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Anna King

UTAS Home Associate Professor Anna King

Anna King

Associate Professor (Research)
Wicking Dementia Research & Education Centre

Room 417d, Medical Science Precinct, Hobart CBD Campuses

+61 3 6226 4817 (phone)

A.E.King@utas.edu.au

Investigating the neurodegenerative diseases of aging

Investigating the neurodegenerative diseases of aging

Associate Professor Anna King's research focuses on investigating the neurodegenerative diseases of aging, including frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. She is particularly interested in determining the mechanisms by which the connections between nerve cells are lost in these diseases.

'The clinical symptoms of most of these neurodegenerative diseases are not due to cell loss or the pathology, but the loss of connections between nerve cells, so they can no longer 'talk' to each other,' said Associate Professor King.

'Nerve cells are very specialized and unique cells. They have a very distinct shape, which is important for the way they function. The shape of a nerve cell is dominated by the long nerve processes, which, like electrical wires, are responsible for connecting nerve cells with each other. What many people don't realize is that sometimes over 99% of the cell is in these nerve processes, yet we really don't know much about how they function,' Associate Professor King said.

Associate Professor King says a lot of her work is at a very cellular level.

'I do a lot of cell culture work where I look at the way cells respond to different things. I would consider myself a cell biologist. My research also extends into animal models and human tissue as this is important in translation.'

Associate Professor King says that in order to understand disease, it is important to understand normal function.

'Sometimes we need to take a step backwards to do some basic research to see how nerve cells work and interact with each other. We can try and treat pathology but if we don't really know how that pathology has come about, we're not really getting rid of the cause of it…'

Associate Professor King is also interested in why these neurodegenerative diseases are related to ageing.

'Some people have mutations that cause these diseases, but they don't develop the disease while they're young, instead the disease develops as they get older.

We need to answer the question of why there is a connection between neurodegenerative diseases and ageing and what's changing in healthy ageing, and what the difference is when we get disease,' said Associate Professor King.

Associate Professor King works for The Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, which is a multi-disciplinary group that brings together all aspects of dementia research, care and education. It's part of the University of Tasmania College of Health and Medicine and receives its core funding from the JO & JR Wicking Trust.

'In the Wicking Centre, we're interested in educating people about dementia' Associate Professor King said. 'It's very important that those involved with working with people with dementia, understand these neurodegenerative diseases, what causes them, why people behave the way they do and the special needs they have. We're keen to combine our research with educating the public and people in care situations,' she said.

'These diseases are becoming more prevalent now because we have treatments for a lot of the other diseases that people used to die from. So people are living longer. These diseases are becoming more prominent in our community and we are really not prepared for this,' said Associate Professor King.

She says there is some evidence now that for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, a proportion of cases could be prevented or delayed by modifying lifestyle factors throughout life. Risk prevention, in other words.

'There's a lot more focus on lifestyle factors now. I think that's a very important area. I feel that if we can do something there, then we should be doing it.'

'At Wicking we're looking at whether cognitive stimulation can improve outcomes in terms of the symptoms of the disease. For example, using your brain in new ways to build up your resilience for when you get older and you're losing those connections,' Associate Professor King said.

The higher the education you have, the lower your risk.

However, ultimately there will still be some people who need treatment and care, Associate Professor King says.

The brain can withstand a lot of pathology before we see anything happening. We need to be catching things earlier. 

We know now that although symptoms occur at a certain (advanced) age, there is a long period before the disease actually presents, during which we're developing the pathology. This can go on for fifteen years or so before we actually develop clinical symptoms. It's important to be looking in those early stages for strategies to help people,' Associate Professor King said.

'Once you've lost cognitive function, you can't really get it back.'

Associate Professor Anna King is an NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Fellow and Associate Director (Research) at the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre in the College of Health and Medicine. She leads an active research team in the field of neurodegenerative disease and ageing, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. She works alongside other University of Tasmania researchers to investigate basic pathological mechanisms of disease, preventative and therapeutic strategies as well as the development of biomarkers to determine brain health.

Biography

Associate Professor King obtained her honours degree from the University of Durham in the UK before training in molecular biology at the Heart Research Institute in Sydney. She undertook her PhD in pathology of neurodegenerative disease at the University of Tasmania. Following her doctoral studies she was awarded postdoctoral fellowships from the Motor Neuron Disease Research Institute of Australia (2008-2011) and Alzheimer's Australia Dementia Research Foundation (2011-2013). In 2017 she was awarded an NHMRC Dementia Fellowship and took on a leadership role as Associate Director (Research) for the Wicking Dementia Centre. She is involved in engaging with the community through the Wicking Centre’s Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) including the Understanding Dementia and Preventing Dementia MOOC and also teaches in the Bachelor of Dementia Care

Associate Professor King's key research interest is in investigating how the connections between nerves cells are lost in neurodegenerative disease with a focus on protective strategies. Since starting her PhD in 2004 she has authored more than 50 peer-reviewed papers in well-regarded Neuroscience journals such as Acta Neuropathologica, Neurobiology of Ageing and Human Molecular Genetics. These papers have been cited over 1000 times. Her research has attracted over $4.5M in funding including NHMRC and ARC grants and fellowships.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Tasmania, Australia. 2008 Thesis: Unravelling the Cellular Pathology leading to Neurodegeneration in Motor Neuron Disease
  • BSc (Hons), University of Durham, UK. 1988

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Member of the International Society of Frontotemporal Dementias (2018-current)
  • Member of Dementia Australia Scientific Committee (2017- current)
  • NHMRC National Institute of Dementia Research (NNIDR) member (2017- current)
  • Member of Pan Asian Committee for Treatment and Research in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (PACTALS) (2014-current)
  • Member of the Australasian Neuroscience Society (2005 - current)
  • Member of Alzheimer's Association (2014 - 2017)
  • Member of the Brain Foundation (2014 - 2016)
  • Member of the Australian Society for Medical Research (ASMR) (2007- 2010)

Other

  • Chair of Organizing Committee for Australian Dementia Forum 2019
  • Local Organizing Committee National Neurotrauma Meeting 2014-2016
  • Local Organizing Committee ANS 2016
  • Grant reviewer NHMRC, MRC, HRCNZ, DARF

Administrative expertise

  • Associate Director (Research) Wicking Dementia Centre (2017-current)
  • Academic Coordinator Wicking Centre (2016-current)
  • College of Health and Medicine Research Committee (2017-current)
  • Co-chair Lab Management Committee for the University of Tasmania Medical Sciences Precinct (2017-current)
  • Animal Ethics Committee member (2013-2016)

Teaching

Neurodegenerative disease, Dementia, Motor Neuron Disease

Teaching expertise

Research Invitations

  • Invited Symposium Speaker at Australasian Neuroscience Society Conference 2018
  • Invited Keynote speaker at Taishan Medical University, Shandong Province, China (May 2017)
  • Invited speaker at 6th Australia-China International Biomedical Research Conference, Xian, China (October 2017)
  • Keynote Speaker at the Wicking Dementia Centre Public Forum (2016)
  • Guest-editor a special issue in Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy titled ‘Axon Pathology and Repair,’ published in August 2016
  • Invited Speaker at Cell Architecture in Development and Disease symposium (2015)
  • Invited Speaker at the Australian and New Zealand National Microfluidics Conference (2014)

View more on AssocProf Anna King in WARP

Expertise

  • Primary Cell Culture and live imaging
  • Molecular and biochemical techniques including viral transduction
  • Biomarkers detection
  • Post mortem human tissue histology
  • Animal Models of neurodegenerative disease including intraocular injection

Research Themes

Anna's research closely aligns with the University's research theme of Better Health as well as the Dementia flagship in the College of Health and Medicine. Her interests lie in investigating the changes in the nervous system that accompany normal ageing as well as the development of age-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. There is accumulating evidence that the clinical symptoms of these diseases are the result of the loss of connectivity between the nerves cells but there is little understanding of the mechanisms by which nerve cells loose connectivity in disease and the contribution that ageing plays to this. Additionally, harnessing the ability of the brain to renew connections (brain plasticity) in ageing and disease may help prevent this loss.

Anna's research focuses predominantly on the axon, the nerve process that is responsible for conducting signals between nerve cells, as well as the connections formed by the axon at the synapse. The key themes of her research are: 

  1. Axonal plasticity, pathology and the mechanisms by which axons degenerate in neurodegenerative disease and injury. 
  2. The role of pathogenic proteins, such as TDP-43, C9ORF72, and β-amyloid in axon and synaptic function 
  3. Excitotoxic mechanism of neurodegeneration
  4. Signalling mechanisms between the cell soma and the axon, including axonal transport 
  5. The role of the neuronal cytoskeleton, including neurofilaments and microtubules in axonal and synaptic function as well as neurodegeneration. 
  6. The role of glial cells, such as oligodendrocytes, microglia and astrocytes, in maintaining axon function.
  7. Development of blood biomarkers to indicate nerve cell health in the brain

Collaboration

Associate Professor King collaborates nationally and internationally with researchers in her field including:

Prof Julie Atkin (Macquarie University) on research projects in motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia. Their joint research has resulted in a number of publications including the highly cited first article to describe the potential role of the C9ORF72 protein in membrane trafficking (M A Farg, et al., 2014 Hum Mol Genet).

