Faculty of Health

Tasmanian pharmacy students lead in national survey

University of Tasmania Pharmacy students boast a 100 per cent success rate in finding employment, a new survey has shown.

The recently released Good Education Group’s The Good University Guide 2017, showed University of Tasmania Bachelor of Pharmacy graduates are in high demand with every pharmacy student successfully finding a full-time job within four months of graduation.

The University of Tasmania’s Bachelor of Pharmacy Course was also rated highly relative to other Australian programs in the areas of ‘teaching quality’ and ‘skill development.’

University of Tasmania Associate Head of Pharmacy, Associate Professor Luke Bereznicki said the program’s focus on clinical skills development had a great deal to do with its success.

“We have maintained and bolstered our clinical placement program in recent years, whereas a lot of pharmacy programs around the country have reduced their clinical placement hours,” he said.

“Historically, we were the first Bachelor of Pharmacy program to implement clinical training for our students, and this remains a strength of our degree.

In additional to local hospital placements, Associate Professor Luke Bereznicki said students also had the opportunity to participate in placement activities in medical practices, and to apply for placements with partner institutions in Europe and North America.

“We think that our focus on clinical skills development is what makes our students more employable,” he said.

“They’re very well prepared for careers in hospital and other practice environments, such as community pharmacies and general practices.”

Associate Professor Luke Bereznicki said working very closely with Tasmanian public hospitals to offer a high quality experience for students, also held students in good stead for employment once they graduated.

“Our course is focussed on providing students with the best clinical training we can offer – in our experience this is what is going to be most important for them in the future, no matter where they end up practising as pharmacists.”