Profiles

Clive McMahon

UTAS Home Dr. Clive McMahon
Clive McMahon

Clive McMahon

Research Fellow Crustacean Nutrition

IMAS Hobart Waterfront Building, Hobart CBD Campuses

+61 (0)3 6226 6949 (phone)

clive.mcmahon@utas.edu.au

Achievements

I have won numerous grants and awards with my colleagues and research students, including GRANTS, AWARDS and DISTINCTIONS:

  • Dec 2103 - The cost of hybridisation for fur seals. Winifred Violet Scott Charitable Trust Grant, $42,500
  • Aug.2013 - Protecting vulnerable land from high wallaby densities. Meat & Livestock Australia Limited B.AHE.0300, $116,614
  • Jun 2013 - Whales, seals and penguins: Defining functional roles and trophic dependencies of key top predators in the Ross Sea. The New Zealand Antarctic Research Institute NZARI RFP 2013-1, $103,500
  • Apr 2013 - When the world isn't big enough: decline of a global migrant: the short-tailed shearwater (Puffinus tenuirostris). Winifred Violet Scott Charitable Trust Grant, $42,000
  • Jul 2012 – A multi-species approach to managing feral animals in tropical savannah landscapes. Australian Research Council (ARC linkage) LP120200537, $223,000
  • Apr 2011 - Can 'critical slowing down' be detected in real ecosystems? Innovative Research Universities Vice Chancellors funding, $40,000
  • Jul 2010 – A strategic review of northern Australian fisheries research and management. The Northern Territory Research and Innovation Board and Fund, $21,600
  • Apr 2010 – Appointed an Australian Research Council assessor (International Reader)
  • Sep 2009 – Demographic analysis to develop models of optimal feral camel control, Alinytjara Wilurara Natural Resources Management Board, $75,000.
  • Jul 2009 – Promoted to Senior Research Fellow in recognition for my 'excellent publication record'
  • Jul 2008 – Appointed editor of Endangered Species Research (http://www.int-res.com/journals/esr/)
  • May 2008 – Vice Chancellor's Awards for Exceptional Performance in Research in the New Researcher category
  • Feb & May 2008 – Charles Darwin University Accelerated Increment (#1 & #2) for 'outstanding performance' in research
  • Nov. 2007 – The 'Alternatives to the Use of 1080' Program, $300,000. Tasmanian Community Forest Agreement
  • Aug 2007 – 'Digging up the past: the impact of life-history traits on royal penguin population dynamics', $13,556. Australian Antarctic Science Grants Scheme AAS2748
  • Nov 2006 – 'Ecological-epidemiological models of feral swamp buffalo control in northern Australia', $766,212. Australian Research Council (ARC linkage) LP0669303. Named Australian Research Council, Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Industry (APDI)
  • 1995 & 1997 Australian Antarctic Service Medallion

Additional Information

Skills

Field Ecology, Demography, Antarctic Ecology

Background

I am with the Sydney Institute of Marine Science (SIMS) and have a number of joint Antarctic seal and seabird projects within IMAS. Before SIMS, I worked on feral animal invasion and population ecology in Northern Australia

General Responsibilities

My primary responsibilities are running the IMOS Antarctic seal tracking program. Briefly, the Antarctic and the surrounding Southern Ocean are one of the most important, yet least observed of marine habitats. Connecting all the world's oceans, the physical structure of the Southern Ocean influences world climate and ecology, and plays a key role in global climate. Within the IMOS program we use satellite linked data loggers that measure physical ocean properties (specifically salinity, temperature, and depth) to depths of up to 2000m. Merging oceanography with marine mammal ecology advances our understanding of the world's oceans and its top predators, and allows us to predict how these species will be affected by future climate changes.