Dr Anthony Cook (University of Tasmania) and Professor Alex Hewitt (University of Tasmania), to develop the use of stem cell technology to investigate mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease.

Prof Michael Breadmore (Chemistry, University of Tasmania), Professor Rosanne Guijt (Deakin), Prof Tracey Dickson (Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania) on projects to develop microfluidic technology for dementia research including development of point of care biomarker devices.

Current projects

  • Axon Degeneration and Axon Protection in Neurodegenerative disease and injury (funded by NHMRC 2014- current)
  • Biomarkers of Brain Health (funded by NHMRC 2018-2021)
  • The Tasmanian Heathy Brain Project (funded by NHMRC 2015-2020)
  • Towards axon protection in ALS (MNDRIA 2018-2019)
  • Staying connected: determining targets to protect neuronal circuitry in ALS (2017-2018)
  • Developing a protocol to predicting health outcomes through oral microbes. Lead by Dr Silvana Bettiol
  • Does plasticity drive Alzheimer’s disease and can sleep help? Judith Jane Mason ANZ trustees. Lead by Dr Matthew Kirkcaldie
  • Could gut microbiota influence cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease? Ubiome. Lead by Dr Jenna Ziebell

Fields of Research

  • Cellular Nervous System (110902)
  • Central Nervous System (110903)
  • Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases (110904)
  • Neurosciences (110999)
  • Cell Development, Proliferation and Death (060103)
  • Gene and Molecular Therapy (100401)
  • Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) (170101)
  • Autonomic Nervous System (110901)
  • Chemical Sciences (039999)
  • Proteomics and Intermolecular Interactions (excl. Medical Proteomics) (060109)
  • Residential Client Care (111718)
  • Health Promotion (111712)
  • Aged Health Care (111702)
  • Separation Science (030108)
  • Knowledge Representation and Machine Learning (170203)
  • Dentistry (110599)
  • Instrumental Methods (excl. Immunological and Bioassay Methods) (030105)
  • Analytical Chemistry (030199)
  • Continuing and Community Education (130101)
  • Cell Metabolism (060104)
  • Ophthalmology (111301)
  • Microbial Genetics (060503)
  • Basic Pharmacology (111501)
  • Medical Infection Agents (incl. Prions) (110802)
  • Biomechanical Engineering (090302)
  • Microtechnology (091009)
  • Plant Physiology (060705)
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences (111504)
  • Flexible Manufacturing Systems (091002)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics (111199)
  • Microbial Ecology (060504)
  • Biomedical Engineering (090399)
  • Oral Medicine and Pathology (110505)
  • Systems Physiology (111603)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (111701)
  • Neurogenetics (060410)

Research Objectives

  • Nervous System and Disorders (920111)
  • Neurodegenerative Disorders Related to Ageing (920112)
  • Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) (920499)
  • Inherited Diseases (incl. Gene Therapy) (920110)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences (970103)
  • Health Education and Promotion (920205)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
  • Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders (920107)
  • Health Related to Ageing (920502)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences (970111)
  • Preventive Medicine (920412)
  • Nutrition (920411)
  • Dental Health (920402)
  • Fabricated Metal Products (861299)
  • Food Safety (920406)
  • Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis) (920116)
  • Infectious Diseases (920109)
  • Scientific Instruments (861503)
  • Expanding Knowledge in Technology (970110)
  • Nursing (920210)
  • Human Pharmaceutical Products (860899)
  • Digestive System Disorders (920105)
  • Coastal and Estuarine Water Management (960903)
  • Human Pharmaceutical Treatments (e.g. Antibiotics) (860803)
  • Energy Storage (excl. Hydrogen) (850602)
  • Cancer and Related Disorders (920102)
  • Diabetes (920104)
  • Evaluation of Health Outcomes (920204)

Publications

Total publications

94

Journal Article

(52 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Chhetri J, King AE, Gueven N, 'Alzheimer's Disease and NQO1: is there a link?', Current Alzheimer Research, 15 pp. 56-66. ISSN 1567-2050 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.2174/1567205014666170203095802 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Chhetri J; Gueven N

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2018Hanson K, Tian N, Vickers JC, King AE, 'The HDAC6 Inhibitor Trichostatin A Acetylates Microtubules and Protects Axons From Excitotoxin-Induced Degeneration in a Compartmented Culture Model', Frontiers in Neuroscience pp. 1-11. ISSN 1662-453X (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2018.00872 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hanson K; Vickers JC

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2018Leung JYK, Bennett WR, King AE, Chung RS, 'The impact of metallothionein-II on microglial response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and downstream effects on neuronal regeneration', Journal of Neuroinflammation, 15, (1) pp. 1-9. ISSN 1742-2094 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12974-018-1070-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Leung JYK; Bennett WR; Chung RS

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2018Tu L, Wang JH, Barathi VA, Prea SM, He Z, et al., 'AAV-mediated gene delivery of the calreticulin anti-angiogenic domain inhibits ocular neovascularization', Angiogenesis pp. 1-15. ISSN 0969-6970 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10456-017-9591-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Bender J; Liu G

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2018Woodhouse A, Fernandez-Martos CM, Atkinson RAK, Hanson KA, Collins JM, et al., 'Repeat propofol anesthesia does not exacerbate plaque deposition or synapse loss in APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease mice', BMC Anesthesiology, 18, (1) Article 47. ISSN 1471-2253 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12871-018-0509-5 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Woodhouse A; Fernandez-Martos CM; Atkinson RAK; Hanson KA; Collins JM; O'Mara AR; Terblanche N; Skinner MW; Vickers JC

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2018King A, Brain A, Hanson K, Dittmann J, Vickers J, et al., 'Disruption of leptin signalling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease', Metabolic Brain Disease, 33, (4) pp. 1097-1110. ISSN 0885-7490 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s11011-018-0203-9 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Hanson K; Dittmann J; Vickers J; Fernandez-Martos C

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2017Cui H, King AE, Jacobson GA, Small DH, 'Peripheral treatment with enoxaparin exacerbates amyloid plaque pathology in Tg2576 mice', Journal of Neuroscience Research, 95, (4) pp. 992-999. ISSN 0360-4012 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/jnr.23880 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2

Co-authors: Cui H; Jacobson GA; Small DH

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2017Stuart KE, King AE, Fernandez-Martos CM, Summers MJ, Vickers JC, 'Environmental novelty exacerbates stress hormones and Aβ pathology in an Alzheimer's model', Scientific Reports, 7, (1) Article 2764. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-03016-0 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Stuart KE; Fernandez-Martos CM; Summers MJ; Vickers JC

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2017O'Mara A, King AE, Vickers JC, Kirkcaldie MTK, 'ImageSURF: An ImageJ plugin for batch pixel-based image segmentation using random forests', Journal of Open Research Software, 5 Article 31. ISSN 2049-9647 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5334/jors.172 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: O'Mara A; Vickers JC; Kirkcaldie MTK

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2017Stuart KE, King AE, Fernandez-Martos CM, Dittmann J, Summers MJ, et al., 'Mid-life environmental enrichment increases synaptic density in CA1 in a mouse model of Aβ-associated pathology and positively influences synaptic and cognitive health in healthy ageing', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 525, (8) pp. 1797-1810. ISSN 0021-9967 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/cne.24156 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Stuart KE; Fernandez-Martos CM; Dittmann J; Summers MJ; Vickers JC

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2017Clark RM, Blizzard CA, Young KM, King AE, Dickson TC, 'Calretinin and Neuropeptide Y interneurons are differentially altered in the motor cortex of the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS', Scientific Reports, 7 Article 44461. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/srep44461 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Clark RM; Blizzard CA; Young KM; Dickson TC

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2017Yap YC, King AE, Guijt RM, Jiang T, Blizzard CA, et al., 'Mild and repetitive very mild axonal stretch injury triggers cystoskeletal mislocalization and growth cone collapse', PLoS One, 12, (5) Article e0176997. ISSN 1932-6203 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176997 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Yap YC; Guijt RM; Blizzard CA; Breadmore MC; Dickson TC

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2017Imlach A, Ward DD, Stuart KE, Summers MJ, Valenzuela MJ, et al., 'Age is no barrier: predictors of academic success in older learners', npj Science of Learning, 2 Article 13. ISSN 2056-7936 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41539-017-0014-5 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Imlach A; Ward DD; Stuart KE; Summers MJ; Saunders NL; Summers J; Srikanth VK; Robinson A; Vickers JC

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2016Clark JA, Southam KA, Blizzard CA, King AE, Dickson TC, 'Axonal degeneration, distal collateral branching and neuromuscular junction architecture alterations occur prior to symptom onset in the SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis', Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy, 76, (Pt A) pp. 35-47. ISSN 0891-0618 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jchemneu.2016.03.003 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Clark JA; Southam KA; Blizzard CA; Dickson TC

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2016Gupta VK, Chitranshi N, Gupta VB, Golzan M, Dheer Y, et al., 'Amyloid β accumulation and inner retinal degenerative changes in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mouse', Neuroscience Letters, 623 pp. 52-56. ISSN 0304-3940 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.04.059 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 24Web of Science - 27

