Profiles

Rodrigo Hamede

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Rodrigo Hamede

ARC Discovery Early Career Research Fellow

Room 320b, Life Sciences Building, Sandy Bay Campus

+61 3 6226 1890 (phone)

+61 3 6226 2745 (fax)

rkhamede@utas.edu.au

Dr Hamede completed his PhD on the ecology and epidemiology of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) in August 2012. He has worked on a number of behavioural, life history, epidemiological and evolutionary problems caused by DFTD throughout Tasmania. Using longitudinal data sets and a multidisciplinary framework he has assessed the impacts of this disease and developed models to predict epidemiological outcomes and evolutionary dynamics between devils and DFTD across wild populations. Dr Hamede specialises in disease ecology and epidemiology but he is often involved in collaborations with researchers from a broad range of disciplines including, genomics, immunology, veterinary medicine mathematical modelling and evolutionary biology. This integrative framework can be used for improving the management of DFTD and other emerging infectious diseases, providing novel insights for the conservation of species affected by wildlife diseases.

Biography

Dr Hamede grew up in Santiago, Chile's capital city. He studied Spanish and Linguistics in Chile and completed his Bachelor of Arts in 1996. However, his real passion has always been wildlife ecology and conservation. After a year living in Kenya, where Rodrigo gorged himself with mammal and bird watching, he decided to travel to Tasmania for three months, with the hope of seeing a wild Tasmanian devil and the famous cool temperate rainforests of Tasmania, which resemble the ones in his beloved Patagonia. In 2003 Rodrigo completed Bachelor of Science at UTas, majoring in zoology and environmental studies. Following that he completed his Honours research project on devil social behaviour in 2004. After a year working with migratory birds for an environmental consultant, he decided to go back to mammals and took a PhD scholarship to study the ecology and epidemiology of DFTD. He has been working as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at UTAS since 2013. He has been recently awarded the prestigious ARC - DECRA fellowship.

Rodrigo has broadened his research scope through the recently created International Associated Laboratory (LIA) to study the roles of cancer in ecology and evolution (CANECEV) in conjunction with the National Centre for Scientific Research and University of Montpellier – France, Deakin University, and UTas – Australia. This new international lab is dedicated to studying ambitious questions in relation to the significance of cancer on ecosystem function, wildlife health and evolutionary biology. Rodrigo is also collaborating with researchers from Chile to understand the transmission of pathogens between domestic animals, wildlife and humans.

Rodrigo has authored 23 peer-reviewed publications. Since his appointment as a postdoctoral researcher at UTas in 2013 he has successfully attracted numerous grants (see Funding section). Funding sources include the Australian Research Council, Ian Potter Foundation, Holsworth Wildlife Foundation, The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Trust, as well as internal UTas funding schemes.

Career summary

Qualifications

DegreeThesis titleUniversityCountryDate of award
PhDThe Ecology and Epidemiology of Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour DiseaseUniversity of TasmaniaAustralia2012
BSc (1st Class Hons)Seasonal, Demographic and Density-Related Patterns of Contact Between Tasmanian Devils: Implications for Transmission of Devil Facial Tumour DiseaseUniversity of TasmaniaAustralia2004
BA (Hons)Traductor e Intérprete Simultáneo y ConsecutivoEATRIChile1996

Languages (other than English)

Spanish

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Australian Mammal Society
  • Wildlife Disease Association
  • British Ecological Society
  • Australian Ecological Society
  • International Society for Conservation Biology

Administrative expertise

Dr Hamede has significant experience in administrating research projects, starting from his own degrees projects (BSc Hons, PhD) through the postgraduate projects of the students he has supervised and is currently supervising at the School of Biological Sciences

Teaching

Conservation Biology, Wildlife Diseases, Animal Behaviour, Behavioural Ecology and Evolution, Epidemiology

Teaching expertise

Dr Hamede has been a Practical Laboratory tutor in areas such as Behavioural Ecology, Endocrinology and Physiology. He has been a guest lecturer for Functional Biology KZA212 and Conservation Biology & Wildlife Management KZA360. He is currently supervising a number of undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Teaching responsibility

Guest Lecturer for KZA212 (Functional biology) and KZA360 (Conservation Biology and Wildlife Management).

Research Appointments

  • Council Member of the Australian Mammal Society
  • Editorial board member for the Australian Ecological Society

Research Invitations

Dr Hamede has been invited as a guest speaker to several prestigious institutions including the University of Cambridge – Department of Pathology, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, University of Oxford – Edward Grey Institute and Wildlife Conservation Research Unit and University of Minnesota – Department of Veterinary Population Medicine.

