English units 4

University of Tasmania
English Units - 1996


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Honours (English 4)



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HEA400 Poets of the Late Fourteenth-Century



Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr JW Wall
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
William Langland, Piers Plowman: An Edition of the C-Text, ed. Pearsall, York Medieval Texts, 2nd series
Tolkein and Gordon, (eds) Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, 2nd edn (revised, Davis), Oxford University Press.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA401 Penitential Literature of the Late Middle Ages & Early Renaissance

The matter of penitence was important for theologians, preachers and literary artists alike, especially after the provisions of the IV Lateran Council (1215). The operation of intellect, will and imagination required exploration and demonstration. The unit uses Chaucer's 'Parson's Tale' as a basis for considering penance in The Canterbury Tales, a selection from the Katherine Group, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Cleanness, a selection from Piers Plowman, and Skelton's 'Ware the Hauke'.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr J Wall
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Robinson FN and Benson LD (eds), The Riverside Chaucer
Cawley AC and Anderson JJ (eds), Pearl, Cleanness, Patience, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Everyman.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA410 Reading Chaucer Otherwise

Examines the position of Chaucer within the literary canon through a reading of specific examples from the history of Chaucer criticism - focusing on specific texts: The Canterbury Tales, The Troilus, the Legend of Good Women. Students have the opportunity to re-examine both Chaucer and the canon through developments in critical theory during the last decade. Specific topics include: Chaucer and political discourses in the 1390s (new historicism); Chaucer and the documents surrounding the 'rape of Cicely de Chaumpaigne (feminism); Chaucer and the so-called 'Scottish Chaucerians' (cultural identity); Chaucer and Spenser (the politics of self-formation); 'Chaucer effects' including film (the past and popular culture); 'anit-imperial Chaucer' - Chaucer in Australia and in the US - and a nostalgic Chaucer in Britain. Critical works by Lee Patterson, Paul Strohm, Sheila Delany, Carolyn Dinshaw, Stephen Knight and David Aers provide starting points.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr J Mead.
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA425 Author for Special Study: Thomas Hardy

Hardy's importance, intrinsically and for many writers and readers of this century, is undoubted. He has received much attention from recent scholars and critics in editions of his texts, both prose and verse; in biography; and in criticism of all important varieties. This unit considers, separately and in mutual relationships, the conditions of Hardy's texts; Hardy as provincial novelist and story-teller; Hardy's verse; and the many critical issues that have been involved in the reading of Hardy since his own time.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Mr JL Winter
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Under the Greenwood Tree, Oxford World's Classics
A Pair of Blue Eyes, Oxford World's Classics
Far from the Madding Crowd, Norton
The Return of the Native, Oxford World's Classics
The Mayor of Casterbridge, Oxford World's Classics
The Woodlanders, Oxford World's Classics
Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Oxford World's Classics
Jude the Obscure, Oxford World's Classics
Hill (ed),The Distracted Preacher and Other Stories, Penguin
Hynes S (ed), Thomas Hardy, Oxford Poetry Library.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA430 Author for Special Studies: Virginia Woolf

Virginial Woolf's experimentation with the novel from 1912 to 1941 has greatly influenced writers who followed in the second half ot the 20th century. Her fiction, her literary criticism, and her diary entries on writing illumijnate each other, and her work has been an important focus of attention in recent studies of gender in literature and society. Woolf is a central figure in critical debates about the nature and development of modernism.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr JS Livett
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
The Voyage Out, Oxford World's Classics
Night and day, Oxford World's Classics
Jacob's Room, Oxford World's Classics
Mrs Dalloway, Oxford World's Classics
To the Lighthouse, Oxford World's Classics
The Waves, Oxford World's Classics
Orlando, Oxford World's Classics
The Years, Oxford World's Classics
Between the Acts, Oxford World's Classics
A Room of One's Own/Three Guineas, Oxford World's Classics
A Writer's Diary, Triad Granada
Selected Essays, Vol 1, Penguin.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA435 Fictocriticism

