Aquaculture units

University of Tasmania
Aquaculture Units - 1996


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Aquaculture, Biology - Department of Aquaculture at Launceston




KQA110 Zoology for Aquaculture

Provides a general introduction to the biology of aquatic animals, and investigates phylogenetic associations, morphology and aspects of physiology and reproduction of invertebrates and vertebrates of importance to aquaculture.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr T Pankhurst
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2x1-hour lectures, a 3-hour laboratory session a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment practical reports (20%), assignments (30%), 3-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Ruppert E and Barnes R, Invertebrate Zoology, 6th edn, Saunders, Philadelphia, 1991.
recommended reading
Course: Associate Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S1A)
Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S2A)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Aquaculture) (S3C)




Staff of the Department of Aquaculture
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KQA113 Fauna of Tasmania

Introduces students to a diverse range of unicellular organisms as well as the major multicellular invertebrate phyla. In the last six weeks the focus shifts to sub-phylum vertebrata. Field trips to terrestrial and fresh-water habitats, a litoral zone and one to observe native Tasmanian vertebrates are compulsory.

Special Notes
teaching staff Prof A W Osborn
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5% (BEd 10%)]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2x1-hour lectures, a 3-hour practical (some in the form of field trips) a week (14 weeks), and an all-day weekend field trip
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment a collection (15%), practical assignments/exam (35%), final exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Raven PH and Johnson GB, Biology, 3rd edn, Mosby, St Louis, 1992.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Biology major) (S3C)






Staff of the Department of Aquaculture
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KQA120 Applied Algology

Teaches students the principles and techniques used to culture marine phytoplankton (micro-algae), from small-scale starter cultures, through to production-scale. Micro-algae as feed organisms are intrinsic to the culture of most marine bivalve, crustacean and finfish. Students gain an understanding of the nutritional and respective algal requirements of these animals. Skills acquired in this unit are directly applicable in the hatcheries and nurseries servicing aquaculture industries. Techniques used to culture seaweeds, used for human and, or marine animal consumption are demonstrated and discussed.

Special Notes
teaching staff Ms C O'Meley and Mr M Daintith
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2-hour lecture, 1-hour tutorial, and a 3-hour practical per week (14 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites KJC162
mutual exclusions
method of assessment final theory exam (30%), mid-semester theory exam (20%), practical exam (15%), (3) practical quizzes (15%), practical reports (10%), and assignment (10%). BSc students enrolled in this unit are required to do an extra 10% assignment
required texts, etc
O'Meley CM and Daintith MJ, Algal Cultures for Marine Hatcheries: Aquaculture Sourcebook ,Turtle Press, Hobart, 1993.
recommended reading
Course: Associate Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S1A)
Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S2A)





Staff of the Department of Aquaculture
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KQA121 Aquatic Ecology I

Examines the ecology of freshwater and marine environments with emphasis upon primary production and food webs, community organisation and nutrient dynamics, and the interaction of physical and biotic factors of the environment. The objective is to provide a basic understanding of general ecological principles with respect to aquatic environments, and to lay the ground work for more specific examination, in subsequent units, of the ecology of aquaculture systems and species.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr T Pankhurst, Assoc Prof NW Pankhurst and Prof N Forteath
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2-hour lecture a week (14 weeks) 8x3-hour laboratory sessions and 2x6-hour field trips
prerequisites KQA110
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment practical reports (30%), assignments (20%), 3-hour exam (50%)
required texts, etc
Barnes RSK and Mann KH (eds), Fundamentals of Aquatic Ecology, 2nd edn, Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, 1991.
recommended reading
Course: Associate Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S1A)
Associate Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S1A)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Aquaculture) (S3C)




Staff of the Department of Aquaculture
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KQA122 Genetics

Covers basic principles of inheritance. Students are introduced to many of the concepts, techniques and experimental organisms fundamental to the discipline. The unit includes: structure and organisation of DNA and chromosomes during cell division; Mendelian genetics; mutation, chromosome variations, cytogenetics, sex determination and sex-linkage, as well as population, evolutionary and ecological genetics and other aspects of modern genetic theory. Emphasis is also placed on human genetics, pedigree analysis and ethical considerations attached to contemporary advances in genetic technology. Polyploidy and sex reversal techniques are applied, as well as cytological investigations. Practical classes are designed to complement and illustrate concurrent lectures.

Special Notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5% (BEd 10%)]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 1-hour lecture, 1-hour tutorial and a 3-hour practical a week
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment practical reports and assignments (30%), final theory exam (70%)
required texts, etc
Russell PJ, Fundamentals of Genetics, Harper and Collins, 1994, or
Gardner EJ, Simmons MJ and Snustad DP, Principles of Genetics, 8th edn,Wiley, 1991.
recommended reading
Course: Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S2A)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Aquaculture) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Biology major) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Biomedical Science) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Sports Science) (S3C)


Staff of the Department of Aquaculture
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KQA125 Laboratory Management

Introduces students to workshop management, tank and pipe construction, water mechanics, welding, net maintenance and laboratory purchasing and occupational health and safety.

Special Notes
teaching staff Mr D Planko, Mr M Hilder
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2-hour lecture and 2-hour practical a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment practical reports (30%), tests (30%), final theory exam (40%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Associate Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S1A)
Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S2A)





Staff of the Department of Aquaculture
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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