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From here you can shape the world.

Research is an integral aspect of the College, and our research degrees equip graduates with the skills, knowledge, confidence and connections to kick start, or further, their careers.

The College of Sciences and Engineering offers a diverse range of research degrees in each of our disciplines, from hard science to creative design.

We recognise the importance of academic and non-academic careers, and work closely with industry to cross-skill our graduates with real-world experience.

Our research degrees may see you travelling to Antarctica, testing cutting-edge technology in local micro-breweries, or designing new naval ships or sustainable housing. Choose a research degree from the University of Tasmania’s College of Sciences and Engineering.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Looking for undergraduate options?
Visit the 'Find a Course' page to explore our study options

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

Closing Date

7th April 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This PhD research project aims to evaluate the capability of VIV (Vortex Induced Vibration) phenomenon in generating alternative energy from water currents to improve the underlying concepts of hydrodynamics, design and optimization of a VIVACE converter “Vortex Induced Vibration Aquatic Clean Energy” that could achieve better efficiency and environmental friendless than that of existing models. Sound skills and substantial experiences are required, including CFD for hydrodynamic application, fluid-structure interaction (FSI), turbulence modelling, a profound knowledge of bluff bodies flow-field, high-level CAD/CAD/CAM along with mechanism animations, design and optimization of the geometry of bluff bodies to stimulate VIV as a driving force, and testing these for renewable energy. A sound publication record is required and experience in collaborative research/publication with the existing AMC staff is a plus.

Objectives:

  1. Conduct a systematic study on:

    1) coupled unsteady characteristics and hydrodynamics of 2D/3D bluff bodies to advance the studies conducted by Liu (1996, 2005);

    2) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) to obtain optimum energy production efficiencies improve the previous work (Liu et al. 2010, Liu 2015).

    3) optimization of motion and geometry parameters numerically; and

    4) the investigation of coupled hydrodynamics efficiency and structural strength-integrity and optimization based on the study by Liu and Veitch (2012).

    These advancements in science and engineering have not been seen in literature and will place the team at the forefront of these subject fields.

  2. Investigate, analyse and establish marketability and commercialization pathways to develop a detailed business model.
The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Skills and sound experiences are required, including CFD for hydrodynamic application, fluid-structure interaction (FSI), turbulence modelling, a profound knowledge of bluff bodies flow-field, high-level CAD/CAD/CAM along with mechanism animations, design and optimization of the geometry of bluff bodies to stimulate VIV as a driving force, and testing these for renewable energy.
  • A sound publication record is required and experience in collaborative research/publication with the existing AMC staff is a plus.
The following skills and experience will be highly regarded:


Experience in collaborative research/publication with the existing AMC staff is a plus.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Dr Pengfei Liu for further information.

Closing Date

7th April 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Rigid-Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) have been adopted around the world as the small boat workhorse of choice for navies, coast guard and lifeboat organisations. In the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), RHIBs provide major fleet units with a versatile and rapidly deployable small boat capability relied upon for various tasks ranging from search and rescue to high speed interception and boarding operations. During these operations, RHIBs often need to be launched, recovered and operated in harsh seaway environments, which can result in considerable risk to both personnel and materiel.

Traditionally the RAN has utilised side-davit based systems for sea boat launch and recovery, however with the future acquisition of the Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV), the RAN will have the capability to perform sea boat launch and recovery via stern ramps integrated into the transoms of these vessels. Several multifaceted and interacting hydrodynamic phenomena materialise during stern ramp-based sea boat launch and recovery. The aim of this project is to develop a new CFD-based simulation capability for examining the multi-vessel hydrodynamic interactions that occur during stern ramp-based launch and recovery operations.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Dr Jonathan Duffy for further information.

Closing Date

7th April 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Current offshore renewable wind energy practice requires the installation of large fixed and floating structures offshore. The mooring system is one of the important components for a floating offshore wind turbine (FOWT). Accurate assessment of the mooring lines is fundamental both in normal/operating and survival conditions. Recent accidents due to extreme weather events have highlighted the risk that improper design of floating structures can have on the structure’s integrity and the environment. Studies shall be performed to investigate the mooring system effect on the overall performance of an FOWT structure. Moreover, the investigation of the importance of the interconnection between the FWOT and the mooring line is therefore crucial.

