Political Science units 2

University of Tasmania
Political Science Units - 1996


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HSA210/310 Political Ideologies

The central concern of this unit is to examine politics and its relationship to what Destut de Tracy termed 'ideology'. The unit begins by considering what kind of activity politics actually involves, arguing that political rule arises when a collection of people deemed to be formally equal form a government amongst themselves. The mode of political communication between these people is persuasion. A further consequence of politics is a literature of political thought. Politics accordingly is not a universal activity and even where it is established it is often regarded with hostility. This rhetorical style is contrasted with a rationalistic, scientistic and ideological style of thinking that emerged in the 19th century. In this context, the unit considers liberalism, nationalism, Marxism and fascism as ideological styles of rule located in modernity, and concludes by considering whether post modernity offers any relief from the rationalistic certainties of modernity.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr DM Jones
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%), tutorial participation (10%), 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Arendt H,The Origins of Totalitarianism, Allen and Unwin.
Heywood A, Political Ideologies.
McLellan D (ed), Marx's Early Writings.
O'Sullivan N, Fascism.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA211/311 19th Century Political Thought: Enlightenment and After

Examines the work of a number of key 19th century political thinkers whose work crucially affected both our understandings of the modern state and in some cases directly affected social and political practices. The unit begins by examining the Kantian background that intimated a philosophical style of politics whose resonance is still felt today. Subsequently the unit examines the work of two significant German philosophers who explored the implications of Aufklarung. This understanding is contrasted with the Romantic irrationalism that coloured the thinking of Joseph de Maistre and later in the century Freidrich Nietzsche. This is followed by an examination of two influential revolutionary thinkers - Marx and Bakunin. The unit concludes by examining what may be considered the most influential political theory of the 19th century, namely liberalism and its three exemplary exponents: Bentham, de Tocqueville and JS Mill.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr DM Jones
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%), tutorial participation (10%), 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Berlin I, The Crooked Timber of Humanity.
Coppleston F, A History of Philosophy, vol 7.
Plamenatz J, Man and Society, vol 2.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA212/312 Political Thought: Liberal Democracy

Explores ideas and practices, strengths and limits of liberal democracy: (a) the liberal, pluralist and procedural model of democracy and its critics (such as Carl Schmitt) and defenders (such as Robert Dahl) with reference to John Rawls' conception of justice and liberties; (b) the complex relationships among liberal democracy, the state, civil society, capitalist markets and social classes from both critically normative and empirically explanatory perspectives; and (c) critics of liberal democracy or liberal theory. The unit enables students: to understand basic concepts such as democracy, liberty and the original position, etc.; to develop analytical skills (e.g. to analyse key texts and to clarify concepts); and to understand and engage in current debates over the central issues of liberal democracy.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr B He
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (35%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Rawls J, A Theory of Justice, Harvard University Press, 1971.
Held D (ed), Prospects for Democracy: North, South, East, West, Policy Press, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA213/313 The Politics of Gender, the Politics of Feminism

Examines the ways in which gender has become a political issue. The unit begins with feminist critiques of political theory (liberal and Marxist) and then looks at the criticisms of these approaches by radical and cultural feminisms. Next, the unit considers theorists of sexual difference and critics of the sex/gender distinction. Finally, the unit questions the very stability of gender as a category in feminist thought by raising issues of ethnicity and sexuality.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr WL Kwok
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial presentation and participation (20%); 2-hour exam in Nov (40%)
required texts, etc
reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA214/314 Representation and Parliamentary Democracy

Looks at the nature and adequacy of the representational mechanisms that link public opinion to the making of public policy. Various theories of representation, consent and obligation are examined. The implications of these theories are assessed in terms of the contemporary operation of parliament.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof RA Herr
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Birch AH, Representation, 2nd edn, Macmillan.
Harrop M and Miller L, Elections and Voters - A Comparative Introduction, Macmillan.
Jaensch D, Getting our Houses in Order - Australia's Parliament: how it works and the need for reform, Penguin.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA215/315 Marxism and Modernity

