Profiles

Heather Lovell

UTAS Home Associate Professor Heather Lovell
Heather Lovell

Heather Lovell

Australian Research Council Future Fellow
Housing and Community Research Unit
Institute for the Study of Social Change

Room 405, Social Sciences Building, Sandy Bay Campus

+61 3 6226 7243 (phone)

+61 3 6226 2864 (fax)

Heather.Lovell@utas.edu.au

Associate Professor Heather Lovell's research is about processes of policy and technology innovation. She is interested in understanding the learning that takes place from policy and technology experiments, and how and why knowledge travels.

The social science of innovation

As a social scientist researching innovation Associate Professor Lovell explores how and why change takes place at a particular time, in a particular place.  Drawing on theories of policy and technology change from across a number of disciplines, Associate Professor Lovell's research has mostly concentrated on innovation in response to the problem of climate change.

'Climate change is an excellent problem to use as a case study for understanding innovation, because it potentially involves a fundamental rethink of existing ways of doing things, for all countries, sectors, and types of organisation'

Associate Professor Lovell's research is summarised in a single-author book published by Routledge (2015) 'The Making of Low Carbon Economies'.

'The book brings together a bunch of different case studies - from financial accounting to housing and forest ecology – in an accessible way in order to explore common findings about low carbon innovation.'

Since starting at UTAS in early 2015 Heather has developed a number of research projects around the themes of energy and environmental technology.

Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship: Smart Grids, Messy Society

Associate Professor Lovell was awarded funding in 2014 to research the changes underway in the Australian utility sector enabled by new digital technologies and capabilities – often referred to as 'smart grids'.  Heather, who hails from the UK, has come to UTAS to investigate how smart grids have been understood and implemented in Australia.

'Smart grids might seem like a rather odd topic of research for a social scientist, but what I am interested in is how policy decisions are made about highly technical issues.'

Smart grid technology can enable better management of services in times of peak demand, and this can remove the need for new infrastructure investment. The concept of a smart grid has most commonly been applied to the electricity sector – as is the case in Australia - although as part of the Future Fellowship Associate Professor Lovell will be studying its application to other sectors such as water and gas.

'The objective is to understand more clearly the effect of smart grid experimentation, including who has learned what from the implementation of smart grids in Australia and internationally, and how and why this knowledge has travelled.'

With her background in the discipline of Human Geography, Associate Professor Lovell is particularly keen to better understand the geographies of experimentation and learning. Her research is investigating the impact of key Australian smart grid trials and programmes on policy and practice – including the Federal Government's $100 million-dollar Smart Grid Smart City project (2010-14) and the Victorian government's mandatory smart meter programme (2009-13).

'What has happened in the State of Victoria is interesting because it looks to be a case of negative learning. For various reasons things didn't go well, and other States have consequently said they are not going to do it in the same way. It has become politically untouchable.'

Exploring this rich politics of innovation and learning is exactly what the Future Fellowship is about. Better understanding of such issues informs both the theory and practice of policy innovation. With a number of important regulatory and policy changes underway in the electricity sector in Australia - coupled with growing concern about consumers leaving the grid to embrace other power-generating technologies such as solar power and battery storage – Australia is one of the leading countries internationally with regard to digitally-enabled utility innovation, and hence a great place to conduct the research.

Associate Professor Heather Lovell is an ARC Future Fellow in the School of Social Sciences. She is interested in processes of policy and technology change, and currently has several active research projects on the topics of smart grids and environmental technology innovation.

Career summary

Qualifications

DegreeTitle of ThesisUniversityCountryAwarded
PhDThe governance of emerging socio-technical systems: the case of low energy housing in the UKUniversity of 
Cambridge
United Kingdom2005
MScEnvironmental Change and ManagementOxford UniversityUnited Kingdom1998
BA(Hons)GeographyUniversity of CambridgeUnited Kingdom1997

Biography

Associate Professor Lovell completed her PhD at Cambridge University (UK) in 2005. Before joining the University of Tasmania in early 2015. Heather was a Reader (Associate Professor) at Edinburgh University in the UK. She previously held posts at Durham and Oxford Universities in the UK, as well as a Research Fellowship in UK Parliament. Prior to commencing her PhD she worked in environmental consultancy.