The goal of this project proposal is to fill this gap in the knowledge by conducting a PhD investigation into the effects of the mooring systems on the operability and survivability of an FWOT structure. Both numerical and experimental approaches are considered in this project to investigate the role of the mooring systems. The numerical approach considers the development of the NewWave and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques due to their compatibility with the modelling of extreme waves. The study aims at establishing efficient numerical modelling techniques for dynamic motion response and structural assessment, including fatigue analysis due to extreme weather conditions.

The experimental investigation considers a systematic series of scale model test at AMC testing facilities that will be used for the validation of the numerical models.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Strong understanding of wave-structure interaction problems
  • Experience with CFD codes
Knowledge and skills that will rank highly include:
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics or a related subject.
  • Experience with open source numerical codes such as OpenFoam and FAST
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Dr Nagi Abdussamie for further information.

Closing Date

10th February 2019

Research Theme

AMC Research Themes:
Innovations in marine technology and coastal environment

CoSE Research Areas: 
Smart Places and Infrastructure
Natural and Extreme Environments

The Research Project

The management of corrosion and integrity for sewer pipelines (concrete pipelines) has become increasingly critical as their failures costs millions of dollars. Leakage from these pipelines can have significant hazardous effects on health, safety and the environment. In-situ investigation of pipeline corrosion is labour intensive and costly, and cannot be applied as a predictive tool to determine the effect on corrosion under various environmental and operational conditions.

The significance of the proposed project is the development of a comprehensive model (probabilistic) to predict the corrosion rate in sewer pipelines considering the data received from online monitoring (e.g. humidity, H2S level, temperature). This predictive model will aim to reduce failure probabilities, optimize maintenance and inspection schedules, optimize the operational conditions (required venting), and to aid in material selection for this type of application. This is essential to improve the safety and significantly reduce risk in sewer pipelines and save billions of dollars per year in Australia.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Advanced Knowledge of probabilistic techniques in engineering applications
  • Basic knowledge of asset integrity management
  • Knowledge of computer programming with MATLAB

Applicants with the following skills will rank highly:

  • In-depth Knowledge of corrosion engineering particularly corrosion phenomena in sewer pipelines.
  • Knowledge of using different machine learning techniques.
For More Information

Please contact Dr Vikram Garaniya for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Women are generally underrepresented in the STEM fields and in entrepreneurial ventures linked to high technology domains. This project will use the latest psychological and sociological research to propose a framework to facilitate that more girls and young women enter and remain in those STEM and entrepreneurial fields where they are significantly underrepresented. The framework will be designed to actively encourage creativity, inventiveness, and global awareness in harmony with the development of a socially responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial mindset. Strategies will be designed, tested and fine-tuned in diverse settings within the secondary and tertiary education sectors, and within the emerging Tasmanian STEM-based entrepreneurial ecosystem, respectively.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Themes

  • Data, Knowledge and Decisions
  • Creativity, Culture and Society

The Research Project

The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is a computationally efficient method for full wave-based computational acoustics simulations, even so it requires significant computational resources for shorter wavelengths. However the most interesting problems are at moderate wavelengths where there is significant diffraction. A particularly interesting class of problems involves coupling between the acoustic medium and its boundaries (fluid-structure interaction). Examples include sound transmission through panels, absorption by curtains near walls, porous surfaces.

This project aims to extend the computational capabilities of the acoustic BEM, with regard to structural coupling, porous surfaces, higher order methods, the effect of corners and edges, etc. These developments can then be applied to problems such as those mentioned above. Through collaboration or co-supervision with colleagues in University of Sydney the project may have access to high class experimental facilities for validation of the models.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied maths, physics or any branch of engineering with an interest in mathematics or computation
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Damien Holloway for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

This project is aimed to develop a three-dimensional hybrid continuous-discontinuous method for studying dynamic fracture of rock under impact and cyclic loads and arching behaviour of resultant irregular-shaped deformable and further breakable fragments.