Co-authors: Vickers JC

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2016Hung SSC, Chrysostomou V, Li F, Lim JKH, Wang J-H, et al., 'AAV-mediated CRISPR/Cas gene editing of retinal cells in vivo', Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 57, (7) pp. 3470-3476. ISSN 1552-5783 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1167/iovs.16-19316 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 33Web of Science - 30

Co-authors: Liu G-S; Hewitt AW

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2016King AE, Woodhouse A, Kirkcaldie MTK, Vickers JC, 'Excitotoxicity in ALS: Overstimulation, or overreaction?', Experimental Neurology, 275 pp. 162-171. ISSN 0014-4886 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2015.09.019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 33Web of Science - 37

Co-authors: Woodhouse A; Kirkcaldie MTK; Vickers JC

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2016Vickers J, Mitew S, Woodhouse A, Fernandez-Martos CM, Kirkcaldie MT, et al., 'Defining the earliest pathological changes of Alzheimer's disease', Current Alzheimer research, 13, (3) pp. 281-287. ISSN 1567-2050 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.2174/1567205013666151218150322 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Vickers J; Mitew S; Woodhouse A; Fernandez-Martos CM; Kirkcaldie MT; Canty AJ; McCormack GH

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2016Vickers JC, Kirkcaldie MT, Phipps A, King AE, 'Alterations in neurofilaments and the transformation of the cytoskeleton in axons may provide insight into the aberrant neuronal changes of Alzheimer's disease', Brain Research Bulletin, 126, (Pt 3) pp. 324-333. ISSN 0361-9230 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2016.07.012 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Vickers JC; Kirkcaldie MT; Phipps A

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2016Fernandez-Martos CM, Atkinson RAK, Chuah MI, King AE, Vickers JC, 'Combination treatment with leptin and pioglitazone in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease', Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, 3, (1) pp. 92-106. ISSN 2352-8737 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.trci.2016.11.002 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5

Co-authors: Fernandez-Martos CM; Atkinson RAK; Chuah MI; Vickers JC

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2015Atkinson RA, Fernandez-Martos CM, Atkin J, Vickers JC, King AE, 'C9ORF72 expression and cellular localization over mouse development', Acta neuropathologica communications, 3 Article 59. ISSN 2051-5960 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s40478-015-0238-7 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Atkinson RA; Fernandez-Martos CM; Vickers JC

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2015Blizzard CA, Southam KA, Dawkins E, Lewis KE, King AE, et al., 'Identifying the primary site of pathogenesis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - vulnerability of lower motor neurons to proximal excitotoxicity', Disease Models & Mechanisms, 8, (3) pp. 215-224. ISSN 1754-8403 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1242/dmm.018606 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Southam KA; Dawkins E; Lewis KE; Clark JA; Dickson TC

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2015Collins JM, King AE, Woodhouse A, Kirkcaldie MTK, Vickers JC, 'The effect of focal brain injury on beta-amyloid plaque deposition, inflammation and synapses in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease', Experimental Neurology, 267 pp. 219-29. ISSN 0014-4886 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2015.02.034 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14

Co-authors: Collins JM; Woodhouse A; Kirkcaldie MTK; Vickers JC

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2015Fernandez-Martos CM, King AE, Atkinson RAK, Woodhouse A, Vickers JC, 'Neurofilament light gene deletion exacerbates amyloid, dystrophic neurite, and synaptic pathology in the APP/PS1 transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease', Neurobiology of Aging, 36, (10) pp. 2757-2767. ISSN 0197-4580 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.07.003 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11

Co-authors: Fernandez-Martos CM; Woodhouse A; Vickers JC

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2015Franks K, Chuah MI, King AE, Vickers JC, 'Connectivity of pathology: the olfactory system as a model for network-driven mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7 Article 234. ISSN 1663-4365 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00234 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Franks K; Chuah MI; Vickers JC

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2015Liu Y, Atkinson R, Fernandez-Martos CM, Kirkcaldie MTK, Cui H, et al., 'Changes in TDP-43 expression in development, aging, and in the neurofilament light protein knockout mouse', Neurobiology of Aging: Experimental and Clinical Research, 36, (2) pp. 1151-1159. ISSN 0197-4580 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2014.10.001 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Liu Y; Fernandez-Martos CM; Kirkcaldie MTK; Vickers JC

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2015Soo KY, Halloran M, Sundaramoorthy V, Parakh S, Toth RP, et al., 'Rab1-dependent ER-Golgi transport dysfunction is a common pathogenic mechanism in SOD1, TDP-43 and FUS-associated ALS', Acta Neuropathologica, 130, (5) pp. 679-697. ISSN 0001-6322 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00401-015-1468-2 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 21

Co-authors: Southam KA

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2015Soo KY, Sultana J, King AE, Atkinson RAK, Warraich ST, et al., 'ALS-associated mutant FUS inhibits macroautophagy which is restored by overexpression of Rab1', Cell Death Discovery, 1 Article 15030. ISSN 2058-7716 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/cddiscovery.2015.30 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Atkinson RAK

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2014Farg MA, Sundaramoorthy V, Sultana JM, Yang S, Atkinson RAK, et al., 'C9ORF72, implicated in amytrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, regulates endosomal trafficking', Human Molecular Genetics, 23, (13) Article ddu068. ISSN 0964-6906 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/hmg/ddu068 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 163Web of Science - 162

Co-authors: Atkinson RAK

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2014Musgrove RE, Horne H, Wilson R, King AE, Edwards LM, et al., 'The metabolomics of alpha-synuclein (SNCA) gene deletion and mutation in mouse brain', Metabolomics, 10, (1) pp. 114-122. ISSN 1573-3882 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s11306-013-0561-6 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Musgrove RE; Horne H; Wilson R; Edwards LM; Dickson TC

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2014Siedler DG, Chuah MI, Kirkcaldie MTK, Vickers JC, King AE, 'Diffuse axonal injury in brain trauma: insights from alterations in neurofilaments', Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 8 Article 429. ISSN 1662-5102 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fncel.2014.00429 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 37Web of Science - 30

Co-authors: Siedler DG; Chuah MI; Kirkcaldie MTK; Vickers JC

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2014Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Microfluidic culture platform for studying neuronal response to mild to very mild axonal stretch injury', Biomicrofluidics, 8, (4) Article 044110. ISSN 1932-1058 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1063/1.4891098 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

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2014Lewis KE, Rasmussen AL, Bennett W, King A, West AK, et al., 'Microglia and motor neurons during disease progression in the SOD1G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Changes in arginase1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase', Journal of Neuroinflammation, 11 Article 55. ISSN 1742-2094 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1742-2094-11-55 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Lewis KE; Bennett W; West AK; Chung RS; Chuah MI

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2013Blizzard CA, King AE, Vickers J, Dickson T, 'Cortical murine neurons lacking the neurofilament light chain protein have an attenuated response to injury in vitro', Journal of Neurotrauma, 30, (22) pp. 1908-1918. ISSN 0897-7151 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1089/neu.2013.2850 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Vickers J; Dickson T

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2013King AE, Southam KA, Dittmann J, Vickers JC, 'Excitotoxin-induced caspase-3 activation and microtubule disintegration in axons is inhibited by taxol', Acta Neuropathologica Communications, 1 Article 59. ISSN 2051-5960 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/2051-5960-1-59 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Southam KA; Dittmann J; Vickers JC

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2013Musgrove REJ, King AE, Dickson TC, 'α-Synuclein protects neurons from apoptosis downstream of free-radical production through modulation of the MAPK signalling pathway', Neurotoxicity Research, 23, (4) pp. 358-369. ISSN 1476-3524 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s12640-012-9352-5 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19

Co-authors: Musgrove REJ; Dickson TC

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2013Southam KA, King AE, Blizzard CA, McCormack GH, Dickson TC, 'Microfluidic primary culture model of the lower motor neuron-neuromuscular junction circuit', Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 218, (2) pp. 164-169. ISSN 0165-0270 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jneumeth.2013.06.002 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 38Web of Science - 30

Co-authors: Southam KA; Blizzard CA; McCormack GH; Dickson TC

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2013Yap YC, Guijt RM, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, 'Stainless steel pinholes for fast fabrication of high-performance microchip electrophoresis devices by CO2 laser ablation', Analytical Chemistry, 85, (21) pp. 10051-10056. ISSN 0003-2700 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1021/ac402631g [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Yap YC; Guijt RM; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC

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2012Hosie KA, King AE, Blizzard CA, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Chronic excitotoxin-induced axon degeneration in a compartmented neuronal culture model', ASN Neuro, 4, (1) Article e00076. ISSN 1759-0914 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1042/AN20110031 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 27Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Hosie KA; Blizzard CA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

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2012King AE, Blizzard CA, Southam KA, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Degeneration of axons in spinal white matter in G93A mSOD1 mouse characterized by NFL and alpha internexin immunoreactivity', Brain Research, 1465 pp. 90-100. ISSN 0006-8993 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2012.05.018 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Southam KA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

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2012Liu Yao, Staal JA, Canty AJ, Kirkcaldie MTK, King AE, et al., 'Cytoskeletal changes during development and aging in the cortex of neurofilament light protein knockout mice', The Journal of Comparative Neurology, 521, (8) pp. 1817-1827. ISSN 0021-9967 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/cne.23261 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Liu Yao; Staal JA; Canty AJ; Kirkcaldie MTK; Bibari O; Mitew ST; Dickson TC; Vickers JC