Teaching Responsibilities

Current Post Doctoral Fellows:

Dr Miguel A Bedoya Pérez: Protecting vulnerable land from high wallaby densities (Charles Darwin University)

Current Doctoral Students:

  • Ms Debbie Baird-Bowers (University of Tasmania),
  • Ms Natalie Bool (University of Tasmania),
  • Ms Jaimie Cleeland (University of Tasmania),
  • Ms Marine Desprez (Macquarie University),
  • Ms Lyn Irvine (University of Tasmania),
  • Mr Stewart Pittard (Charles Darwin University)

Publications

Selected Publications:

Charrassin, J.-B., M. A. Hindell, S. R. Rintoul, F. Roquet, S. Sokolov, M. Biuw, D. Costa, L. Boehme, P. Lovell, R. Coleman, R. Timmerman, A. Meijers, M. Meredith, Y.-H. Park, F. Bailleul, M. Goebel, Y. Tremblay, C.-A. Bost, C. R. McMahon, I. C. Field, M. Fedak, and C. Guinet. 2008. Southern Ocean frontal structure and sea ice formation rates revealed by elephant seals. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105:11634–11639.

McMahon, C. R., H. R. Burton, and M. N. Bester. 2003. A demographic comparison of two southern elephant seal populations. Journal of Animal Ecology 72:61-74.

McMahon, C. R., and G. C. Hays. 2006. Thermal niche, large-scale movements and implications of climate change for a critically endangered marine vertebrate. Global Change Biology 12:1330-1338.

Roquet, F., C. Wunsch, G. Forget, P. Heimbach, C. Guinet, G. Reverdin, J. B. Charrassin, F. Bailleul, D. Costa, L. A. Huckstadt, K. T. Goetz, K. Kovacs, M., C. Lydersen, M. Biuw, O. A. Nøst, H. Bornemann, J. Plotz, M. N. Bester, T. McIntyre, M. M. C. Muelbert, M. A. Hindell, C. R. McMahon, G. D. Williams, R. Harcourt, I. C. Field, L. Chafik, K. W. Nicholls, L. Boehme, and M. A. Fedak. 2013. Estimates of the Southern Ocean general circulation improved by animal-borne instruments. Geophysical Research Letters 40:6176–6180.

Wilson, R. P., and C. R. McMahon. 2006. Measuring devices on wild animals: what constitutes acceptable practice? Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 4:147-154.

Full list of publications:

http://www.researcherid.com/rid/D-5713-2013

View more on Dr Clive McMahon in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology) (060205)
  • Wildlife and Habitat Management (050211)
  • Physical Oceanography (040503)
  • Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  • Ecological Impacts of Climate Change (050101)
  • Population Ecology (060207)
  • Animal Physiological Ecology (060806)
  • Biological Oceanography (040501)
  • Animal Behaviour (060801)
  • Global Change Biology (069902)
  • Climate Change Processes (040104)
  • Analytical Biochemistry (060101)
  • Veterinary Epidemiology (070704)
  • Stochastic Analysis and Modelling (010406)
  • Community Ecology (060202)
  • Biological Adaptation (060303)
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (050202)

Research Objectives

  • Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960808)
  • Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments (960502)
  • Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960801)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
  • Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Environments (excl. Social Impacts) (960306)
  • Climate Variability (excl. Social Impacts) (960304)
  • Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change (960305)
  • Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Oceanography (969901)
  • Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales (960405)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences (970105)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences (970104)
  • Environmental Health (920405)
  • Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Forest and Woodlands Environments (960404)
  • Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts) (960307)
  • Global Effects of Climate Change and Variability (excl. Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica and the South Pacific) (excl. Social Impacts) (960310)
  • Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Marine Environments (960507)
  • Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960806)
  • Marine Oceanic Processes (excl. climate related) (969902)

Publications

Total publications

29

Journal Article

(29 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Hindell MA, Sumner M, Bestley S, Wotherspoon S, Harcourt RG, et al., 'Decadal changes in habitat characteristics influence population trajectories of southern elephant seals', Global Change Biology pp. 1-15. ISSN 1354-1013 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13776 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Hindell MA; Sumner M; Bestley S; Wotherspoon S; Lea MA

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2017Labrousse S, Sallee J-B, Fraser AD, Massom RA, Reid P, et al., 'Variability in sea ice cover and climate elicit sex specific responses in an Antarctic predator', Scientific Reports, 7 Article 43236. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/srep43236 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Fraser AD; Massom RA; Hobbs W; Hindell MA

