Welcome Ceremony Protocols

Welcome to Country

A Welcome to Country is when an Aboriginal Elder or Custodian welcomes people to their land.

A Welcome to Country always occurs at the opening of an event and is usually the first item on the program. A local Aboriginal Elder or Custodian of the land conducts the ceremony. This may be done through a speech, song, ceremony or a combination of these things.

A Welcome to Country ceremony that acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land shows respect for Aboriginal peoples, as Australia's original inhabitants.

It is important to follow guidelines for recognising and promoting Aboriginal culture and custodianship of country.

Acknowledgement to Country

Where an Elder or Aboriginal custodian is not available, an Acknowledgement to Country should occur. This can be given by an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person who comes from another country or a non-Aboriginal person if an Aboriginal person is not present.

Below are suggested wordings for an Acknowledgement to Country.

Acknowledgement of Country Hobart

As a reflection of this institution's recognition of the deep history and culture of this island, the University of Tasmania wishes to acknowledge the − Mouheneenner (pronounced Moo-he-ne-nah) People, the traditional owners and custodians of the land upon which this campus was built.

We acknowledge the contemporary Tasmanian Aboriginal community, who have survived invasion and dispossession, and continue to maintain their identity, culture and Indigenous rights.

We also recognise the value of continuing Aboriginal knowledge and cultural practice, which informs our understandings of history, culture, science and environment; the University's role in research and education, and in supporting the development of the Tasmanian community.

Acknowledgement of Country Launceston

As a reflection of this institution's recognition of the deep history and culture of this island, the University of Tasmania wishes to acknowledge the − Panninher(Par-nin-her) and the Leterrermairrener Letter-ramare-ru-nah) People, the traditional owners and custodians of the land upon which this campus was built. We acknowledge the contemporary Tasmanian Aboriginal community, who have survived invasion and dispossession, and continue to maintain their identity, culture and Indigenous rights.

We also recognise the value of continuing Aboriginal knowledge and cultural practice, which informs our understandings of history, culture, science and environment; the University's role in research and education, and in supporting the development of the Tasmanian community.

Acknowledgement of Country Cradle Coast Campus

As a reflection of this institution's recognition of the deep history and culture of this island, the University of Tasmania wishes to acknowledge the Plairhekehillerplue (Pl-air-aka-hill-a-ploo) People, the traditional owners and custodians of the land upon which this campus was built.

We acknowledge the contemporary Tasmanian Aboriginal community, who have survived invasion and dispossession, and continue to maintain their identity, culture and Indigenous rights.

We also recognise the value of continuing Aboriginal knowledge and cultural practice, which informs our understandings of history, culture, science and environment; the University's role in research and education, and in supporting the development of the Tasmanian community.