History units 2

University of Tasmania
History Units - 1996


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History at levels 200 and 300

The following units are either year-length and 20% in value, or semester-length and 10% in value.

full year [20% units]
HTA203/303 Modern Europe 1815-1914
HTA204/304 Australia Since 1890
HTA212/312 Europe in the High Middle Ages, AD 1000-1300
HTA242/342 Imperialism and Revolution

semester 1 [10% units]
HTA209/309 Europe in an Age of Crisis 1560-1640
HTA221/321 Modern India till Independence
HTA223/323 Modern China: the End of the Qing Empire 1850-1916
HTA224/324 Modern China: Revolution and Reintegration 1916 to the Present
HTA226/326 Women as Colonisers and Colonised

semester 2 [10% units]
HTA222/322 India since Independence
HTA220/320 Historiographical Studies
HTA227/327 Anglo-Saxon England AD 600-1066
HTA329 The History of Van Diemen's Land 1642-1856

Students intending to major in History will normally take 40%, in either 10% or 20% units, at level 200, and 40% at level 300.

Each of the history units will entail an average of two hours classwork a week. The lecture hours cited will apply when the whole week's teaching is in that form. In every unit at least one hour in each will be a lecture, and at least one hour in every fortnight will be a tutorial.



HTA201/301 The Barbarian West: Europe AD 400-1000




Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)
Bachelor of Science - Physical Sciences, Psychology or Humanities (S3G.03)






Staff of the Department of History
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA202/302 Late Medieval and Renaissance Europe



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA203/303 Modern Europe 1815-1914

Surveys the sociopolitical history of the major European nations, and their relations with each other.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (Mon and Fri at 12.10 p.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA204/304 Australia Since 1890

Examines patterns of change in Australia since 1890, embracing economic, social, political, religious, and cultural change. The unit also helps students to develop historical research and writing skills.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr RG Ely
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (Tues and Thurs at 11.10 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (20%), 4x500-word exercises (20%), tutorial participation (10%), 3-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Dyster B and Meredith D, Australia in the International Economy, Cambridge.
Macintyre S, The Oxford History of Australia, vol 4 1901-1942, Oxford University Press.
[p/b] White R, Inventing Australia, Allen & Unwin.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA208/308 The Expansion of Europe: from Crusaders to Conquistadors, c.1100-1600



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA209/309 Europe in an Age of Crisis 1560-1640

The late 16th and early 17th centuries were an age of crisis in Europe. Population growth, price rise, taxation and war were creating social unrest and political division, while religious division and cultural ferment were undermining old certainties and values. This unit considers Spain under Philip II, Elizabethan England, the French Wars of Religion, the Dutch revolt, and the Thirty Years War, and focuses on changing social conditions and world views as well as power politics.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof MJ Bennett
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (Tues and Fri at 10.00 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%), tutorial participation (10%), 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Dunn RS, The Age of Religious Wars 1559-1715, Norton
[p/b] Rabb T, The Struggle for Stability in Early Modern Europe, Longman
[p/b] Elliott JH, Europe Divided 1558-1598, Fontana.
[p/b] Parker G, Europe in Crisis 1598-1648, Fontana.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA211/311 Europe Since 1914



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA212/312 Europe in the High Middle Ages, AD 1000-1300

Studies the general history of Europe during the formative period from the recovery after the last Barbarian invasions to the end of the 13th century expansion. Special attention is given to the 'Twelfth-Century Renaissance', with emphasis on such topics as the early development of the modern nation state, growth of papal government, the Crusades and the origin of universities.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof RM Thomson
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (Wed and Fri at 11.10 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,500-word essays (40%), tutorial performance (10%), 3-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Southern RW, The Making of the Middle Ages, Hutchinson, 1953 etc.
[p/b] -,Western Society and the Church in the Middle Ages, Pelican History of the Church, vol 2, 1970.
[p/b] Brooke CNL, The Twelfth Century Renaissance, Thames & Hudson, 1969.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA220/320 Historiographical Studies