View more on Mr Rodrigo Hamede Ross in WARP

View more on Dr Rodrigo Hamede Ross in WARP

Expertise

Tasmania has easy access to wilderness areas, pristine marine environments and a rich diversity of ecosystems; it is therefore a wonderful place to work with native wildlife. Fortunately, our endemic mammals have had better luck than their mainland cousins (no dingoes or established fox populations in Tasmania), and although some species have suffered sudden population declines, Tasmania is one of the best places in the world to study mammals and their role in ecosystems. While most of Rodrigo's work is related to Tasmanian devils and DFTD, he collaborates with research projects with wombats, eastern and spotted tail quolls, bettongs, antechinus etc. UTas School of Biological Sciences and particularly the department of Zoology have a strong background and emphasis in mammalian conservation, behavioural and evolutionary ecology of mammals. Dr Hamede's particular areas of expertise are: wildlife diseases, epidemiology, conservation biology, behavioural ecology and evolutionary biology.

Research Themes

Infectious diseases are an important part of ecosystems, and their dynamics and effects on wild populations are an essential part of ecosystem adaptability and evolution. Wildlife diseases are also increasingly being recognised as a significant problem in conservation biology. Understanding the interaction between host and pathogens from an ecological, epidemiological and evolutionary perspective is therefore, a vital step for assessing the effect of infectious diseases at individual, population and ecosystem levels. Dr Hamede is interested in most areas of disease ecology, particularly in behavioural adaptations and evolutionary processes between host and pathogens as well as using social networks to understand the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. As an emerging disease, DFTD is a unique host-pathogen system that allows studying the epidemiology, impact and evolutionary dynamics of a species exposed to a new pathogen. Rodrigo’s research interests also include understanding the interactions and pathogen transmission between domestic animals, wildlife and humans and the resulting implications for wildlife conservation and human health.

Collaboration

Rodrigo has several research collaboration projects underway both in Australia and overseas, primarily aimed at understanding selective processes in Tasmanian devils and DFTD and their consequences for managing this disease in the wild. These are outlined below.

  • Immune responses to DFTD in wild devils. UTAS - Menzies Institute, Prof Greg Woods, Dr Alex Kreiss, Dr Cesar Tovar, Dr Ruth Pye
  • Diagnostic test for DFTD in wild populations. UTAS ACROSS, Prof Emily Hilder, Assoc Prof Robert Shellie, Dr Naama Karu
  • Emergence, Transmission and Evolution of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease. Washington State University, Prof Andrew Storfer; Griffiths University, Prof Hamish McCallum; Sanger Institute, Dr Liz Murchison.
  • Transmission dynamics across DFTD genetic sub lineages Cambridge University, Dr Liz Murchison

Awards

  • 2017: Australian Research Council – Discovery Early Career Research Award. Hamede, R. Living with cancer: adaptations in Tasmanian facial tumour disease. $370,159
  • 2016: Eric Guiler Tasmanian devil Research Grant. Hamede, R. Distribution, prevalence and epidemiology of DFTD and DFT2 in southern Tasmania. $33,130
  • 2016: Eric Guiler Tasmanian devil Research Grant. Ujvari, B. and Hamede, R. Nature’s solution, do immunoglobulins fight cancer in Tasmanian devils? $33,264.
  • 2016: Holsworth Research Endowment for David Hamilton. PI-CIs Hamede, R., Cameron, E. and Jones, M. Social networks, behaviour and transmission of facial tumour disease in the Tasmanian devil. $7,400
  • 2015: Eric Guiler Tasmanian devil Research Grant. Metabolomics for Tasmanian devils: DFTD biomarkers discovery, Shellie, R., Karu, N. & Hamede, R. Jones, M. $33,000.
  • 2014: Research Enhancement Grant Scheme. Understanding ecological processes and selective mechanisms involved in tolerance to Tasmania devil facial tumour disease. Hamede, R.University of Tasmania, $14,500.

Current projects

Rodrigo has several research collaboration projects underway both in Australia and overseas, these are outlined below.

  • Roles of cancer in ecology and evolution. Frederick Thomas, National Centre for Scientific Research and University of Montpelier – France and Beata Ujvari, Deakin University Australia.
  • Immune responses to DFTD in wild devils. UTAS - Menzies Institute, Prof Greg Woods, Dr Alex Kreiss, Dr Cesar Tovar, Dr Ruth Pye
  • Diagnostic test for DFTD in wild populations. UTAS ACROSS, Prof Emily Hilder, Assoc Prof Robert Shellie, Dr Naama Karu
  • Emergence, Transmission and Evolution of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease. Washington State University, Prof Andrew Storfer; Griffiths University, Prof Hamish McCallum; Sanger Institute, Dr Liz Murchison.
  • Transmission dynamics across DFTD genetic sub lineages Cambridge University, Dr Liz Murchison
  • Biodiversity of parasites infecting two tick species parasitizing mammals at varying degree of contact with wildlife and domestic animals in a semiarid area of Chile. Dr Gerardo Acosta, Universidad Austral, Chile.