Research Themes

Heather's research aligns to the University's research themes of Environment, Resources and Sustainability and Data, Knowledge and Decisions. Her research interests include the processes and politics of policy and technology innovation, the geographies of policy experimentation and learning, and standards as sites of innovation. Interdisciplinary work drawing together different strands of academic scholarship - geography, political science, sociology, science and technology studies and public administration - is a key feature of her research. 

She has undertaken empirical studies across a number of different topics related to climate change, infrastructure and utilities, including: low energy housing, carbon markets and carbon accounting, district heating, household energy monitoring, environmental sensor technologies, and smart grids. 

Heather's current main research project (an ARC Future Fellowship 'Smart Grids Messy Society') is investigating changes to Australian utility infrastructures – largely unaltered since first installed 100 years ago - that allow them to operate as 'smart grids'. The main aims of the research are: to investigate the societal drivers for, and implications of, smart grids; and to assess how smart grid implementation varies from place to place, and the implications of this for theories and practices of innovation and learning. The research aims to provide new insights about the complex societal reaction to smart grids in Australia; a country at the forefront of smart grid implementation.

Associate Professor Lovell is also currently involved in a number of other team-based, interdisciplinary projects working with industry partners. For example, the $2.9M CONSORT project has been funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) to research use of battery storage by households on Bruny Island, Tasmania. UTAS is leading the social science research of  CONSORT, working closely with industry partners TasNetworks and Reposit Power. In 2015-6 Heather co-led a Sense-T project investigating the use of environmental sensor data within financial markets. This interdisciplinary project, undertaken in collaboration with UTAS colleagues from politics, marine studies and business, addressed issues about the requirements and limitations financial markets might place on environmental sensor data collection and protocols. Heather is also a Co-Investigator in a political science project called 'Remembering how to lead', funded by the Australian and New Zealand School of Government (ANZOG), and led by A/P Grube in the UTAS Institute for the Study of Social Change. The project is about the institutional memory of 'leadership learnings' in the governance of policies and programmes with significant public-private partnerships.

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Institute of Australian Geographers
  • Royal Geographical Society-Institute of British Geographers (UK)

Committee associations

  • TasNetworks Tariff Reform Working Group (2015- )
  • Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy Journal Editorial Board (2014- )
  • UK Government Expert Panel on Household Energy Behaviour, the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (2012-13)
  • Climate Disclosure Standards Board (CDSB) Technical Working Group (2009-12)
  • Scottish Alliance for Geoscience, Environment and Society (SAGES), Co-Theme Leader - Society (2009-2012)
  • Elsevier International Encyclopedia of Housing and Home Editorial Committee (Environment Section Editor) (2008-2012)

Administrative expertise

  • Research Co-ordinator, School of Social Sciences, UTAS (2016)
  • University Research Themes Working Group (2016)
  • Faculty of Arts Strategic Theme Area theme leader 'Future Energy' (2016)
  • University Research Committee Member, UTAS (2015-16)
  • Head of Environment and Society Research Group, University of Edinburgh (2013-15)
  • Chief Investigator on several large research projects including ARC Future Fellowship (2015-18) and Nuffield Early Career Fellowship (2008-11)

Teaching

Environmental change and sustainability, Energy policy and politics, Sociotechnical transitions, Theory and processes of innovation, Carbon markets, Carbon accounting, Environmental markets

Teaching expertise

Heather is not teaching in her current role at UTAS, because of the research Fellowship that she holds. Her prior experience is with postgraduate (Masters) teaching. At Edinburgh University she ran and taught a postgraduate course The Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability which attracted around fifty students per year from across the University (Engineering, Social and Political Science, GeoSciences).  She also contributed several regular guest lectures, for example, on sustainable housing (to a Society, Sustainability and Environment undergraduate course; Carbon Markets MSc Course); voluntary carbon markets (to Carbon Markets MSc Course); innovation and policy change (to British Council Chevening Fellows; Climate Change Science & Policy MSc Course). She led her Research Group Teaching Review (2008), and in 2009 represented her department on a cross-University Committee establishing a new Sustainable Development undergraduate course at Edinburgh University.  She also supervised several Masters student dissertations each year, including one student who won the annual dissertation prize (Leggett, 2009), and another (Giorgetti, 2009) whom she subsequently collaborated with on a UN report.

