Profiles

Geoffrey While

UTAS Home Dr Geoff While
Geoff While picture

Geoff While

ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow;
Lecturer in Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecology

Room Rm 331, Life Sciences Building, Sandy Bay Campus

+61 3 6226 7822 (phone)

+61 3 6226 2745 (fax)

Geoffrey.While@utas.edu.au

The social lives of many animals, including humans, often involve interactions between close family members. However, despite decades of research, there is still considerable speculation regarding exactly why animals live together in family groups.

"My research matters because it addresses a really fundamental question, which has significant biological and philosophical relevance, and that is trying to understand why animals live together and the impacts that this might have on the environment and society and evolution more generally."

Geoffrey While - June 2015

The Origins of the family

Geoffrey While is a Doctor of behavioural and evolutionary ecology. His research focuses on understanding what triggered the initial evolution of family life. To achieve this he uses a unique model organism, a lizard.

Geoff said that the research has a number of close parallels with the initial origins of family living across a range of different species, including our own.

'Like humans, some lizards form long term monogamous relationships and live in family groups, nurturing their offspring within the home. Constraints on suitable habitat and the quality and quantity of mating partners are thought to be key factors that influence family living,' he said.

'If suitable habitat is scarce, male and female lizards may choose to remain together. Their offspring may also choose to stay within the family 'home' because it is safer than fighting for a territory of their own. This leads to the formation of small stable family groups.'

Geoff is also interested in factors that lead to the breakdown of lizard families.

'Promiscuity by both males and females, in the search for better quality and quantity of offspring, can lead to the breakup of families. Female promiscuity within the family unit turns biological fathers into non-biological fathers and full siblings into half siblings.'

'This has significant consequences for the benefits of cooperation between family members. Over evolutionary time this can decrease the stability of family groups and ultimately lead to the breakdown of the family unit.'

But it is not all about social lizards. Geoff's research both in Tasmania and abroad is also helping us to understand how animals will respond to global climate change.

For example, he has been collaborating with scientists from the University of Oxford over the past eight years. In England, a species of lizard was introduced 30–40 years ago from warmer climates in Italy and France. Geoff and his colleagues have found that the lizards have evolved to cope with the considerably cooler climate in England in this short time.

'The lizards in England are forced to lay their eggs in soil temperatures much cooler than they prefer. This means that eggs take much longer to develop and in some years do not even hatch before the end of summer.

'Incredibly, English lizards have evolved a number of mechanisms to cope with this. First, female lizards in England hold on to their eggs for longer before laying, capitalising on the fact that a basking lizard can maintain a much higher body temperature than the surrounding soil. Second, the embryos of English lizards develop faster than their European counterparts.

'The net result is that offspring hatch out several weeks earlier than they do in France and Italy, and this has allowed the persistence of this species in England.'

Geoff's research tells us that rapid adaptation to climate is possible. This has important implications for our understanding of how species will cope with current climate change.

Career summary

Qualifications

PhD: University of Tasmania 

BSc (Hons): University of Tasmania

Biography

Dr Geoff While has had a life-long interest in zoology culminating in a Bachelor of Science degree with first class honours from the University of Tasmania (1999–2002). He then then undertook and completed his PhD (2004–2009), which integrated a detailed field based study with hypothesis driven experimental studies to document the social and mating system of Egernia whitii. Over the duration of his PhD, Geoff established the Egernia system as a model system for examining key evolutionary and ecological questions relating to the evolutionary origins of sociality. Following completion of his PhD in August 2009, Geoff was employed as a post-doctoral research fellow on an Australian Research Council funded project (2009-2011) examining the ecological and evolutionary significance of maternal (thermal) effects and specifically the role maternal effects play in understanding key evolutionary processes (e.g., the divergence of sex determining systems). During this project he spent time at the University of Oxford, collaborating on a project examining colonisation dynamics in the introduced wall lizard. Geoff moved to Oxford in 2011 to begin a Marie Curie Fellowship in which he explored how context dependent sexual selection influences population persistence/expansion and evolutionary diversification during colonisation. Following this fellowship, he returned to the University of Tasmania to take up a 4 year lectureship in evolutionary ecology, during which time he has continued his collaboration with Oxford. In January 2015 Geoff was awarded an ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow to work on the origins of family living.

Research Themes

Geoff's main area of interest is in the nexus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, for both of which UTAS was awarded the highest possible rating of '5' in the 2012 Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) exercise. Furthermore, Geoff's work on understanding the impacts of anthropomorphic environmental change, for example through the movement of invasive species and global climate change, aligns closely with the Environment, Resources and Sustainability Research Theme Area.

Teaching

Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Animal Behaviour

Teaching expertise

Geoff has a broad range of teaching expertise from coordinating, lecturing and running practicals in large 1st to 3rd year undergraduate courses to supervising and mentoring post-graduate students.

Fundamental to Geoff's teaching philosophy is the nexus between his research and teaching. Geoff provides his students every opportunity to engage with his research including the initiation of reading groups for 3rd year students and the integration of 3rd year students into his research program via the Dean's summer scholarship program.

Teaching responsibility

Geoff coordinates two of the School of Biological Sciences major undergraduate units, which includes a core 1st year Unit, KPZ163 Ecology (www.utas.edu.au/units/KPZ163), and a popular 3rd year Unit, KZA301 Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecology (www.utas.edu.au/units/KZA301). He lectures and leads practicals in both. 

Geoff also teaches into KZA 306, Biology and Society (www.utas.edu.au/units/KZA306), a discussion based unit which explores contemporary theories and concepts in ecology and evolutionary biology, and the impacts of modern zoological thinking upon society. Geoff typically supervises one 3rd year zoology research project student (KZA 304; www.utas.edu.au/units/KZA304) per semester and has supervised 8 honours students over the past 2 years.

Research Invitations

Geoff has been invited as a guest speaker at several large international conferences. This includes the Animal Behaviour Meeting in Indianapolis (2011), the World Congress of Herpetology in Vancouver (2012) and the Joint meeting of the Ichthyologists and Herpetologists in New Orleans (2016). He is also regularly invited to speak at University seminar series. This includes the University of Oxford (2009), Nottingham Trent University (2012), the University of Edinburgh (2013) and the Australian National University (2015).

View more on Dr Geoff While in WARP

Expertise

Geoff works in the area of Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecology. This means he is interested in trying to understand how behaviour helps animals deal with the challenges put forward by their environment and the consequences of this for their reproductive success, survival and ultimately evolutionary change. Within this area, Geoff has a broad range of interests. However, much of his research focuses on trying to understand:

  • The evolutionary origins of family living/social behaviour
  • The evolutionary origins of parental care
  • Male and female mating behaviour
  • What causes invasive species to persist and expand in a particular area
  • The consequences of global climate change for species distribution
  • The extent to which organisms have the potential to adapt to climate change
  • How divergent species interact when they come back into secondary contact and the consequences for genetic exchange between species (e.g., hybridisation)
  • The ecological and evolutionary consequences of non-genetic effects of mothers on their offspring (maternal effects)

To achieve this, his research takes novel, integrated and holistic approaches which bring together multiple lines of evidence and multiple collaborators from around the world. Specifically, Geoff uses a wide range of skills including detailed long term field studies, sophisticated experimental manipulations, theoretical modelling and broad comparative analyses. This allows him to connect processes occurring across levels of biological organisation (from individuals to populations to species) to address fundamental questions in biology. Most importantly, much of it requires expertise in the dark art of lizard wrangling.