Fields of Research

  • Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  • Host-Parasite Interactions (060307)
  • Conservation and Biodiversity (050202)

Research Objectives

  • Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales (960405)
  • Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of environments (960899)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)

Publications

Dr Hamede has published findings of his work in several internationally recognised journals, including: Ecology Letters, PNAS, Journal of Applied Ecology, Conservation Biology, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London and others. He has also presented his results on national and international stages i.e. Epidemics: International Conference on Emerging Infectious Disease Dynamics (USA 2008), International Wildlife Disease Association (Argentina 2010), International Mammalogy Congress (UK 2013) and others. The full list of Rodrigo's publications is available below.

Total publications

44

Highlighted publications

(9 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2017Journal ArticleHamede RK, Beeton NJ, Carver S, Jones ME, 'Untangling the model muddle: Empirical tumour growth in Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease', Scientific Reports, 7 Article 6217. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-06166-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Beeton NJ; Carver S; Jones ME

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2017Journal ArticleWells K, Hamede RK, Kerlin DH, Storfer A, Hohenlohe PA, et al., 'Infection of the fittest: devil facial tumour disease has greatest effect on individuals with highest reproductive output', Ecology Letters, 20, (6) pp. 770-778. ISSN 1461-0248 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ele.12776 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 14

Co-authors: Jones ME

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2016Journal ArticleEpstein B, Jones M, Hamede R, Hendricks S, McCallum H, et al., 'Rapid evolutionary response to a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils', Nature Communications, 7 Article 12684. ISSN 2041-1723 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12684 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 48Web of Science - 50

Co-authors: Jones M; Schonfeld B

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2015Journal ArticleHamede RK, Pearse A-M, Swift K, Barmuta LA, Murchison EP, et al., 'Transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils: localized lineage replacement and host population response', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282, (1814) Article 20151468. ISSN 0962-8452 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1468 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15

Co-authors: Barmuta LA; Jones ME

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2013Journal ArticleHamede RK, McCallum HI, Jones M, 'Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease', Journal of Animal Ecology, 82, (1) pp. 182-190. ISSN 0021-8790 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02025.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 52Web of Science - 50

Co-authors: McCallum HI; Jones M

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2013Journal ArticleSiddle HV, Kreiss A, Tovar C, Yuen CK, Cheng Y, et al., 'Reversible epigenetic down-regulation of MHC molecules by devil facial tumour disease illustrates immune escape by a contagious cancer', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110, (13) pp. 5103-5108. ISSN 0027-8424 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1219920110 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 91Web of Science - 89

Co-authors: Kreiss A; Tovar C; Jones ME; Woods GM

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2012Journal ArticleHamede R, Bashford J, Jones M, McCallum H, 'Simulating devil facial tumour disease outbreaks across empirically derived contact networks', Journal of Applied Ecology, 49, (2) pp. 447-456. ISSN 0021-8901 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2011.02103.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25

Co-authors: Bashford J; Jones M

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2012Journal ArticleHamede R, Lachish S, Belov K, Woods G, Kreiss A, et al., 'Reduced effect of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease at the disease front', Conservation Biology, 26, (1) pp. 124-134. ISSN 0888-8892 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01747.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 35Web of Science - 37

Co-authors: Lachish S; Woods G; Kreiss A; Jones M; McCallum H

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2009Journal ArticleHamede Ross RK, Bashford JD, McCallum HI, Jones Menna, 'Contact networks in a wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population: using social network analysis to reveal seasonal variability in social behaviour and its implications for transmission of devil facial tumour disease', Ecology Letters, 12, (11) pp. 1147-1157. ISSN 1461-023X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01370.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 170Web of Science - 158

Co-authors: Bashford JD; McCallum HI; Jones Menna

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Journal Article

(38 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Hamilton DG, Jones ME, Cameron EZ, McCallum H, Storfer A, et al., 'Rate of intersexual interactions affects injury likelihood in Tasmanian devil contact networks', Behavioral Ecology Article arz054. ISSN 1045-2249 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/beheco/arz054 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones ME; Cameron EZ

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2019Hohenlohe PA, McCallum HI, Jones ME, Lawrance MF, Hamede RK, et al., 'Conserving adaptive potential: lessons from Tasmania devils and their transmissible cancer', Conservation Genetics, 20, (1) pp. 81-87. ISSN 1566-0621 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-019-01157-5 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: Jones ME

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2019Wells K, Hamede RK, Jones ME, Hohenlohe PA, Storfer A, et al., 'Individual and temporal variation in pathogen load predicts long-term impacts of an emerging infectious disease', Ecology, 100, (3) Article e02613. ISSN 0012-9658 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ecy.2613 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Jones ME