Research Invitations

  • Invited keynote address for the Royal Society of Tasmania's Winter Lecture Series, July 2016
  • Invited seminar speaker at RMIT Centre for Urban Research, September 2015
  • Invited speaker at Australian Utility Week industry conference, November 2015
  • Invited keynote speaker at Australasian Housing Researchers Conference, Hobart, Australia, February 2015.
  • Invited by ClimateXChange to lead a study for the Scottish Government on Energy Productivity, 2014.
  • Invited keynote speaker at a seminar on Energy Vulnerability Conditions and Pathways: Towards a Research and Policy Agenda, jointly organised by the Energy Geographies Working Group of the Royal Geographical Society - Institute of British Geographers, and the International Energy Vulnerability Network, Manchester, UK, May 2013.
  • Invited Workshop Discussant at an international workshop Getting to Zero: International Perspectives on Low Carbon Housing, Manchester, UK, February, 2013.
  • Invited Keynote speaker, University of Birmingham Seminar on Household Energy Consumption, Technology and Efficiency, Birmingham, UK, June 2012.
  • Invited Keynote speaker, British Sociological Association Seminar on Climate Change, Southampton, UK, March 2012.
  • Invited speaker for Our Changing World public lecture, Edinburgh University, October 2012.

View more on AssocProf Heather Lovell in WARP

Expertise

  • Policy and technology change
  • Sociotechnical transitions
  • Environmental governance
  • Energy policy and politics
  • Innovation in utilities 
  • Carbon markets and carbon accounting

Collaboration

Heather has significant collaborations with the UK, where she studied and worked until recently, in particular with Edinburgh University (School of GeoSciences, School of Informatics and School of Social and Political Sciences), and St Andrews University (School of Management).  In the period 2005-15 she had several UK grants with a total value of £3.75 million (AUS$6.3 million). These involved a range of academic, government and industry partners including: the University of Durham, the UK  Tyndall Centre, Edinburgh City Council, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, the International Emissions Trading Association, and the Association of Certified Chartered Accountants. Through her current projects Heather is involved in research collaborations with TasNetworks (ARC Future Fellowship, CONSORT project, Consultancy), Peking University, the National Australia Bank and the Climate Disclosure Standards Board (Sense-T project), and Griffith University and the New Zealand government (ANZOG project).

Current projects

2016-19 Consumer Energy Systems Providing Cost-Effective Grid Support (CONSORT), Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) (Co-Investigator & Social Science Project Lead, led by Prof Sylvie Thiebaux, ANU); $2,895,951.

2015 Australian and New Zealand School of Government (ANZOG) 'Remembering how to lead': Building Institutional Memory of 'Leadership Learnings' in Collaborative Governance Environments, led by A/P Grube in the UTAS Institute for the Study of Social Change, $64,842.2014

Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship, Smart Grids, Messy Society? An evaluation of the implementation of smart grids in Australia, $820,406.

Fields of Research

  • Sociology and Social Studies of Science and Technology (160808)
  • Australian Government and Politics (160601)
  • Built Environment and Design (129999)

Research Objectives

  • Residential Construction Processes (870404)
  • Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards (960799)
  • Institutional Arrangements for Environmental Protection (960605)

Publications

Heather's field of research is about understanding the processes of policy and technology change, with a particular focus on energy and environmental issues. She has published extensively on sociotechnical transitions, and environmental governance and markets. 

Heather's published work has significant interdisciplinary reach, spanning the fields of Science and Technology Studies, public policy studies, accounting, sociology, and human geography. She has published in journals such as the Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers (2013), Economy and Society (2013), Technology Analysis and Strategic Management (2008) and Accounting, Auditing and Accountability (2011).  Heather has brought together a number of strands of her research in a book published by Routledge The making of low carbon economies (2015).