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2017Labrousse S, Sallee J-B, Fraser AD, Massom RA, Reid P, et al., 'Under the sea ice: exploring the relationship between sea ice and the foraging behaviour of southern elephant seals in East Antarctica', Progress in Oceanography, 156 pp. 17-40. ISSN 0079-6611 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.pocean.2017.05.014 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fraser AD; Massom RA; Hindell MA

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2017McMahon CR, Harcourt RG, Burton HR, Daniel O, Hindell MA, 'Seal mothers expend more on offspring under favourable conditions and less when resources are limited', Journal of Animal Ecology, 86, (2) pp. 359-370. ISSN 0021-8790 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12611 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Daniel O; Hindell MA

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2017Irvine L, Thums M, Hanson CE, McMahon CR, Hindell MA, 'Quantifying the energy stores of capital breeding humpback whales and income breeding sperm whales using historical whaling records', Royal Society Open Science, 4, (3) Article 160290. ISSN 2054-5703 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3709492.v3 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2016Hindell MA, McMahon CR, Bester MN, Boehme L, Costa D, et al., 'Circumpolar habitat use in the southern elephant seal: implications for foraging success and population trajectories', Ecosphere, 7, (5) Article e01213. ISSN 2150-8925 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ecs2.1213 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 18

Co-authors: Hindell MA; Herraiz Borreguero L; Williams G

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2016Hoenner X, Whiting SD, Enever G, Lambert K, Hindell MA, et al., 'Nesting ecology of hawksbill turtles at a rookery of international significance in Australia's Northern Territory', Wildlife Research, 43, (3) pp. 461-473. ISSN 1035-3712 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/WR16047 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hoenner X; Hindell MA

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2016Hoenner X, Whiting SD, Hamann M, Limpus CJ, Hindell MA, et al., 'High-resolution movements of critically endangered hawksbill turtles help elucidate conservation requirements in northern Australia', Marine and Freshwater Research, 67, (8) pp. 1263-1278. ISSN 1323-1650 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/MF15013 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Hoenner X; Hindell MA

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2016Pascoe P, Lea MA, Mattlin RH, McMahon CR, Harcourt R, et al., 'Assessing the utility of two- and three-dimensional behavioural metrics in habitat usage models', Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 562 pp. 181-192. ISSN 0171-8630 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps11947 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Lea MA; Hindell MA

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2015Beeton NJ, McMahon CR, Williamson GJ, Potts J, Bloomer J, et al., 'Using the Spatial Population Abundance Dynamics Engine for conservation management', Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 6, (12) pp. 1407-1416. ISSN 2041-210X (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/2041-210X.12434 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Beeton NJ; Williamson GJ; Forbes LK; Johnson CN

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2014Banks J, Lea M-A, Wall S, McMahon CR, Hindell MA, 'Combining bio-logging and fatty acid signature analysis indicates spatio-temporal variation in the diet of the southern elephant seal, Mirounga leonina', Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 450 pp. 79-90. ISSN 0022-0981 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2013.10.024 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Banks J; Lea M-A; Hindell MA

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2014Desprez M, Harcourt R, Hindell MA, Cubaynes S, Gimenez O, et al., 'Age-specific cost of first reproduction in female southern elephant seals', Biology Letters, 10, (5) Article 20140264. ISSN 1744-9561 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2014.0264 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2014McMahon CR, Howe H, van den Hoff J, Alderman R, Brolsma H, 'Satellites, the all-seeing eyes in the sky: counting elephant seals from space', PLoS One, 9, (3) Article e92613. ISSN 1932-6203 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092613 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Howe H

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2014New LF, Clark JS, Costa DP, Fleishman E, Hindell MA, et al., 'Using short-term measures of behaviour to estimate long-term fitness of southern elephant seals', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 496 pp. 99-108. ISSN 0171-8630 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps10547 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 52Web of Science - 46

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2014van den Hoff J, McMahon CR, Simpkins GR, Hindell MA, Alderman R, et al., 'Bottom-up regulation of a pole-ward migratory predator population', Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 281, (1782) Article 20132842. ISSN 0962-8452 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2842 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2013Desprez M, McMahon CR, Hindell MA, Harcourt R, Gimenez O, 'Known unknowns in an imperfect world: incorporating uncertainty in recruitment estimates using multi-event capture-recapture models', Ecology and Evolution, 3, (14) pp. 4658-4668. ISSN 2045-7758 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.846 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2013Roquet F, Wunsch C, Forget G, Heimbach P, Guinet C, et al., 'Estimates of the Southern Ocean general circulation improved by animal-borne instruments', Geophysical Research Letters, 40, (23) pp. 6176-6180. ISSN 0094-8276 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/2013GL058304 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 39Web of Science - 31

