Faculty of Health

Haemostasis Research Group


Investigating haemostasis to identify and prevent abnormalities that lead to blood clots

Our group is interested in the body's haemostatic system. This is the mechanism that ensures excessive clotting or bleeding does not occur.

With an aging population both in Tasmania and Australia, the costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of blood clots are likely to be significant financial burden on healthcare systems. Our research could potentially lead to the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics, and ultimately improved care of patients at risk of developing blood clots.

We are particularly interested in identifying and investigating abnormalities that may contribute to the development of blood clots (thrombosis). Blood clots can develop in people with a range of diseases including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease and range of autoimmune conditions. They are a leading cause of illness and deaths, particularly in developed countries, and impact significantly on health systems world-wide.

We are currently involved in a variety of haemostasis based projects. These include investigating;

  1. The effects of pathological antibodies found in patients with autoimmune diseases (particularly systemic lupus erythematosus) on platelets, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis,
  2. Novel biomarkers in patients with autoimmune diseases that are associated with the development of blood clots,
  3. Natural compounds found in hot chilli peppers and their effects on platelet function, and
  4. The effects of exercise, high intensity training, and travel on haemostasis.

We work in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Tasmania through the School of Health Sciences' Dr James Fell and Dr Cecilia Kitic, and Associate Professor James Sharman and Prof Heinrich Korner of the Menzies Institute for Medical Research.

Our research is currently supported by the University of Tasmania and Clifford Craig Medical Research Trust.

With an aging population both in Tasmania and Australia, the costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of blood clots are likely to be significant financial burden on healthcare systems. Our research could potentially lead to the development of new diagnostics and therapeutics, and ultimately improved care of patients at risk of developing blood clots.

Key Information


Name: Haemostasis Research Group

Research group head:

Other staff:

Contact details:

Dr Murray Adams

School of Health Sciences, Newnham Campus, Launceston

Phone: 03 6324 5483

Email: Murray.Adams@utas.edu.au

Research theme areas:

Keywords

  • Haemostasis
  • Haemostatic
  • Blood
  • Coagulation
  • Thrombosis
  • Biomarker
  • Exercise
  • Disease