Administration units 2

University of Tasmania
Administration Units - 1996


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Year 2 (level 200) and Year 3 (level 300)

Coordinator: Dr HR Hall
The department reserves the right not to offer any 200 or 300 level units which do not attract a minimum enrolment, or which cannot be offered because of staff leave or movements.

Staff of the Department of Political Science


HSD206/306 Policy Process

Provides an understanding of public policy-making as a primary activity of governments. The setting of agendas, issue processing and implementation of policy are key aspects of the policy process discussed. The unit also makes a critical evaluation of several theories of policymaking and especially the interaction between different actors within this process.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr M Haward, Dr J Homeshaw
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (30%); tutorial assessment (10%); and a 2-hour exam in June (60%)
required texts, etc
Davis G et al, Public Policy in Australia, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 1993.
Ham M and Hill M, The Policy Process in the Modern Capitalist State, Harvester Wheatsheaf, London, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD208/308 Business-Government Relations

Explores interactions and interdependencies between business and government in contemporary liberal capitalist countries, especially Australia. The unit examines the critical aspects of the political and economic environment which shape business-government interaction. Topics include the ideologies which shape this interaction between business and government, the structural interdependency of business and government in capitalist economic systems, the relative political power of business and government, patterns of interaction between business and government, contemporary issues of structural economic adjustment and the role of business and government in this process.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr S Bell
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial presentation (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Bell S and Wanna J (eds), Business-Government Relations in Australia, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Sydney, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD209/309 Policy Analysis

Provides an introduction to the analysis of public policymaking, focusing on techniques and models used to assess and evaluate policy. Policy analysis is a central activity within government, but it is also of key interest to non-governmental organisations. The unit focuses on the differences between 'analysis for' and 'analysis of' policy-making, and includes topics such as option analysis, implementation research, evaluation, forecasting and conflict resolution.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr MG Haward, Dr J Homeshaw
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites (HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106) and HSD206/306
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (30%), tutorial assessment (10%), 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Hogwood BW and Gunn LA, Policy Analysis for the Real World, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1984.
Pal LA,Public Policy Analysis: An Introduction, 2nd edn, Nelson Canada, Scarborough, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD217/317 Personnel Management

Examines the political dimension of policies, processes and procedures involved in the management of people in the work place. The unit is concerned with the critical analysis of those areas of employment regulation which are primarily the responsibility of managers. Topics include the human resource management approach, work design and employee participation, selection, performance appraisal, personnel development, leadership, equity issues, sexual harassment, health and safety, and organisational culture.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff Dr HR Hall
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (30%); tutorial assessment (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc a reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD223/323 Regional Development Policy

Examines the interaction of state, community and market at the local level, and their impact on regional development. Topics include the role of official development agencies, central-regional relations, alternative community-based strategies and oppositional planning. Cases considered include Tasmania, the Maritime provinces of Canada, and Appalachia in the USA.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff Dr MG Haward
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word case study (30%); tutorial assessment (10%); 2-hour exam in June (60%)
required texts, etc
Gaventa J, Smith BE and Willingham A (eds), Communities in Economic Crisis, Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 1990.
Savoie D, Regional Economic Development, 2nd edn, Toronto University Press, Toronto, 1992.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD225/325 Women and Work in Australia

Examines, from the point of view of various disciplines, the position of women in the workforce in Australia. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which education, professional, trade union and organisational practices, and government policy affect women's career biographies. The issues of equal employment opportunity, affirmative action and sexual harassment are examined, as is the economic contribution of women's unpaid work.

Special notes this unit is cross listed in Women's Studies (see HAF214/314) 
teaching staff Dr J Homeshaw
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial a week
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2000-word essay (30%), tutorial assessment (10%), 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Encel S and Campbell D, Out of the Dolls House, Longman Cheshire, Melbourne, 1991.
Probert B and Wilson B,Pink Collar Blues, Melbourne University Press, Carlton, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD230/330 Australian Environmental Policy

Introduces students to the dynamics which shape environmental policy in contemporary Australia as well as to relevant aspects of environmental political theory. The relationship between capitalism and environmental protection is considered in the context of recent disputes between economic and environmental concerns. The pattern of Australian environmental policy is also considered in relation to a number of particular case studies, such as the Wesley Vale pulp mill dispute and environmental degradation of the Murray-Darling river basin. Overall, a central question which guides the unit is: Can governments effectively manage the environment?

Special notes
teaching staff Dr K Crowley, Dr S Bell
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment tutorial participation (10%); 2,000-word essay (40%); 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Walker KJ, Australian Environmental Policy, UNSW Press, Kensington, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD231/331 Social Policy In Welfare States

Describes and explains key features of the welfare state in liberal democracies. Focusing primarily on the Welfare State in Australia, the unit examines issues such as: its history and form; its political bureaucratic and community foundations; the policy community and dominant paradigms; the political choices involved; the characteristics of the policies developed; and, in particular, the recent shift towards increasing use of market mechanisms in policy design and delivery. Theoretical debates about citizenship, justice and individualism in relation to welfare are also considered.