Awards

  • 2009: Royal Society of Tasmania's Doctoral Award
  • 2009:  Nominated for the Faculty 1000 in Biology
  • 2013:  Australian Institute of Policy and Science Tall Poppy award

Collaboration

Geoff's research is highly collaborative. At a global scale, he has co-authored papers with more than 50 authors from across 10 countries. Geoff has long running collaborations with world leaders in evolutionary biology, ecology, comparative biology, theoretical modelling, behavioural endocrinology and physiology from the Universities of Oxford (UK), Groningen (the Netherlands), Lund (Sweden), Texas (USA) and Iowa State (USA), as well as the University of Sydney, Flinders University, Monash University, Macquarie University and the University of New South Wales all in Australia. For his recent ARC Discovery Project, Geoff leads a collaborative project that includes Australian-based molecular biologists at Flinders and Monash Universities and internationally renowned evolutionary biologists from the Universities of Lund and Oxford. His long term research project on invasive wall lizards in the UK, through Oxford and Lund, involves ongoing collaborations with the Universities of Paris (France), Pavia (Italy), Trier (Germany), Valencia (Spain) as well as the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France).

Current projects

Geoff currently runs or co-runs five large research projects both at UTAS and through the Universities of Oxford and Lund.

1) The Origins of Family Living (UTAS) – Geoff's main area of interest targets the origins of social living – why animals live together. This is a topic of fundamental importance not just for evolutionary biologists, but to sociologists, anthropologists and philosophers. His research aims to understand the factors which triggered the initial emergence of social behaviour.

2) The Evolutionary Significance of Maternal Thermal Effects (UTAS) - Maternal thermal effects (non-genetic effects of the mother on her offspring) are common in ectotherms, however their ecological or evolutionary consequences are poorly understood. Geoff's work (in collaboration with Associate Professor Erik Wapstra) on the spotted snow skink (Niveoscincus ocellatus) integrates field and lab based experimental work with theoretical modelling to address this. 

3) Predicting the Potential Effects of Global Climate Change (UTAS) – Understanding how species will respond to climate change is fundamental to predicting the impacts of climate change on global biodiversity. Geoff's work (in collaboration with Associate Professor Erik Wapstra) uses a combination of experimental work and detailed climatic modelling to predict the response of various lizard species to climate change. 

3) Colonisation Dynamics in an Invasive Species (Oxford/Lund) – Invasive species are one of the biggest ecological and economic threats to the world. Geoff's work (in collaboration with Dr Tobias Uller of the University of Lund) aims to examine the factors that promote the initial persistence and expansion of invasive species in their non-native range.

4) Causes and Consequences of Hybridisation upon Secondary Contact (Oxford/Lund) – Genetic exchange between species is increasingly recognised as playing an important role in evolution. Geoff's work (in collaboration with Dr Tobias Uller of the University of Lund) uses experimental work, field studies and sophisticated molecular techniques to examine how individuals from different species interact upon secondary contact, the consequences of those interactions for reproductive success and how this influences the strength and direction of gene flow between species.

Fields of Research

  • Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  • Evolutionary Biology (060399)
  • Ethology and Sociobiology (060304)
  • Animal Behaviour (060801)
  • Life Histories (060308)
  • Biogeography and Phylogeography (060302)
  • Population Ecology (060207)
  • Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change (060306)
  • Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology (060803)
  • Biological Adaptation (060303)
  • Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics (060411)
  • Animal Physiology - Systems (060603)
  • Zoology (060899)
  • Global Change Biology (069902)
  • Terrestrial Ecology (060208)
  • Animal Physiological Ecology (060806)
  • Ecological Physiology (060203)
  • Evolution of Developmental Systems (060305)
  • Plant Systematics and Taxonomy (060310)
  • Epigenetics (incl. Genome Methylation and Epigenomics) (060404)
  • Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis (060309)
  • Ecological Impacts of Climate Change (050101)
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (050202)

Research Objectives

  • Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences (970105)
  • Ecosystem Assessment and Management at Regional or Larger Scales (960501)
  • Ecosystem Adaptation to Climate Change (960305)
  • Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960806)
  • Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity at Regional or Larger Scales (960805)
  • Mountain and High Country Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960810)
  • Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960801)
  • Climate Change Models (960303)
  • Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of environments (960899)
  • Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales (960405)
  • Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Mountain and High Country Environments (960509)
  • Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts) (960307)
  • Social Impacts of Climate Change and Variability (960311)
  • Climate Variability (excl. Social Impacts) (960304)
  • Weather (960203)

Publications

Geoff's publication record demonstrates a wide range of research interests. Specifically, he has published on foraging ecology, hatching asynchrony, social evolution, parental care, maternal effects, endocrinology, life-history trade-offs, sex allocation theory, hybridisation, invasive species and climate change. The impact of these papers for the wider scientific community has been highlighted by communications in leading popular science magazines (e.g., National Geographic, New Scientist) as well as national and international media centres (e.g., BBC earth, BBC one show, ABC News). Geoff is currently an associate editor for two large evolutionary biology journals, BMC Evolutionary Biology and Frontiers in Social Evolution.

Total publications

113

Highlighted publications

(9 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2015Journal ArticleWhile GM, Michaelides S, Heathcote RJP, MacGregor HEA, Zajac N, et al., 'Sexual selection drives asymmetric introgression in wall lizards', Ecology Letters, 18, (12) pp. 1366-1375. ISSN 1461-023X (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ele.12531 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 22Web of Science - 23

Co-authors: MacGregor HEA

Tweet

2015Journal ArticleWhile GM, Williamson J, Prescott G, Horvathova T, Fresnillo B, et al., 'Adaptive responses to cool climate promotes persistence of a non-native lizard', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282, (1803) Article 20142638. ISSN 0962-8452 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2638 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Beeton NJ; Halliwell B

Tweet

2014Journal ArticleWhile GM, Uller T, 'Quo vadis amphibia? Global warming and breeding phenology in frogs, toads and salamanders', Ecography, 37, (10) pp. 921-929. ISSN 0906-7590 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ecog.00521 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11

Tweet

2014Journal ArticleWhile GM, Uller T, Bordogna G, Wapstra E, 'Promiscuity resolves constraints on social mate choice imposed by population viscosity', Molecular Ecology, 23, (3) pp. 721-732. ISSN 0962-1083 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/mec.12618 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Bordogna G; Wapstra E