Co-authors: Hindell MA; Williams GD

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2013McMahon CR, Harcourt R, Bateson P, Hindell MA, 'Animal welfare and conservation, the debate we must have: A response to Draper and Bekoff (2012)', Biological Conservation, 158 pp. 424. ISSN 0006-3207 (2013) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2012.10.027 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2012Field IC, Harcourt RG, Boehme L, De Bruyn PJN, Charrassin J-B, et al., 'Refining instrument attachment on phocid seals', Marine Mammal Science, 28, (3) pp. E325-E332. ISSN 0824-0469 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1748-7692.2011.00519.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Field IC; Hindell MA

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2012Hindell MA, Bradshaw CJA, Brook BW, Fordham DA, Kerry K, et al., 'Long-term breeding phenology shift in royal penguins', Ecology and Evolution, 2, (7) pp. 1563-1571. ISSN 2045-7758 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.281 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Hindell MA; Hull C

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2012Hoenner X, Whiting SD, Hindell MA, McMahon CR, 'Enhancing the use of Argos satellite data for home range and long distance migration studies of marine animals', PLOS One, 7, (7) Article e40713. ISSN 1932-6203 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0040713 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 34Web of Science - 30

Co-authors: Hoenner X; Hindell MA

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2012McMahon CR, Harcourt R, Bateson P, Hindell MA, 'Animal welfare and decision making in wildlife research', Biological Conservation, 153 pp. 254-256. ISSN 0006-3207 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2012.05.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2012Schwarz LK, Hindell MA, McMahon CR, Costa DP, 'The implications of assuming independent tag loss in southern elephant seals', Ecosphere, 3, (9) Article UNSP 81. ISSN 2150-8925 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1890/ES12-00132.1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2012Vertigan C, McMahon CR, Andrews-Goff V, Hindell MA, 'The effect of investigator disturbance on egg laying, chick survival and fledging mass of short-tailed shearwaters (Puffinus tenuirostris) and little penguins (Eudyptula minor)', Animal Welfare, 21, (1) pp. 101-111. ISSN 0962-7286 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.7120/096272812799129493 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Andrews-Goff V; Hindell MA

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2011Newland CB, Field IC, Cherel Y, Guinet C, Bradshaw CJA, et al., 'Diet of juvenile southern elephant seals reappraised by stable isotopes in whiskers', Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 424, (March) pp. 247-258. ISSN 0171-8630 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps08769 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16

Co-authors: Newland CB; Field IC; Hindell MA

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2011Speed CW, Meekan MG, Field IC, McMahon CR, Stevens JD, et al., 'Spatial and temporal movement patterns of a multi-species coastal reef shark aggregation', Marine Ecology Progress Series, 429 pp. 261-275. ISSN 0171-8630 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps09080 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 49Web of Science - 45

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2007Bailleul F, Charrassin JB, Ezraty R, Girard-Ardhuin F, McMahon CR, et al., 'Southern elephant seals from Kerguelen Islands confronted by Antarctic Sea ice. Changes in movements and in diving behaviour', Deep-Sea Research. Part 2: Topical Studies in Oceanography, 54, (3-4) pp. 343-355. ISSN 0967-0645 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.dsr2.2006.11.005 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 63Web of Science - 59

Co-authors: Field IC

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2005McMahon CR, Hindell MA, Burton HR, Bester MN, 'Comparison of southern elephant seal populations, and observations of a population on a demographic knife-edge', Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 288, (March 10) pp. 273-283. ISSN 0171-8630 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3354/meps288273 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 42Web of Science - 43

Co-authors: Hindell MA

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2004McMahon CR, Bradshaw CJA, 'Harem choice and breeding experience of female southern elephant seals influence offspring survival', Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 55, (4) pp. 349-362. ISSN 0340-5443 (2004) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-003-0721-1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 24