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2011Blizzard CA, Chuckowree JA, King AE, Hosie KA, McCormack GH, et al., 'Focal Damage to the Adult Rat Neocortex Induces Wound Healing Accompanied by Axonal Sprouting and Dendritic Structural Plasticity ', Cerebral Cortex, 21, (2) pp. 281-291. ISSN 1047-3211 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhq091 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 28

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Chuckowree JA; Hosie KA; McCormack GH; Chapman JA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

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2011Musgrove REJ, King AE, Dickson TC, 'Neuroprotective upregulation of endogenous alpha-synuclein precedes ubiquitination in cultured dopaminergic neurons ', Neurotoxicity Research , 19, (4) pp. 592-602. ISSN 1029-8428 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s12640-010-9207-x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Musgrove REJ; Dickson TC

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2011King AE, Dickson TC, Blizzard CA, Woodhouse A, Foster SS, et al., 'Neuron-glia interactions underlie ALS-like axonal cytoskeletal pathology', Neurobiology of Aging: Experimental and Clinical Research, 32, (3) pp. 459-469. ISSN 0197-4580 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2009.04.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 21

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Blizzard CA; Woodhouse A; Foster SS; Chung RS; Vickers JC

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2009Blizzard CA, King AE, Haas MA, O'Toole DA, Vickers JC, et al., 'Axonal shearing in mature cortical neurons induces attempted regeneration and the reestablishment of neurite polarity', Brain Research: International Multidisciplinary Journal Devoted to Fundamental Research in The Brain Sciences, 1300, (November) pp. 24-36. ISSN 0006-8993 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2009.08.059 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Haas MA; O'Toole DA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

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2009Vickers JC, King AE, Woodhouse A, Kirkcaldie MT, Staal JA, et al., 'Axonopathy and cytoskeletal disruption in degenerative diseases of the central nervous system ', Brain Research Bulletin, 80, (4-5) pp. 217-223. ISSN 0361-9230 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2009.08.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 40Web of Science - 37

Co-authors: Vickers JC; Woodhouse A; Kirkcaldie MT; Staal JA; McCormack GH; Blizzard CA; Musgrove REJ; Mitew S; Liu Y; Chuckowree JA; Bibari O; Dickson TC

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2009Woodhouse A, Shepherd CE, Sokolova A, Carroll VL, King AE, et al., 'Cytoskeletal alterations differentiate presenilin-1 and sporadic Alzheimer's disease', Acta Neuropathologica, 117, (1) pp. 19-29. ISSN 0001-6322 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00401-008-0458-z [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Woodhouse A; Sokolova A; Dickson TC; Vickers JC

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2007King AE, Dickson TC, Blizzard CA, Foster SS, Chung RS, et al., 'Excitotoxicity mediated by non-NMDA receptors causes distal axonopathy in long-term cultured spinal motor neurons', European Journal of Neuroscience, 26, (8) pp. 2151-2159. ISSN 0953-816X (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05845.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Blizzard CA; Foster SS; Chung RS; West AK; Chuah MI; Vickers JC

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2006King AE, Bartlett C, Sauve Y, Lund R, Dunlop S, et al., 'Retinal ganglion cell axons regenerate in the presence of intact sensory fibres', Neuroreport, 17, (2) pp. 195-199. ISSN 0959-4965 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1097/01.wnr.0000195668.07467.a8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

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2006King AE, Chung RS, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Localisation of glutamate receptors in developing cortical neurons in culture and relationship to susceptibility to excitotoxicity', Journal of Comparative Neurology, 498, (2) pp. 277-294. ISSN 0021-9967 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/cne.21053 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 41Web of Science - 40

Co-authors: Chung RS; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

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2006Quilty MC, King AE, Gai WP, Pountney DL, West AK, et al., 'Alpha-synuclein is upregulated in neurones in response to chronic oxidative stress and is associated with neuroprotection', Experimental Neurology, 199, (2) pp. 249-256. ISSN 0014-4886 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2005.10.018 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 75Web of Science - 66

Co-authors: Quilty MC; Gai WP; West AK; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

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2005Chung RS, McCormack GH, King AE, West AK, Vickers JC, 'Glutamate induces rapid loss of axonal neurofilament proteins from cortical neurons in vitro', Experimental Neurology, 193, (2) pp. 481-488. ISSN 0014-4886 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2005.01.005 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 36Web of Science - 34

Co-authors: Chung RS; McCormack GH; West AK; Vickers JC

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Chapter in Book

(4 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Hung SS, Li F, Wang J-H, King AE, Bui BV, et al., 'Methods for In Vivo CRISPR/Cas Editing of the Adult Murine Retina', Retinal Gene Therapy: Methods and Protocols, Humana Press, CJF Boon and J Wijnholds (ed), United States, pp. 113-133. ISBN 978-1-4939-7521-1 (2018) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7522-8_9 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Liu G

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2017Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Microfluidic Device for Studying Traumatic Brain Injury', Stem Cell Technologies in Neuroscience, Springer Science+Business Media LLC, AK Srivastava, EY Snyder, YD Teng (ed), New York, United States, pp. 145-156. ISBN 9781493970223 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-7024-7_10 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

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2015Southam KA, King AE, Blizzard CA, McCormack GH, Dickson T, 'A Novel In Vitro Primary Culture Model of the Lower Motor Neuron-Neuromuscular Junction Circuit', Microfluidic and Compartmentalized Platforms for Neurobiological Research, Springer, E Biffi (ed), United States, pp. 181-193. ISBN 978-1-4939-2509-4 (2015) [Other Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-2510-0_11 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: Southam KA; Blizzard CA; McCormack GH; Dickson T

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2014King AE, Vickers JC, 'Excitotoxicity and Axon Degeneration', Handbook of Neurotoxicity, Springer, R Kostrzewa (ed), New York, pp. 1223-1245. ISBN 978-1-4614-5835-7 (2014) [Other Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4614-5836-4_145 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: Vickers JC

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Conference Publication

(38 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Khadka S, Bettiol S, King A, Goldberg LR, McCammon SA, et al., 'Comparison of DNA extraction and quantification methods to estimate bacterial load in oral cavity', Molecular Microbiology Meeting 2018, 11-12 April 2018, Sydney (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bettiol S; Goldberg LR; McCammon SA; Crocombe LA

2017Goldberg LR, Canty A, King AE, Price AD, Carr AR, et al., 'Can mature -age non-traditional students succeed in an online Bachelor of Dementia Care program?', International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG) World Congress, San Francisco, 23-27 July 2017, San Francisco (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Goldberg LR; Canty A; Price AD; Carr AR; Ziebell JM; Westbury JL; Elliot K-E

2015Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Guijt RM, Breadmore MC, 'Microfluidic maze for studying the role of neuron-glia signalling in neuronal networks', Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS 2015), 25-29 October, Gyeongju, South Korea, pp. 648-650. ISBN 978-097980648-3 (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Guijt RM; Breadmore MC

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2014King AE, Fernandez-Martos CM, Hanson K, Woodhouse A, Vickers JC, 'The role of anesthesia in exacerbation of ad pathology in a transgenic mouse model of amyloid plaque deposition', Australian Neuroscience Society Conference, 28-31 January 2014, Adelaide (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fernandez-Martos CM; Hanson K; Woodhouse A; Vickers JC

2014Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Microfluidic model for mild traumatic brain injury', Proceedings, The 18th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, 26-30 October 2014, San Antonio, Texas, United States, pp. 989-992. ISBN 978-0-9798064-7-6 (2014) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

2014King AE, Fernandez-Martos CM, Hanson K, Woodhouse A, Vickers JC, 'Anaesthetic exposure and dementia: What can we learn from studies in transgenic mice?', Australian Society of Anaesthetists, 1-2 Mar, Hobart, TAS (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fernandez-Martos CM; Hanson K; Woodhouse A; Vickers JC

2012Blizzard C, King AE, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Site specific excitotoxicity: a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis', 32nd Annual Meeting Australian Neuroscience Society, January 2012, Gold Coast, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard C; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2012King AE, Blizzard C, Mitew S, Dickson TC, 'Investigating the role of interneurons in neurological disease', DANDIS, January, 2012, Queensland, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard C; Mitew S; Dickson TC

2012Blizzard C, King AE, Hosie KA, Dickson TC, 'Site-specific excitotoxin exposure in vivo leads to neuronal excitotoxicity and axonal dysfunction', 32nd Annual Meeting Australian Neuroscience Society, January 2012, Gold Coast, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard C; Hosie KA; Dickson TC

2012Southam K, Blizzard C, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, King AE, 'Modelling site specific excitotixicity in vitro', University of Tasmania Sharing Excellence in Research meeting, September 2012, Hobart, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Southam K; Blizzard C; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2012Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Microfluidic culture platform for studying neuronal response to axonal stretch injury', 28th International Symposium on Microscale Bioseparations and Analyse, 21- 24 October 2012, Shanghai, China (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

2012Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Lab on a chip for studying neuronal degeneration', 3rd Australia & New Zealand Micro/Nanofluidics and Bionano Symposium, 12-13 April 2012, New Zealand (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

2012Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Microfluidic culture platform for studying neuronal response to axonal stretch injury', Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, October 28 - November 1, 2012, Okinawa, Japan, pp. 1-13. ISSN 1932-1058 (2012) [Conference Extract]

