Profiles

Pauline Marsh

UTAS Home Dr Pauline Marsh
Pauline Marsh

Pauline Marsh

Lecturer

Room L208, ABC Building, Hobart CBD Campuses

+61 467 027 220 (phone)

Pauline.Marsh@utas.edu.au

Dr Pauline Marsh is a researcher and teacher with the Centre for Rural Health. She is interested in many aspects of primary health care, but particularly in the role and capacity of informal community support and care. Pauline has established strong research relationships with several community gardens in Tasmania. She has taught into postgraduate primary health care units, as well as teaching and research experience in the humanities. Pauline has published in international journals in the areas of therapeutic space, end-of-life care, rural health, dignity of risk, dementia, primary health care, Aboriginal studies and film theory.

Biography

Pauline has been part of the CRH research team since 2015. Her current work includes research projects exploring therapeutic space, rural community wellbeing, end-of-life care, dementia inclusivity, and rural student placements experiences. Before joining the CRH she held an honorary research position with the School of Humanities (UTas). Alongside her academic career Pauline has extensive experience in the community sector, working across areas of consumer consultation, and health policy and research. Pauline is also a Registered Nurse and has worked in a variety of community and acute healthcare settings. She has an interest in film theory and Aboriginal Studies, and is an emerging filmmaker.

Publications

Pauline has contributed research articles to a range of international and Australian journals on topics of therapeutic space, dignity of risk, community gardens, dementia, palliative care, primary health care and film theory and Aboriginal Studies.

Career summary

Qualifications

Degree

Thesis title

University

Country

Date of award

PhD

Cinematic Campfires: Australian Feature Film and Reconciliation 2000-2010.

University of Tasmania

Australia

Dec 2012

Postgrad Cert (Ageing and Social Planning)

 

University of Tasmania

Australia

2009

BA (1st Class Hons)

 

University of Tasmania

Australia

2004

Postgrad Diploma (Emergency Acute Care Nursing)

 

University of Melbourne

Australia

1999

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Australian Health Practitioners Regulation Agency
  • Palliative Care Tasmania
  • Social Determinants of Health Advocacy Network Advisory Group
  • Tasmanian Bereavement Care Network
  • Medical Aid Films Research and Development Committee

Administrative expertise

  • Managing small-medium community-based participatory projects
  • Co-owner and manager Artist Studio

Teaching

Teaching expertise

  • Primary health care
  • Community nursing
  • Aboriginal studies
  • Film theory
  • Film as health promotion

Teaching responsibility

Foundations of Community Nursing

Research Appointments

Member of the Medical Aid Films Research and Development Committee

View more on Dr Pauline Marsh in WARP

Expertise

  • Therapeutic space
  • Palliative Care
  • Dementia inclusivity
  • Rural student placements
  • Reconciliation cinema

Research Themes

Pauline's research aligns with two UTAS research themes: Better Health and Creativity, Culture and Society. Her community garden-based research explores the therapeutic capacity of informal, community spaces and the people who populate them. This qualitative work brings together the theory and practice from a range of areas: therapeutic space, biophilia, third place, health promoting palliative care, dementia studies, creative arts and volunteering. Pauline is continuing to explore the effectiveness of gardens in the health care and palliative spaces, and the relationships between formal care providers and community spaces, volunteers and creative activities.

Pauline's rural health workforce research focuses on identifying and addressing the constraints on student placements in rural teaching sites. Along with other CRH academic staff, she employs qualitative techniques to understand the barriers and enablers of undergraduate student experiences, across a range of health science practitioner disciplines.

Pauline has also maintained an interest in Aboriginal Studies and Film Theory, stemming from her PhD research on Reconciliation Cinema.

Collaboration

Pauline is involved in an ongoing participant research program with a number of Community Gardens in Tasmania through the DIGnity supported community gardening program. She has collaborated with the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre on dementia-inclusivity projects, and with various community organisations to undertake evaluation of services.

Awards

  • 2016 Feminism in Film Award, Womens Independent Film Festival, LA
  • 2016 Red Flag Initiative Recipient (Wide Angle Tasmania)
  • 2009 Australian Postgraduate Award (PhD Scholarship)
  • 2003 Riawunna Prize (Graduand)
  • 2002 Dean’s Roll of Excellence

Current projects

  1. A study on the social and wellbeing impacts of therapeutic horticulture
  2. DIGnity Supported Community Gardening as a tool for enabling dementia inclusivity
  3. Living loving dying: Experiences of caring and palliation
  4. The Garden at the End of Life: Establishing the need, impact and feasibility of arts and nature-based hospices
  5. Constraints and enablers of the use of rural health services for professional experience placements
  6. Bereavement Care Follow Up: Tasmanian Specialist Palliative Care Services

