,
which is a wide-ranging study of Australian poetry from the early 20th century through to the contemporary moment. This component includes some canonical poetic texts as well as indigenous, performance, multicultural and song lyric versions of poetic writing. The component also looks at examples of the theoretical discourse on poetry and the idea of an 'Australian poetics'. It is organised around broad theoretical questions such as poetry and politics, poetry and everyday life, poetry and non-lyuric forms, poetry and cultural production, and poetry in relation to poetics. Students have the opportunity to make a special study of an individual poet's work.
Not available in 1996
or (c) (sem 2) Gender in Australian Writing.
The construction of gender roles, both male and female, has formed a vital part of the mythology of writing in Australia. Men's and women's experience in the bush, urban life, the two world wars, immigration, work, domesticity, and art, have been represented in styles ranging from nineteenth-century realism to the symbol and metaphor of modernism and its aftermath. The unit offers a critical study of these representations, together with some analysis of the literary and ideological assumptions they involve.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator and a, b) Dr P Mead, (c) Dr J Livett
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment class test and/or assignment (20%), 2,500-word esay (40%), 2-hour exam in Nov (40%)
required texts, etc
(a) Brian Castro, Double Wolf
-,Drift
Marr D (ed), Patrick White Letters, Random House, 1994
Mudrooroo, Doctor Wooreddy's Prescription for Enduring the Ending of the World
-, Writing From the Fringe: A Study of Modern Aboriginal Literature, Hyland House, 1990
-, The Garden of Gethsemane: Powers from the Lost Decade, Hyland House, 1991
Rowley H, Christina Stead: A Biography, Heinemann, 1994
Patrick White, The Aunt's Story
-, Flaws in the Glass

(b) Lionel Fogarty, New and Selected Poems, Hyland House, 1995
Paul Kelly, Lyrics, Harper Collins, 1993
Dorothy Porter, Monkey's Mask, Hyland House, 1994
Kenneth Slessor, Collected Poems, Harper Collins, 1994
John Tranter, The Floor of Heaven, Angus & Robertson, 1993
Mead P and Tranter J (eds), The Penguin Book of Modern Australian Poetry, Penguin, 1994
Judith Wright, Collected Poems, Harper Collins, 1994

(c) Carmel Bird (ed), Relations: Australian Short Stories 
David Mahlouf, The Great World
Patrick White, The Twyborn Affair 
Shirley Hazzard, The Transit of Venus
Henry Handel Richardson ,The Getting of Wisdom 
Elizabeth Jolley,Miss Peabody's Inheritance.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
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Group F: Literary Criticism & Theory

The aim of modules in this group is to inform students of the richness of modern critical and theoretical debate, and its antecedents. No prior knowledge is assumed, but the courses aim to build to a high level of familiarity and competence.



HEA260/360 Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism

(a) (sem 1) Twentieth Century Literary Criticism & Theory offers an introductory survey of structuralism, semiotics and some aspects of post-structuralism as they pertain to the study of literary texts. There is a particular focus on developments in narrative theory, including the work of the most influential theorists in this area.
Sem 2 continuation, either (b) or (c) or (d)

(b) (sem 2) Practices & Problems in Literary Criticism, Classical to Modern: Literary theory and the practice of criticism from classical times to the present have repeatedly argued within, or sometimes with, such questions as: how does literature relate to 'the world'; what part do morals and politics play in the writing and criticism of literature; how do writers and critics treat history; what happens when writers and critics group works in genres; what, indeed, are literature and criticism, what are their functions, their values, and so on? The aim of the module is to give definition to such questions, and to examine possible answers to them. Although certain examples of critical writings are prescribed, they are supplemented by other primary sources in criticism. A distinctive feature of this module is its aim to develop students' own critical capacities through class discussion and writing sessions involving a very wide range of examples of poetry, prose and drama.

(c) Language, Literature and Environment, which examines a selection of contemporary fictions from the perspective of current thinking about environmental issues. The works of fiction examined portray a variety of interactions between people and environments and demonstrate a range of attitudes towards the 'natural' environment as an economic and spiritual 'resource'. Reading is informed by some key works in recent environmental theory and in relevant critical theory and is directed towards an understanding of the way in which fiction both reflects and helps to shape attitudes and awareness in the community. It also contributes to framing questions about the idea of 'nature'.