Concerns the works of Karl Marx and examines the various traditions of Marxist thought which have developed in the 20th century. The unit deals with the key features of Marx's thought and the manner in which his ideas have influenced important movements and individual thinkers, among them: Engels, Lenin, Mao Zedong, Gramsci, Lukacs and the Frankfurt School. The traditions of Marxism are discussed through examining the key texts and concepts of class, capitalism, revolution, ideology, power, democracy and modernity.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996
teaching staff Dr B He
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (35%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
McLellan D, Karl Marx: Selected Writings, Oxford University Press, 1977.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA216/316 Postmodern Politics: Ideology, Power and Freedom

Introduces students to some of the diverse ideas that have come to be associated with 'postmodern' or 'poststructuralist' political theory. The unit begins by considering critical re-evaluations of fundamental concepts of freedom, power, ideology and reason/rationality in examples of liberal, Marxist/socialist and critical theory (the Frankfurt School) perspectives. Nietzsche's critique of power and modernity is examined as an influential precursor to later 'postmodern' ideas. The unit then outlines some of the implications for political theory of Derrida's 'deconstruction' and Foucault's analysis of discourse, power and freedom. The most common criticisms of 'postmodern' are also examined before concluding with a look at some of the ways in which 'postmodern' ideas have influenced feminism, the study of non-Western cultures and the construction of new approaches to politics.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996.
teaching staff Dr T Narramore
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (45%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in Nov (40%)
required texts, etc
a reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA217/317 Quantitative Analysis in Political Research

Examines the logic and use of quantitative methods to study political phenomena, especially political behaviour and public policy. Topics include the foundations of empirical research, research design, data collection and applied statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of political data is presented, together with an introduction to computers and software. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate statistics are discussed within the context of politics rather than their mathematical foundations.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr G Smith
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (30%); lab assignments and tutorial participation (30%); 2-hour exam in June (40%)
required texts, etc
Norusis MJ, The SPSS Guide to Data Analysis for Release 4, SPSS, Chicago, 1990.
Rose D and Sullivan O, Introducing Data Analysis for Social Scientists, Open University Press, Buckingham, 1993.
Statistics - a Powerful Edge, Australian Bureau of Statistics, 1994.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA218/318 Asian Political Thought

Familiarises students with some of the key texts and debates in Asian political thought. Chinese political thought is the main focus, with some reference to other traditions. The period covered is from the beginnings of Chinese statehood to the 20th century. The thinkers considered include Confucius, Lao Tzu, Han Fei Tzu, Chu Hsi, and Sun Yat-Sen. Asian political thought is the foundation of Asian government with an influence still apparent today. It is also a body of theorising as rich and diverse as Western political thought, to which it provides an essential complement.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof J Cotton
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Chan Wing-Tsit (ed), A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy, Princeton University Press, 1963
or deBary WT et al, Sources of Chinese Tradition, 2 vols, Columbia University Press, 1960.
Confucius, The Analects, Penguin, 1979.
deBary WT, East Asian Civilizations: A Dialogue in Five Stages, Harvard University Press, 1988.
Fung Yu-Lan, A Short History of Chinese Philosophy, Free Press, 1948.
Lao-Tzu,Tao Te Ching, Penguin, 1963.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA219/319 Politics and Culture in Psychoanalysis

Psychoanalytic thought challenges many central premises of traditional political and cultural studies. The notion of the unconscious, for example, removes rational and conscious thought from the centre of political agency. Similarly, the psychoanalytic theory of sexuality questions the stability of sexed identity. The unit concentrates on the work of Jacques Lacan and his self-proclaimed 'return to Freud', and critically assesses texts that use Lacan's thought for political and cultural analyses. The unit examines the use of Lacanian thought in theories of ideology, domination and revolution. It focuses on developments in film criticism, and feminist film criticism in particular, that use Lacanian concepts of the mirror-stage and castration. It considers feminist attempts to shape psycholanalytic thought into a theory of sexed identity; and finishes with the possibility of a psychoanalysis of race and ethnicity.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr WL Kwok
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%), tutorial participation and presentation (20%), 2-hour exam in Nov (40%)
required texts, etc
Lacan J, The Ecrits: a selection.
Elliott A, Social Theory and Psychoanalysis in Transition.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA220/320 The Politics of Development: Theories and Issues