Offers a methodological and philosophical introduction to issues in historical research and writing. Methodological issues are considered through the study of several historians who have given an account their own historical work. Philosophical issues are approached in a preliminary and nontechnical way. No prerequisite in philosophy is required of students undertaking this unit.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr RG Ely
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (Thurs 3.00-5.00 p.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x1,000-word essays (30%), tutorial participation (20%), 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Stern F (ed), The Varieties of History, Papermac.
[p/b] Tosh J, The Pursuit of History, Longman.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA221/321 Modern India till Independence

Is for students who wish to pursue either their general interest in Asian history or a more particular interest in Indian history at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The unit focuses on the formidable problems besetting India's emergence as a modern nation. It explores the formation of India's national identity during the colonial period, ending with its independence in 1947. It also focuses on the growth of religious nationalism and ethnicity, challenging the basis of the emerging nation. Many of these problems and challenges persisted and plagued India's critical nation-building efforts following independence. HTA222/322 is a natural extension of this unit and is strongly recommended to students of HTA221/321.
May be studied as HAS204/304

Special notes
teaching staff Dr A Roy
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (Mon and Wed at 10.00 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAS204/304
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%), tutorial performance (10%), 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Bayly CA, Indian Society and the Making of the British Empire, Cambridge.
Bayly CA (gen ed),The Raj: India and the British, 1600-1947, National Portrait Gallery
[p/b] Brown JM, Modern India. The Origins of an Asian Democracy, 2nd edn, Oxford.
[p/b] Sakar S, Modern India: 1885-1947, Macmillan India.
[p/b] Wolpert SA, A New History of India,4th edn, Oxford.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA222/322 India since Independence

Though India's national liberation movement is one of the oldest and most experienced in colonial Asia and Africa, she shares with other newly liberated countries the formidable problems and challenges of national reconstruction. Perhaps the world's oldest continuous civilisation, forming a complex mosaic of enormous social and cultural diversities, and comprising the world's second largest population, facing serious problems of economic development, India chose a democratic path to nation building and has astonishingly earned the reputation of being the developing world's 'most shining example' of parliamentary democracy. What made this possible? Can India, with her gigantic demographic, ethnic, social and economic pressures, continue to maintain her democratic system, stability and global aspirations? Issues such as these should remain the central concerns of this unit. HTA221/321 is a direct antecedent of this unit, and is strongly recommended to students of HTA222/322.
May be studied as HAS207/307

Special notes
teaching staff Dr A Roy
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (Mon and Wed at 10.00 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAS207/307
method of assessment 2,500-word essay (40%), tutorial performance (10%), 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Brass PR, The Politics of India since Independence, Cambridge University, Cambridge, 1990.
[p/b] Baxter C et al, Government and Politics in South Asia, 2nd edn, Westview, Boulder, 1991.
[p/b] Hardgrave RL, India. Government and Politics in a Developing Nation, 3rd edn, Harcourt Brace, 1980.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA223/323 Modern China: the End of the Qing Empire 1850-1916

The making of modern China follows a long and tortuous path. After a brief introduction to the foundations of pre-modern Chinese society and the traditional factors of decline, this unit examines the new and unfamiliar forces that tore at its political and social seams, the trauma of intellectual alienation, the Confucian officials' attempts to save the Confucian order and their failure, and the final demise of China's two thousand-year old monarchy.
May be studied as HAS201/301

Special notes
teaching staff Dr KS Liew
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (Mon at 3.00 p.m. , Thurs at 10.00 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAS201/301
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%), tutorial performance (10%), 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Money DC, China: The Land and The People, Allen & Unwin.
[p/b] Hsu ICY, The Rise of Modern China, Oxford,
or [p/b] Spence JD, The Search for Modern China, Yale.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA224/324 Modern China: Revolution and Reintegration 1916 to the Present