DOI: 10.1063/1.4891098 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

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2012King AE, Mitew S, Kirkcaldie MTK, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Investigating the role of inhibition in neurological disease', 32nd Annual Meeting Australian Neuroscience Society, January 2012, Gold Coast, Australia (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mitew S; Kirkcaldie MTK; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2011Bennett WR, Blackburn NB, King AE, Chung RS, West AK, 'Does metallothionein attenuate mutant SOD1 aggregation in MND', 22nd Symposium on ALS/MND, November 2011, Sydney, Australia (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bennett WR; Blackburn NB; Chung RS; West AK

2011Blizzard C, King AE, Hosie KA, Dickson TC, 'Modelling site-specific excitotoxicity in vivo', 22nd International Symposium on ALS/MND, November 2011, Sydney, Australia (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard C; Hosie KA; Dickson TC

2011Hosie KA, King AE, Blizzard C, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Modelling ALS pathology in vitro', 22nd Symposium on ALS/MND, November 2011, Sydney, Australia (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hosie KA; Blizzard C; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2011King AE, Herne KE, Boyer K, Orpin P, 'The experience of food insecurity amongst elderly Tasmanians', Food Futures Conference 2011, Conference Proceedings, 22-23 November 2011, Hobart, pp. 1-20. (2011) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Herne KE; Boyer K; Orpin P

2011King AE, Hosie KA, Vickers JC, Blizzard C, Dickson TC, 'An in vitro investigation of the role of interneurons in the development of ALS', 22nd Symposium on ALS/MND, November 2011, Sydney, Australia (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hosie KA; Vickers JC; Blizzard C; Dickson TC

2011Yap YC, Dickson TC, King AE, Breadmore MC, Guijt RM, 'Lab-on-a-chip: A novel in vitro model for studying traumatic brain injury', Proceedings of the 11th Asia Pacific International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Analysis, November 2011, Hobart, Australia (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yap YC; Dickson TC; Breadmore MC; Guijt RM

2010Blizzard CA, Chuckowree JA, King AE, Hosie KA, Chapman JA, et al., 'Focal damage to the neocortex induces dendritic structural plasticity', Australian Neuroscience Society/Australian Physiological Society, January, Sydney, Australia (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Chuckowree JA; Hosie KA; Chapman JA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2010Dickson TC, King AE, Vickers JC, 'Neurodegeneration in ALS and AD: which comes first the axon or the soma?', Australian Neuroscience Society Conference, 31 January - 3 February, Sydney (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Vickers JC

2010Blizzard CA, Chuckowree JA, King AE, Hosie KA, Chapman JA, et al., 'Focal damage to the neocortex induces dendritic structural plasticity', Proceedings of the Dementia, Ageing and Neurodegenerative Diseases Group Conference 2010, 30 January 2010, Sydney, Australia (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Chuckowree JA; Hosie KA; Chapman JA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2009Blizzard CA, Chuckowree JA, King AE, McCormack GH, Chapman JA, et al., 'Acute neocortical injury induces axonal sprouting and dendritic remodelling', ASMR National Scientific Conference, Neurogenetics on the Apple Isle, February, Hobart (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard CA; Chuckowree JA; McCormack GH; Chapman JA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2009Dickson TC, King AE, Kirkcaldie MTK, Hosie K, Chung RS, et al., 'Novel alpha-internexin pathological alterations in both the spinal cord and brain of the G93A SOD1 model of amytrophic lateral sclerosis', Society for Neuroscience, 17-21 Oct, Chicago, pp. 304.13. (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Kirkcaldie MTK; Hosie K; Chung RS; Vickers JC

2009Dickson TC, King AE, Kirkcaldie MTK, Hosie K, Vickers JC, 'Novel alpha-internexin pathological alterations in both the spinal cord and forebrain of the G93A SOD1 model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis', Australian Society for Medical Research, 15-17 November, Hobart, Tasmania (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Kirkcaldie MTK; Hosie K; Vickers JC

2009King AE, Dickson TC, Vickers JC, 'Investigating the cause and consequence of axonal pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis', DANDIS Conference, Australian Neuroscience Society, 27 January, Canberra (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Vickers JC

2009King AE, Hosie K, Staal JA, Musgrove R, Vickers JC, et al., 'Microfluidic investigation of excitotoxin induced ALS-like axonal degeneration', ALS and Other Motor Neuron Disorders, 20th Symposium on ALS/MND, 8-10 December, Berlin, pp. 102. (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hosie K; Staal JA; Musgrove R; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2009Musgrove R, King AE, Dickson TC, 'Alpha-synuclein is a potential neuroprotectant in both wild-type cortical and dopaminergic neurons, but not A53T mutant neurons', 9th International Conference AD/PD, 11-15 March, Prague, Czech Republic (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Musgrove R; Dickson TC

2009Musgrove R, King AE, Dickson TC, 'Alpha-synuclein upregulation is a neuroprotective response of dopaminergic and cortical neurons', Australian Society for Medical Research, 15-17 November, Hobart, Tasmania (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Musgrove R; Dickson TC

2008Blizzard C, Chuckowree JA, McCormack GH, Chapman JA, King AE, et al., 'Delayed morphological alterations in a subpopulation of interneurons in the peri-wound region following focal damage to the adult rat neocortex', Neuroscience, 15-19 November 2008, Washington DC (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Blizzard C; Chuckowree JA; McCormack GH; Chapman JA; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2008King AE, Dickson TC, Blizzard CA, Foster SS, Woodhouse A, et al., 'Neuron-glia interactions underlying axonal health in an in vitro spinal culture model of relevance to ALS', Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, 19th Symposium on ALS/MND, 3-5 November, Birmingham, pp. 85. (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Blizzard CA; Foster SS; Woodhouse A; Chung RS; Vickers JC

2008Vickers JC, King AE, Blizzard CA, Woodhouse A, Foster SS, et al., 'Murine spinal neurons in vitro develop proximal axonal transport abnormalities and swellings that are similar to early axonal changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis', Society for Neuroscience, 15-19 November, Washington, DC (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Vickers JC; Blizzard CA; Woodhouse A; Foster SS; Chung RS; Dickson TC

2008Vickers JC, King AE, Chung RS, Foster S, West AK, et al., 'Axonopathy, excitotoxicity and neuronal degeneration in ALS 2008', Australian Neuroscience Society Conference, 27-30 January, Hobart (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Vickers JC; Chung RS; Foster S; West AK; Chuah MI; Dickson TC

2007King AE, Dickson TC, Blizzard CA, Foster SS, Chung RS, et al., 'ALS-like axonal pathology in cultured spinal motor neurons', Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, 18th Symposium on ALS/MND, 1-3 December, Toronto, pp. 191. (2007) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Blizzard CA; Foster SS; Chung RS; West AK; Chuah MI; Vickers JC

2007King AE, Dickson TC, Blizzard CA, Foster SS, Chung RS, et al., 'ALS-like pathology in cultured spinal motor neurons following excitoxicity', IBRO International Conference, 12-17 July, Melbourne (2007) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dickson TC; Blizzard CA; Foster SS; Chung RS; West AK; Chuah MI; Vickers JC

2006King AE, Chung RS, Vickers JC, Dickson TC, 'Relationship between the developmental localisation of glutamate receptor subunits in vitro and susceptibility to excitotoxicity', Australian Neuroscience Society Conference, 31 January - 3 February, Sydney (2006) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Chung RS; Vickers JC; Dickson TC

2006Vickers JC, King AE, Dickson TC, Chung RS, Chuckowree JA, et al., 'In vitro models of the key pathological changes in axons associated with neurodegenerative disease and acquired brain injury', 4th Congress of Federation of Asian-Oceanain Neuroscience Societies, November, Hong Kong (2006) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Vickers JC; Dickson TC; Chung RS; Chuckowree JA; Haas MA; Staal JA; Woodhouse A; Blizzard C; West AK; Chuah I; McCormack G