Is an introduction to theories and issues relating to world poverty - commonly, although perhaps controversially, referred to as underdevelopment. Major themes include modernisation; economic growth and distribution of wealth; Marxist and neo-Marxist critiques; democracy, human rights and gender issues in development; international aid and trade; and resources and environment.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996
teaching staff Assoc Prof PJ Eldridge
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (35%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Cammack P, Pool D and Tordoff W, Third World Politics: A Comparative Introduction, 2nd edn, Macmillan, 1993.
Hettne B, Development Theory and the Three Worlds, Longman Scientific and Technical, UK, 1990.
Allen T and Thomas A, Poverty and Development in the 1990s, Oxford University Press, UK, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA221/321 Comparative Political Culture



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA222/322 Comparative Political Systems

Is a study of the concept of system and its relevance to politics, with particular reference to the relationship between system and structure. Britain and the European Community are given particular attention.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr WW Bostock
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (60%)
required texts, etc
Bostock WW, Approaches to Political Explanation, RDI Press.
Birch AH, The British System of Government, 7th edn, Allen & Unwin,
or Kavanagh D, British Politics, Oxford.
Dalton A, Politics and the European Community, Longman.
Macfarlane LJ, Issues in British Politics since 1945, Longman.
George S, Politics and Policies in the European Community, Oxford.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA223/323 Ethnic Politics

Is a study of the politics of ethnicity and language. After considering some theories, the unit examines modern ethnic and linguistic nationalism, with particular attention being given to Canada and Quebec, and to several supra-national language-based movements.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr WW Bostock
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (60%)
required texts, etc
a reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA224/324 Race Politics

Is a study of the politics of race and ethnicity. Some theories of race and ethnicity and their political expression are considered. Race and ethnic politics in South Africa, Mauritius, Fiji and elsewhere are examined.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff Dr WW Bostock
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (30%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc a reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA225/325 American Political Institutions

Is an introduction to the operation of American political institutions. The unit considers the separations-of-powers doctrine as enunciated in the constitution and examines how the meaning of this constitutional prescription has changed over the past two hundred years. The roles of informal political institutions are considered.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr GW Smith
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Bibby JF, Governing by Consent: An Introduction to American Politics, CQPress, Washington, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA230/330 Political Economy: Theories and Issues

Examines the theoretical development of domestic and international political economy in the period of the modern states system, focusing on the relationship between society, the economy and the state. Theories studied include liberalism, Marxism and economic nationalism. Selected issues in the post World War II liberal world economy are examined to illustrate the theories.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (35%); tutorial work (15%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Heilbroner R, The Worldly Philosophers, 7th edn, Pelican Books, 1991.
Fusfeld DR, The Age of the Economist,7th edn, Harper Collins, USA, 1994.
Caporaso JA and Levine DP, Theories of Political Economy, Cambridge University Press, Vic, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA232/332 International Organisation

Examines theory, politics and administration in the field of study of international organisation. The first half of the unit considers various theoretical approaches that have clustered around the substantive core of the field: the problem of international governance. Particular attention is focused on regime analysis. The second half of the unit deals with the application of these theoretical approaches in the specific context of global institutions such as the United Nations and regional institutions in the South Pacific and Antarctica.

Special notes not available to students who have undertaken HSD232/332 International Organisation.
teaching staff Assoc Prof RA Herr, Dr HR Hall
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Archer C,International Organizations.
Young O, International Cooperation: Building Regimes for Natural Resources and the Environment.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA233/333 Japan and the Asia-Pacific Region

Provides comprehensive analysis of the recent efforts of Japan to transform its dominant economic power into active political power in the Asia-Pacific. The unit begins with a look at domestic factors shaping Japan's involvement with the region, then examines relations with the USA (trade tensions and security), relations with China, the question of Japan as a model for the NICs, aid and investment in Southeast Asia, the Japanese military and security strategy, and relations with Australia.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996
teaching staff Dr T Narramore
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (45%); tutorial work (15%); 2-hour exam in Nov (40%)
required texts, etc
Akaha T and Langdon F (eds),Japan in the Post-hegemonic World, Lynne Reinner, Boulder, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA234/334 Sovereignty, the State and International Order

Is an introduction to the role of the state in contemporary world order. The unit examines the adequacy of the state as a basis for explaining international relations. Theories range from the realist school to the idealist school.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof RA Herr
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Bull H, The Anarchical Society: A Study of Order in World Politics, Macmillan.
Hollis M and Smith S, Explaining and Understanding International Relations, Clarendon, 1992.
Mckinlay RD and Little R, Global Problems and World Order, Frances Pinter.
Viotti PR and Kauppi MV, International Relations Theory, Macmillan, New York, 1990.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA235/335 The South Pacific in World Affairs

