Sociology units 2

University of Tasmania
Sociology Units - 1996


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Second and third year (levels 200/300)

Coordinators: Dr T Scrase (200 level);
Dr R Julian (300 level).
Unless otherwise noted, essential texts are discussed at the first lecture in each unit.

Please note that the department has made changes to the structure of its major and double major and to its Honours prerequisites for 1996.

A major in Sociology

(80%-100% of Sociology units in total) consists of the units
HGA257/357 Modernity to Postmodernity (20%)
HGA203/303 Social Research (10%)
plus a minimum of 50% and a maximum of 70% selected from the other units offered.
Prerequisite: HGA100 Sociology 1

For students who began a major in or before 1995 and intend to complete the major in 1996, the following requisites must be met:
HGA201 Theories of Modern Society (10%)
HGA301 Modern Sociological Analysis (10%) or
HGA205/305 Social and Cultural Change in Contemporary Society (10%)
HGA203/303 Social Research (10%)
Prerequisite: HGA100 Sociology 1.


A double major in Sociology

(140% of Sociology units in total) consists of the units:
HGA257/357 Modernity to Postmodernity (20%)
HGA203/303 Social Research (10%)
HGA204/304 Quantitative Research Methods (10%) or
HGA230/330 Qualitative Research Methods (10%)
plus 100% selected from the other Sociology units offered.

For students who began a major in or before 1995 and intend to complete the double major in 1996 the following requisites must be met:
HGA201 Theories of Modern Society (10%)
HGA301 Modern Sociological Analysis (10%) or
HGA205/305 Social and Cultural Change in Contemporary Society (10%)
HGA203/303 Social Research (10%)
HGA204/304 Quantitative Research Methods (10%) or
HGA230/330 Qualitative Research Methods
plus 100% selected from the other Sociology units offered.
Prerequisite: HGA100 Sociology 1.


A minor in Sociology

consists of Sociology units to the value of 40%.
Prerequisite: HGA100 Sociology 1.

Details of which units will be offered in semesters 1 and 2 and full-year units during 1996 are given below:

Semester 1
HGA203/303 Social Research
HGA205/305 Social and Cultural Change in Contemporary Society
HGA211/311 Social Stratification
HGA219/319 Religion and Society
HGA221/321 The Individual and Society
HGA222/322 Information and Society
HGA230/330 Qualitative Research Methods
HGA253/353 Women in Chinese Societies
HGA255/355 Globalisation and Culture
Semester 2
HGA204/304 Quantitative Research Methods
HGA225/325 Popular Culture and the Mass Media
HGA227/327 Women, Power and Society
HGA229/329 Sociology of Health and Illness
HGA233/333 Mass Social Movements
HGA251/351 Sport, Leisure and Tourism
HGA257/357 Modernity to Postmodernity (20%)
HGA258/358 Social Justice, Marginality and Difference

Full-year unit
HGA256/356 Understanding Other Cultures

Students intending to re-enrol must check with the department before they do so. Full details of all units to be offered in 1996 will be available from the department at the time of re-enrolment.
Students who are considering an honours degree in Sociology should bear in mind the prerequisites for honours when making their choice of units.

Please note: All units are available at both 200 and 300 level. Note, however, that some units have prerequisites.




HGA203/303 Social Research

Concerns the whys and hows of social research as practised in Sociology. An expertise in social research makes it possible to gather data about social phenomena and human behaviour, to look for patterns in them, to construct hypotheses to account for those patterns, and then to test these explanations by further observation.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr J Chang
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 5 exercises (70%), final exam (30%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)
Graduate Diploma of Science (InfoSys)


Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA204/304 Quantitative Research Methods

In the explosive growth of social science statistical methods, it is easy to forget that quantitative social research rests on logical foundations that cut across specific techniques. This unit teaches the 'causal logic' and basic statistical techniques used in survey analysis. The objectives are: to allow students to be more critical consumers of research findings in the mass media and in scholarly journals; to provide them with hands-on experience through laboratory exercises using a variety of techniques for quantitative data analysis; and to give them the opportunity to develop their own research hypotheses, identify relevant data and conduct data analysis to test them.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr R Volpato
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites HGA203/303
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment exercises (60%), final exam (30%), laboratory performance (10%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)
Graduate Diploma of Science (InfoSys)






Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA205/305 Social and Cultural Change in Contemporary Society

Examines the course and likely consequences of processes of social change in advanced societies. Attention is paid to the relations between technological, social and cultural change, and to the impact of change upon individuals. Claims that modern society is giving way to a new social order are assessed.
May be studied as HAC221/321.