Introduces students to developments within the discipline 'English' currently called Fictocriticism. Postmodern critical and creative work is moving rapdily away from, on the one hand, the traditional academic gendres of essay, chapter and journal article and, on the other, the creative genres of fiction and poetry. A hybrid kind of writing, part critical, part theoretical, part creative, is proving influential in the reformulation of literary and cultural studies, not least for its recent exposure of what has always been the literariness of critical genres. This unit studies some of the influential work of cultural commentary that is currently being done by writers working outside and againsdt disciplinary generic norms, and the crucial questions of subjectivity, objectivity, value and cultural politics they are facing. There is the opportunity for students to do fictocritical work for their asessment.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr P Mead
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2-hour seminar weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment written work totalling no more than 8,000 words
required texts, etc
Kathy Acker et al, Angry Women
Walter Benjamin, Charles Baudelaire: a Lyric Poet in the Age of High Capitalism
Maud Ellmann, The Hunger Artists: Starving, Writing and Imprisonment
Greil Marcus, Lipstick Traces: a Secret History of the Twentieth Century, The UTS Review.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA450 Honours Long Essay

Length 10,000 words; topic and supervisor to be nominated by the student in consultation with the Department. Due in week 12 of semester 2.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA465 Fiction & Form

Beginning with the experiments of Modernism, the unit offers an exploration of some of the means by which 20th century novelists have challenged the conventions of earlier fiction. The range of works studies provides the focus for an examination of an variety of 'postmodernism', including the influences of feminism, new writing from outside the colonising 'centres', and the influence of critical theory on fiction writers.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, A Hundred Years of Solitude
Jeannette Winterson, Oranges are Not the Only Fruit
Salman Rushdie, Midnight's Children
Rodney Hall, Just Relations
John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman
Marina Warner, Indigo
Elizabeth Jolley, Foxybaby
Julian Barnes, Flaubert's Parrot
Russell Hoban, Riddley Walker.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA470 Further Studies in Shakespeare



Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Dr RS Gaby
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Alexander (ed), Complete Works, Collins
or individual texts in separate paperbacks, for study of
Much Ado About Nothing,
Twelfth Night,
Measure for Measure,
Troilus and Cressida, 
Sonnets,
Hamlet, 
Othello, 
Cymbeline,
The Tempest.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA474 Condition of England Literature

Examines attempts by novelists and other writers to interrogate the 'condition of England' in the 1840s and 50s, and again in the last decades of the nineteenth and the first decades of the twentieth centuries. In both phases the growth of industrialism prompted urgent questioning not only of the rights of people and classes but of concepts of nationhood. The capacity to see and understand both human individuality and human aggregations is reviewed in Condition of England literature, which also powerfully interrogates forms of literature. Comparisons are made of the earlier and the later phases of the Condition of England novel and there is some discussion of post-Edwardian texts, including those which contain images, tropes and settings that involve memories and 'recreations' of the condition of England in the past. Some non-literary evidence and some works of visual art are discussed also.

Special notes
teaching staff (Coordinator) Mr JL Winter
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
Benjamin Disraeli, Sybil, Oxford World's Classics
Elizabeth Gaskell, Mary Barton, Oxford World's Classics
-, North and South, Oxford World's Classics
Charles Kingsley, Alton Locke, Oxford World's Classics
Charles Dickens, Little Dorrit, Oxford World's Classics
George Gissing, The Nether World, Oxford World's Classics
Henry James, The Princess Casamassima
HG Wells, Tono-Bungay, Everyman
EM Forster, Howards End
Robert Tressell, The Ragged-Trousered Philanthropists, Paladin
Virginia Woolf, The Years
Isabel Colegate, The Shooting Party

recommended reading Shelston A (ed), Thomas Carlyle, Selected Writings, Penguin
Anthony Trollope, The Way We Live Now, Oxford World's Classics
George Gissing, The Odd Women, Virago
John Galsworthy, The Forsyte Saga, Penguin.

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HEA498/499 English 4 (Honours) Full time/English 4 (Honours) Part time

Comprises three units of coursework and a long essay. Intending students are asked to state by 18 December 1995 their preferences for three of the units HEA400 to HEA490. The Department will seek to teach a minimum of four of those units, but this depends on availability of staff. Not more than seven units may be offered.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [100% / 50%]
teaching pattern full year - 3x2-hour seminars a week
prerequisites approval from the department and eligibility as set out under 'Honours prerequisites'; see HEA- above
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3x3,000-word essays (30%), 10,000-word essay (40%), 3x3-hour exams in Nov (30%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of English
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

To continue with Sociology units