Total publications

48

Highlighted publications

(3 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2015BookLovell HC, 'The Making of Low Carbon Economies', Routledge, United Kingdom, pp. 286. ISBN 978-0-415-72471-5 (2015) [Authored Research Book]

[eCite] [Details]

2009Journal ArticleLovell HC, Bulkeley HA, Liverman D, 'Carbon offsetting: Sustaining consumption?', Environment and Planning A: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 41, (10) pp. 2357-2379. ISSN 0308-518X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/a40345 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 75Web of Science - 63

Tweet

2009Journal ArticleLovell HC, Bulkeley HA, Owens SE, 'Converging agendas? Energy and climate change policies in the UK', Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 27, (1) pp. 90-109. ISSN 0263-774X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/c0797j [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 71Web of Science - 56

Tweet

Journal Article

(26 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Gale F, Ascui F, Lovell H, 'Sensing reality? New monitoring technologies for global sustainability standards', Global Environmental Politics, 17, (2) pp. 65-83. ISSN 1526-3800 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1162/GLEP_a_00401 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Gale F; Ascui F

Tweet

2017Lovell H, 'Mobile policies and policy streams: The case of smart metering policy in Australia', Geoforum, 81 pp. 100-108. ISSN 0016-7185 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.02.011 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2016Lovell H, 'Are policy failures mobile? An investigation of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure Program in the State of Victoria, Australia', Environment and Planning A, 49, (2) pp. 314-331. ISSN 0308-518X (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/0308518X16668170 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Tweet

2016Lovell H, 'The role of International policy transfer within the multiple streams approach: the case of smart electricity metering in Australia', Public Administration, 93, (3) pp. 754-768. ISSN 0033-3298 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/padm.12259 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Tweet

2015Lovell HC, 'The multiple communities of low carbon transition: an assessment of communities involved in forest carbon measurement', Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, 20, (11) pp. 1363-1382. ISSN 1469-6711 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13549839.2014.905515 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2

Tweet

2014Lovell HC, 'Climate change, markets and standards: the case of financial accounting', Economy and Society, 43, (2) pp. 260-284. ISSN 0308-5147 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/03085147.2013.812830 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7

Tweet

2014Pullinger M, Lovell H, Webb J, 'Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK smart metering standards and commercial feedback devices', Technology Analysis & Strategic Management, 26, (10) pp. 1144-1162. ISSN 0953-7325 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/09537325.2014.977245 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 7

Tweet

2013Lovell HC, Ghaleigh N-S, 'Climate Change and the Professions: the unexpected places and spaces of carbon markets', Transactions - Institute of British Geographers, 38, (3) pp. 512-516. ISSN 0020-2754 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/tran.12021 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 5

Tweet

2013Lovell HC, Bebbington J, Larrinaga C, Sales de Aguiar TR, 'Putting carbon markets into practice: a case study of financial accounting in Europe', Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 31, (4) pp. 741-757. ISSN 0263-774X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/c1275 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 8

Tweet

2012Ascui F, Lovell HC, 'Carbon accounting and the construction of competence', Journal of Cleaner Production, 36 pp. 48-59. ISSN 0959-6526 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2011.12.015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 20Web of Science - 13

Tweet

2012Leggett M, Lovell HC, 'Community perceptions of REDD+: a case study from Papua New Guinea', Climate Policy, 12, (1) pp. 115-134. ISSN 1469-3062 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2011.579317 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 33Web of Science - 31

Tweet

2012Schroeder H, Lovell HC, 'The role of non-nation-state actors and side events in the international climate negotiations', Climate Policy, 12, (1) pp. 23-37. ISSN 1469-3062 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/14693062.2011.579328 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 46Web of Science - 38

Tweet

2011Ascui F, Lovell HC, 'As frames collide: Making sense of carbon accounting', Accounting, Auditing and Accountability, 24, (8) pp. 978-999. ISSN 1368-0668 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1108/09513571111184724 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 44Web of Science - 38