The project will address:

  1. How can the transition of rock from continua to discontinua during fracture be modelled?
  2. How can the hybrid method be accelerated using heterogeneous CPU and GPU parallel computing technique for large-scale real time modelling?
  3. How can the hybrid method to consider dependence of rock strength on loading rates and how can heterogeneity be implemented to simulate rock fracture progressive process?
  4. How can the hybrid method be calibrated against well-known dynamic/cyclic rock fracture experiments?
  5. How can the hybrid method be applied to model rock fragmentations in rock boring & blast and rock mass instability in surface and underground excavations.

The outcome of this project will improve the rock mass excavation / fragmentation efficiency in rock cutting, drilling, crushing and blasting, and improve the rock mass stability in surface and underground excavation in mining, tunnelling and civil engineering. This project will improve our access to natural resources, especially deep or offshore natural resources, and safeguard our existing and new infrastructures.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Continuous or discontinuous mechanics
  • Programming skills (preferably C/C++ and Python)
  • Computer graphics

More Information

Please contact Dr Hong Y Liu for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022

The Research Project

Hobart based shipbuilder, INCAT, builds some of the world's largest and fastest high speed aluminium catamaran ferries. Critical to the success of INCAT's vessels has been their ability to operate at high speed in heavy seas, and INCAT's position as worldwide leaders in their market niche has been assisted over more than two decades by ongoing collaborative research with the University of Tasmania's School of Engineering. A long term goal is to optimise the ship structure, minimising weight without compromising integrity at critical locations. Past recent research in this area has sought to quantify the loads exerted during a slam (severe wave impact) event. Structural vibrations following a slam (known as "whipping") are known to significantly modify the internal forces as determined by a quasi static analysis, and their effect has been partially quantified through testing of a 2.5m hydroelastic model, full scale strain measurements, and dynamic finite element analysis. The current project aims to extend this work by relating the asymmetric slams and bending moments to the asymmetric design loads within the superstructure connecting the two hulls (referred to as "pitch connecting moment" and "split loads") whilst further quantifying the motions response in oblique sea directions. This has the capacity to influence international design codes and to provide a more rational framework for the determination of design loads in similar ships worldwide.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience in shipping industry
  • Model testing experience in towing tanks or model test basins
  • Marine engineering or naval architecture academic background
  • Experience in use of Computational Fluid Mechanics and/or Finite Element Analysis

More Information

Please contact Dr Jason Lavroff for more information.

Closing Date

7 June 2019

The Research Project

Soils, though often modelled as continuum, are particulate in nature. Professor Andrew Chan has performed extensive research on the breakage and crushing of particles using a novel method by combining scaled boundary finite element and discrete element method. This project is to extend current research to three-dimensions, to include better breakage algorithm including chipping and implementation on a parallel computer. The method can then be applied to various practical engineering problems such as breakage of particles under loading, crushing of mineral ores as well as change in stress-strain behaviour of the soil due to change in particle size distribution.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Programming skills
  • Engineering mechanics

More Information

Please contact Professor Andrew Chan for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

We have developed an automated blood oxygen level controller for preterm infants that has recently been undergoing clinical trials. This PhD project aims to make further advances by investigating enhancements to our current oxygen control algorithm and technology.

Potential research areas include development of advanced algorithms and predictive methods to enhance the control algorithm, for example by using intelligent pattern recognition including neural network techniques and our extensive clinical signal database.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, including Biomedical, Mechatronic and Electrical/Electronics Engineering.

More Information

Please contact Dr Tim Gale for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

The State of Tasmania exhibits some of the lowest levels of educational attainment among Australia’s states and territories. This project will use the latest educational, psychological and sociological research to design practical research- and evidence-based strategies to enthuse Tasmanian children to fully engage during their schooling years. The strategies will collectively target and inclusively align the many stakeholders (parents, guardians, teachers, peers, career counsellors, etc.) that play a role in influencing children’s aspirations for a better and brighter future. The strategies will be designed, tested, evaluated, and fine-tuned in diverse formal and informal educational settings. The project will make use of trans-disciplinary and integrative learning approaches with a strong focus on bridging the gap between the STEM and STEAM domains.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Bernardo A. León de la Barra for more information.