Is a survey of the contemporary politics of the island microstates of the South Pacific. The unit covers the period from the beginning of decolonisation in the early 1960s to the present. Domestic and international dimensions of politics are examined, focusing on such issues as the Fiji coups, the struggle for independence in New Caledonia, great power rivalry and the reform of regionalism.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof RA Herr
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Ghai Y (ed),Law Politics and Government in the Pacific Islands, University of the South Pacific.
Fairbairn Te'o IJ et al, The Pacific Islands: Politics Economics and International Relations, East West Center, Honolulu, 1991.
Hoadley S, The South Pacific Foreign Affairs Handbook, Allen & Unwin, North Sydney, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA240/340 Australian Foreign Policy

Is a critical examination of Australian Foreign Policy from federation until the present. This unit focuses on the search for an independent foreign policy throughout this period, including recent attempts to define an integral role in the Asia Pacific region and the role of middle power in international affairs in the 1990s. It examines political, economic and strategic issues and includes an evaluation of the links between external and domestic policy decisions.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (35%); tutorial work (15%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Evans G and Grant B,Australia's Foreign Relations: In the World of the 1990s, 2nd edn, Melbourne University Press, Carlton, 1991.
Mediansky FA (ed), Australia in a Changing World: New Foreign Policy Directions, Maxwell Macmillan Australia, Botany, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA241/341 The Australian Political System: Political Parties and Parliament



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA242/342 The Australian Political System: Federalism and Political Power

Focuses on Australian federalism and on theories of state power. Australian federalism is discussed in a theoretical and comparative context and includes such topics as federal institutions, state politics, regionality and fiscal relationships. Additionally the distribution of power in the Australian State is considered within theories of pluralism, corporatism, elitism and class.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr S Tanner
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (30%); tutorial performance (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Emy HV and Hughes O, Australian Politics: Realities in Conflict, 2nd edn, Macmillan, 1992.
Summers J, Woodward D and Parkin A,Government, Politics, Power and Policy in Australia, 5th edn, Longman Cheshire, 1994.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA243/343 Politics and Australian Culture



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA250/350 Politics in Contemporary Japan

Introduces students to the most important features of contemporary Japanese politics. The unit analyses democratic reconstruction after World War II, the dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party and the recent emergence of new conservative forces, the rise and decline of the Socialists, the political context of economic and industrial policies, and the political tensions that these policies have created in areas such as the environment and local, ethnic and sexual politics. The unit also familiarises students with some of the general forms of political analysis that have been applied to the particular case of Japan.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr T Narramore
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (45%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in June (40%)
required texts, etc
Ecclesten B, State & Society in Postwar Japan, Polity Press, 1989.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA251/351 Radicalism and Reform in Modern China



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA252/352 Comparative Politics of Development in South and Southeast Asia

Explores issues and approaches relating to political and economic development in South and Southeast Asia. Topics include structures of wealth, poverty and political power; social and cultural aspects; external aid, trade and investment; democracy and human rights; role and status of women; urban and rural development; environment. Comparisons and illustrations are drawn from various countries across the region.

Special notes students are advised to have taken or to undertake HSA220/320 or HSA253/353 or HSA254/354 or HTA222/322 or equiv. 
teaching staff Assoc Prof PJ Eldridge
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Brown D, The State and Ethnic Politics in Southeast Asia, Routledge, 1994.
Diamond L et al (eds), Democracy in Developing Countries: Asia, vol 3, Lynne Rienner, 1989.
Hewison K, Robison R and Rodan G, Southeast Asia in the 1990s: Authoritarianism, Democracy and Capitalism, Allen and Unwin, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA253/353 Southeast Asian Politics: Indonesia