Special notes not offered after 1996
teaching staff
campus & mode Dr S Crook
unit weight Hbt, int
teaching pattern [10%]
prerequisites sem 1 - an hour a week (13 weeks)
corequisites HGA201 Theories of Modern Society (see 1995 h/bk)
mutual exclusions
method of assessment HAC221/321, HGA257/357, HAC232/332
required texts, etc essay (40%), final exam (60%).
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA211/311 Social Stratification

Reviews patterns of inequality in advanced industrial societies in three arenas: socioeconomic, sociocultural and legal-political. Four levels of analysis are distinguished: world-system, national, community and domestic. The unit objectives are: to familiarise students with the major theories of stratification and the key theoretical debates; to introduce the major concepts used in contemporary stratification analyses; to outline patterns of stratification in advanced societies; to familiarise students with the methodological problems encountered, and the main measures used, in stratification and mobility research; and to provide an opportunity for critical assessment of the current debates on class and stratification.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof J Pakulski
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA212/312 Kinship and Family



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA214/314 Population and Society



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA216/316 Australian Social Structure



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA217/317 Social Control and Deviant Behaviour



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA218/318 Urban Sociology



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA219/319 Religion and Society

Is an examination of the major sociological and anthropological theories of religion including an analysis of religious institutions from a comparative perspective. The range of substantive topics considered includes utopian communities, millenarianism, secularisation and the relationship of religion to other social practices and processes.
May be studied as HAC222/322

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof G Easthope, Dr N Cook
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC222/322
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA220/320 Science, Technology and Contemporary Society



Special notes may be studied as HAC223/323. Not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA221/321 The Individual and Society

Focuses on social interaction as providing a point of articulation between the macro analysis of social institutions and identity formation and change at the level of the individual.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr R Julian
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA222/322 Information and Society

Examines the institutional changes resulting from the development of mass media, information systems and the expanding use of microcomputers. The focus is on the social implications of the mass production of, flow of, and public access to, information, so as to make students 'information aware'. With such awareness and associated judgments students become able to: distinguish between various forms of information; assess information needs; assess the impact of information forms and flows on individuals, groups, and organisations; diagnose how information is lost within social systems; outline ways in which information flows, structures and use can be enhanced within social systems.
May be studied as HAC224/324

Special notes
teaching staff Mr R Volpato
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC224/324
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)
Graduate Diploma of Science (InfoSys)






Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA223/323 Social Problems and Social Policy



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA224/324 Occupations and Professions



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA225/325 Popular Culture and the Mass Media

Reviews sociological conceptions of culture, considers variants of 'mass culture theory' and seeks to identify major forms of contemporary popular culture. Television news, advertising, news-papers, film and 'soap opera' are among those forms of media that are taken as case studies. The overall aims of the unit are: to develop awareness among students of competing theories and approaches in the sociology of culture; to explore in depth the role of mass media in society, highlighting the crucial role they play in cultural formation; to show how popular culture formation is a continually changing and contested process; and to explore the links between popular culture, consumerism and consumption.
May be studied as HAC225/325

Special notes
teaching staff Dr S Crook
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC225/325
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA227/327 Women, Power and Society

Examines gender relations, with an emphasis on advanced industrial societies. The importance of gender divisions in key institutions such as family, school, and labour market is considered. Claims that gender is a major dimension of social inequality are assessed. Attention is paid throughout to the cultural production of femininity and masculinity. The unit not only considers the main developments in the social science literature on the role and significance of gender in society, but also enables students to formulate their own position in relation to central debates in the sociology of gender.
May be studied as HAF201/301

Special notes
teaching staff Dr N Cook, Dr R Julian
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAF201/301
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA229/329 Sociology of Health and Illness

Examines the manner in which illness is socially defined, coped with and socially distributed. Exploring that distribution illustrates the distribution of resources and power in society. In modern societies, institutions and occupations that deal with the sick constitute a major aspect of state and private funding. The characteristics of these occupations are examined.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof G Easthope
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA230/330 Qualitative Research Methods

Explores established research techniques in contemporary sociology including observation and interviewing not typically considered under quantitative methods. In addition to the qualitative methods themselves, consideration is also given to the analysis of data collected by such methods and their uses in sociological inquiry. Students receive hands-on experience and practice with a range of qualitative research methods in a new, purpose-built qualitative research laboratory.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr A Franklin, Dr R Julian
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 4 exercises (40%), assignment (30%), exam (30%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)
Graduate Diploma of Science (InfoSys)






Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA231/331 Migrants in Australian Society



Special notes may be studied as HAC226/326. Not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA233/333 Mass Social Movements

Addresses the major theoretical debates and research findings in the sociology of mass social movements. The unit reviews the results of movement studies in Australia within a broad comparative framework which includes Western 'ecopax', civil rights and feminist movements, European fascist movements, and democratic movements in Eastern Europe. The unit's objectives are: to familiarise students with major theories of mass movements and key theoretical debates; to introduce major concepts used in contemporary analyses of social movements; to outline the main types of contemporary mass social movements; to familiarise students with methodological problems encountered in movement research; and to provide an opportunity for critical assessment of current debates on the nature and importance of mass social movements.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof J Pakulski
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA235/335 Language and Social Order