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

40

Total funding

$4,867,609

Projects

Proteomic analysis of exosomes from iPS cell-derived neurons with mislocalised TDP-43 (2019)$99,665
Description
Our overarching hypothesis is that TDP-43 mislocalisation leads to altered axonal and exosomal protein expression, and which may underpin the mechanism of TDP-43 pathological spread leading to neurodegeneration of motor circuits in ALS. To begin testing this hypothesis, we have designed experiments to address three Specific Aims:Aim 1: To characterize human iPS cell-based models of TDP-43 mislocalisationAim 2: To quantify proteins differentially expressed in axons and exosomes of iPS cell-derived neurons with and without TDP-43 mislocalisationAim 3: To quantify transmission of TDP-43 mislocalisation and altered phosphorylation in a human cerebral organoid model
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($99,665)
Scheme
Grant - Innovator
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; King AE; Atkinson Rachel; Perry SE; Hewitt A
Year
2019
Developing a protocol to predicting health outcomes through oral microbes (2018)$9,917
Description
Older people in residential aged care are vulnerable to aspiration pneumonia, which is a primary reason for hospitalisation. Links have been drawn between this vulnerability and poor oral hygiene, prompting interventions in teeth cleaning. To determine the effectiveness of teeth-cleaning interventions objective measures are needed, such as microbiological testing. The goal of this study is to develop and validate a microbiological measure of effective oral hygiene to be used in a large-scale intervention targeting oral hygiene in residential aged care facilities.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($9,917)
Scheme
Grant- Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Bettiol SS; Crocombe LA; Goldberg LR; King AE
Year
2018
Developing a robust laboratory protocol for analyzing oral swabs for pathogenic or key microbiological flora (2018)$8,122
Description
The aim of this subproject is to develop and validate a qPCR protocol for analysing solutions derived from swabs of oral tissue to quantify numbers and distribution of pathogenic bacterial species within a complex microbiological ecology. This protocol will later be used to determine the change in type and load of oral microorganisms following a period of daily oral hygiene.
Funding
Australian Dental Health Foundation ($8,122)
Scheme
Grant-Wrigley Foundation Community Service Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Crocombe LA; Bettiol SS; Goldberg LR; King AE
Year
2018
Detecting Biomarkers of Brain Health in Dementia (2018 - 2021)$720,144
Description
Neurons signal to each by sending electrical impulses along their axons to the connections between neurons, the synapses. Loss of this signalingin thought to be the underlying cause of the clinical symptoms of dementia, correlating closely with cognitive decline. This loss of connectivityis accompanied by various types of pathology in the brain such as accumulation of extracellular beta amyloid and intracellular tau, although theconnection between pathology and neurodegeneration is not yet clear. One of the biggest challenges we face in developing treatments fordementia is the need to monitor the changes that are going on inside the brain of living individuals. In order to do this, we need to developbiomarkers; measurable biological indicators of a disease process. While there has been significant progress in the development of biomarkers toindicate the presence of pathology in the brain, biomarkers of neurodegeneration, which may be a correlate of brain health, are lacking. I have adeveloping international reputation in investigating the mechanisms by which nerve cells lose their connections in dementia, with the goal ofidentifying targets for therapeutic intervention. Capitilizing on my current expertise I propose to bring together preclinical work in animalmodels of dementia with a human cohort study to fully characterize blood based biomarkers that reflect the neuritic and synaptic changesoccurring in the brains of people with dementia. Working with Professor Michael Breadmore (University of Tasmania, ACROSS), an international leader in the development of portable analytical devices, I will then develop a point of care analysis tool to monitor brain health inboth rodent models and people at risk of dementia. Working at the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, a multidisciplinary teamacross neuroscience and health services, I am well placed to bridge the gap between research and industry, and to lead a new directive indementia research.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($720,144)
Scheme
Fellowship - Boosting Dementia Research Leadership
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Period
2018 - 2021
Grant Reference
APP1136913
Towards Axon Protection in ALS (2018)$98,470
Description
Nerve cells communicate with each other and their targets, such as muscle, via long processes called axons. In motor neuron disease these nerve cell processes degenerate and are lost, resulting in a loss of movement. Several mechanisms or axon degeneration have been recently identified, but we dont know which of these mechanisms is involved in motor neuron disease. In this project, we will use two models to determine which mechanisms of axon degeneration are involved in nerve process loss in motor neuron disease. This will allow us to determine which molecules to target for therapeutic intervention.
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($98,470)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Perry SE; Leung JY
Year
2018
How does stress impact pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease? (2018)$50,000
Description
This study will determine how glucocorticoid stress signaling influences Aβ processing (and vice versa) in primary neurons from APP/PS1 transgenic mice and wildtype controls.
Funding
Dementia Australia Research Foundation Ltd ($50,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dementia Grants Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sinclair D; King AE; Vickers JC
Year
2018
Advanced high resolution biomolecular analysis facility for Tasmania (2018)$350,790
Description
This proposal seeks support for an advanced, multi-purpose mass spectrometry platform for high-throughput and targeted biomolecular analysis, including proteomics and metabolomics. The intended purpose of the proposed infrastructure is to provide a centralised state-of-the-art facility that supports internationally competitive research programs in plant science, agricultural research, food safety, animal and human health research and separation science at the University of Tasmania (UTAS) and within the broader Tasmanian scientific community. Theanticipated benefit is a greatly enhanced capacity for leading edge research of national significance that alignswith the UTAS strategic research plan and national priorities.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($350,790)
Scheme
Grant-Linkage Infrastructure
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Smith SM; Paull B; Woods GM; King AE; Wilson RR
Year
2018
Grant Reference
LE180100059
Could gut microbiota influence cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease? (2018)$0
Description
This pilot grant will map gut microbiota in three populations:A) Individuals with a clinical diagnosis of dementia: Individuals identified by a clinician as living with dementia will be recruited (n=20). These individuals must be residing in the community as gut microbiota alterations are known to be dependent on the environment (13).B) Spousal caregivers for those living with dementia: Carers of individuals living with dementia are six times more likely to develop dementia (14). Stress is a leading theory for this occurrence, however shared gut microbiota is a potential unexplored link. This group potentially represents the pre-clinical population where alterations to gut microbiota are occurring before symptoms are established (n=20).C) Spousal caregivers providing informal care to someone who does not have dementia: A cohort of individuals providing care to a spouse living with a chronic illness will be recruited (n=20). This group will provide evidence as to whether the disease and/or gut microbiota influence AD development.By determining the gut microbiota diversity in these populations, we will begin to understand whether gut microbiota influences cognitive decline and dementia. Initially this will be a cross-sectional study but if data are promising then it will lead to a longitudinal study.
Funding
uBiome, Inc. ($0)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Ziebell JM; King AE; Lea EJ
Year
2018
Can microglia priming influence neurodegeneration? (2018)$10,000
Description
Inflammation has been implicated in premature ageing of the brain and the development of neurological disease (1). Microglia are the inflammatory cells of the brain, and currently it is unclear whether they are active (driving pathology) or passive (a bystander) in the ageing and neurodegenerative processes. In response to disturbances in the microenvironment microglia are capable of secreting both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to restore homeostasis. With subsequent disturbances, microglia mount an exaggerated response, due to priming. Increasing age impedes microglias ability to perform the most essential of homeostatic functions. At this time microglia are known as dystrophic; stuck in a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Understanding this switch to a pro-inflammatory state may aid in preventing the effects of ageing through modulation of microglial activity and offers a novel target for therapy to slow the progression of neurological disease. For this to be effective, we must first define the precise roles of microglia in ageing and neurodegeneration. By determining microglial phenotype throughout disease progression we can gain insight into their role in disease pathology.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,000)
Scheme
Grant-Strategic Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Ziebell JM; King AE; Lea EJ
Year
2018
Investigating Batten disease-causing CLN3 mutations in patient-specific stem cells and neurons (2017)$24,898
Description
Batten disease is a rare childhood disease that results in dementia and a progressive loss of vision, and which can be due to mutation of the CLN3 gene. Using advances in stem cell technologies, we will study how the Batten disease-causing mutations in CLN3 differently affect nerve health.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($24,898)
Scheme
Grant-Establishment
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt A; King AE; Ware T
Year
2017
CRISPR/Cas gene editing of Batten disease genes in patient-specific stem cells (2017)$51,411
Description
Batten disease is a rare childhood disease that results in dementia and a progressive loss of vision, and which can be due to mutation of the several genes, including CLN2 and CLN3. Using advances in stem cell technologies, we will study how the Batten disease-causing mutations in these genes differently affect nerve health.
Funding
Batten Disease Support and Research Association ($51,411)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt A; King AE; Pebay A; Grubman A
Year
2017
Improving the Oral Health of Tasmanians in Residential Aged Care (2017)$28,336
Description
This project seeks to improve and maintain the oral health of people who move into residential aged care by providing an objective way to document they are receiving effective oral care. The project is a staff initiative. It is the result of a suggestion by staff at the Fred French and Peace Haven Homes of Masonic Care Tasmania, Inc. during their participation in a current federally-funded initiative with researchers at the University of Tasmania. The specific aim of the funded project is to decrease cases of aspiration pneumonia through testing the effectiveness of a new model of oral health care. Staff have suggested the value of adding an objective way to obtain and regularly analyse oral bacteria and this is the focus of the project we are presenting to the TCF.Residents in aged care are particularly vulnerable to aspiration pneumonia. This type of pneumonia is directly related to poor oral health. Poor oral health alters the type of bacteria growing in the mouth and throat. If residents have a swallowing problem (dysphagia), they are more likely to aspirate material into their lungs. If residents with dysphagia have poor oral health, they aspirate pathogenic bacteria and this greatly increases the likelihood of aspiration pneumonia, resulting in unplanned hospitalisations and death. In Australia, the cost burden of this acquired pneumonia has been estimated at more than $500 million each year. The funded model being evaluated has three essential components: (i)Increase staff knowledge with the support of a Community of Practice including residents, healthcare professionals, community members, residential community leaders, legislators (to bridge the practice-policy divide), and on-site supervised dental/oral health therapy, nursing, and medical students,(ii)Provide daily evidence-based oral care a 3-month period of 2-minutes of teeth cleaning after meals using timed electric or regular toothbrushes, or daily denture care. For residents who cannot adjust to the electric toothbrushes, staff are developing 2-minute strategies for using regular toothbrushes, e.g., brushing to a series of enjoyed and resident selected 2-minute recorded songs,(iii)Monitor compliance from their ongoing experience, staff have suggested the potential advantages of the proposed objective and regular analysis of oral bacteria.Increasing and maintaining residents oral health will decrease the load of pathogenic oral bacteria and thus decrease residents risk for developing aspiration pneumonia. Understanding the type of pathogenic oral bacteria that are associated with aspiration pneumonia and ill health will further support staff to provide daily oral care. Bacteria will be gathered from non-invasive swabs of tissue from residents gum, hard palate, cheek, and tongue. Results of these regular analyses will reinforce how effective oral care can reduce the clinical indications of aspiration pneumonia and ill health and the personal and economic consequences of unplanned transfers or admissions to hospital. This cost-effective model can then be easily implemented in any residential aged care community.
Funding
Tasmanian Community Fund ($28,336)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Goldberg LR; Crocombe LA; Bettiol SS; King AE; Legge S
Year
2017
Staying connected: determining targets to protect neuronal circuitry in ALS (2017)$97,119
Description
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by degeneration and loss of nerve cell processes. The resulting loss of connectivity is likely to be the key contributor to the clinical symptoms of disease and is evident from the substantial axonal pathology present. In this project we will investigate mechanisms of axonopathy resulting from pathologic TDP-43, a key contributor to disease. We will utilize a novel of of axon degeneration in the cisual system which allows us to directly probe changes in the axon.
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($97,119)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Kirkcaldie MTK
Year
2017
Does plasticity drive Alzheimers disease and can sleep help (2017)$94,140
Description
This study seeks to elucidate a potential causal mechanism for Alzheimers disease: that plasticity drives disease pathology, and that sleep compensates for these effects of plasticity in a manner which declines with age. The study will manipulate levels of cortical plasticity and the duration of sleep in a transgenic rodent model, the APP/PS1 mouse, and track the resulting development of pathology.
Funding
The Mason Foundation ($94,140)
Scheme
Grant-Judith Jane Mason & Harold Stannett Williams
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kirkcaldie MTK; King AE; Vickers JC
Year
2017
Identifying the role of oligodendrocytes in disease onset and the progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (2017)$99,923
Description
Neurons have been the main focus of research and the target of therapeutic development in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Previous studies have display evidence showing the potential involvement of other non-neuronal cells in the disease progression including astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Although loss of myelin and oligodendrocyte degeneration has been identified, it has been mostly regarded as a secondary event occurring as a response to the degeneration of axons. Our recent studies have shown evidence supporting the potential active role ofTDP43 (TAR-DNA-binding protein 43) in oligodendrocytes development in vitro. These results suggested that alteration of TDP43 expression could induced oligodendrocytes pathology in ALS and is possible to have an active contribution to disease progress in ALS as well as the onset of the disease.
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($99,923)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Leung JY; King AE