Tweet

2011Lovell HC, MacKenzie D, 'Accounting for Carbon: The Role of Accounting Professional Organisations in Governing Climate Change', Antipode: a radical journal of geography, 43, (3) pp. 704-730. ISSN 0066-4812 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2011.00883.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 57Web of Science - 48

Tweet

2010Lovell H, Smith SJ, 'Agencement in housing markets: The case of the UK construction industry', Geoforum, 41, (3) pp. 457-468. ISSN 0016-7185 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.geoforum.2009.11.015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 35Web of Science - 24

Tweet

2010Lovell HC, Liverman D, 'Understanding carbon offset technologies', New Political Economy, 15, (2) pp. 255-273. ISSN 1356-3467 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13563460903548699 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 61Web of Science - 44

Tweet

2010Lovell HC, Schroeder H, 'Carbon Standards and non nation-state actors', Exploration & Production. The Oil and Gas Review, 8, (1) pp. 14-15. ISSN 1754-288X (2010) [Professional, Non Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

2010Lovell HC, 'Governing the carbon offset market', Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 1, (3) pp. 353-362. ISSN 1757-7780 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/wcc.43 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 23

Tweet

2009Lovell HC, 'The role of individuals in policy change: the case of UK low-energy housing', Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 27, (3) pp. 491-511. ISSN 0263-774X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/c0878j [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 30Web of Science - 31

Tweet

2009Lovell HC, Bulkeley HA, Liverman D, 'Carbon offsetting: Sustaining consumption?', Environment and Planning A: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 41, (10) pp. 2357-2379. ISSN 0308-518X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/a40345 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 75Web of Science - 63

Tweet

2009Lovell HC, Bulkeley HA, Owens SE, 'Converging agendas? Energy and climate change policies in the UK', Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 27, (1) pp. 90-109. ISSN 0263-774X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/c0797j [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 71Web of Science - 56

Tweet

2008Lovell HC, 'Discourse and innovation journeys: the case of low energy housing in the UK', Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, 20, (5) pp. 613-632. ISSN 0953-7325 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/09537320802292883 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 25

Tweet

2007Lovell HC, 'The governance of innovation in socio-technical systems: The difficulties of strategic niche management in practice', Science and Public Policy, 34, (1) pp. 35-44. ISSN 0302-3427 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3152/030234207X190540 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 37

Tweet

2007Lovell HC, 'Exploring the role of materials in policy change: innovation in low-energy housing in the UK', Environment and Planning A: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 39, (10) pp. 2500-2517. ISSN 0308-518X (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1068/a38408 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20

Tweet

2005Lovell HC, 'Supply and Demand for Low Energy Housing in the UK: Insights from a Science and Technology Studies Approach', Housing Studies, 20, (5) pp. 815-829. ISSN 0267-3037 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/02673030500214118 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 44Web of Science - 38

Tweet

2004Lovell HC, 'Framing sustainable housing as a solution to climate change', Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, 6, (1) pp. 35-55. ISSN 1523-908X (2004) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/1523908042000259677 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 54

Tweet

Book

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Hawkey D, Webb J, Lovell H, McCrone D, Tingey M, et al., 'Sustainable Urban Energy Policy: Heat and the City', Routledge, United Kingdom, pp. 246. ISBN 9781138826120 (2016) [Authored Research Book]

[eCite] [Details]

2015Lovell HC, 'The Making of Low Carbon Economies', Routledge, United Kingdom, pp. 286. ISBN 978-0-415-72471-5 (2015) [Authored Research Book]

[eCite] [Details]