Co-authors: Bradshaw CJA

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Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

16

Total funding

$1,683,384

Projects

Uncoupling oceanographic and life history drivers to alternate foraging strategies in Long-nosed fur seals (2017)$3,000
Description
Long-nosed fur seal (LNFS, formerly New Zealand fur seal, Arctocephalus forsteri) breeding range in South Australia is distributed across a relatively small geographic area characterized by a southern distribution, associated with narrow shelves in proximity to localized seasonal coastal upwelling in summer and autumn. Early in lactation (December to March), females undertake short foraging trips (~4 days duration) to near shelf waters (70-90 km the colony), in regions associated with localised upwelling. However, between April to May females switch to foraging in distant oceanic waters 700-1,000 km to the south of breeding colonies, associated with the Subtropical Front (STF), where they continue to forage until the weaning of their pup in September/October. These winter foraging trips can last more than two weeks. It is unclear if this major shift in foraging distribution occurs in response to: 1) reduced prey availability as a consequence of cessation in coastal upwelling; 2) life-history/pup growth factors that enable females to switch to more reliable but distant foraging grounds once their pup reaches a size and condition threshold where they can sustain longer fasts; or 3) a combination of these factors.Understanding the role of the in-situ oceanographic and life history factors in shaping alternate summer and winter foraging strategies is the central focus of this study. Changes in shelf oceanographic features associated with fur seal foraging areas will be monitored using a novel approach, by simultaneously fitting biologging tags to fur seals and oceanographic (CTD/Fluorometer/Irradiance) tags onto Australian sea lion males. Sea lions forage over shelf waters year round and sample the entire water column, providing a means to monitor changes in local oceanographic conditions from the summer to winter period.
Funding
Field Naturalists Society of South Australia Inc ($3,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; Semmens JM; McMahon CR; Goldsworthy S; Bailleul F; Harcourt R; Foo DX
Year
2017
Donations - Geolocation Journeys (2016 - 2017)$18,494
Description
This project repurposes retired geolocators from marine predator tracking projects into pieces of art. Donations from the public have been accepted for these pieces through the UTAS Foundation. The funds raised are to support current and future marine predator tracking projects at IMAS through the purchase of geolocators.
Funding
Donation via University of Tasmania Foundation ($18,494)
Scheme
Donation - Individual
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; McMahon CR; Cleeland JB; Alderman R
Period
2016 - 2017
Uncoupling oceanographic and life history drivers to alternate foraging strategies in Long-nosed fur seals (2016 - 2017)$13,500
Description
Long-nosed fur seal (LNFS, formerly New Zealand fur seal, Arctocephalus forsteri) breeding range in South Australia is distributed across a relatively small geographic area characterized by a southern distribution, associated with narrow shelves in proximity to localized seasonal coastal upwelling in summer and autumn. Early in lactation (December to March), females undertake short foraging trips (~4 days duration) to near shelf waters (70-90 km the colony), in regions associated with localised upwelling. However, between April to May females switch to foraging in distant oceanic waters 700-1,000 km to the south of breeding colonies, associated with the Subtropical Front (STF), where they continue to forage until the weaning of their pup in September/October. These winter foraging trips can last more than two weeks. It is unclear if this major shift in foraging distribution occurs in response to: 1) reduced prey availability as a consequence of cessation in coastal upwelling; 2) life-history/pup growth factors that enable females to switch to more reliable but distant foraging grounds once their pup reaches a size and condition threshold where they can sustain longer fasts; or 3) a combination of these factors.Understanding the role of the in-situ oceanographic and life history factors in shaping alternate summer and winter foraging strategies is the central focus of this study. Changes in shelf oceanographic features associated with fur seal foraging areas will be monitored using a novel approach, by simultaneously fitting biologging tags to fur seals and oceanographic (CTD/Fluorometer/Irradiance) tags onto Australian sea lion males. Sea lions forage over shelf waters year round and sample the entire water column, providing a means to monitor changes in local oceanographic conditions from the summer to winter period.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($13,500)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; Semmens JM; McMahon CR; Goldsworthy S; Bailleul F; Harcourt R; Foo DX