Closing Date

21 January 2019

Research Theme

  • Marine, Antarctic & Maritime
  • Data, Knowledge & Decisions
  • Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Australia is the world leader in the design and manufacture of state of the art large aluminium ferries, and Incat Australia Pty Ltd (Incat) is one of the dominant builders of these vessels in the international market. Research is required to increase reliability, seakeeping and passenger comfort of Incat vessels by improving vessel design, systems and performance in relation to the key operational conditions of vessel speed and random wave characteristics. To satisfy these overarching design requirements, this Project aims to:

  1. Establish an ongoing ship monitoring system to remotely measure vessel motions and structural loads, exploiting cloud technology to obtain real time-data on vessel performance.
  2. Improve structural efficiency by analysing large datasets at full-scale using sophisticated statistical methods to more accurately predict the peak wave loads acting on the vessel.
  3. Improve passenger comfort by extensively investigating and interpreting the motions response of the vessel and ride control activity under commercial operating conditions.
  4. Develop a “Smart” semi-autonomous interface to provide on-board seakeeping guidance to the operator in moderate and rough seas to increase ship safety, vessel longevity and improve passenger comfort.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours or Upper Second Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background skills and experience in Marine Engineering or Naval Architecture specific to high-speed craft;
  • Knowledge and  experience in stochastic process modeling;
  • Well-developed skills in programming, data analyses or optimisation techniques.

Applicants MUST include a one-page cover letter expressing their interest in the project based on their background experience whilst also addressing their suitability for the project.

Successful PhD applicants with a background in mechanical engineering, civil, marine engineering or naval architecture will be based at the University of Tasmania in Hobart.

Successful PhD applicants with a background in applied statistics will be based at a partner institute in Sydney. Those interested in applying for the position in Sydney must directly contact Dr Babak Shabani to discuss the application process.

More Information

Please contact Dr Babak Shabani for more information prior to applying.

Closing Date

31 December 2021

Research Theme

Data, Knowledge & Decisions

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Currently, there are numerous methods and techniques aimed at extending the service life or repair existing structural elements. Bolting or welding of steel plates, applying CFRP and external prestressed tendons are the most common among these techniques. Nevertheless, these techniques have limitations and disadvantages such as increasing the self-weight of the structure, introducing stress concentration, reducing the fatigue lie of the structure or high labour and materials cost. Among the recently developed repairing and upgrading methods is the so-called Local Post-Tensioning (LPT) which increases the stiffness and the load carrying capacity of the structural member through adding reinforcing steel bars to a segment of the beam.

This project will be investigating the use of innovative strengthening and upgrading techniques (or their combinations) in order to extend the service life and restore the load carrying capacity of various steel, concrete or composite structural elements. The candidate will be using nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, experiments, or both to validate theoretical findings.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Civil (Structural  Engineering)

More Information

Please contact Dr Assaad Taoum to discuss prior to applying.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Theme

Data, Knowledge and Decisions

The Research Project

Some forms of structural failure can be quite abrupt (e.g. buckling) whereas others may exhibit early warning signs. I have an interest in understanding and predicting both types of failure, and in measures to mitigate them. In the former category I am particularly interested in moderately thin walled shells, the effect of irregular geometries (e.g. cutouts, defects) and in local reinforcement. These could be studied by nonlinear Finite Element Analysis, or experimentally. In the latter category there is a growing body of knowledge on Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) using sensors and ambient excitations (such as wind loading) to detect changes in a structure. Wind turbine towers and blades are examples of application of these two areas.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The Research Higher Degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A background in one or more of:
    • civil/structural engineering
    • computational mechanics
    • applied mathematics
    • signal processing
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Damien Holloway for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Micro-grids encounter high renewable energy penetrations early, given their small size. The inherent variability is managed with enabling technologies such as energy storage. This proposal aims to eliminate the cost and complexity of energy storage, via adoption of synthetic storage. Synthetic storage allows for improved renewable penetration and reduced diesel fuel consumption. The approach investigates replacement of fixed speed diesel assets with variable speed diesel technology, for improved generator flexibility, response and efficiency. The expected project outcomes include both a reduction in cost and complexity for high renewable energy penetration micro-grids. Project benefits extend to reduced emissions and improved reliability. The research improves accessibility and affordability of renewable energy based micro-grids, addressing the key barriers of cost and complexity.  The outcomes include the ability of existing micro-grid configurations to transition from low to high levels of renewable energy penetration without a reliance on energy storage technologies. The benefits in simplifying the micro-grid framework include, accelerated uptake and utilisation of renewable energy, grid consolidation and grid decarbonisation, the impacts of which extend to cleaner, cheaper energy provision.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Hybrid diesel power system simulation;
  • Wind turbine generator simulation;
  • Power converter configuration and simulation.