Tweet

2011Journal ArticleUller T, While GM, Cadby CD, Harts A, O'Connor K, et al., 'Altitudinal divergence in maternal thermoregulatory behaviour may be driven by differences in selection on offspring survival in a viviparous lizard', Evolution, 65, (8) pp. 2313-2324. ISSN 0014-3820 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01303.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Uller T; Cadby CD; O'Connor K; Wapstra E

Tweet

2010Journal ArticlePen I, Uller T, Feldmeyer B, Harts A, While GM, et al., 'Climate-driven population divergence in sex-determining systems', Nature, 468, (7322) pp. 436-439. ISSN 0028-0836 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/nature09512 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 62Web of Science - 65

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2009Journal ArticleWhile GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Female aggression predicts mode of paternity acquisition in a social lizard', Proceedings of The Royal Society. Biological Sciences, 276, (1664) pp. 2021-2029. ISSN 0962-8452 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1926 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

Tweet

2009Journal ArticleWhile GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Family conflicts and the evolution of sociality in reptiles', Behavioral Ecology, 20, (2) pp. 245-250. ISSN 1045-2249 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arp015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 38Web of Science - 35

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2007Journal ArticleWhile GM, Jones SM, Wapstra E, 'Birthing asynchrony is not a consequence of asynchronous offspring development in a non-avian vertebrate, the Australian skink Egernia whitii', Functional Ecology, 21, (3) pp. 513-519. ISSN 0269-8463 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2007.01272.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 28

Co-authors: Jones SM; Wapstra E

Tweet

Journal Article

(53 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Botterill-James T, Ford L, While GM, Smiseth PT, 'Resource availability, but not polyandry, influences sibling conflict in a burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides', Behavioral Ecology, 28, (4) pp. 1093-1100. ISSN 1045-2249 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arx073 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Botterill-James T

Tweet

2017Botterill-James T, Halliwell B, McKeown S, Sillince J, Uller T, et al., 'Family aggression in a social lizard', Scientific Reports, 7 Article 3502. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-03531-0 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Botterill-James T; Halliwell B; McKeown S; Uller T; Wapstra E

Tweet

2017Caldwell AJ, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Plasticity of thermoregulatory behaviour in response to the thermal environment by widespread and alpine reptile species', Animal Behaviour, 132 pp. 217-227. ISSN 0003-3472 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.07.025 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

Tweet

2017Cunningham GD, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Climate and sex ratio variation in a viviparous lizard', Biology Letters, 13, (5) Article 20170218. ISSN 1744-9561 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2017.0218 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Cunningham GD; Wapstra E

Tweet

2017Halliwell B, Uller T, Chapple DG, Gardner MG, Wapstra E, et al., 'Habitat saturation promotes delayed dispersal in a social reptile', Behavioral Ecology, 28, (2) pp. 515-522. ISSN 1045-2249 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arw181 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Halliwell B; Uller T; Wapstra E

Tweet

2017Halliwell B, Uller T, Wapstra E, While GM, 'Resource distribution mediates social and mating behavior in a family living lizard', Behavioral Ecology, 28, (1) pp. 145-153. ISSN 1045-2249 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arw134 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Halliwell B; Wapstra E

Tweet

2017MacGregor HEA, Lewandowsky RAM, d'Ettorre P, Leroy C, Davies NW, et al., 'Chemical communication, sexual selection, and introgression in wall lizards', Evolution, 71, (10) pp. 2327-2343. ISSN 1558-5646 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/evo.13317 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: MacGregor HEA; Lewandowsky RAM; Davies NW

Tweet

2017MacGregor HEA, While GM, Barrett J, Perez i de Lanuza G, Carazo P, et al., 'Experimental contact zones reveal causes and targets of sexual selection in hybridizing lizards', Functional Ecology, 31, (3) pp. 742-752. ISSN 0269-8463 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/1365-2435.12767 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: MacGregor HEA

Tweet

2017MacGregor HEA, While GM, Uller T, 'Comparison of reproductive investment in native and non-native populations of common wall lizards reveals sex differences in adaptive potential', Oikos, 126, (11) pp. 1564-1574. ISSN 1600-0706 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/oik.03984 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: MacGregor HEA

Tweet

2017While GM, Uller T, 'Female reproductive investment in response to male phenotype in wall lizards and its implications for introgression', Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 121 pp. 876-882. ISSN 0024-4066 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/biolinnean/blx025 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2017Botterill-James T, Sillince J, Uller T, Chapple DG, Gardner MG, et al., 'Experimental manipulation suggests effect of polyandry but not mate familiarity on within-pair aggression in the social skink, Liopholis whitii', Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 71 Article 71. ISSN 0340-5443 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-017-2302-8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Botterill-James T; Wapstra E

Tweet

2016Botterill-James T, Halliwell B, Cooper-Scott E, Uller T, Wapstra E, et al., 'Habitat structure influences parent-offspring association in a social lizard', Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 4, (96) pp. 1-10. ISSN 2296-701X (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fevo.2016.00096 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Botterill-James T; Halliwell B; Cooper-Scott E; Wapstra E

Tweet

2016Heathcote RJP, While GM, MacGregor HEA, Sciberras J, Leroy C, et al., 'Male behaviour drives assortative reproduction during the initial stage of secondary contact', Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 29, (5) pp. 1003-1015. ISSN 1010-061X (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/jeb.12840 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: MacGregor HEA

Tweet

2016Michaelides SN, While GM, Zajac N, Aubret F, Calsbeek B, et al., 'Loss of genetic diversity and increased embryonic mortality in non-native lizard populations', Molecular Ecology, 25, (17) pp. 4113-4125. ISSN 0962-1083 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/mec.13755 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2016Paredes U, Radersma R, Cannell N, While GM, Uller T, 'Low Incubation temperature induces DNA hypomethylation in lizard brains', Journal of Experimental Zoology: Part A, 325, (6) pp. 390-395. ISSN 1932-5223 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/jez.2024 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Tweet

2016Bordogna G, Cunningham G, Fitzpatrick LJ, Halliwell B, MacGregor HEA, et al., 'An experimental test of relatedness-based mate discrimination in a social lizard', Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 70, (12) pp. 2139-2147. ISSN 0340-5443 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-016-2217-9 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Bordogna G; Cunningham G; Fitzpatrick LJ; Halliwell B; MacGregor HEA; Munch KL; Wapstra E

Tweet

2015McEvoy J, While GM, Jones SM, Wapstra E, 'Examining the role of testosterone in mediating short-term aggressive responses to social stimuli in a lizard', PLoS One, 10, (4) Article e0125015. ISSN 1932-6203 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125015 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Jones SM; Wapstra E

Tweet

2015Caldwell AJ, While GM, Beeton NJ, Wapstra E, 'Potential for thermal tolerance to mediate climate change effects on three members of a cool temperate lizard genus, Niveoscincus', Journal of Thermal Biology, 52 pp. 14-23. ISSN 0306-4565 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2015.05.002 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Beeton NJ; Wapstra E