Covers modern (post-World War 2) Indonesia - the transition to independence from Dutch rule, the establishment of political institutions, changing role of parties, ideological conflict, the military, economic problems, external relations (including relations with Australia); and a comparative assessment of the roles of Presidents Sukarno and Suharto. Particular attention is paid to the impact on politics of cultural factors, notably religion.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff Assoc Prof PJ Eldridge
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500 word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Brown C and Cribb R, Modern Indonesia, Longman Cheshire, 1995.
Legge JD, Sukarno: A Political Biography, Allen & Unwin, 1990.
Schwarz A, A Nation in Waiting: Indonesia in the 1990s, Allen and Unwin, 1994.
Vatikiotis M,Indonesian Politics Under Suharto: Order, Development and Pressure for Change, Routledge, London and New York, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA254/354 Southeast Asian Politics: Malaysia, The Philippines and ASEAN

Explores the development of regional relations with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) against the background of more detailed study of Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines since independence. Analysis of political and governmental structures is placed within broader social, cultural and historical contexts. Relations between ASEAN, major international powers and neighbouring countries (Vietnam, Cambodia, Australia) are addressed in the latter part of the unit.

Special notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof PJ Eldridge
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Borthwick M, Pacific Century: The Emergence of Modern Pacific Asia, Allen and Unwin, Oxford, 1992.
Diamond L, Linz J and Lipset S, Democracy in Developing Countries, (vol 3 - Asia), Lynne Rienner, Boulder, 1989.
Neher C, Southeast Asia in the New International Era, Westview Press, Boulder, 1991.
Sandhu K, Siddique S et al, The ASEAN Reader, Singapore Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA255/355 The Asian Dragons

The rise of the Asian dragons - South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore - has established a model of modernisation in the Asia-Pacific region which challenges many theories of development. All are now powerful economies, and important trading partners with Australia. While all have experienced some democratisation, the direction of their political and social development is still uncertain. This unit covers these issues, and considers the likely impact of future developments (Hong Kong's retrocession to China, Korean unification, improving China-Taiwan relations, trends towards regional integration). It also questions the extent to which other Asian nations can emulate the dragons.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof J Cotton
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%); tutorial participation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Deyo FC (ed), The Political Economy of the New Asian Industrialism, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1987.
Gold TB, State and Society in the Taiwan Miracle, ME Sharpe, Armonk NY, 1986.
Macdonald DS, The Koreans: Contemporary Politics and Society, 2nd edn, Westview, 1991.
Milne RS and Mauzy DK, Singapore: The Legacy of Lee Kuan Yew, Westview, 1990.
Scott I, Political Change and the Crisis of Legitimacy in Hong Kong, Oxford University Press, 1989.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA256/356 Politics in Contemporary China

Deals briefly with the major political and social developments in Mao Zedong's China. The unit concentrates on political developments with particular emphasis on the post-Cultural Revolution period and the political and economic reforms instituted since 1978 in Deng Xiaoping's China. The intentions behind the reforms are examined in more detail, along with their political, social and economic consequences. The events leading up to June 4 1989 and the decisions which led to the crisis are analysed from various points of view. Reasons for the survival of Chinese communist party rule and broadly socialist policies are examined and contrasted with some Soviet and Eastern European experiences. The Democracy Movement and the question of an emergent civil society in China are examined.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr B He
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (35%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Harding H, China's Second Revolution: Reform after Mao, Allen & Unwin, Sydney, 1987.
White G, Riding the Tiger: the Politics of Economic Reform in Post-Mao China, Hampshire and Macmillan, 1993.
Nathan A, China's Crisis: Dilemmas of Reform and Prospects for Democracy, Columbia University Press, New York, 1990.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSA257/357 East Asian Democratisation in the Post Cold War Era

Discusses the historical, cultural, social and political preconditions for, process of, and problems with, democratisation in the countries of the region such as Japan, China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) and Korea. The 'transition to democracy' literature and various theoretical frameworks to analyse democratisation in East Asia are introduced and discussed. East Asian democratisation is compared with recent democratisation in Eastern Europe and analysed in the context of global democratisation in the world of the post-cold war era.

Special notes may be studied as HAS216/316
teaching staff Dr B He, Dr T Narramore, Dr DM Jones
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (35%); tutorial participation (15%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Fukuyama F, The End of History and the Last Man, Penguin, London, 1992.
Huntington SP, The Third Wave: Democratisation in the Last Twentieth Century, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1991.
Nathan A, China's Crisis: Dilemmas of Reform and Prospects for Democracy, Columbia University Press, New York, 1990.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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