Year
2017
How do microglia-synapse dynamics change with Alzheimer's disease? (2017)$50,000
Description
This project explores the emerging role of microglia in facilitating changes to neuronal connections, synaptic plasticity or the ability of the brain to remodel throughout the lifespan in response to a changing environment. Using state of the art imaging techniques, this project will explore microglia-synapse interactions in real time, to elucidate the role microglia play in synaptic plasticty in Alzheimer's disease and throughout ageing.
Funding
Dementia Australia Research Foundation Ltd ($50,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dementia Grants Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Ziebell JM; Canty A; King AE
Year
2017
Bioplatforms Australia (BPA) - collaborative research (2016)$15,000
Description
Funds will be used to procure services from BPA that will support proteomics and research projects on, respectively, molecular mechanisms of DFTD and the physiological response of diatoms to environmental stresses.
Funding
Bioplatforms Australia Ltd ($15,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wilson RR; Foo E; King AE; Tovar Lopez CD; Martin AR
Year
2016
A mouse model of mild maternal iodine deficiency and its effect on brain structure (2016)$35,000
Description
Establishinga mouse model of mild gestationaliodine deficiency to study its effects on brain structure and function.
Funding
Brain Foundation ($35,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Kirkcaldie MTK; King AE; Vickers JC; Burgess JR; Hynes K
Year
2016
The Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project: a longitudinal intervention study to reduce the risk of ageing-related cognitive decline and dementia (2016 - 2020)$878,790
Description
It has been estimated that between 30 and 50% of dementia cases may be preventable by addressing modifiable risk factors such as vascular factors and complex mental stimulation. Increasing levels of education at a younger age have been associated with decreased risk of developing dementia in older ages, leading to the suggestion that building cognitive reserve may provide greater resilience to dementia. The Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project (THBP) is a large scale prospective trial that examines whether the real-world intervention of university-level study, as a form of complex mental stimulation, in older adults may provide benefits to cognitive resilience, so as to reduce ageing-related decline in cognitive performance, and reduce the risk of dementia. The initial phase of the THBP (2010-2015) involved identifying genetic interactions that may modify risk of ageing-related cognitive decline and mediate the benefits of engagement in complex mental stimulation. In addition, the THBP has developed constructs to measure prior and current levels of cognitive reserve and performance. The proposed project will realise the long term outcomes of the THBP to determine how a university course-based intervention may affect cognitive capacity through ageing and if it may effectively protect individuals from significant decline and dementia. Furthermore, we will determine how common variations in genes linked to brain plasticity, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, may modify how an individual gains potential benefit from the intervention. In this regard, a genetic profile comprised from BDNF and apolipoprotein E polymorphisms, may also predict those at greatest risk of dementia. Finally, we will investigate whether BDNF protein levels in blood may serve as a biomarker for the effects of the intervention and/or as a potential indicator of relative risk or protection from significant cognitive decline.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($878,790)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Vickers JC; Summers M; Valenzuela M; Summers JJ; King AE; Robinson AL; Srikanth V
Period
2016 - 2020
Grant Reference
1108794
PhD top-up - Kelsey Hanson (2015 - 2017)$30,000
Description
The overall aim of this project is to examine mechanisms of axon degeneration in Alzheimer's disease to trial axonal and synaptic protective strategies in vivo and in vitro.
Funding
The Yulgilbar Foundation ($30,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Hanson K
Period
2015 - 2017
Microfluidic technology to help understand physical damage to brain cells (2015 - 2017)$415,500
Description
Understanding the organisation, structure and mechanisms of the human brain and nervous system remains one of the biggest challenges of science. This project will develop a new cell culture platform to form defined molecular networks of brain cells and to monitor changes throughout the network in response to a small localised injury within the network. This innovative platform will be used to help understand changes within cells in response to physical damage to networks of brain cells. This is one of the major causes of death and disability in developed nations, and is identified as a risk factor for a range of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and motor neuron disease.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($415,500)
Scheme
Grant-Discovery Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Breadmore MC; Guijt RM; Dickson TC; King AE
Period
2015 - 2017
Grant Reference
DP150100998
INHIBITORY REGULATION OF MOTOR NEURONS: A NEW TARGET MECHANISM FOR ALS ? (2015)$86,329
Description
There is considerable evidence from many areas of clinical and basic medical research that in MND motor neurons may be dying due to a toxicity that is triggered due to their over activity known as excitotoxicity. There is new evidence that this toxic cascade may initially be triggered by the death or dysfunction of another type of neuron in the brain the interneuron. Interneurons are critical regulators of motor neuron activity and modulators of the balance that is essential for normal brain function. Research has developed a method of specifically growing interneurons and/or motor neurons, derived from transgenic mice developed to model MND, in primary culture. This highly specific brain in a dish approach will allow us to determine if the presence of abnormal or pathogenic interneurons can lead to abnormal motor neuron function and pathology. Not only would these studies provide important insight into the mechanisms responsible for ALS, but they would also provide a high throughput model for later assessing potential therapeutic interventions.
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($86,329)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Dickson TC; King AE
Year
2015
Axon degeneration and axon protection in CNS disease and injury (2015 - 2017)$377,077
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($377,077)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Vickers JC; Canty A
Period
2015 - 2017
Grant Reference
1085221
Investigating the role of oligodendrocytes in frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) (2015)$50,000
Description
Current research on frontotemporal-lobar dementia (FTLD) is focused on the detrimental effect of the pathological proteins in neurons. However, in FTLD, protein aggregates are also found in oligodendrocytes, which are responsible for myelinating and supporting axons. FTLD has a strong genetic and pathological links with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), the most common form of motor neuron disease. In ALS there is now substantial evidences suggesting that oligodendrocyte degeneration is involved in disease pathogenesis potentially as a primary pathologic mechanism. Both FTLD and ALS share the common pathologic protein, TDP-43, which is found to aggregate in oligodendrocytes, hence it is feasible to suggest a role for oligodendrocyte dysfunction in FTLD. Studies in ALS tissue and mouse models have suggested that defects in the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocytes as well as their ability to myelinate axons may contribute to the disease. This proposed study aims to establish the role of oligodendrocyte dyfunction in FTLD with a focus on determining the potential role of TDP-43 in the differentiation and remyelination process of oligodendrocytes. This will allow us to have a better understanding in the pathogenesis of FTLD as well as identifying new therapeutic targets for treatments.
Funding
Dementia Australia Research Foundation Ltd ($50,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dementia Grants Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Leung JY; King AE
Year
2015
The role of ALS/FTLD proteins in axon function and degeneration in disease (2014)$89,710
Description
By achieving the following aims this project will investigate the role of TDP-43 and other ALS/FTLD proteins in the normal function of the axon and determine how this may contribute to the pathogenesis of disease. Aim 1: to determine the normal localization of TDP-43 and other ALS/FTLD proteins Aim 2: to determine the effect of protein overexpression or knockdown on the axonal proteome (proteomic analysis) and the expression of axonal mRNA. Aim 3: to determine the effect of directing ALS/FTLD proteins to the axon. Aim 4: to investigate the effect of TDP43 and mutants expression on axons in vivo in a retinal model Aim 5:Determine if mutant TDP-43 can be transferred from the axon to oligodendrocytes.
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($89,710)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Vickers JC
Year
2014
The role of FTLD proteins in neurite health, function and dysfunction (2014 - 2016)$90,000
Description
In the last seven years a number of proteins have been identified that are pathologically or genetically associated with Frontotemporal Lobe Degeneration including TDP-43, FUS, C9ORF72 and progranulin. As ubiquitously expressed proteins it has been difficult to assess the role these proteins play in disease, particularly associated with ageing. This project proposes that the disease-associated roles are likely to stem from functions that are specific to neurons and/or glial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that many of these proteins are involved in neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal maintenance. This project will use a threefold approach to investigate the role of FTLD proteins in disease. First, it will utilize novel primary cell culture techniques that allow compartmentalization of the neuron to probe axonal and somatodenditic mechanisms. Second, it will utilize an in-vivo intraocular injection model to rapidly examine the effect of mutant and non-mutant proteins on downstream connectivity. Finally, it will investigate neurite pathology in human tissue. This project will provide mechanistic insight into the role of FTLD proteins in disease.
Funding
Dementia Australia Research Foundation Ltd ($90,000)
Scheme
Grant-Scholarship
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Atkinson RAK; Vickers JC
Period
2014 - 2016
Axon protection in Alzheimer's disease (2014)$59,097
Description
Alzheimers disease (AD) affects approximately 11% of the population over 65 years and up to 50% of individuals over 85 years and is now the 3rd major cause of death in Australia. In the absence of effective therapeutic intervention it is imperative that we renew our research efforts along novel and innovative lines to prevent, palliate and/ or reduce this condition. One of the key features of AD is the degeneration of the long nerve processes or axons. These are susceptible to damage and this can result in nervous system disconnection and failure even in the absence of cell loss. My research focuses on understanding why axons degenerate in neurodegenerative disease with the aim of finding effective therapeutic agents to prevent this loss. Due to our lack of mechanistic insight into axon degeneration mechanisms, there are currently no therapeutic drugs that target axon degeneration, and this could be one reason to account for the failure of many therapeutic agents that provide only neuronal protection. Therefore axon protection strategies may offer promise in preventing or delaying the ongoing clinical symptoms of the disease. To address this important issue, I have developed a novel cell culture technique that uses microfluidic technology to separate neuronal axons from the soma. This allows us to probe the cellular mechanisms of axon degeneration in conditions related to AD. Using these novel in vitro techniques I have begun to unravel some of these mechanisms and identify some potential points of intervention. Specifically, I have examined axon degeneration mechanisms following excitotoxicity, which results from overstimulation of neurons. Excitotoxicity is one of the key causes of nerve cell degeneration in AD. My work has shown that excitotoxicity causes axons to degenerate and that destabilization of microtubule proteins is an early event in this degeneration. Importantly, stabilizing microtubules with drugs such as taxol and epothilone D prevents axon degeneration following excitotoxicity in our cell culture model. Taxol and epothilone D are both agents that are currently approved for use in the treatment of cancer. The next step is to test whether these agents can block axon degeneration in animal models. In order to do this I will use two models. Firstly I will use an in vivo model of axon degeneration induced by excitotoxicity. This will be used to directly confirm that microtubule stabilization with epothilone D can protect axons from degeneration following excitotoxicity in vivo. Secondly I will use a mouse model of AD which develops axon pathology and for which excitotoic mechanisms are implicated. This AD will be treated with Epothilone D and pathology examined as well as cognitive function. This project will provide preliminary data to pave the way to expanding the project by obtaining significant funding from national research funding schemes such as NHMRC.
Funding
Equity Trustees Limited ($59,097)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Canty A; Fernandez-Martos CM
Year
2014
Interneuron dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A new target for potential therapeutics? (2013)$83,435
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($83,435)
Scheme
Grant-in-Aid Zo-ee MND Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Dickson TC; King AE
Year
2013
Axonal protection in ALS (2013)$78,307
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($78,307)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Blizzard C; Dickson TC
Year
2013
2013: 24th Symposium on ALC/MND - Italy, 6-8 December 2013 (2013)$2,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($2,500)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Year
2013
Determining the mechanism underlying post-operative cognitive decline (2012)$6,508
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($6,508)
Scheme
Grant-Starter
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Terblanche N; Blizzard C; King AE; Dickson TC; Skinner MW; Vickers JC
Year
2012
The role of excitotoxicity in mediating distal axonal degeneration in ALS (2011 - 2013)$379,034
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($379,034)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Dickson TC; Vickers JC; Chung RS; King AE
Period
2011 - 2013
Grant Reference
1003931
Myelin loss in Alzheimer's disease (2011 - 2012)$90,000
Funding
Dementia Australia Research Foundation Ltd ($90,000)
Scheme
Fellowship-Postdoctoral Fellowship in Dementia
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Period
2011 - 2012
The role of muscle-neuron Signaling in Neuromuscular Disease (2011)$15,000
Funding
University of Tasmania ($15,000)
Scheme
Grant-Institutional Research Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Year
2011
Nina Buscombe Award Travel Grant (2010)$2,200
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Victoria ($2,200)
Scheme
Grant-Travel
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Year
2010
The Role of Distal Axonal Degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Motor Neuron Disease) (2009)$16,583
Funding
University of Tasmania ($16,583)
Scheme
Grant-Institutional Research Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Year
2009
The role of distal axonal degeneration in ALS (2009)$27,360
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($27,360)
Scheme
Grant-In-Aid
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Vickers JC; Dickson TC
Year
2009
Investigating the causes and consequences of axonal pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (2008 - 2010)$217,500
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($217,500)
Scheme
Fellowship-Bill Gole MND Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Period
2008 - 2010
Travel to attend ALS/MND International Symposium in Birmingham 2008 (2008)$5,000
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($5,000)
Scheme
Grant-Travel
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE
Year
2008
Unravelling the cellular pathology underlying neuronal degeneration in motor neuron disease (2007)$24,744
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($24,744)
Scheme
Grant-in-Aid Zo-ee MND Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Vickers JC; King AE; Dickson TC; Chung RS; West AK; Chuah MI
Year
2007