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2019Martin LB, Addison B, Bean AGD, Buchanan KL, Crino OL, et al., 'Extreme Competence: Keystone Hosts of Infections', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 34, (4) pp. 303-314. ISSN 0169-5347 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2018.12.009 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Flies AS; Ruiz Aravena M

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2018Woods GM, Fox S, Flies A, Tovar CD, Jones M, et al., 'Two decades of the impact of Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD)', Integrative and Comparative Biology, 58, (6) pp. 1043-1054. ISSN 1540-7063 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/icb/icy118 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Woods GM; Flies A; Tovar CD; Jones M; Lyons AB; Bettiol S

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2018Margres MJ, Jones ME, Epstein B, Kerlin DH, Comte S, et al., 'Large-effect loci affect survival in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) infected with a transmissible cancer', Molecular Ecology, 27, (21) pp. 4189-4199. ISSN 0962-1083 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/mec.14853 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Jones ME; Comte S; Schonfeld B

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2018Ruiz-Aravena M, Jones ME, Carver SS, Estay S, Espejo C, et al., 'Sex bias in ability to cope with cancer: Tasmanian devils and facial tumour disease', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 285, (1891) Article 20182239. ISSN 0962-8452 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2018.2239 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ruiz-Aravena M; Jones ME; Carver SS

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2018Russell T, Madsen T, Thomas F, Hamede R, Ujvari B, 'Oncogenesis as a selective force: adaptive evolution in the face of a transmissible cancer', BioEssays, 40, (3) Article 1700146. ISSN 1521-1878 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/bies.201700146 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Ujvari B

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2018Thomas F, Kareva I, Raven N, Hamede R, Pujol P, et al., 'Evolved dependence in response to cancer', Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 33, (4) pp. 269-276. ISSN 0169-5347 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2018.01.012 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ujvari B

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2018Kwon YM, Stammnitz MR, Wang J, Swift K, Knowles GW, et al., 'Tasman-PCR: A genetic diagnostic assay for Tasmanian devil facial tumour diseases', Royal Society Open Science, 5, (10) Article 180870. ISSN 2054-5703 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rsos.180870 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Pye RJ; Kreiss A; Jones ME

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2018Ujvari B, Klaassen M, Raven N, Russell T, Vittecoq M, et al., 'Genetic diversity, inbreeding and cancer', Proceedings from the Royal Society of London B- Biological Sciences, 285, (1878) Article 20172589. ISSN 1471-2954 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2017.2589 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Ujvari B

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2018Margres MJ, Ruiz-Aravena M, Hamede R, Jones ME, Lawrance MF, et al., 'The genomic basis of tumor regression in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii)', Genome Biology and Evolution, 10, (11) pp. 3012-3025. ISSN 1759-6653 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evy229 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Ruiz-Aravena M; Jones ME

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2018Thomas F, Vavre F, Tissot T, Vittecoq M, Giraudeau M, et al., 'Cancer is not (only) a senescence problem', Trends in Cancer, 4, (3) pp. 169-172. ISSN 2405-8033 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.trecan.2018.01.002 [eCite] [Details]

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2017Hamede RK, Beeton NJ, Carver S, Jones ME, 'Untangling the model muddle: Empirical tumour growth in Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease', Scientific Reports, 7 Article 6217. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-06166-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Beeton NJ; Carver S; Jones ME

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2017Hendricks S, Epstein B, Schonfeld B, Wiench C, Hamede R, et al., 'Conservation implications of limited genetic diversity and population structure in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii)', Conservation Genetics, 18, (4) pp. 977-982. ISSN 1566-0621 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10592-017-0939-5 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Schonfeld B; Jones M

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2017Karu N, Hamede Ross RK, Wilson RR, 'That Old Devil Called Tasmanian', The Column, 13, (2) pp. 2-5. ISSN 1471-6577 (2017) [Professional, Non Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Karu N; Wilson RR

2017Thomas F, Jacqueline C, Tissot T, Henard M, Blanchet S, et al., 'The importance of cancer cells for animal evolutionary ecology', Nature Ecology and Evolution, 1, (11) pp. 1592-1595. ISSN 2397-334X (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41559-017-0343-z [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Ujvari B

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2017Wells K, Hamede RK, Kerlin DH, Storfer A, Hohenlohe PA, et al., 'Infection of the fittest: devil facial tumour disease has greatest effect on individuals with highest reproductive output', Ecology Letters, 20, (6) pp. 770-778. ISSN 1461-0248 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/ele.12776 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 14

Co-authors: Jones ME

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2017Wright B, Willet CE, Hamede R, Jones M, Belov K, et al., 'Variants in the host genome may inhibit tumour growth in devil facial tumours: evidence from genome-wide association', Scientific Reports, 7 Article 423. ISSN 2045-2322 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-00439-7 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Jones M