Fields of Research

  • Primary Health Care (111717)
  • Health and Community Services (111708)
  • Cinema Studies (190201)
  • Social and Cultural Geography (160403)
  • Mental Health (111714)
  • Film and Television (190204)
  • Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment (160801)
  • Health Policy (160508)
  • Urban Sociology and Community Studies (160810)
  • Specialist Studies in Education (130399)
  • Horticultural Production (070699)
  • Public Health and Health Services (111799)
  • Human Geography (160499)
  • Film, Television and Digital Media (190299)
  • Aged Health Care (111702)

Research Objectives

  • Palliative Care (920211)
  • Cultural Understanding (959999)
  • Social Structure and Health (920413)
  • Health and Support Services (920299)
  • Rural Health (920506)
  • Mental Health Services (920209)
  • Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society (970116)
  • Health Education and Promotion (920205)
  • Visual Communication (950205)
  • Understanding Australia's Past (950503)
  • Arts and Leisure (950199)
  • Distribution of Income and Wealth (940108)
  • Health Inequalities (920206)
  • Health Related to Ageing (920502)
  • Health (929999)
  • Disability and Functional Capacity (920403)
  • Recreation (950103)
  • Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services) (920201)

Publications

Pauline has contributed research articles to a range of international and Australian journals on topics of therapeutic space, dignity of risk, community gardens, dementia, palliative care, primary health care and film theory and Aboriginal Studies.

Total publications

30

Journal Article

(9 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Marsh P, 'The DIGnity of risk: learning from a unique supported community gardening project in Tasmania', Hort Journal Australia, March 2018 pp. 32-33. ISSN 2203-4242 (2018) [Professional, Non Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

2018Marsh P, Brennan S, Vandenberg M, ' It's not therapy, it's gardening': community gardens as sites of comprehensive primary healthcare', Australian Journal of Primary Health, 24, (4) pp. 337-342. ISSN 1448-7527 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/PY17149 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Brennan S; Vandenberg M

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2018Marsh P, Courtney-Pratt H, Campbell M, 'The landscape of dementia inclusivity', Health & place, 52 pp. 174-179. ISSN 1353-8292 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2018.05.013 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Courtney-Pratt H; Campbell M

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2017Marsh P, Gartell G, Egg G, Nolan A, Cross M, 'End-of-Life care in a community garden: Findings from a Participatory Action Research project in regional Australia', Health and Place, 45 pp. 110-116. ISSN 1353-8292 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.03.006 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Cross M

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2016Marsh P, 'Postcolonial longing on the Australian cinematic frontier', Ilha do Desterro, 69, (2) pp. 177-191. ISSN 0101-4846 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n2p177 [eCite] [Details]

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2016Marsh P, Spinaze A, 'Community gardens as sites of solace and end-of-life support: a literature review', International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 22, (5) pp. 214-219. ISSN 1357-6321 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.12968/ijpn.2016.22.5.214 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Spinaze A

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2013Marsh Pauline, 'Picturing a Golden Age: September and Australian Rules', Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, (5) Article 4. ISSN 2009-4078 (2013) [Refereed Article]

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2013Marsh Pauline, 'Family tremors: Margot Nash's Call Me Mum', Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia, 4, (1) pp. 103-116. ISSN 2013-6897 (2013) [Refereed Article]

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2012Marsh P, 'The primitive, the sacred and the stoned in Richard J. Frankland's Stone Bros', Studies in Australasian Cinema, 6, (1) pp. 29-43. ISSN 1750-3175 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1386/sac.6.1.29_1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3

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Conference Publication

(13 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Cross M, Barnett AP, Marsh P, Green R, 'Factors enabling and constraining work-integrated learning in rural practice settings', 6th Rural and Remote Health Scientific Symposium, 11-12 April 2018, Canberra (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cross M; Barnett AP; Green R

2017Marsh P, 'Great and Good Gardening: Innovative Primary Health Care in Rural Community Gardens', Rural Health and Collaborative Research Symposium, 7 June 2017, Launceston, Tasmania (2017) [Conference Extract]

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2017Kent K, Marsh P, Barnett T, Ball MJ, 'A review of bereavement care standards', Rural Health and Collaborative Research Symposium, 7 June 2017, Launceston, Tasmania (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Kent K; Barnett T