Chapter in Book

(7 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2015Lovell H, 'Low-carbon economies', Research Handbook on Climate Governance, Edward Elgar Publishing, Backstrand, K. and Lovbrand, E (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 356-365. ISBN 9781783470594 (2015) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.4337/9781783470600.00043 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2015Lovell HC, Mac Kenzie D, 'Allometric equations and timber markets: an important forerunner of REDD+?', The Politics of Carbon Markets, Routledge, Benjamin Stephan, Richard Lane (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 69-90. ISBN 978-0-415-70713-8 (2015) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2013Lovell HC, 'Measuring Forest Carbon', Governing the Climate: New approaches to rationality, power and politics, Cambridge University Press, Johannes Stripple and Harriet Bulkeley (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 175-196. ISBN 9781107046269 (2013) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2012Brown ME, Escobar VM, Lovell HC, 'Communicating the Needs of Climate Change Policy Makers to Scientists', Human and Social Dimensions of Climate Change, InTech, Netra Chhetri (ed), Croatia, pp. 49-62. ISBN 9789535108474 (2012) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.5772/3242 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2012Lovell HC, 'Eco-communities', International Encyclopedia of Housing and Home, Elsevier, Susan J. Smith (ed), Spain, pp. 1-5. ISBN 978-0-08-047171-6 (2012) [Other Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-08-047163-1.09003-2 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2012Lovell HC, MacKenzie D, 'Accounting for Carbon: The Role of Accounting Professional Organisations in Governing Climate Change', The New Carbon Economy: Constitution, Governance and Contestation, Wiley-Blackwell, Peter Newell, Max Boykoff, Emily Boyd (ed), UK, pp. 107-134. ISBN 9781444350227 (2012) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2008Lovell HC, 'Evolution of policy and practice in low-energy housing', Housing, the Environment and our Changing Climate, Chartered Institute of Housing, Christoph Sinn and John Perry (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 77-98. ISBN 9781905018604 (2008) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Review

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2008Lovell HC, 'Beyond the carbon economy: energy law in transition', Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 51, (6) pp. 872-873. ISSN 0964-0568 (2008) [Review Single Work]

DOI: 10.1080/09640560802423913 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

Conference Publication

(9 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Lovell HC, 'The promise of smart grids', American Association of Geographers Annual Conference, March 29th-April 2nd, San Francisco, pp. 1. (2016) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2016Lovell HC, Powells G, 'Energy feedback: Place, Policy and Mobility', Energy Feedback Symposium, 4th-5th July, Edinburgh (2016) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2015Lovell HC, 'The Making of Low Carbon Economies', Australasian Housing Researchers Conference, 18-20 February, Hobart, pp. 1. (2015) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2015Lovell HC, 'Policy mobilities: the case of smart meters in Australia', The Institute of Australian Geographers Annual Conference, 1-3 July, Canberra, pp. 1. (2015) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2015Lovell HC, 'What we know about households who are already off-grid', Australian Utility Week Conference, 24th-25th November, Sydney, pp. 1. (2015) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Lovell HC, 'The making of a zero carbon home', Devices and Desires: the Cultural Politics of a Low Carbon Society, 21 to 23 May 2014, Lund, Sweden, pp. 1. (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Lovell HC, 'The making of low carbon economies', AC conference 2014, 26-29 August 2014, United Kingdom, pp. 1. (2014) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Lovell HC, Webb J, Hawkey D, Tingey M, Scott-Mearns N, 'The changing narratives of district heating in the UK: a case study of the city of Edinburgh', AC conference 2014, 26-29 August 2014, United Kingdom, pp. 1. (2014) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2013Lovell HC, 'New district heating in Edinburgh and Glasgow: origins and outcomes', Energy Vulnerabilities, 21 to 23 May 2013, Manchester, UK, pp. 1. (2013) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Lovell H, Watson P, 'TasNetworks Tariff Trial Method Review - Phase One', TasNetworks, Australia (2016) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Watson P

2016Lovell H, Watson Phillipa, 'Tariff Trial Survey Design', TasNetworks, Tasmania (2016) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Watson Phillipa

2010Lovell HC, Sales de Aguiar T, Bebbington J, Larringa-Gonzalez C, 'Accounting for Carbon', ACCA and IETA, online (2010) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Grants & Funding

Since moving to Australia in 2015 Associate Professor Lovell has worked on seven new projects covering the topics of smart grids (ARC, ARENA, TasNetworks), environmental technologies and markets (Sense T, UTAS Cross-Discplinary Incentive Grant) and leadership in government (ANZOG). They are linked by a common conceptual interest in understanding processes of innovation and change. Since completing her PhD in 2005 Heather has lead or co-lead 13 research project grants with a total value of $12.5 million ($AUS).