(d) Post-Modernism - the second half of HEA249/349 above.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern Semester 1
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays (50%), 2-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
(a)Lodge D (ed), Modern Criticism and Theory, Longmans
Toolan MJ, Narrative: a Critical Liguistic Introduction, Routledge
Sontag S (ed), Barthes: Selected Writings, Fontana
James Joyce, Dubliners, Penguin
(b)Samuel Johnson, Selected Writings, ed. Cruttwell, Penguin
Matthew Arnold, Selected Poems and Prose, ed. Allott, Dent
Russell and Winterbottom (eds), Classical Literary Criticism, Oxford World's Classics
Lodge (ed), Modern Criticism and Theory, Longman
(c)Rodney Hall, Just Relations
Beverley Farmer, The Seal Woman
Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It
Leslie Marmon, Silko Ceremony
Gabrielle Lord, Salt
Edward Abbey, The Monkey Wrench Gang 

recommended reading (a) Jefferson A and Robey D (eds), Modern Literary Theory: a Comparative Introduction
(b) Bradford R (ed), The State of Theory
Freadman R and Miller S, Re-Thinking Theory
Parker D, Ethics, Theory and the Novel
Righter W, The Myth of Theory
(c) (recommended reading in environmental and critical theory - these will be placed in Reserve)
Rachel Carson, Silent Spring 
Evernden N, The Natural Alien
Marx L, The Machine in the Garden
Mathews F, The Ecological Self
Meeker J, The Comedy of Survival
Merchant C,The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology and the Scientific Revolution 
Nash R, Wilderness and the American Mind
Oelschlaeger M, The Idea of Wilderness: From Prehistory to the Age of Ecology
Todorov T, The Poetics of Prose
Wilson A, The Culture of Nature: North American Landscape from Disney to the Exxon Valdez.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



Group G: Textual Bibliography

The department has unusual strengths in the area of textual bibliography, which is the study of the material production and transmission of texts and their editing. This unit teaches this important subject, and aims to redefine some of the bases of literary study.



HEA273/373 Textual Bibliography

In the last few years, bibliography, for long regarded as an important but auxiliary subject in literary studies, has become central in the debate about defining and understanding text. Bibliography begins with the study of books and manuscripts as physical objects, with the physical constitution of what we read, and with knowledge of how it was formed and transmitted by scribes, authors and printers. Topics treated include bibliographical description and analysis; palaeography; aspects of typography, printing, printing history and publishing. The main emphasis, however, is on the theory and practice of editing texts. Whenever possible, topics treated are related to authors and periods studied elsewhere in the English course. Practical work in the department's bibliographical press is an important component: most classes in this unit are held in the New Albion Press room.

Special notes please note that it may be necessary to limit enrolments because of the constraints of this teaching space.
teaching staff (Coordinator) Mr JL Winter
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2 practical exercises (25%), 2,000-word essay (25%), 3-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Philip Gaskell, A New Introduction to Bibliography (in hard covers). Loan copies are available.

recommended reading Greetham DC, Textual Scholarship: an Introduction.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



Group H: Cultural Studies

This group of modules aims to present a field that has become both important and controversial. If literary texts use the language we also use for non-literary purposes, they are bound to the culture and society that produces them in ways wider than the word 'literary' may seem to allow. Cultural studies look at such wider connections.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)









HEA274/374 Australian Cultural Studies: an Introduction

Introduces the field of study Cultural Studies. The unit surveys the theoretical, methodological and practical aspects of Cultural Studies in its local, national and international contexts, including the contentious origins of Cultural Studies in relation to Literary Studies. Also introduced are relevant approaches within Cultural Studies such as the study of popular and mass culture, subcultures, globalisation, indigenous cultures and the media. The unit focuses on questions of criminality, everyday life, gender, race, sexuality and textuality in the history of Australian cultural production (including Tasmania) and in contemporary culture more broadly. The objective is to introduce students to ways of analysing the diversity and complexity of the contemporary cultures they inhabit and the world of representations that both produce and reflect those cultures.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr P Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 1-hour lecture and 1-hour tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (50%), 1.5-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Jimmy Chai, Bran Nue Dae
Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life
Frow and Morris (eds), Australian Cultural Studies: a Reader
Gray A and McGuigan J, Studying Culture: An Introductory Reader
Dick Hebdidge, Subcultures: the Meaning of Style
George Miller, Mad Max
Mudrooroo, Doctor Wooreddy's Prescription for Enduring the Ending of the World.
Semester 2 continuations:
Modern Australian Writing B (see HEA250/350)
Narrative into Film (see HEA221/321).
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



Group I: Gender in Literature

This group aims to broaden the discussion of literary texts and to engage with pressing issues in contemporary discussion of reading, writing and society by looking at issues of gender.



HEA281/381 Gender in Literature

(sem 1) Considers the work of some 18th and 19th century women writers, framing the study of their fiction with two polemical texts: A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Wollstonecraft) and Woolf's A Room of One's Own, which looks back at the tradition of women writing.
Sem 2 continuation: Gender in Australian Writing- see under HEA250/350 above.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr RM Blair, Dr RS Gaby
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays (50%) 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Wollstonecraft M, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Norton
-, Mary: The Wrongs of Woman
Behn A, The Rover, Methuen
Shelly M, Frankenstein
Bront‘ C, Shirleyin1>
Gaskell E, Cousin Phyllis and Other Tales, Oxford
Woolf V, A Room of One's Own
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

To continue with English units