2017Marsh P, 'Walking each other home: community gardens and end-of-life care', Australian Palliative Care Conference 2017, 6-8 September 2017, Adelaide (2017) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Marsh P, 'DIGnity Supported Community Gardening', Australian Therapeutic Landscapes Conference 2017, 13 October 2017, Adelaide (2017) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Marsh P, 'Speed Talk Presentation', Australian Palliative Care Conference 2017, 6-8 September 2017, Adelaide (2017) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Barnett T, Marsh P, Bridgman H, Kent K, Green R, et al., 'Development of a Tasmanian Bereavement Care Network', Building Compassionate Communities Tasmania Forum 2017, 13 October and 16 October, Hobart and Launceston Tasmania (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Barnett T; Bridgman H; Kent K; Green R; Ball M

2017Marsh P, Bynon J, 'DIGnity Supported Community Gardening: Sites of leisure, pleasure and risk taking', ANZALS 13th Biennial Conference: Leisure for Social Change, 4 - 7 December 2017, Hobart, Tasmania (2017) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2016Marsh P, 'Walking Each Other Home: Weaving Informal Palliative Supports into a Community Garden', 21st International Congress on Palliative Care, 18-21 October, Montreal, Canada (2016) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2016Marsh P, 'Walking Each Other Home: Weaving Informal Palliative Supports into a Community Garden', Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, pp. e35-e36. ISSN 0885-3924 (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2015Marsh P, Mathewson D, Knowles D, Edmondson P, 'The State of Play: Tasmania's changing health and social care landscape', Tasmanian Health Conference 2015, 17 October, Hobart, Tasmania (2015) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Webb M, Marsh P, 'Shaping the System: advocacy techniques', Navigating a changing environment, 13-14 November, Hobart, Tasmania (2014) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2012Marsh P, 'Picturing a National Coming-of-Age in Peter Carstairs' September', Alphaville Inaugural Conference: Cinema in the Interstices, 7-9 September, 2012, Cork, Ireland (2012) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Barnett T, Bridgman H, Marsh P, Kent K, Ball M, 'Tasmanian bereavement care network and initiatives project: final report', Centre for Rural Health, University of Tasmania, Australia (2017) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Barnett T; Bridgman H; Kent K; Ball M

2017Bridgman H, Barnett AP, Marsh P, De Deuge J, 'Review of headspace Clinical Pathways in Tasmania: Delivered via The Link Youth Health Services and Cornerstone Youth Services Inc, Tasmania', Centre for Rural Health, University of Tasmania, Australia (2017) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bridgman H; Barnett AP; De Deuge J

2017Bridgman H, Barnett T, Marsh P, De Deuge J, 'Review of headspace Clinical Pathways in Tasmania', Centre for Rural Health, Tasmania, Australia (2017) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bridgman H; Barnett T; De Deuge J

Other Creative Work

(4 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Marsh P, Mason VB, Shemesh J, 'DIGnity Supported Community Gardening', Centre for Rural Health and LaMoodja Film, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 3:30mins (2017) [Minor Creative Work]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mason VB

2017Marsh P, Shemesh J, Mason VB, 'In the Heart of the Garden', Centre for Rural Health and LaMoodjaFilm, Hobart, pp. 1 (2017) [Minor Creative Work]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Mason VB

2016Marsh P, 'Woodvine - A Gift', Inspired by Nature Films, Tasmania, pp. 1 (2016) [Minor Creative Work]

[eCite] [Details]

2016Marsh P, Wood D, Treasure R, 'The Conquest of Emmie', Wide Angle Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 1 (2016) [Minor Creative Work]

[eCite] [Details]

Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Marsh P, 'Gardening program cultivating community connections', Community Care Review, Australian Ageing Agenda, Australia, 31 August 2017 (2017) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

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Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