Period
2016 - 2017
Molecular biomarkers for seabird age estimation (2016)$800
Description
The aim of my research is to develop and implement a non-lethal method to accurately and reliably estimate the age of individual long-lived seabirds.
Funding
Linnean Society of New South Wales ($800)
Scheme
Grant-Joyce W Vickery Scientific Research Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; McMahon CR; Dickinson JL; Jarman SN; De Paoli-Iseppi R
Year
2016
Molecular biomarkers for seabird age estimation. (2016)$7,500
Description
The aim of my research is to develop and implement a non-lethal method to accurately and reliably estimate the age of individual long-lived seabirds.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($7,500)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; Dickinson JL; McMahon CR; Jarman SN; Deagle BE; De Paoli-Iseppi R
Year
2016
Assessment of habitats, productivity and food webs on the Kerguelen Axis in the Indian Sector of the Southern Ocean (2015)$0
Description
The Southern Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing environments on earth. Australia seeks to sustain marine resources of high fisheries and conservation value that are dependent on the productive ecosystems of the Kerguelen Axis (including Australias Territory of Heard Island and McDonald Islands south to the Antarctic continent). The Kerguelen Axis has never been surveyed as a single region to determine the critical relationships between environmental and biogeochemical drivers responsible for the transition between the northern copepod-fish dominated foodweb to the southern krill-based foodweb. This knowledge is essential for ecosystem-based management of fisheries, as well as conservation of whale populations and marine biodiversity. The results will be important for assessing likely responses to change in the ecosystem (from climate or fisheries) as well as change in the global oceans and carbon cycle, which are fundamental to the Earths response to climate change
Funding
Department of Environment and Energy (Cwth) ($0)
Scheme
Grant-Australian Antarctic Science
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Constable A; Andrews-Goff V; Bell E; Bestley S; Bowie AR; Boyd PW; Corney SP; Cox MJ; Davidson AT; Deagle BE; Double MC; Emmerson L; Harcourt R; Hindell MA; Kawaguchi S; Koubbi P; Lea MA; McMahon CR; McMinn A; Melbourne-Thomas J; Moteki M; Odate T; Rintoul SR; Southwell C; Sumner MD; Swadling KM; Takahashi K; Tilbrook B; Trull T; Westwood KJ; Ziegler PE; Causse R; Phillips HE; Pruvost P; Kokubun N
Year
2015
Seals from space: Developing techniques to use satellite remote sensing to census pack-ice seals in Prydz Bay (2015 - 2017)$148,000
Description
Despite i component of the Southern Ocean ecosystem, pack-ice seals (crabeater, Ross and leopard seals) are notoriously difficult to census as they are sparsely distributed over large regions of remote pack-ice. Historically, population censuses have been made from ship- or helicopter-based surveys, which are expensive and logistica!!ydifficult, and this inevitably leads to data which are limited, in time and space. High resolution satellite images allow us now to accurately census seals e.g. elephant and Weddell seals at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. Using this technology promises to provide regular estimates of the numbers of pack-ice seals in important regions such as Prydz Bay This study will develop techniques to survey pack-ice seals from high resolution satellite images, including automatic detection functions and a preliminary habitat model based on the characteristics of the ice contained in the images.
Funding
Department of Environment and Energy (Cwth) ($148,000)
Scheme
Grant-Australian Antarctic Science
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; Fretwell P; Harcourt R; Lea MA; McMahon CR; Southwell C
Period
2015 - 2017
Seals as Oceanographic Samplers (2015 - 2018)$1,090,800
Description
The Antarctic and the surrounding Southern Ocean are one of the most important, yet least observed of marine habitats. Connecting all the worlds oceans, the physical structure of the Southern Ocean profoundly influences world climate and ecology, and plays a key role in global climate. Within the IMOS program we use satellite linked data loggers that measure physical ocean properties (specifically salinity, temperature and depth) to depths of up to 2000m. Merging oceanography with marine mammal ecology advances our understanding of the worlds oceans and its top predators, and allow us to predict how these species will be affected by future climate changes. This study collects important data on ocean properties throughout the Antarctic winter data previously unavailable but crucially important to oceanographic and climate studies. Importantly this study builds on an existing continuous eight year time-series of annual oceanographic measurements between Davis and Kergeulen.