Tweet

2015Michaelides S, Cornish N, Griffiths R, Groombridge J, Zajac N, et al., 'Phylogeography and conservation genetics of the common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on islands at Its northern range', PLoS One, 10, (2) Article e0117113. ISSN 1932-6203 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0117113 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Tweet

2015Michaelides SN, While GM, Zajac N, Uller T, 'Widespread primary, but geographically restricted secondary, human introductions of wall lizards, Podarcis muralis', Molecular Ecology, 24, (11) pp. 2702-2714. ISSN 0962-1083 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/mec.13206 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7

Tweet

2015While GM, Chapple DG, Gardner MG, Uller T, Whiting MJ, 'Quick guide: Egernia lizards', Current Biology, 25 pp. R593-R595. ISSN 0960-9822 (2015) [Non Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

2015While GM, Michaelides S, Heathcote RJP, MacGregor HEA, Zajac N, et al., 'Sexual selection drives asymmetric introgression in wall lizards', Ecology Letters, 18, (12) pp. 1366-1375. ISSN 1461-023X (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ele.12531 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 22Web of Science - 23

Co-authors: MacGregor HEA

Tweet

2015While GM, Williamson J, Prescott G, Horvathova T, Fresnillo B, et al., 'Adaptive responses to cool climate promotes persistence of a non-native lizard', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282, (1803) Article 20142638. ISSN 0962-8452 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2638 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Beeton NJ; Halliwell B

Tweet

2015McEvoy J, While GM, Sinn DL, Carver S, Wapstra E, 'Behavioural syndromes and structural and temporal consistency of behavioural traits in a social lizard', Journal of Zoology, 296, (1) pp. 58-66. ISSN 0952-8369 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/jzo.12217 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Sinn DL; Carver S; Wapstra E

Tweet

2014Heathcote RJP, Bell E, d'Ettorre P, While GM, Uller T, 'The scent of sun worship: basking experience alters scent mark composition in male lizards', Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 68, (5) pp. 861-870. ISSN 0340-5443 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-014-1700-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14

Tweet

2014While GM, Uller T, 'Quo vadis amphibia? Global warming and breeding phenology in frogs, toads and salamanders', Ecography, 37, (10) pp. 921-929. ISSN 0906-7590 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ecog.00521 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11

Tweet

2014While GM, Uller T, Bordogna G, Wapstra E, 'Promiscuity resolves constraints on social mate choice imposed by population viscosity', Molecular Ecology, 23, (3) pp. 721-732. ISSN 0962-1083 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/mec.12618 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Bordogna G; Wapstra E

Tweet

2013McEvoy J, While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'The role of size and aggression in intrasexual male competition in a social lizard species, Egernia whitii', Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 67, (1) pp. 79-90. ISSN 0340-5443 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00265-012-1427-z [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Sinn DL; Wapstra E

Tweet

2013Michaelides S, While GM, Bell C, Uller T, 'Human introductions create opportunities for intra-specific hybridization in an alien lizard', Biological Invasions, 15, (5) pp. 1101-1112. ISSN 1387-3547 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10530-012-0353-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 11

Tweet

2012Rago A, While GM, Uller T, 'Introduction pathway and climate trump ecology and life history as predictors of establishment success in alien frogs and toads', Ecology and Evolution, 2, (7) pp. 1437-1445. ISSN 2045-7758 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.261 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16

Tweet

2011Worth JRP, Burridge CP, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Development of 13 microsatellite loci in the spotted snow skink Niveoscincus ocellatus (Squamata: Scincidae) ', Conservation Genetic Resources, 3, (2) pp. 287-290. ISSN 1877-7252 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s12686-010-9343-x [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Worth JRP; Burridge CP; Wapstra E

Tweet

2011Uller T, While GM, Cadby CD, Harts A, O'Connor K, et al., 'Altitudinal divergence in maternal thermoregulatory behaviour may be driven by differences in selection on offspring survival in a viviparous lizard', Evolution, 65, (8) pp. 2313-2324. ISSN 0014-3820 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01303.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Uller T; Cadby CD; O'Connor K; Wapstra E

Tweet

2011While GM, 'Comment on 'Intrasexual competition among females: evidence for sexual selection' by Kimberly Rosvall', Behavioral Ecology, 22, (6) pp. 1141. ISSN 1045-2249 (2011) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arr107 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Tweet

2011Isaksson C, While GM, McEvoy J, van de Commenacker J, Olsson M, et al., 'Aggression, but not testosterone, is associated to oxidative status in a free-living vertebrate', Behaviour: An International Journal of Behaviourial Biology, 148, (5-6) pp. 713-731. ISSN 0005-7959 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1163/000579511X574204 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 13Web of Science - 11

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Wapstra E

Tweet

2011Isaksson C, While GM, Olsson M, Komdeur J, Wapstra E, 'Oxidative stress physiology in relation to life history traits of a free-living vertebrate: the spotted snow skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus', Integrative Zoology, 6, (2) pp. 140-149. ISSN 1749-4877 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-4877.2011.00237.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2011While GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Variation in social organization influences the opportunity for sexual selection in a social lizard ', Molecular Ecology, 20, (4) pp. 844-852. ISSN 0962-1083 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04976.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2010Cadby CD, While GM, Hobday AJ, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Multi-scale approach to understanding climate effects on offspring at birth and date of birth in a reptile', Integrative Zoology, 5, (2) pp. 164-175. ISSN 1749-4877 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-4877.2010.00201.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 14

Co-authors: Cadby CD; Hobday AJ; Wapstra E

Tweet

2010Pen I, Uller T, Feldmeyer B, Harts A, While GM, et al., 'Climate-driven population divergence in sex-determining systems', Nature, 468, (7322) pp. 436-439. ISSN 0028-0836 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/nature09512 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 62Web of Science - 65

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2010Wapstra E, Uller T, While GM, Olsson M, Shine R, 'Giving offspring a head start in life: field and experimental evidence for selection on maternal basking behaviour in lizards', Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 23, (3) pp. 651-657. ISSN 1010-061X (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01924.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 48Web of Science - 47

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2010While GM, Isaksson C, McEvoy J, Sinn DL, Komdeur J, et al., 'Repeatable intra-individual variation in plasma testosterone concentration and its sex-specific link to aggression in a social lizard ', Hormones and Behavior, 58, (2) pp. 208-213. ISSN 0018-506X (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2010.03.016 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 34Web of Science - 34

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Sinn DL; Wapstra E

Tweet

2009Uller T, While GM, Wapstra E, Warner DA, Goodman BA, et al., 'Evaluation of offspring size-number invariants in 12 species of lizard', Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 22, (1) pp. 143-151. ISSN 1010-061X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2008.01629.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2009While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Female aggression predicts mode of paternity acquisition in a social lizard', Proceedings of The Royal Society. Biological Sciences, 276, (1664) pp. 2021-2029. ISSN 0962-8452 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1926 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

Tweet

2009While GM, Uller T, McEvoy J, Wapstra E, 'Long-lasting effects of among- but not within-litter timing in a viviparous lizard', Evolutionary Ecology Research, 11, (8) pp. 1259-1270. ISSN 1522-0613 (2009) [Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Wapstra E