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2016Epstein B, Jones M, Hamede R, Hendricks S, McCallum H, et al., 'Rapid evolutionary response to a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils', Nature Communications, 7 Article 12684. ISSN 2041-1723 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12684 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 48Web of Science - 50

Co-authors: Jones M; Schonfeld B

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2016Karu N, Wilson R, Hamede R, Jones M, Woods GM, et al., 'Discovery of biomarkers for Tasmanian devil cancer (DFTD) by metabolic profiling of serum', Journal of Proteome Research, 15, (10) pp. 3827-3840. ISSN 1535-3907 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00629 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Karu N; Wilson R; Jones M; Woods GM; Hilder EF; Shellie RA

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2016Peck S, Corkrey R, Hamede R, Jones M, Canfield P, 'Hematologic and serum biochemical changes associated with Devil Facial Tumor Disease in Tasmanian Devils', Veterinary Clinical Pathology, 45, (3) pp. 417-429. ISSN 0275-6382 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/vcp.12391 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Corkrey R; Jones M

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2016Pye RJ, Hamede R, Siddle HV, Caldwell A, Knowles GW, et al., 'Demonstration of immune responses against devil facial tumour disease in wild Tasmanian devils', Biology Letters, 12, (10) Article 20160553. ISSN 1744-9561 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0553 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 24Web of Science - 26

Co-authors: Pye RJ; Kreiss A; Jones ME; Lyons AB; Woods GM

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2016Ujvari B, Hamede R, Peck S, Pemberton D, Jones M, et al., 'Immunoglubolin dynamics and cancer prevalence in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii)', Scientific Reports, 6 Article 25093. ISSN 2045-2322 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/srep25093 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Jones M

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2015Hamede RK, Pearse A-M, Swift K, Barmuta LA, Murchison EP, et al., 'Transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils: localized lineage replacement and host population response', Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 282, (1814) Article 20151468. ISSN 0962-8452 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1468 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 15

Co-authors: Barmuta LA; Jones ME

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2015Wright B, Morris K, Grueber CE, Willet CE, Gooley R, et al., 'Development of a SNP-based assay for measuring genetic diversity in the Tasmanian devil insurance population', BMC Genomics, 16, (791) pp. 1-11. ISSN 1471-2164 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12864-015-2020-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Jones M

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2015Peck S, Corkrey R, Hamede R, Jones M, Canfield P, 'Hematologic and serum biochemical reference intervals for wild Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii)', Veterinary Clinical Pathology, 44, (4) pp. 519-529. ISSN 0275-6382 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/vcp.12304 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Corkrey R; Jones M

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2013Hamede RK, McCallum HI, Jones M, 'Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease', Journal of Animal Ecology, 82, (1) pp. 182-190. ISSN 0021-8790 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2012.02025.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 52Web of Science - 50

Co-authors: McCallum HI; Jones M

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2013Siddle HV, Kreiss A, Tovar C, Yuen CK, Cheng Y, et al., 'Reversible epigenetic down-regulation of MHC molecules by devil facial tumour disease illustrates immune escape by a contagious cancer', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110, (13) pp. 5103-5108. ISSN 0027-8424 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1219920110 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 91Web of Science - 89

Co-authors: Kreiss A; Tovar C; Jones ME; Woods GM

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2013Ujvari B, Pearse A-M, Swift K, Hodson P, Hua B, et al., 'Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours', Evolutionary Applications, 7, (2) pp. 260-265. ISSN 1752-4571 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/eva.12117 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Jones M

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2012Hamede R, Bashford J, Jones M, McCallum H, 'Simulating devil facial tumour disease outbreaks across empirically derived contact networks', Journal of Applied Ecology, 49, (2) pp. 447-456. ISSN 0021-8901 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2011.02103.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 25

Co-authors: Bashford J; Jones M

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2012Hamede R, Lachish S, Belov K, Woods G, Kreiss A, et al., 'Reduced effect of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease at the disease front', Conservation Biology, 26, (1) pp. 124-134. ISSN 0888-8892 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01747.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 35Web of Science - 37

Co-authors: Lachish S; Woods G; Kreiss A; Jones M; McCallum H

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2012Lane A, Cheng Y, Wright B, Hamede R, Levan L, et al., 'New Insights into the Role of MHC Diversity in Devil Facial Tumour Disease', PLoS-One, 7, (6) Article e36955. ISSN 1932-6203 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036955 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Jones M

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2009Hamede Ross RK, Bashford JD, McCallum HI, Jones Menna, 'Contact networks in a wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population: using social network analysis to reveal seasonal variability in social behaviour and its implications for transmission of devil facial tumour disease', Ecology Letters, 12, (11) pp. 1147-1157. ISSN 1461-023X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01370.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 170Web of Science - 158