Special notes may be studied as HAC227/327. Not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA236/336 Organisation Theory



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA251/351 Sport, Leisure and Tourism

Investigates the prominent positions that sport, leisure and tourism occupy in contemporary society. Processes of development and change affecting sport, leisure and tourism, including commercialisation and policy development are examined in the light of competing theoretical approaches. Particular attention is paid to recent empirical research. Topics include: the growth of women's sports; home leisure and entertainment; and eco-tourism. Australian and Tasmanian case studies are explored and placed in comparative perspective.
May be studied as HAC228/328

Special notes
teaching staff Dr A Franklin
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC228/328
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA252/352 Childhood and Adolescence



Special notes not offered in 1996
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA253/353 Women in Chinese Societies

Examines continuity and change in aspects of women's lives in various Chinese societies (the People's Republic of China, Taiwan, and other Chinese cultural areas). These societies have a common culture but different sociopolitical characteristics and so provide an illuminating set of comparisons. Two sets of issues are addressed: (a) changes in the position of women in Chinese society and family life; and (b) the extent to which the position of women relative to men differs across social cleavages (such as rural/urban, class, education) in various Chinese societies.
May be studied as HAS214/314, HAF253/353

Special notes
teaching staff Dr J Chang
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC253/353, HAF214/314
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA254/354 Cultures and Societies of Southeast Asia



Special notes may be studied as HAS217/317, HAC229/329. Not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA255/355 Globalisation and Culture

Is an examination of social processes that tend to break down the boundaries between national societies. Competing sociological explanations of globalisation are compared, including a specific consideration of the issue of whether it is simply the product of modernisation or capitalist development or an entirely new process. Consideration is then given to such empirical phenomena as: multinational enterprises and the new international division of labour; the crisis of the state and the emergence of a global polity; religions and ethnic fundamentalist revivals; and the spread of a global consumption culture. Throughout, specific reference is made to the absorption of the 'third world' into the global system and to the effectivity of culture as a globalising force.
May be studied as HAC230/330, HAS218/318

Special notes
teaching staff Dr T Scrase
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC230/330, HAS218/318
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA256/356 Understanding Other Cultures

Examines the diversity of the world's cultural forms, and the classical and contemporary concepts and theories that anthropologists have developed to understand them, especially with respect to the impact of postmodernity on other cultures. The unit surveys world cultures from gatherer-hunters to pastoralists and intensive rice growers, then reviews classical anthropological issues surrounding political structures, religion and thought, kinship and social organisation, and gender relations - to provide students with a grasp of comparative sociological frameworks. An overview of more contemporary processes and theory explores ways of analysing issues such as indigenous peoples in modern societies; the role of third world peoples in environmental movements; and 'isolated' and localised peoples in regional and national infrastructures. These issues are considered in relation to contemporary postmodern debates in anthropology.
May be studied as HAC231/331

Special notes
teaching staff Dr N Cook, Dr A Franklin
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (26 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAC231/331
method of assessment 2 assignments (50%), final exam (50%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA257/357 Modernity to Postmodernity

Traces the processes of modernisation and postmodernisation that have shaped the major institutions and practices of contemporary advanced societies. Changes affecting work, stratification, political institutions, culture and the self are given particular attention. Major debates about the origins and consequences of modernising and postmodernising change are reviewed. The unit introduces students to the theoretical concepts used by sociologists in the study of social change, and provides opportunities to develop skills in conceptual and theoretical analysis.
May be studied as HAC232/332

Special notes
teaching staff Dr S Crook, Assoc Prof J Pakulski
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 4 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HGA205/305, HAC221/321, HAC232/332
method of assessment class test (10%), 3,000-word assignment (30%), final 3-hour exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HGA258/358 Social Justice, Marginality and Difference

Far reaching local and international social transformations engendered by globalisation have heightened the need to reexamine social justice, marginality and difference in the broader social context. Competing sociological perspectives on social justice are reviewed exploring, in particular, whether social justice is a right or a privilege in contemporary society. Social justice as an integral aim of policy, planning and development (e.g. in schools, in work, or in terms of unemployment and poverty alleviation) is critically examined. The unit moves on to explore the social processes that have led to the (social and cultural) marginalisation of various groups (e.g. indigenous Australians, tribal Asians, poor immigrant women). Finally, consideration is given to the concept of 'difference' as a form of cultural resistance to marginalisation and oppression. Cross-national comparisons, especially between Australia and Asia, provide examples for lectures and tutorial discussion. Overall, the unit aims to enhance students' understanding of competing local and international perspectives and approaches to social justice, marginality and difference.
May be studied as HAS221/321

Special notes
teaching staff Dr T Scrase
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (13 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAS221/321
method of assessment essay (40%), final exam (60%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Sociology
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

To continue with Sociology units