2009While GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Family conflicts and the evolution of sociality in reptiles', Behavioral Ecology, 20, (2) pp. 245-250. ISSN 1045-2249 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arp015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 38Web of Science - 35

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2009While GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Offspring performance and the adaptive benefits of prolonged pregnancy: experimental tests in a viviparous lizard', Functional Ecology, 23, (4) pp. 818-825. ISSN 0269-8463 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2009.01544.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2009While GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Within-population variation in social strategies characterize the social and mating system of an Australian lizard, Egernia whitii ', Austral Ecology, 34, (8) pp. 938-949. ISSN 1442-9985 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2009.02002.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2009While GM, Wapstra E, 'Effects of basking opportunity on birthing asynchrony in a viviparous lizard', Animal Behaviour, 77, (6) pp. 1465-1470. ISSN 0003-3472 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2009.03.001 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2009While GM, Wapstra E, 'Snow skinks (Niveoscincus ocellatus) do not shift their sex allocation patterns in response to mating history', Behaviour: An International Journal of Behaviourial Biology, 146, (10) pp. 1405-1422. ISSN 0005-7959 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1163/156853909X436254 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2008Sinn DL, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Maternal care in a social lizard: links between female aggression and offspring fitness', Animal Behaviour, 76, (4) pp. 1249-1257. ISSN 0003-3472 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2008.06.009 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 45Web of Science - 43

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

Tweet

2008While GM, Wapstra E, 'Are there benefits to being born asynchronously: an experimental test in a social lizard', Behavioral Ecology, 19, (1) pp. 208-216. ISSN 1045-2249 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arm124 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Tweet

2007While GM, Jones SM, Wapstra E, 'Birthing asynchrony is not a consequence of asynchronous offspring development in a non-avian vertebrate, the Australian skink Egernia whitii', Functional Ecology, 21, (3) pp. 513-519. ISSN 0269-8463 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2007.01272.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 28

Co-authors: Jones SM; Wapstra E

Tweet

2006While GM, McArthur C, 'Distance from cover affects artificial food-patch depletion by macropod herbivores', Wildlife Research, 33, (7) pp. 565-570. ISSN 1035-3712 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/WR05063 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: McArthur C

Tweet

2005While GM, McArthur C, 'Foraging in a risky environment: a comparison of Bennett's wallabies Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) and red-bellied pademelons Thylogale billiardierii (Marsupialia: Macropodidae) in open habitats', Austral Ecology, 30, (7) pp. 756-764. ISSN 1442-9985 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2005.01516.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16

Tweet

Chapter in Book

(5 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Whiting M, While GM, 'Sociality in Lizards', Comparative Social Evolution, Cambridge University Press, Rubenstein, DR and Abbot, P (ed), University Printing House, Cambridge CB2 8BS, UK, pp. 390-426. ISBN 978-1-107-04339-8 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2015Uller T, While GM, 'Chapter 12. The evolutionary ecology of reproductive investment in lizards', Reproductive Biology and Phylogeny of Lizards and Tuatara, CRC Press, JL Rheubert, DS Siegel, SE Trauth (ed), United States, pp. 425-447. ISBN 978-1-4665-7986-6 (2015) [Other Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2015While GM, Halliwell B, Uller T, 'Chapter 15. The Evolutionary Ecology of Parental Care in Lizards', Reproductive Biology and Phylogeny of Lizards and Tuatara, CRC Press, JL Rheubert, DS Siegel, SE Trauth (ed), United States, pp. 590-619. ISBN 978-1-4665-7986-6 (2015) [Other Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Halliwell B

2011McEvoy J, While G, Wapstra E, 'Mammals of Tasmania's Alpine Zones', The Abels: A Comprehensive Guide to Tasmania's Mountains over 1100m High, Volume 2, Tasmanian Outdoors Collection, B Wilkinson (ed), Australia, pp. 34-39. ISBN 9780646554303 (2011) [Other Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Wapstra E

2011Wapstra E, While G, 'Reptiles of Tasmania's Alpine Zones', The Abels: A Comprehensive Guide to Tasmania's Mountains over 1100m High, Volume 2, Tasmanian Outdoors Collection, B Wilkinson (ed), Australia, pp. 28-33. ISBN 9780646554303 (2011) [Other Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Conference Publication

(54 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2016Botterill-James T, Sillince J, Wapstra E, While GM, 'Female promiscuity, mate familiarity and family dynamics', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 16-19 February, Grindelwald, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Botterill-James T; Wapstra E

2016Caldwell AJ, While GM, Kearney M, Wapstra E, 'Surviving and thriving? Climate change effects on widespread and alpine temperate lizard species', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 16-19 February, Grindelwald, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2016Cunningham GD, Ljungstrom G, While GM, Olsson M, Wapstra E, 'Reactive females: individual, annual and geographic variation in temperature effects on phenology', Species on the Move Conference Program, 09-12 February 2016, Hobart, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cunningham GD; Wapstra E

2016Cunningham GD, Ljungstrom G, While GM, Olsson M, Wapstra E, 'Reactive females: individual, annual and geographic variation in temperature effects on phenology', Australian Society of Herpetologists AGM Conference, 16-19 February, Grindelwald, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cunningham GD; Wapstra E

2016Cunningham GD, Schwanz L, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Sex in a cold climate: predicting sex determination in snow skinks across Tasmania', Australian Sex Summit, Yarra Valley, Victoria (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cunningham GD; Wapstra E

2016Fitzpatrick L, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Female allocation across the geographic range of a viviparous skink', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 16-19 February, Grindelwald, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fitzpatrick L; Wapstra E

2016Halliwell B, Sillince J, Wapstra E, Uller T, While GM, 'Habitat saturation influences offspring dispersal in Liopholis whitii', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 16-19 February, Grindelwald, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Halliwell B; Wapstra E

2016Munch KL, Noble D, Wapstra E, While GM, 'Mate familiarity influences social learning strategies in a monogamous lizard', 16th congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, 28 July - 03 August, Exeter, United Kingdom (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Munch KL; Noble D; Wapstra E

2016While GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'The evolutionary ecology of family living in lizards', 16th congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, 28 July - 03 August, Exeter, United Kingdom (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2016Caldwell AJ, While GM, Kearney M, Wapstra E, 'Can behavior and physiology mitigate climate change impacts on snow skink persistence and distribution?', Species on the Move Conference Program, 09-12 February, Hobart, Tasmania (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2015While GM, Barnes EA, McEvoy J, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Marriage, death and divorce: insights from a social lizard', Australian Society of Herpetologists AGM Conference, 21-24 January, Eildon, Victoria (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Barnes EA; McEvoy J; Wapstra E

2015Caldwell AJ, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Plasticity of thermoregulatory behavior in response to the thermal environment: a comparative test across specialist and generalist reptile species', Behaviour 2015 Conference, 09-14 August, Cairns, Australia (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2015Halliwell B, Botterill-James T, Barnes EA, Uller T, Wapstra E, et al., 'Habitat structure, promiscuity and social organisation in Liopholis whitii, an experimental test', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 21-24 January, Eildon, Victoria (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Halliwell B; Botterill-James T; Barnes EA; Wapstra E