Special notes may not be offered in 1996 
teaching staff Dr W Ryan
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment seminar (20%); 2,000-word essay (20%); 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Jones MA, The Australian Welfare State: Origins, Control and Choices, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 1990.
Bryson L, Welfare and the State, Macmillan, Melbourne, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD232/332 International Organisation

Examines theory, politics and administration in the field of study of international organisation. The unit considers various theoretical approaches that have clustered around the problem of international governance, with particular attention being paid to regime analysis; and then applies these theoretical approaches in the specific context of global institutions such as the United Nations, and regional institutions in the South Pacific and Antarctica.

Special notes this unit is not available to students who have undertaken the Political Science unit HSA232/332 International Organisation 
teaching staff Dr HR Hall, Assoc Prof RA Herr
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial assessment (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Archer C, International Organizations, Routledge, London, 1992.
Young O, International Cooperation: Building Regimes for Natural Resources and the Environment, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1989.
A reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD233/333 Australian Industrial Relations

Examines the history, parties, processes and contemporary development of the Australian industrial relations system. The unit focuses on the origins of Australia's system of compulsory arbitration - the principles which have dominated wage fixation this century - and the consequences of the arbitration system for social equity, economic efficiency and industrial conflict; and then considers the role of the key parties in the system - governments, unions, management and employer associations. The unit also examines the federal nature of the Australian system, with particular attention being paid to the Tasmanian system; and looks at recent developments such as the Prices and Incomes Accords of the Hawke and Keating Labor Governments, the rise of the New Right, the deregulation debate of the 1980s and the shift to enterprise bargaining in the 1990s.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr S Fry
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial assessment (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Deery S and Plowman D, Australian Industrial Relations, 3rd edn, McGraw-Hill, Sydney, 1991.
Dabscheck B,Australian Industrial Relations in the 1980s, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1989.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD234/334 Comparative and Asian Industrial Relations

Is concerned with the comparative study of industrial relations at the national and organisational levels of analysis. The unit comprises three parts: (a) considers various theoretical approaches to industrial relations; (b) applies these approaches in the comparative study of industrial relations in the United States, Australia and selected Western European countries; and (c) adopts a comparative approach to the study of industrial relations in various Asian countries: Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Japan, the Philippines, Thailand and Taiwan. Topics include labour regulation and industrial conflict resolution; the nature of trade unionism; and the role of the state and the International Labour Organisation.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr S Fry
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial assessment (10%); 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Bamber GJ and Lansbury RD (eds),International and Comparative Industrial Relations, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 1993.
Deery SJ and Mitchel RJ (eds), Labour Law and Industrial Relations in Asia, Longman Cheshire, Melbourne, 1993.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD235/335 Public Administration

Familiarises students with the theory and practice of public administration in liberal democracies such as Australia. The unit comprises three sections: (a) deals with traditional approaches to public administration; (b) examines the ideological and empirical criticisms of existing systems; and (c) examines the origins, characteristics, implications and criticisms of 'managerialism' introduced since the 1970s and 1980s. Comparisons are made between Australia, Britain, the United States, Canada and New Zealand.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr W Ryan
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); 2-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Hughes O, Public Management and Administration, Macmillan, Melbourne, 1994.
Wanna J et al, Public Sector Management in Australia, Macmillan, Melbourne, 1992.
A reader, available from the Department of Political Science.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD236/336 The Politics of Australian Economic Policy

The economy and economic policy are central features of Australian public life. The unit examines key intersections between politics and the economy, focusing on the politics of economic policy formation in Australia including the historical evolution of Australian economic policy. Particular attention is paid to key shifts in macro- and microeconomic policy since the end of the long post-war economic boom in the 1970s. The major institutions and processes of economic policy formation are considered; and the relative capacities of the Australian state in relation to the management of economic policy are evaluated. Arguments about Australia's key economic problems and economic prospects, and about the capacity and desirability of state regulation of the economy are also considered.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr S Bell
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106 or Year 1 Economics or Commerce
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%); tutorial presentation (10%); 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Bell S, Ungoverning the Economy: the Political Economy of Australian Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1996.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HSD237/337 Quantitative Analysis in Political Research

Examines the logic and use of quantitative methods to study political phenomena with an emphasis on political behaviour and public policy. Topics include the foundations of empirical research, research design, data collection and applied statistical analysis. Statistical analysis of political data is presented in conjunction with an introduction to computers and software. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate statistics are discussed within the context of their application to the study of politics rather than their mathematical foundations.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr G Smith
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - a lecture and a tutorial weekly
prerequisites HSD100 or HSD105 or HSD106
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (30%); laboratory assignments and tutorial participation (30%); 2-hour exam in June (40%)
required texts, etc
Norusis MJ, The SPSS Guide to Data Analysis for Release 4,SPSS, Chicago, 1990.
Rose D and Sullivan O, Introducing Data Analysis for Social Scientists, Open University Press, Buckingham, 1993.
Statistics - A Powerful Edge, Australian Bureau of Statistics, 1994.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of Political Science
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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