Funding
Department of Environment and Energy (Cwth) ($40,400)
Scheme
Grant-Australian Antarctic Science
Administered By
Macquarie University
Research Team
Harcourt R; Galton-Fenzi B; Hindell MA; Jonsen I; Kusahara K; Lea MA; McMahon CR; Rintoul SR; Roquet F; Tamura T; Williams GD
Period
2015 - 2018
An integrated ecosystem study of an Australian marine biodiversity hotspot (2015 - 2016)$40,900
Description
This study will determine the biological and physical drivers of the distribution and abundance of top predators in southern Storm Bay, Tasmania. We will conduct fortnightly boat-based surveys of predators and the zooplankton prey fields, as well as characterise the habitats using hi-resolution multi-beam sonar and ocean profile data.
Funding
Sea World Research and Rescue Foundation Inc ($40,900)
Scheme
Grant-Research Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lea MA; Swadling KM; Lucieer VL; McMahon CR
Period
2015 - 2016
Climatic variability and harvest impacts on the demography of the short-tailed shearwater (Ardenna tenuirostris): A trans-hemisphere migrant (2015 - 2016)$12,200
Description
The aim of this project is to investigate the intrinsic relationship of short-tailed shearwaters (STSW) vital rates and their interaction with the environment, and to quantify how environmental variability affects, individual fitness, population growth rates and population viability of the Furneaux Island group populations. Using a 67-year mark-recapture time series integrated with tracking data collected through this study, information will be incorporated with demographic and environmental parameters to investigate the mechanisms underpinning the health of the population and the individual performance of the STSW. Additionally we will estimate vital rates (survival and fecundity) for the Fisher Island population and relate these vital rates to environmental covariates and harvest rates to create a robust population and harvest model for STSW.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($12,200)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
McMahon CR; Hindell MA; Beeton N; Price CA
Period
2015 - 2016
Bottom-up and top-down influences on demographic parameters of Southern Ocean albatrosses (2014)$6,862
Funding
Antarctic Science Ltd ($6,862)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; Lea MA; McMahon CR; Cleeland JB
Year
2014
Bottom-up and top-down influences on demographic parameters of Southern Ocean albatrosses (2014)$8,228
Funding
Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research ($8,228)
Scheme
Fellowship
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hindell MA; Lea MA; McMahon CR; Cleeland JB
Year
2014
The cost of hybridisation (2014)$42,500
Funding
Winifred Violet Scott Charitable Trust ($42,500)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
McMahon CR; Baird-Bower D
Year
2014
When the World Isn't Big Enough: Decline of a Global Migrant - the Short-Tailed Shearwater (2013)$3,500
Funding
Birdlife Australia ($3,500)
Scheme
Grant-Conservation
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
McMahon CR; Bool NM; Lea MA; Hindell MA
Year
2013
When the World Isn't Big Enough: Decline of a Global Migrant - the Short-Tailed Shearwater (Puffinus tenuirostris) (2013 - 2015)$22,100
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($22,100)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
McMahon CR; Bool NM
Period
2013 - 2015
Ecological-epidemiological Models of Feral Swamp Buffalo Control in Northern Australia (2006 - 2009)$265,000
Funding
Australian Research Council ($265,000)
Scheme
Grant-Linkage Projects Round 2
Administered By
Charles Darwin University
Research Team
Bradshaw CJA; McMahon CR; Bowman DMJS; Brook BW
Period
2006 - 2009
Grant Reference
LP0669303

Research Supervision

Current

5

Completed

1

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDDemography of Two Sympatric Fur Seals (Arctocephalus gazella and A. tropicalis): Intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of survival2013
PhDThe Influence of Climate on the Migration Phenology of Humpback Whales (Megaptera Noveangliae) on the West Coast of Australia2013
PhDInference of Foraging Success in a Top Southern Ocean Predator2015
PhDComparative Diving Physiology and Ecology Across Southern Ocean Marine Predators2015
PhDSeabird Age Estimation with Molecular Biomarkers2015

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDThe Life-history of Short-tailed Shearwaters (Puffinus tenuirostris) in Response to Spatio-temporal Environmental Variation
Candidate: Caitlin Anne Vertigan
2010