5

Total funding

$275,768

Projects

Dementia Cafes: facilitating community conversations about dementia (2017)$8,390
Description
Talking about dementia at a grass roots level can address stigma, demystify the condition, and facilitate inclusion, support and understanding of those living with Dementia. The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the effectiveness of dementia cafs to stimulate such conversations, based in one local area. Three sessions will be held in local caf locations, and one in a community garden setting, the partnerships to do this are already established. Participants will be invited to attend through existing local networks and local advertising in newspapers, radio and notice boards. It is anticipated, based on experience of prior community events that between 20-30 people will attend each session. Pilot data (postcard feedback from participants, researcher notes, and interviews with contributors) will be thematically analysed to explore what attendees specifically seek in attending, and if the caf setting meets their needs. The analysis will allow further refinement and inclusion of the approach in a toolbox of conversation starters related to development of dementia friendly communities.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($8,390)
Scheme
Grant-CCS Research Theme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Becker SE; Courtney-Pratt HM; Marsh P; Andersson J
Year
2017
DIGnity: Supporting people to participate in their local Community Garden (2017)$83,845
Description
This is a Participatory Research project involving three regional community gardens. Each garden will host weekly/fortnightly supported gardening sessions over 2017, during which professional health and social supports will be provided to enable people with health and mobility constraints to participant in a range of community gardening activities. The aim is to improve the health and wellbeing of people with health constraints, through community gardening. Whilst community gardens are well suited to promoting wellbeing - through physical activity, social engagement, biophilia and healthy eating to date they have not generally positioned themselves as intentional therapeutic spaces. Rather, the core functions of community gardens have been in food production and distribution, and not in assisting members of the broader community who have particular physical, mental and emotional needs. This research follows on from two successful trial projects in the Okines community garden at Dodges Ferry. These trials have involved onsite support from an Occupational Therapist, fibre artist, garden coordinators and an accredited mental health social worker. This team, along with the CRH researcher Pauline Marsh, will continue to work with volunteers, and expand to include the Dunalley/Tasman gardens and extend the program to run over a full year. DIGnity has the support of the Tasman GP, the South Eastern Community Care and hospice@home, all of whom have expressed support for referring clients to the DIGnity sessions.The research questions are:What impacts does a supported community gardening environment have on wellbeing and quality of life for those involved? What are the barriers and enablers to community gardens functioning as deliberate, sustainable therapeutic spaces?
Funding
Tasmanian Community Fund ($83,845)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Marsh P
Year
2017
DIGnity Supported Community Gardening as a tool for enabling dementia-friendly environments (2017)$8,758
Description
DIGnity is a Participatory Action Research Program that aims to build the therapeutic capacity of three established community gardens and the surrounding community. Since February 2017, health-workers, artists and researchers have worked alongside community members, garden coordinators and volunteers in a shared public gardening space. Some of the participants in DIGnity are living with cognitive impairments, or caring for someone living with dementia. This project explores the experiences of this cohort of the DIGnity community. Using mixed qualitative methods we will ask what they see as the challenges and enablers of being in the public space of the garden and draw on their knowledge and ideas about future needs for ongoing engagement and participation. We will also explore how people with dementia contribute to the wider community through the DIGnity program, particularly the contribution toward dementia friendly public spaces.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($8,758)
Scheme
Creativity, Culture & Society Research Development
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Marsh P; Courtney-Pratt HM; Campbell Marina
Year
2017
Regional Bereavement Care Networks and Initiatives (2016)$172,285
Description
Establishing and evaluating bereavement care networks in Tasmania.
Funding
Department of Health and Human Services Tasmania ($172,285)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Barnett Tony; Bridgman H; Marsh P; Quarmby L; Clifford CA; Ball MJ
Year
2016
Walking Each Other Home: Weaving End of Life Support into a Community Garden (2015)$2,490
Description
The proposed research will observe, analyse and document the process and outcomes of a broader community-engagement project, the Walking Each Other Home (WEOH) pilot project. Walking Each Other Home (WEOH) is a regional community garden-driven pilot project that will consult with community members about their end-of-life care and support needs. It aims to determine how the community garden space and its volunteer network might actively respond to those needs in an on-going, sustainable way. The consultation centres on three events: a community information exchange gathering; four weaving discussion groups in the garden, in which discussions and weaving activity is based on end-of-life themes; and a garden community workshop that responds artistically and physically to those discussions. WEOH is complemented by this small-scale research projectWEOH: Weaving End of Life Supports into a Community Garden (hereon WEOH: Weaving). WEOH: Weaving aims to decipher and communicate the factors that impact on the Okines Community Gardens capacity to provide end-of-life support. Ultimately, this research project aims to assist other gardens and similar community-based volunteer organisations when planning their involvement in end-of-life support.The research methodology is informed by principles of participatory action research (PAR). It also adopts the theoretical view of qualitative research as a performative process, and thus influential on the outcomes. The researcher is a community member, and the design comprises participant observation of the pilot project events and follow-up semi-structured interviews with consultation participants. These methods are augmented by a systematic literature review.Thematic analysis will be employedcodes and themes will be discussed with the WEOH project team. Findings will be provided to the community members in the form of a plain language document, which tells the story of the project and highlights the learnings. In addition, an academic paper drawing on the findings and literature review will be published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Palliative Care. Both documents will make a significant contribution to the current research on community palliative care, community gardens and volunteer palliative care.
Funding
Okines Community House ($2,490)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Marsh P
Year
2015

Pauline is interested in supervising HDR candidates with an interest in community-based health care and social support. She is well-placed to support candidates researching community gardens, neighbourhood houses, the application of third place theory, rural workforce issues, and the creative arts and health.