Co-authors: Bashford JD; McCallum HI; Jones Menna

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2009McCallum HI, Jones M, Hawkins CE, Hamede Ross RK, Lachish S, et al., 'Transmission dynamics of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease may lead to disease-induced extinction', Ecology, 90, (12) pp. 3379-3392. ISSN 0012-9658 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1890/08-1763.1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 120Web of Science - 113

Co-authors: McCallum HI; Jones M; Hawkins CE; Lachish S; Sinn DL; Beeton N

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2008Hamede RK, McCallum HI, Jones Menna, 'Seasonal, demographic and density-related patterns of contact between Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii): Implications for transmission of devil facial tumour disease', Austral Ecology: a journey of ecology in the Southern Hemisphere, 33, (5) pp. 614-622. ISSN 1442-9985 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2007.01827.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 54Web of Science - 48

Co-authors: McCallum HI; Jones Menna

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2008Jones Menna, Cockburn A, Hamede Ross RK, Hawkins CE, Hesterman H, et al., 'Life-history change in disease-ravaged Tasmanian devil populations', National Academy of Sciences of The United States of America. Proceedings, 105, (29) pp. 10023-10027. ISSN 0027-8424 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0711236105 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 117Web of Science - 106

Co-authors: Jones Menna; Hawkins CE; Hesterman H; Lachish S; McCallum HI

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2007Jones ME, Jarman PJ, Lees CM, Hesterman H, Hamede RK, et al., 'Conservation management of Tasmanian devils in the context of an emerging, extinction-threatening disease: Devil Facial Tumor Disease', EcoHealth, 4, (3) pp. 326-337. ISSN 1612-9202 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10393-007-0120-6 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 79Web of Science - 62

Co-authors: Jones ME; Hesterman H; McCallum HI

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Chapter in Book

(4 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Hamede R, McCallum H, Jones M, 'Learning to live with cancer: insights from local adaptations in Tasmanian devils and transmissible tumours', Saving the Tasmanian devil: recovery using science-based management, CSIRO Publishing, C Hogg, S Fox, D Pemberton, K Belov (ed), Australia (In press) (2019) [Other Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones M

2019Jones ME, Hamede RK, Hollings T, McCallum HI, 'Devils and disease in the landscape: the impact of disease on devils in the wild and on the Tasmanian ecosystem', Saving the Tasmanian devil: recovery using science-based management, CSIRO Publishing, C Hogg, S Fox, D Pemberton, L Belov (ed), Australia (In press) (2019) [Other Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones ME; Hollings T

2019Jones ME, Hamede RK, Storfer A, Hohenlohe P, Murchison E, et al., 'Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease: ecology and evolution of an uncommon enemy', Wildlife Disease Ecology: Linking Theory to Data and Application, Cambridge University Press, K Wilson, A Fenton, and D Tompkins (ed), United Kingdom (In press) (2019) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones ME

2012Jones M, Hamede R, McCallum H, 'The Devil is in the detail: Conservation biology, animal philosophies and the role of animal ethics committees', Science Under Siege: Zoology under Threat, The Royal Zoological Society of New South Wales, P Banks, D Lunney and C Dickman (ed), Sydney, Australia, pp. 79-88. ISBN 978-0-9803272-7-4 (2012) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.7882/FS.2012.028 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones M; McCallum H

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Conference Publication

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Karu N, Patchett AL, Wilson RR, Hamede Ross RK, Jones Menna, et al., 'Application of metabolomics and proteomics for biomarker discovery and development of therapies for the transmissible cancer, Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease', February 2nd-5th 2017, Lorne, VIC, pp. Page 22. (2017) [Conference Edited]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Karu N; Patchett AL; Wilson RR; Jones Menna; Lyons AB; Woods GM

2016Karu N, Wilson RR, Hamede Ross RK, Jones Menna, Woods GM, et al., 'Discovery of serum biomarkers for Tasmanian Devil cancer (DFTD)', Proceedings of The Australian & New Zealand Metabolomics Conference, 31st March - 1st April, 2016, Melbourne, Australia (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Karu N; Wilson RR; Jones Menna; Woods GM; Hilder EF; Shellie RA

Grants & Funding

Rodrigo has won a number of grants through his academic career, these include grants from the Australian Research Council, Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment Grant, Dr. Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Grant (on 6 occasions), Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation trust and Research Enhancement Grant Scheme.