Research Supervision

Associate Professor King is currently seeking PhD students in the following areas

  • Biomarkers of Brain Health
  • Axon function and dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease

Current

10

Completed

11

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDCharacterisation and Comparison of Rodent Models of Alzheimers Disease2014
PhDNovel Short-Chain Quinones Against Mitochondrial Dysfunction2014
PhDAxon Degeneration and Axon Protection in Alzheimer's Disease2015
PhDInvestigating Mechanisms of Axon Degeneration and Protection in Neurological Disease2015
PhDOligodendrocyte Dysfunction in Dementia2016
PhDA Longitudinal Intervention Study to Reduce Ageing-Related Cognitive Decline and Reduce Risk of Dementia2016
PhDIdentification of Type and Load of Oral Microorganisms Associated with the Clinical Signs of Aspiration Pneumonia and Ill Health in People Living in Residential Aged Care2017
PhDThe Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project: Gene-education interaction may reduce the risk of ageing-related cognitive decline and dementia2017
PhDPatient-specific Stem Cell Models of Batten Disease2018
PhDDevelop a Novel Device for Regular Monitoring of Blood Biomarkers in Dementia2018

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDFrontotemporal Dementia and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Proteins in Neurite Health and Dysfunction
Candidate: Rachel Alice Kathryn Atkinson
2018
PhDInterneuron Dysfunction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Candidate: Rosemary Maree Clark
2017
PhDEnvironmental Enrichment for Healthy and Alzheimers Disease-associated Pathological Ageing
Candidate: Kimberley Stuart
2017
PhDEmtins: Novel Peptides Derived from Metallothionein-II as Potential Therapeutics in Alzheimer's Disease
Candidate: Emma Dawn Eaton
2016
PhDThe Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury in Experimental Models of Alzheimers Disease
Candidate: Jessica Marie Collins
2016
PhDLab-on-a-Chip Platforms for Understanding Neuronal Cellular Interactions
Candidate: Yiing Chiing Yap
2015
PhDDistal Axon and Neuromuscular Junction Degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Candidate: Katherine Adriana Southam
2014
PhDRole of Neurofilaments in Ageing and Neurodegenerative Disease
Candidate: Yao Liu
2013
PhDAxonal and Synaptic Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease
Candidate: Stanislaw Mitew
2013
PhDAlpha-synuclein in the Neurodegenerative Mechanisms of Parkinson's Disease and Dementia with Lewy Bodies
Candidate: Ruth Elizabeth Joy Musgrove
2012
PhDThe Response of the Mature Central Nervous System to Traumatic Brain Injury
Candidate: Catherine Anne Blizzard
2011