Beginning with World War One, this unit studies the forces of revolution and reintegration in the 20th century which led China to where it is today. It discusses the failures of the first Chinese Republic, the roots of fragmentation and disorder, the strange and untried means adopted by the Chinese to cope with the situation confronting them, the war of resistance against Japan, the trial of strength between the Nationalists and the Communists and the Chinese experience of Communist rule after 1949.
May be studied as HAS208/308

Special notes
teaching staff Dr KS Liew
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (Wed and Fri at 1.05 p.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAS208/308
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%), tutorial performance (10%), 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] de Crespigny R, China This Century, Oxford.
[p/b] Hsu ICY, The Rise of Modern China, Oxford.
[p/b] Spence JD, The Search for Modern China, Yale.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA225/325 Ireland Since Independence and Partition



Special notes not offered in 1996 
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA226/326 Women as Colonisers and Colonised

Examines the role of women in the British Imperial advance and retreat in the 19th and 20th centuries, including a discussion of women in 19th century Australia, Canada and New Zealand and an examination of the role of British women in India and Africa. Considerable emphasis is placed on women in Irish history: their part as nationalist and revolutionary leaders; their early efforts to organise for female objectives; the mobilisation of feminists in modern Ireland on issues such as divorce, contraception and abortion; the part played by women in the Ulster Troubles; and the social analysis of some eminent Irish women writers.
May be studied as HAF203/303

Special notes
teaching staff Prof RP Davis
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2 hrs a week (Mon at 11.10 a.m., Wed at 12.10 p.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions HAF203/303
method of assessment 2,000-word essay (40%), tutorial performance (10%), 2-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Bernstein H, For Their Triumphs and Their Tears: Women in South Africa, Fund for Southern Africa.
Trollope J, Britannia's Daughters: Women of the British Empire, Cresset.
Ward M, Unmanageable Revolutionaries: Women and Irish Nationalism, Pluto.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA227/327 Anglo-Saxon England AD 600-1066

Begins with the first reliable written information about the English peoples and emphasises what the sources tell us most about: the conversion of the English and the character of their Church and culture, the development of kingship, the interplay of Germanic and Christian social values, relations with continental Europe, and the emergence of a single monarch of England after the Viking incursions. The unit ends with the decline of the Old English state and its transformation with the Norman Conquest.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof RM Thomson
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs a week (Tues and Fri at 10.00 a.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 500-word tutorial paper (10%), 2,000-word essay (35%), tutorial participation (5%), 2-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Campbell J, John E and Wormald P, The Anglo-Saxons, Penguin.
[p/b] Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People, tr. Shirley-Price L and Farmer DH, Penguin.
[p/b] Keynes S and Lapidge M, Alfred the Great, Penguin.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



HTA242/342 Imperialism and Revolution

Surveys, through selected countries, the general development of the Second British Empire to its 19th century peak, and to its subsequent transformation into the modern Commonwealth. British colonial policy is contrasted with developing nationalism in Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Kenya and South Africa. The nature and results of ethnic conflict in these countries is compared and the historical background of current problems, such as the liquidation of the apartheid legacy in South Africa and the attempt to find a solution for the Northern Ireland Troubles, is examined.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof RP Davis
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [20%]
teaching pattern full year - 2 hrs a week (Mon and Thurs at 2.00 p.m.)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2x2,000-word essays (40%), tutorial participation (10%), 3-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
[p/b] Lyons FSL, Ireland Since the Famine, Fontana,
or [p/b] Foster RF, Modern Ireland, 1600-1972, Penguin.
[p/b] McNaught K, The Penguin History of Canada, Penguin
[p/b] Sinclair K, A History of New Zealand, Penguin.
[p/b] Lloyd TO, The British Empire, 1558-1983, Oxford,
or [p/b] Porter B, The Lion's Share: A Short History of British Imperialism 1850-1983, Longmans.
[p/b] Davenport TRH, South Africa: A Modern History, Cambridge.
recommended reading

Course: Bachelor of Arts (R3A)







Staff of the Department of History
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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