Previous significant research funding includes:

  • 2013-17, UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), IDEAL: Intelligent Domestic Energy Advice Loop. £1.9M (Co-Investigator and Director of Work Package Two - Data Acquisition).
  • 2013-17, EPSRC, TEDDINET: Transforming Energy Demand through Digital Innovation Network project. £0.5M (Co-Investigator and Director of Work Package - Communications).
  • 2010-14, UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), Heat & the City. £0.8M (Co-Investigator)
  • 2008-2011, Interdisciplinary Cluster on Energy Systems, Equity and Vulnerability (InCluESEV) Research Councils UK Energy Programme; Convenor (2008-2009) of Carbon Capture and Storage Work Package; £0.55M.
  • 2008-13 (part-time) New Career Development Fellowship UK Nuffield Foundation, Fungible Carbon New Career Development Fellowship. £166,553. (Principal Investigator, with Professor Donald MacKenzie). This Fellowship was one of only three awarded in the UK in 2009, across all social science disciplines.
  • 2005-2007, ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship Policies for Emerging Socio-Technical Systems: the case of low energy housing in the UK (with Professor Susan Smith, University of Durham); £56,000.

Funding Summary

Number of grants

8

Total funding

$5,216,431

Projects

Decision making of Australian households at the end of their Solar Feed in Tariff (2017)$6,202
Description
This project will set up the feasibility of an investigation into the impact on basic household economics and decision making of the cessation of generous Feed-in-Tariffs (FiT) for electricity generated from residential solar photovoltaics. The investigation will help us understand the future of energy generation and consumption in Australia.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($6,202)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lovell HC
Year
2017
Tariff Trial, Phase One (2016)$7,787
Description
Review of tariff trial approach, sample size and overall trial method robustness (Phase One). 1. A review of the 600 household sample size, including discussion of its main opportunities/advantages and limitations. 2. A brief review of up to 10 other publically available tariff trials in Australia, including gathering data on sample size, location, and other key methodological characteristics. This is to benchmark the proposed Tasmania tariff trial, providing comparison of the sample size and experimental design against other similar trials completed within the Australian electricity market. 3. Methodological review of the experimental design. 4. Highlighting of any significant problems with the experimental design (show stoppers) in the methodological review. 5. Suggestion of modifications that could be made to the experimental design to ensure robustness, and of any further activities or approaches that will encourage robustness. This consultancy involves advising on the research approach being only. We are not involved in data collection or analysis.
Funding
Tasmanian Networks Pty Ltd ($7,787)
Scheme
Consultancy
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lovell HC; Watson Phillipa
Year
2016
Tariff Trial (2016 - 2017)$15,520
Description
UTAS will be assisting TasNetworks to develop a survey tool for the Tariff Trail. UTAS will do this by a) running a workshop to develop survey topics, and b) drafting survey questions for review by TasNetworks. The survey is being developed in May and June 2016 for use at the start of Phase One of the Tariff Trial. This is Phase 2 of UTAS assistance.The survey being developed will be sent to householders along with the terms and conditions for the tariff trial. It is a before survey that is to be filled out prior to advanced meter installations in participant homes. This before survey will be coupled in data analysis with an after survey that will be developed at a later date
Funding
Tasmanian Networks Pty Ltd ($15,520)
Scheme
Consultancy
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lovell HC; Watson Phillipa
Period
2016 - 2017
Fermen Tasmania: tracking the initiation, uptake and implementation of a Tasmania food futures vision (2016)$6,974
Description
Our project will use several research techniques and interdisciplinary perspectives to track and document the detail of how FermenTasmania (FT) emerged and has diffused, both as an overall concept and as a set of new fermentation business ideas and practices in a supply chain. FT - as a distinctive new idea - provides a rare opportunity to research in real-time the detail of how innovations initiate, coalesce and develop during their early stages. To explore this topic we will utilitise the full breadth of our teams interdisciplinary expertise in wine science and transdisciplinary research (Carew - TIA), horizontal business networks in the wine industry (Lewis Business), processes of policy and technology change (Lovell Social Sciences) and quantitative analysis of logistics, supply chains, data and information flows (Turner/Mirowski Engineering & ICT). This project will provide an important opportunity to develop and fine-tune our interdisciplinary collaboration and application of methods, including discourse analysis, science and technology studies ethnographies, social media network mapping, and interaction mapping.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($6,974)
