Aviation Studies units

University of Tasmania
Physical Sciences (Launceston) Aviation Studies Units - 1996


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Aviation Studies - Department of Physical Sciences at Launceston




KJV101 Aviation Science I

Is the first in a series of four sequential units introducing aviation students to the scientific concepts and laws underlying the technology upon which the aviation industry is based. Appropriate detail of the applications of aviation technology in the industry are developed, and students are exposed to the fundamentals of meteorology and aeronautics preparing them for preliminary flight training. The unit includes such topics as the understanding of local weather conditions and their effect on aircraft, the behaviour of an airfoil, and aircraft performance: the stall, wing modification, straight and level flight.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr R Rodgers and others
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [16.7%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 6 hrs a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites KXA171
mutual exclusions
method of assessment continuous assessment (50%), 3-hour exam in June (50%)
required texts, etc
Kermode A, Mechanics of Flight, 9th edn, Longman, 1987.
Manual of Meteorology Part 1, Department of Science, Bureau of Meteorology, Canberra, 1981.
Cutnell J and Johnson K, Physics, Wiley, New York, 1989.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJV102 Aviation Science II

Builds on KJV101. Students, by this stage, will have completed their first flight training segment, so the unit is more concerned with the application of knowledge. Among the topics to be presented are: atmospheric stability and air mass movement; weather data and the interpretation of synoptic charts; pilot interaction with weather services; aircraft performance; climb, descent, turn, take-off and landing. The science describing these topics is also developed during the course of the unit.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr R Rodgers
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 5 hrs a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJV101
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment continuous assessment (50%), 3-hour exam in Nov (50%)
required texts, etc
Cutnell J and Johnson K, Physics, Wiley, New York, 1989.
Manual of Meteorology, Parts 1 & 2, Department of Science, Bureau of Meteorology, Canberra, 1981.
Kermode A, Mechanics of Flight, 9th edn, Longman UK, 1987.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJV112 Air Traffic Control I

Introduces students to the air traffic control system at the operational level. The unit describes the components of the Airspace System with emphasis on the inter-relationship between en-route, terminal, tower and the pilot.

Special Notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [7.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 3 hrs a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment assignments (30%), 2-hour exam (70%)
required texts, etc
Manual of Air Traffic Services, Civil Aviation Authority, Melbourne, 1994.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJV114 Aviation Development I

Is a study of the operation of powerplant component systems: carburettor, supercharging, propellers, fuel metering and distribution, undercarriage and hydraulic systems, aircraft instrumentation. The unit provides students with exposure to Federal and State regulatory functions for aircraft operations, principles of radio telephony and safety procedures required prior to cross-country flight. Thirty-three hours flying are provided. BAK theory.

Special Notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern Inter-Semester Break
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour theory exam (50%), 1.5 hrs flight test (50%)
required texts, etc
Bent L, Aircraft Powerplants, 5th edn, McGraw Hill, New York 1985.
Manual of Meteorology, Department of Science, Bureau of Meteorology, Canberra 1981.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJV124 Aviation Development II

Provides flight training in those pilot operations required of a private pilot. The unit is designed to develop, through theoretical and practical application of basic navigation, the knowledge and skills needed for the safe execution of cross-country flying. Thirty hours of flying are provided to enable the student to complete the Private Pilot's Licence. APEX theory.

Special Notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [4.3%]
teaching pattern Summer School
prerequisites KJV114
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3.5-hour theory exam (50%), 3-hour flight test (50%)
required texts, etc
Thom T, Private Pilot, Aviation Theory Centre, Victoria, 1992.
General Meteorology, Part 2, Aviation Meteorology, AGPS Canberra, 1989.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJV134 Aviation Development III

Is a study and review of regulations and procedures needed to decide whether an aircraft is suitable for a specific flight. Particular reference is made to: airworthiness, loading of the aircraft and speed limitations; responsibility of a pilot with regard to weather; and operational briefing prior to planning a VFR flight. The Instrument and General Phase will provide 20 hours of flying and emphasises basic instrument flight and the development of general skills.

Special Notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [4.3%]
teaching pattern summer school
prerequisites KJV124
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment continuous assessment (50%), assignments (50%)
required texts, etc
Thom T, Aeroplane Performance and Operation, Aviation Theory Centre, Victoria, 1988.
Thom T, Commercial Pilot Licence Navigation, Aviation Theory Centre, Victoria, 1989.
Bent L, Aircraft Powerplants, 5th edn, McGraw Hill, New York 1985.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJV144 Flight Physiology

Is a study of aeromedical information: the causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment of flight environment disorders. The effects of altitude, spatial disorientation, and psychological factors are included as they relate to pilot performance. During this unit the student will complete 12 hours of Night VFR, and 10 hours of single engine simulator.

Special Notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [4.4%]
teaching pattern summer school
prerequisites KJV134
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment continuous assessment (30%), 2.5-hour flight test (70%)
required texts, etc
Edwards D, Pilot Mental and Physical Performance, Iowa State University Press, Ames 1A, 1990.
Harding R and Mills F, Aviation Medicine, BMG, London, 1988.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Aviation Studies (S3J)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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