2015Botterill-James T, Halliwell B, Barnes EA, McEvoy J, Uller T, et al., 'Identifying the costs benefits and incidences of parental care in a social lizard', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 21-24 January, Eildon, Victoria (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Botterill-James T; Halliwell B; Barnes EA; McEvoy J; Wapstra E

2015Munch KL, Wapstra E, While GM, 'The effect of personality on male-male interactions in a social lizard, Egernia whitii', Behaviour 2015 Conference, 09-14 August, Cairns, Australia (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Munch KL; Wapstra E

2015Munch KL, Wapstra E, While GM, 'The lizards and the bees: implementing bee tracking technology to unravel the social structure of lizard populations', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 21-24 January, Eildon, Victoria (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Munch KL; Wapstra E

2015Wapstra E, Cunningham GD, While GM, 'Climate influences on phenology and sex ratios in snow skinks', Australian Society of Herpetologists AGM, Eidon, Victoria (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Cunningham GD

2015Wapstra E, McEvoy J, While GM, 'Repeatable intra-individual variation in Testosterone and sex specific links to aggressive personalities in a social lizard, Egernia whitii', Behaviour 2015 Conference, 09-14 August, Cairns, Australia (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; McEvoy J

2015Gruber JE, Wapstra E, While GM, Cunningham GD, 'Disentangling sex allocation: a multifactorial approach', Behaviour 2015 Conference, 09-14 August, Cairns, Australia (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Gruber JE; Wapstra E; Cunningham GD

2015While GM, Halliwell B, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Polyandry, male care and the evolutionary origins of family living', Behaviour 2015 Conference, 09-14 August, Cairns, Australia (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Halliwell B; Wapstra E

2015Halliwell B, Uller T, Wapstra E, While GM, 'Habitat structure, mating behavior and social organisation in Liopholis whitii, an experimental test', Behaviour 2015 Conference, 09-14 August, Cairns, Australia (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Halliwell B; Wapstra E

2014Cunningham GD, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Degrees of change: the evolution of sex determination in shifting climates', Ecological Society of Australia 2014 Annual Conference, 28 September - 03 October 2014, Alice Springs, Australia (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cunningham GD; Wapstra E

2014McEvoy J, Wapstra E, While GM, 'The interplay between environment, aggression and fitness in a free living vertebrate', Ecological Society of Australia 2014 Annual Conference, 28 September - 03 October, Alice Springs, Australia (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Wapstra E

2014McEvoy J, While GM, Wapstra E, 'The interplay between environment, aggression and fitness in a free living vertebrate', Book of abstracts for the Ecological Society of Australia 2014 Annual Conference, 28 September - 3 October 2014, Alice Springs, Australia (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Wapstra E

2014Wapstra E, Caldwell AJ, Beeton N, While GM, 'An integrated approach to understanding climate change on snow skinks', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual meeting, 29 January - 01 February, Greenhills, ACT (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Caldwell AJ; Beeton N

2014While GM, Uller T, Wapstra E, 'Aggression and the evolutionary ecology of social systems', EGI Student Conference on Ecology and Evolution, 18-20 March, Oxford, UK (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2013Wapstra E, Caldwell AJ, Beeton N, While GM, 'Some snow skinks like it hot', 8th Biannual Meeting of the Australasian Evolution Society, 30 September - 03 October, Geelong, Australia (2013) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Caldwell AJ; Beeton N

2013Wapstra E, Caldwell AJ, Cadby C, Beeton N, While GM, 'The potential role of phenotypic plasticity in buffering climate change in a viviparous lizard', 11th INTECOL Congress, 18-23 August, London, UK (2013) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Caldwell AJ; Cadby C; Beeton N

2012Caldwell AJ, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Can behaviour buffer climate change?', 14th International Behavioral Ecology Congress, 12-18 August, Lund, Sweden (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2012Caldwell AJ, While GM, Wapstra E, 'The role of phenotypic plasticity in buffering climate change', First Joint Congress on Evolutionary Biology, 06-10 July, Ottawa, Ontario (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2011Caldwell AJ, While GM, Wapstra E, 'Behavioural responses to environmental variation in cool temperate reptiles and the implications for species persistence under projected climate change', 28th Annual Meeting Australian and New Zealand Society for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry, December, University of Tasmania, Hobart (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2011McEvoy J, While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Intrasexual male competition in a social lizard', Behaviour Conference 2011: The 48th Animal Behavior Society Meeting, 27-30 July 2011, Indiana, USA (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Sinn DL; Wapstra E

2011While GM, Uller T, Pen I, Cadby C, Wapstra E, 'Altitudinal divergence in maternal thermoregulatory behaviour may be driven by differences in selection on offspring survival in a viviparous lizard. Adaptation to climate from a spatial perspective', European Science Foundation workshop, 2011, Lammi biological station, Finland (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cadby C; Wapstra E

2011While GM, Wapstra E, Uller T, 'The causes and consequences of social organization in a reptile', British Herpetological Symposium, May 2011, Bangor, Wales (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2011Caldwell AJ, Wapstra E, While GM, 'Behavioural responses to the thermal environment and its implications for climate change impacts', Ecological Society of Australia Conference 2011, 21-25 November, Hobart, Tasmania (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Caldwell AJ; Wapstra E

2011While GM, Wapstra E, Uller T, 'The causes and consequences of social organization in a reptile', British Herpetological Symposium 2011, 08-09 April, Bangor, Wales (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2010McEvoy J, While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Five Axes of Personality in a free-living lizard population', International Society of Behavioural Ecology (ISBE) conference, September 2010, Perth (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: McEvoy J; Sinn DL; Wapstra E

2010Pen I, Uller T, Feldmeyer B, Harts A, While GM, et al., 'Climate driven population divergence in sex determining systems', International Society of Behavioural Ecology (ISBE), September, 2010, Perth (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2010Wapstra E, Uller T, While GM, Cadby C, 'Aggression and the evolutionary ecology of social systems', International Society of Behavioural Ecology (ISBE) conference, September 2010, Perth (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Cadby C

2010While GM, Uller T, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Aggression and the evolutionary ecology of social systems', International Congress of Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry, 2010, Japan (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

2009Wapstra E, Cadby C, While GM, Uller T, 'The effects of climate variation on phenological and life history traits in spotted snow skinks (Niveoscincus ocellatus) across its climatic range', Annual Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologist, 2009, Auckland, New Zealand (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Cadby C

2009Wapstra E, Uller T, While GM, Cadby C, Feldmeyer B, et al., 'Different sex determination mechanisms between two populations of a viviparous skink: observations and potential explanations', Fifth International symposium on the biology of vertebrate sex determination, 2009, Kona Hawaii (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Cadby C

2009While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Conspecific aggression and its influence on key social strategies in a social lizard', Annual Meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, 2009, Auckland, New Zealand (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