Scheme
Grant-Cross-Disciplinary Incentive
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lovell HC; Carew ALJ; Lewis GK; Mirowski LT; Turner P
Year
2016
CONSORT: Consumer Energy Systems Providing Cost-Effective Grid Support (2016 - 2019)$3,965,701
Description
It is a technical project led by computer scientists and engineers, working with industry to develop better ways of managing renewable energy generation and battery storage on electricity grid. I am providing social science input, working with householders on Bruny Island.
Funding
Australian Renewable Energy Agency ($2,895,951)
Collaborators
Reposit Power Pty Ltd ($726,750); Tasmanian Networks Pty Ltd ($200,000); University of Sydney ($143,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research and Development
Administered By
Australian National University
Research Team
Thiebaux S; Blackhall L; Chapman A; Lovell HC; Osborne L; Scott P; Spaccavento D; Verbic G; Harwood A
Period
2016 - 2019
Sense-T Stage 2: Sensing Natural Capital - the role of environmental sensor data within new financial markets (2015 - 2016)$329,000
Description
The role of environmental sensor data within new financial markets. Key objective: to provide a standardised approach to the collection and processing of environmental data, informed by both technical feasibility and awareness of the requirements imposed by new financial markets, which is internationally consistent and fit for purpose. The project will convene a Technical Committee to deliver a new draft environmental data accounting standard, to be published for wider international consultation by the end of 2016.The research will position Tasmania at the forefront of international efforts to develop standards to underpin the rapidly-developing areas of natural capital accounting and new environmental markets, thus enabling Tasmanian businesses to continue to innovate new products and services with international market potential.
Funding
National Australia Bank Limited ($20,000); University of Tasmania ($309,000)
Scheme
Grant - Institutional
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lovell HC; Ascui F; Gale F; Haward MG
Period
2015 - 2016
Remembering How to Lead: Building institutional memory of 'leadership learnings' in collaborative governance environments (2015 - 2016)$64,842
Description
This project seeks to understand how leaders involved in collaborative inter-jurisdictional policy environments draw from and pass on institutional memory.
Funding
The Australia and New Zealand School of Government ($64,842)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Grube DC; Corbett Jack; Lovell HC; Scott R
Period
2015 - 2016
Smart Grids, Messy Society? An evaluation of the implementation of smart grids in Australia (2014 - 2018)$820,405
Description
New information technologies allow utility infrastructures to operate as smart grids, with the promise of multiple economic and environmental benefits. Utility infrastructures are largely unaltered since first installed 100 years ago, and smart grids have the potential to catalyse significant innovation. The two main aims of the research are: 1) to investigate the societal drivers for, and implications of, smart grids; 2) to assess how smart grid implementation varies from place to place, and the implications of this for theories and practices of innovation and learning. The research will provide new insights about the messy, complex societal reaction to smart grids in Australia; a country at the forefront of smart grid implementation.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($820,405)
Scheme
Fellowship-Future
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lovell HC
Period
2014 - 2018
Grant Reference
FT140100646

Research Supervision

I have successfully supervised four doctoral students to completion. I currently supervise two students at UTAS: Veryan Hann who is working on the ARENA Bruny Island project, and Anthony Broese van Groenou who is researching off-grid households.

Please get in touch if you have an interest in pursuing a PhD on a topic related to my Future Fellowship (see 'Highlights' tab for details).

Current

2

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDARENA CONSORT Smart Grid Pilot: Exploring the governance and implementation of energy innovation and community acceptance2016
PhDLiving Off Grid: Exploring the motivations and experiences of Australian households who are not connected to the central electricity grid2017