More Information

Please contact Michael Negnevitsky for more information.

Closing Date

June 2019

The Research Project

Marine phytoplankton drive global climate, form the base of marine food-webs, and can cause ecosystem disruption and collapse due to harmful algal blooms. In the ocean, phytoplankton interact with bacterial symbionts - their microbiomeswhich lab studies show are essential for their growth. However, we currently know almost nothing about phytoplankton microbiomes in natural marine systems, or how they interact to enhance the growth and toxicity of harmful algal blooms.

A PhD research opportunity is open for a talented graduate to investigate the diversity and function of natural phytoplankton microbiome, and how they enhance growth and toxicity of harmful dinoflagellates. The project combines microfluidics and single-cell genomics and microbial community profiling using NGS sequencing to characterise microbiome membership, structure and function directly from phytoplankton blooms. Using lab model co-culture techniques, the project will also determine how microbiomes are recruited by toxic phytoplankton, and examine their role in algal physiology and toxin production.

The project is supervised by Drs Christopher Bolch and Andrew Bridle and will be based in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) at the University of Tasmania in Launceston. The project also includes collaboration with researchers in the Scotland (Scottish Association for Marine Science) and the USA (New York University).

Essential skills/experience

Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in molecular biology and/or microbiology are encouraged to apply. Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships.

Desirable skills/experience

Candidates with strong computing skills and experience of collecting and analysing next-generation-sequencing (NGS) data will be viewed favourably.

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Christopher Bolch at chris.bolch@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

28th April 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Oceanic fronts are sharp gradients between adjoining water masses and serve as mixing boundaries between water with different features (Belkin, 2009). Frontal processes, across a variety of temporal and spatial scales, operate in concert to drive coastal ecosystem structure and function. Climate change can have a profound effect on front formation leading to changes, which have important consequences for biodiversity. Furthermore, changes in concentration of one or a few 'leverage species' may result in sweeping communitylevel changes raising concerns about fishery sustainability, ecosystem health, and the maintenance of global biogeochemical cycles (Woodson and Litvin, 2015) in coastal regions. Conflicting studies show scenarios of both increasing and decreasing frontal probability due to climate change. It has been shown that there can a reduction in frontal frequency during warming anomalies. However, long term decadal-scale records show increasing trends of frontal activity. Regardless, the trend in front probability has not been shown to be globally uniform.

The first aim of this research is to comprehensively verify global trends of frontal frequency within global marine hotspots and resolve fine-scale frontal features (using new high-resolution satellite imagery) to assess patterns and trends in regional scale hotspot areas. Furthermore, given the variety of scales at which fronts operate, it is critically important to understand frontal activity at depth integrated submesoscales. As fronts play a role in driving local biological activity, unravelling the role of submesoscale dynamics on phytoplankton abundance and diversity is important for quantifying global influence on marine ecosystems. 

The second aim of this research is to develop adaptive sampling algorithms for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to characterize submesoscale fronts across depth integrated measurements. When coupled with high resolution satellite measurements (above), unprecedented scales of frontal processes can be visualized.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Biological oceanography/marine ecology background
  • Experience with programming for statistics and image processing (e.g. MATLAB)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Knowledge of remote sensing algorithm development and satellite image processing
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andy Fischer, for further information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

The Research Project

For the past 58 years, science in Antarctica has been carried out under the terms of the Antarctic Treaty, and national and international scientific research programs have been the most conspicuous visible expression of the workings of the treaty. It has been said that "science is the currency of the influence in the Antarctic Treaty" (Press, 2013). This project will study how scientific cooperation among the contracting parties and the consultative parties, how they are organized and how they play their respective roles. The project will focus on China as a specific case study.