Funding Summary

Number of grants

23

Total funding

$3,735,853

Projects

Will natural selection save the Tasmanian devil from extinction? (2018 - 2021)$405,000
Funding
Australian Research Council ($300,000)
Collaborators
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment ($60,000); Zoos Victoria ($45,000)
Scheme
Grant-Linkage Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK
Period
2018 - 2021
Grant Reference
LP170101105
Evaluating epidemiological and population dynamics in response to devil translocations (2018)$20,000
Description
The project will provide essential individual and population based data to evaluate the effects of immunisations and translocations of devils to the wild. The information gathered in this project will be vital for refining future translocations and improving the long-term success of the Wild Devil Recovery Plan.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($20,000)
Scheme
Donation-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK; Jones ME
Year
2018
Living with cancer: adaptations in Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease (2017 - 2019)$370,159
Description
The project integrates disease ecology and evolution to understand how defence mechanisms against infectious diseases arise and evolve in nature. Infectious diseases exert strong evolutionary pressures on populations, forcing the development of adaptive strategies to fight the costs of infection. The goal of the project is to determine individual differences in response to infection and how these affect population-scale transmission and evolutionary dynamics under natural and managed scenarios. This innovate approach will reveal the adaptive capability andresilience of populations against diseases and the effects of management interventions in controlling disease outbreaks and preventing population declines or extinctions.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($370,159)
Scheme
Fellowship-Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK
Period
2017 - 2019
Grant Reference
DE170101116
Distribution, prevalence and epidemiology of DFTD and DFT2 on the d Entrecasteaux channel area (2017)$31,130
Description
Two different transmissible cancers (DFTD and DFT2) are present in south-eastern Tasmania. This study will assess the distribution, prevalence, infection dynamics and survival after infection in both cancers. This information will create a baseline dataset for evaluating the threat of DFT2 and its possible interactions and selective processes with DFTD.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($31,130)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK; Jones ME; Woods GM; Darby JM
Year
2017
Evaluating the benefits in Tasmanian devils of immune responses to transmissible cancer (2017)$25,000
Description
A one year field and laboratory study to further our work on the evolution of resistance and tolerance in Tasmanian devils to facial tumor disease and to advance knowledge of immunology of devils for vaccine research. This work is a collaboration between the School of Biological Sciences and the Menzies Institute for Medical Research.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($25,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK; Carver SS; Woods GM
Year
2017
Nature's solution, do immunoglobulins fight cancer in Tasmanian devils, Sarcophilus harrisii? (2017)$33,264
Description
The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), a highly contagious transmissible cancer, has been threatening the survival of the worlds largest extant carnivorous marsupial, the Tasmaniandevil (Sarcophilus harrisii). Despite >10 years of intensive research no treatment or cure has so far been found. In a recent study we demonstrated that the devils immune system may have a natural solution to control the disease. Devils that have a higher level of certain type of immunoglobulins (IgM) relative to IgG have been found to be less susceptible to DFTD1. In the current proposal we aim to further elucidate the mechanisms underpinning IgM expression and devil DFTD prevalence, as well as to demonstrate whether the devils immune system has recently evolved to overcome the fitness reducing effect of DFTD. The study will have important implication for vaccine development and for future management of the remaining Tasmanian devil populations.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($33,264)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
Deakin University
Research Team
Ujvari B; Hamede Ross RK; Thomas F; Madsen T
Year
2017
Proteomics for Tasmanian devils: a DFTD pre-clinical test (2017)$15,000
Description
Proteins within the circulatory system offer insight into the pathophysiology of an individual, and protein biomarkers are frequently the basis for clinical diagnostic tests. This project will use proteomics to compare serum from non-infected and DFTD-infected Tasmanian devils to identify a DFTD-specific protein signature that could be used to develop a diagnostic test for early detection of DFTD.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($15,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Wilson RR; Hamede Ross RK; Woods GM
Year
2017
Attendance at the Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases conference (2016)$2,175
Description
I will be traveling to Cornell University, Ithaca USA, to attend the 'Ecology and Evolution ofInfectious Diseases' (EEID) meeting on May 22 2016. The conference will start the day after onMonday 23 2016 and will last for the next 34days (final schedule soon to be confirmed by theorganising committee). EEID (http://www.eeidconference.org/) is the leading conference focusedon understanding the role of infectious diseases in natural ecosystems, attracting the majority ofexperts in this research discipline. Therefore, it is an ideal venue to expose my research at UTasand exchange new ideas with other colleagues. During the conference, I will have the opportunityto meet with my current research collaborators, Prof Andrew Storfer (Washington StateUniversity) and Dr Paul Hohenlohe (Idaho University), and work on our National ScienceFoundation USAfunded research project "Emergence, transmission and evolution ofTasmanian devil facial tumour disease". We will discuss our current joint publications, updatesfrom our recent work and future directions for our research project (eg. supervision for PhDstudents, data analyses and potential grant applications).
Funding
Ian Potter Foundation ($2,175)
Scheme
Grant-Travel