2008While GM, Wapstra E, 'Birthing asynchrony in reptiles: a little explored maternal effect', 2nd Wollongong Workshop in Evolutionary Ecology: Evolution of parental effects: Conceptual issues and empirical patterns, January 2008, Wollongong, Australia (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2007While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Linking variation in behaviour to variation in fitness: social aggression, territory size, and mating system in a social lizard', International Evolution Meeting, June 2007, International Evolution Meeting, New Zealand (2007) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

2007While GM, Sinn DL, Wapstra E, 'Linking variation in behaviour to variation in fitness : social agressing, teritory size and mating system in a social lizard', 4th Australasian Evolution Society Meeting, June 2007, 4th Australasian Evolution Society Meeting, UNSW (2007) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sinn DL; Wapstra E

2007While GM, Wapstra E, 'Effects of temperature on birth spread in a viviparous lizard (Egernia whitii): consequences for offspring phenotype and fitness', Australian Society of Herpetologists Annual Conference, December 2007, Albany WA, Australia (2007) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2007Wapstra E, Cadby C, While GM, Sinn DL, Uller T, 'Climate effects in birth dates and offspring sex ratios in two natural populations of a viviparous skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus', International Evolution Meeting, June 2007, International Evolution Meeting, New Zealand (2007) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E; Cadby C; Sinn DL

2006While GM, Wapstra E, 'Hatching asynchrony in birds: what can reptiles tell us?', International Evolution Meeting, June 2006, International Evolution Meeting, New York, USA (2006) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2006While GM, Wapstra E, 'Hatching asynchrony in reptiles - a potential link to the evolution of sociality', Animal Behaviour meeting, August 2006, Animal Behaviour meeting, Salt Lake City, USA (2006) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2006While GM, Wapstra E, 'What can reptiles tell us about hatching processes in birds?', Annual Meeting, Society of Herpetologists, April, 2006, Annual Meeting, Society of Herpetologists, Melb (2006) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2006While GM, Wapstra E, 'Do female Niveoscincus ocellatus alter sex allocation based on mating experience?', 1st Evolution and Ecology meeting, April 2006, 1st Evolution & Ecology meeting, Uni of Wollongong (2006) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2005While GM, Wapstra E, 'Social and genetic architecture in a social lizard', Proceedings of Fifth World Congress of Herpetology , June 2005, Stellenbosch, South Africa (2005) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

2005While GM, Wapstra E, 'Determinants of home range size and overlap in a social lizard (Egernia whittii)', 30th Meeting Australian Society of Herpetologists, February 2005, Gold Coast, Australia (2005) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wapstra E

Thesis

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2009While GM, 'The Causes and Consequences of Social Structuring in Egernia whitii; Implications for Understanding the Evolution of Sociality' (2009) [PhD]

[eCite] [Details]

Grants & Funding

Geoff and his collaborators have been fortunate enough to acquire significant funding for each of their research projects. Specifically, his work on the early origins of family living was recently funded to the tune of $700,000 by the Australian Research Council. Their work on colonisation and hybridisation dynamics in the wall lizard in Europe was funded by a $290,000 Marie Curie Fellowship (awarded to Geoff) and a $400,000 Swedish research Council (awarded to his collaborator Dr Tobais Uller). Their work on climate change and maternal effects has been funded by multiple ARC grants (awarded to his collaborator Associate Professor Erik Wapstra and Dr Tobias Uller). All projects have also attracted substantial student funding.