Essential skills/experience

  • Understanding of China's Antarctic science program

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Prof Marcus Haward at Marcus.Haward@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

The Research Project

This PhD project seeks to undertake an integrated assessment of climate change adaptation policy planning and investment for marine protected areas (MPAs) in West Africa. The assessment will include climate risk screening to evaluate exposure and vulnerability of MPA communities to climate change impacts, multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) and social vulnerability assessments using stakeholder perceptions for prioritization and public acceptability of adaptation options. Cost benefit analysis (CBA) and cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) will be undertaken for investment prioritization of the climate change adaptation policy options, based on financial rewards, largest net social welfare value and their successful implementation. Coastal communities must have the capacity to adapt to climate change in order to reduce their socio-economic vulnerabilities (Metcalf, S. J., et.al (2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.5751/ES-07509-200235). Climate resilient MPAs can mitigate climate impacts on surrounding communities, enhance marine ecosystem health and function thereby conserving fish stocks and marine biodiversity. This supports food security, reduce poverty, promote tourism, culture and the economic growth of countries. West African Countries are among the most vulnerable nations in the world affected by climatic variability. The development of policies for long-term costs and benefits of climate change adaptation options for MPAs are needed to create resilience in the protection of cities, coastal communities and the marine resources of these emerging nations

Essential skills/experience

  • Ocean governance
  • fisheries and climate science
  • policy analysis
  • resource economics
  • GIS

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Gretta Pecl at Gretta.Pecl@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

12th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) defines the boundary of national jurisdiction. Under that definition, about 64% percent of the global ocean is beyond the jurisdiction of any nation, that are often called the "high seas." Human activities and the corresponding impact on the marine ecosystem of in the high seas has drastically increased since the 1950s. The UN Resolution 69/292 (2015) supported the development of an international legally binding instrument (ILBI) under the UNCLO.$. on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ).

The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) is the world leader of high sea conservation. The Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CAM LR Convention) is the first international treaty that codified the precautionary approach and ecosystem approach in its text. This research will focus on CCAMLR. And explore what lessons learned from CCAMLR can apply more broadly to BBNJ.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply. The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language.
  • Proven skills in social science research methods.

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Demonstrated competence in the field of this project      
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Marcus Haward for further information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

The Research Project

Marine phytoplankton grow in association with their own bacterial communities –  microbiomes –that are critical for their growth and physiology. Isolation/culture of algal cells results in depletion, disturbance or imbalance of their unique microbiomes (dysbiosis), reduced growth, unreliable biomass production, and often death. In contrast, retaining balanced microbiomes improves algal growth rate and biomass production and optimise biochemical/nutritional composition for aquaculture and biotechnology.

A PhD opportunity is open for a talented graduate to examine the diversity and function of marine haptophyte microbiomes. The project aims to determine how microbiome structure/composition modifies growth and physiology of haptophytes, and to engineer micr0biomes– construct synthetic microbiomes to optimise productivity of haptophytes such as Isochrysis, Tisochrysis and Diachronema.  The project combines NGS-based microbial community profiling, transcriptomics and culture-based approaches to examine host-functional responses, and construct/test synthetic engineered microbiomes of key haptophyte species used in aquaculture and biotechnology.  The project will be based in the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) and CSIRO Marine Research Laboratories in Hobart. The project is supervised by Drs Christopher Bolch (IMAS) and Anusysa Willis (CSIRO), and Kelli Anderson (IMAS) and Dr Heroen Verbruggen (Univ. Melbourne).

Essential skills/experience

Graduates with a strong academic record in Biological or Health Sciences and a background/experience in molecular biology and/or microbiology are encouraged to apply. Applications for this PhD position are open to domestic and international students, provided the latter are competitive when applying for fee waiver scholarships.

Desirable skills/experience

Candidates with strong computing skills and experience of collecting and analysing next-generation-sequencing (NGS) data will be viewed favourably.

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Christopher Bolch at chris.bolch@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

8th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project proposes to investigate fine-scale habitat use and subsurface behaviour of juvenile/sub-adult white sharks in coastal waters.

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply
  • Science and/or Mathematics

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Essential skills/experience: R, Matlab, and ArcGIS for spatial and statistical analyses, experience working in the field with sharks
  • Desirable skills/experience: Experience working with White Sharks
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jayson Semmens for further information.