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK
Year
2016
From epidemic to endemic? Modelling coexistence and evolutionary adaptations in Tasmanian devils and devil facial tumour disease (2016)$15,441
Description
Using immunological and epidemiological data to detect differences in pathogen fitness and host selective adaptations to infection
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($15,441)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK; Jones ME
Year
2016
Demography and epidemiology of Tasmanian devil populations and DFTD in long-diseased areas (2016)$25,000
Description
Tasmanian devils persist in areas long affected by facial tumour disease. We will reveal how epidemic anddemographic patterns are changing, and how devil's social and spatial organisation, breeding and dispersal maintainpopulations in the landscape. The project will help predict the epidemic outcome and the future of the devil.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($25,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK; Carver SS
Year
2016
Social networks, behaviour and transmission of facial tumour disease in the Tasmanian devil (2015 - 2017)$19,200
Description
This project wilt investigate contact networks and behaviours associated with infection risk in wild Tasmanian devils, and how these translate to bltin inuries and transmission d namics of Devil Facial Tumour Disease DFTD
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($19,200)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK; Jones ME; Cameron EZ; Hamilton D
Period
2015 - 2017
Demography and epidemiology of Tasmanian devils and facial tumour disease in long-diseased areas (2015 - 2017)$16,250
Description
This project will reveal the mechanisms underlying continued persistence of low density wild devil populations in areas where population and stochastic modelling have predicted a genuine risk of local extinction.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($16,250)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK; Carver SS; Comte S
Period
2015 - 2017
Tasmanian devil conservation physiology: Role of devil immune system in Devil Facial Tumour Disease progression (2015 - 2017)$16,100
Description
The project aims to establish the biochemistry blood indicator baseline in wild devils and assess how it changes at different stages of infection.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($16,100)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Carver SS; Hamede Ross RK; Ruiz Aravena M
Period
2015 - 2017
Does differential growth rate of tumour strains contribute to the variant epidemic patters of facial tumour disease in northwest Tasmania? (2015)$25,000
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($25,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK
Year
2015
Metabolomics for Tasmanian devil DFTD biomarkers discovery (2015)$33,000
Description
The project aims to create a databank of metabolic profiles from 100 Tasmanian devil serum samples using high-resolution instrumentation and then probe this databank to unravel the metabolic differences between healthy and DFTD animals.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($33,000)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Shellie RA; Karu N; Wilson RR; Hamede Ross RK; Hilder EF
Year
2015
Understanding ecological processes and selective mechanisms involved in tolerance to Tasmania devil facial tumour disease (2014)$14,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($14,500)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK
Year
2014
INTECOL (The International Association for Ecology) (2013)$2,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($2,500)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK
Year
2013
Emergence, transmission and evolution of Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease (2013 - 2016)$2,492,071
Funding
National Science Foundation ($2,492,071)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
Washington State University
Research Team
Storfer A; Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK
Period
2013 - 2016
Understanding variant disease susceptibility to save the Tasmanian devil and the biodiversity it protects from extinction (2012)$19,170
Funding
National Geographic Society ($19,170)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK
Year
2012
Saving the Tasmanian Devil from extinction in the wild through understanding the interaction between the devil and its contagious tumour (2011)$12,000
Funding
Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund ($12,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK
Year
2011
Eric Guiler Research Grant for DFTD (2008 - 2010)$47,505
Funding
Donation via University of Tasmania Foundation ($47,505)
Scheme
Donation - Individual
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hamede Ross RK
Period
2008 - 2010
Epidemiology and Transmission Dynamics of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) (2007)$5,000
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($5,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; Hamede Ross RK
Year
2007
Managing Tasmanian Devil Populations Affected by the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (2005 - 2009)$91,388
Funding
Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water & Environment ($78,888); Donation via University of Tasmania Foundation ($12,500)
Scheme
Donation - Individual
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Jones ME; McCallum HI; Hamede Ross RK
Period
2005 - 2009

Research Supervision

Current Supervisor for:

  • David Hamilton (main supervisor PhD)
  • Manuel Ruiz (co-supervisor PhD)
  • Sebastien Comte (co-supervisor PhD)
  • Robyn Taylor (co-supervisor PhD)
  • Samantha James (Honours)

Past students:

  • Elise Dewar (Hons)
  • Gavin Davis (Hons)
  • Cecilia Moreno (Zoology Research Unit KZA304
  • Amanda Sinclair (Zoology Research Unit KZA304)

Current

5

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDThe Tasmanian Devil and its Transmissible Cancer: Physiology of the devil-devil interaction2014
PhDThe microbial ecology of transmission sites of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease2014
PhDThe spatial epidemiology of the Devil Facial Tumour Disease in long-diseased populations of its unique host, the Tasmanian devil2014
PhDSocial networks, behaviour and transmission of facial tumour disease in Tasmanian devils2014
PhDLearning to Live with Cancer: Local adaptations to transmissible tumours in Tasmanian Devils2019