Funding Summary

Number of grants

16

Total funding

$883,118

Projects

Live long and prosper: reproductive senescence in a viviparous skink (2016 - 2017)$10,100
Description
Understanding how animals live across a wide climatic range is vital in the current period of climate uncertainty. The life history of reptiles is particularly important as their thermal environment directly influences them and little is known of the process of ageing in this group. Ageing, or senescence of wild animals is a key subject in the study of evolutionary biology today. Central to this is our growing knowledge of telomeres; caps on the end of chromosomes which slow age-related cell decline. There has been relatively little investigation into ageing in reptile taxa. Studying patterns of senescence in a reptile will make an important contribution to life history theories of ageing in the field of biogerontology. Building on an unparalleled dataset, this project uses the model system of the spotted snow skink (Niveoscincus ocellatus) to explore biological theories of aging across different environments and examine the relationships between telomeres, life history and environment. Linking variation within populations and divergence between populations is particularly important in predicting and managing climate change effects as the ability of populations and species to respond to climate change will depend on how individuals adapt to novel environmental conditions.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($10,100)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; While GM; Fitzpatrick L
Period
2016 - 2017
Female promiscuity, environmental variation and the evolution of family living (2016 - 2017)$12,015
Description
The animal kingdom is characterised by diverse forms of social organisation. A key problem in evolutionary biology is understanding how sociality evolves despite costs to group living arising from conflicts between group members. This project will integrate experimental and observational methods to determine how female promiscuity and environmental variation modulate levels of within-family conflicts, thereby influencing the evolution of sociality in a social species of lizard. This is an excellent study system, as it is representative of simple family living, and so can help yield insights into the origins of family living from a solitary lifestyle
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($12,015)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM; Wapstra E; Botterill-James T
Period
2016 - 2017
Female multiple mating and the evolutionary origins of complex societies (2015 - 2017)$334,200
Description
This project will connect micro-evolutionary processes with macro-evolutionary change to provide a unifiedunderstanding of why animals live together. Evolutionary transitions to and from complex social behaviourappear linked to female multiple mating (polyandry). However, the causal pathway by which variation inDP150102900 (Submitted to RO) Dr Geoffrey While PDF Created: 18/03/2014 Page 4 of 95polyandry results in the emergence and diversification of sociality is yet to be established. Using a vertebratesystem we will integrate empirical, theoretical and comparative approaches to show i) the ecological causesof individual variation in female polyandry; ii) its effect on social behaviours that promote social complexity atthe population level; iii) how this corresponds to divergence in social complexity across species.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($334,200)
Scheme
Grant-Discovery Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM; Chapple D; Gardner M; Uller T; Cornwallis CK
Period
2015 - 2017
Grant Reference
DP150102900
Female multiple mating, male care and the origins of complex sociality (2015 - 2017)$369,453
Description
The project will connect processes occurring across levels of biological organisation to provide a unified understanding of why animals live together. Evolutionary transitions to and from complex social behaviour appear linked to female multiple mating (polyandry). However, the causal pathway by which variation in polyandry results in the emergence and diversification of sociality is yet to be established. This project will combine empirical, theoretical and comparative approaches to address this. It will test: i) the environmental causes of individual variation in polyandry; ii) its effect on social behaviours that promote social complexity at the population level; and iii) how this corresponds to divergence in social complexity across species.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($369,453)
Scheme
Fellowship-Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM
Period
2015 - 2017
Grant Reference
DE150100336
Aggression and the evolutionary ecology of family living (2015)$300
Description
Animal personality has recently been suggested to play a fundamental role in the emergence and diversification of social organization (Wolf and Weissing 2012), but this has yet to be empirically tested. This project will address this by integrating a large manipulative experiment, long-term data from a wild vertebrate population and The Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour theoretical modelling. This research will directly address the importance of behavioural responses for influencing the evolution of sociality and put the role of behaviour as a driver of evolution to the test.
Funding
Australasian Society for the Study of Animal Behaviour ($300)
Scheme
Grant-Student Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM; Wapstra E
Year
2015
Secondary contact, genetic exchange and their consequences for evolutionary diversification (2014 - 2015)$8,800
Description
The proposed research will examine the fine scale genetic structure within one species of Tasmanian endemic snow skink, Niveoscincus ocellatus. Specifically, the project will focus on examining populations along the east coast of Tasmania and in particular, a putative contact zones between two major mitochondrial clades. It will address four key aims; i) characterize the fine scale genetic structure among populations; (ii) establish the extent of genetic mixing at contact zones between two clades; (iii) establish the relationship between geographic limits to dispersal and genetic structuring; (iv) establish the relationship between population genetic and phenotypic divergence. This project will provide important insights into the current and historical factors that influence rates of genetic exchange among populations of N. ocellatus, and their consequences for intraspecific genetic divergence. The findings will contribute to a better understanding of the processes that ultimately lead to the establishment of independent evolutionary lineages. Population studies such as this are a crucial step towards bridging the gap between micro-evolutionary processes and macro-evolutionary change.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($8,800)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM; Wapstra E; Burridge CP; MacGregor HEA
Period
2014 - 2015
Degrees of change: the evolutionary ecology of sex determination in shifting climates (2014 - 2016)$22,300
Description
This is an ambitious research program that includes field and laboratory experiments with theoretical ecological and evolutionary modelling that addresses the functional and selective relationships between sex allocation, sex determination and species response to climate change research fields that have traditionally been artificially separated in many research programs. This goal will be achieved by modelling the current climatic evolutionary transition between GSD and TSD. Development of this mechanistic model requires a long-term data set, the collection of complete paternity information so that the effect of birth date on male reproductive success can be accounted for within the model, the integration the model with past climatic data over a range of temporal and geographic scales, and the application of the model to projections of future climate change.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($22,300)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; While GM; Cunningham GD
Period
2014 - 2016
Aggression and the evolutionary ecology of family living (2014 - 2016)$18,800
Description
This project will develop a framework for understanding how animal personality mediates the evolution and maintenance of social organisation. It will focus on key a personality trait, aggression. Aggression is a personality trait which has strong and persistent effects on fitness-related traits linked to social strategies (e.g. territory acquisition and defense, reproductive strategy, promiscuity, and dispersal). Therefore, differences in both the distribution and frequency of aggression are likely to have strong effects on social structure which may in turn influence social trajectories. To test this the project has three integrated aims: 1) to test how aggression influences social behavior and how this relationship changes under different ecological contexts; 2) to examine the consequences of variation in aggression and social behaviour for reproductive output and offspring survival; 3) to predict the long-term (evolutionary) consequences of the feedback between aggression and social behaviour for the emergence and maintenance of social organisation.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($18,800)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM; Wapstra E; Munch KL
Period
2014 - 2016
Testing the role of female promiscuity in evolutionary transitions to complex sociality (2013)$14,000
Funding
University of Tasmania ($14,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM
Year
2013
Testing the causal relationship between ecology, promiscuity and social organisation in a lizard (2013 - 2015)$17,000
Description
This project will provide natural population observations and enclosure based manipulations of promiscuity in Egernia Whitee.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($17,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM; Wapstra E; Halliwell B
Period
2013 - 2015
Can snow skinks survive climate change? (2012)$1,250
Funding
Ecological Society of Australia Limited ($1,250)
Scheme
Award-Student Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; While GM; Caldwell AJ
Year
2012
Can snow skinks survive climate change? (2012)$11,000
Funding
Foundation For National Parks and Wildlife ($11,000)
Scheme
Grant-Agency
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; While GM; Caldwell AJ
Year
2012
Behaviour, and the evolutionary ecology of social systems: linking aggression, population dynamics, and selection (2011)$12,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($12,500)
Scheme
Grant-Near Misses
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
While GM
Year
2011
Hopeful or helpless: extinction risk under projected climate change in endemic snow skinks (2010 - 2012)$18,700
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($18,700)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; While GM; Caldwell AJ
Period
2010 - 2012
Potential impacts of climate change in Niveoscincus Ocellatus, a reptile with temperature dependent sex determination (2008)$19,700
Funding
Winifred Violet Scott Charitable Trust ($19,700)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; Cadby-Bibari C; While GM
Year
2008
Genetic and Social Architecture in Egernia (2004 - 2006)$13,000
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($13,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wapstra E; While GM
Period
2004 - 2006

Research Supervision

Geoff runs a vibrant and active research group which is dedicated to tackling a range of questions within the fields of Behavioural and Evolutionary Ecology. Central to his research group is facilitating an environment of intellectual exchange and development both within the group itself as well as with national and international collaborators. As part of his supervision philosophy, Geoff tries to give his students the opportunity to excel in the many different aspect of research science. This includes researching interesting topics both at UTAS and overseas, acquiring research funding, presenting work at national and international conferences and supporting his students to publish in high quality international journals.

If you are interested and passionate about the natural world, enjoy thinking and talking about Science and enjoy being part of a vibrant research environment then please contact Geoff. He has a wide range of projects available (see research tab for details). Applicants must have a strong track record, be proficient in English, and be excited and willing to learn.

Current

5

Completed

5

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDMother knows best: the how, when and why of sex allocation in snow skinks2013
PhDThe role of aggressionfor the maintenance and evolution of social system2014
PhDSibling Cooperation and the Evolutionary Origins of Complex Sociality2015
PhDMaternal Effects and Female Allocation Decisions Across the Geographic Range of a Viviparous lLzard (Niveoscincus ocellatus)2015
PhDCauses and Consequences of Hybridization - From Behaviour to Evolution2017

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDThe Consequences of Sexual Selection in the Common Wall Lizard: Insights following secondary contact and non-native introductions
Candidate: Hannah Elizabeth Alexandra MacGregor
2017
PhDBehaviour, Ecology and Social Organisation in Liopholis whitii: Insights into the evolutionary origins of sociality
Candidate: Benjamin Halliwell
2017
PhDCan Snow Skinks Survive Climate Change? The potential for behaviour, physiology and competition to mitigate and enhance climate change impacts on snow skink life history, distribution and persistence
Candidate: Amanda Jane Caldwell
2016
PhDAggression as a Personality Trait in Egernia whitii: Mechanisms and Outcomes
Candidate: Joanne McEvoy
2013
MastersShould I Mate or Should I Wait? The Morphology of Sperm Storage, and its Consequences for Sperm Viability and Mating Strategies in a Temperate Skink Species, Niveoscincus ocellatus
Candidate: Mathieu Alexandre Russell
2012