Closing Date

20th March 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will focus on idealised ocean model simulations to test how continental breakup, and the resulting change in width and depth of seaways, and their position relative to wind and buoyancy forcing, affects ocean circulation. This will provide a mechanistic understanding of the effect of the opening of seaways on the climate system. This PhD project is part of a recently funded ARC Discovery Project, and the PhD researcher will have the opportunity to collaborate with the chief investigators, postdocs, and other PhD students involved.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
Selection Criteria
  • Essential skills/experience: Honours (or equivalent) or Master's degree in physics, maths, engineering, physical oceanography, meteorology or related geophysical disciplines.
  • Solid mathematical skills, particular in regards to partial differential equations and linear algebra.
  • Basic programming skills (UNIX/Linux operating systems and scripting languages, Python, Matlab, etc.).
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Andreas Klocker for further information.

Closing Date

31 May 2019

The Research Project

Tasmanian waters are undergoing unprecedented warming rates almost four times the global average, setting off a large-scale shift of specie’s distribution. The unique Tasmanian marine ecosystem and associated fisheries is affected by newly arriving species. The long-spined sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii has extended its distribution from NSW and eastern Victoria to along the east-coast of Tasmania, converting rich and diverse kelp forests into deserted barren habitats. Change in the abundance of Centrostephanus is affected by predation including by southern rock lobsters and eastern rock lobsters. These two species are found from NSW to Tasmania but with Easterns dominating catches in NSW while Southerns dominate catches in Tasmania. The abundance of both lobster species changes through time with rapid increase in southern rock lobster stocks underway at present because of rising recruitment and reduced catches regulated by government. Abundance of eastern rock lobsters is currently low and constrained to North-East Tasmania, however, progressive warming conditions of eastern Tasmania would be expected to favour this species.

This project aims to test relative predation of urchins and optimal foraging by eastern rock lobsters and southern rock lobsters, by applying field and laboratory experiments. Outcomes will be relevant to the management of this threat to Tasmanian ecosystems and fisheries.

Essential skills/experience

An honour’s/master’s degree in biology, ecology, animal physiology or related field Laboratory and technical skills and independent problem solving Excellent written, oral and communication skills Desirable skills/experience: Diving, setup of experiments and previous experience with aquatic animal husbandry would be advantageous Experience in statistical programming with R. Video analysis

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Dr Michael Oellermann for more information.

Closing Date

30 November 2019

The Research Project

This project will focus on the distribution of marine plastics in Antarctic sea ice. The candidate will analyse plastics in archived and new ice cores collected around Antarctica to evaluate the spatial and seasonal patterns, if any, in the samples. Additional work will be conducted in the home laboratory to quantify the mechanisms of plastics incorporation during sea ice formation, using both a sea-ice tank and modelling approaches. Work is envisage with SCRIPPS advisors to evaluate the bioaccumulation and toxicology of microplastics through the polar food-web, from algae, to zooplankton and marine mammals.

Essential skills/experience

  • An undergraduate degree plus Honours or Masters that includes marine biology and chemistry
  • Experience with laboratory-based work, programming for data analysis
  • Strong written and oral communication skills

Desirable skills/experience

  • Familiarity with plastics or sea-ice biogeochemistry

Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee's reports and supervisory support.

Contact for more information

Please contact Delphine Lannuzel at delphine.lannuzel@utas.edu.au for more information.

Closing Date

12th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Environmental problems are necessarily influenced by political factors, and interactions among diverse local, national and international interests and actors. The focus of this study is how the interests (and voices) of local and indigenous communities are addressed (or not) in the global governance and management of marine resources and environment.

Utilising a political ecology approach, drawing on institutional theory, this project is interested in how different forms of inequalities and exclusion are generated, persist and, consequently, exacerbate the economic vulnerability of local populations in the management of the marine environment.

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply
  • Political Science
  • Political Ecology
  • International Relations
The following eligibility criteria apply to this project
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, analytical and communication skills.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Demonstrated proficiency in written and verbal English language.
  • Proven skills in social science research methods.

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Demonstrated competence in the field of this project      
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Marcus Haward for further information.

Closing Date

15th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The research project is to determine the optimal environmental conditions over different seasons for growing selected kelp species (Order Laminariales) in Tasmania, and assess their ability to take up inorganic nitrogen.  The project has four aims:

  1. Manipulate densities of microscopic gametophyte and/or juvenile kelp growing on lines in the laboratory – for example five different densities of kelp gametophytes per unit area line.  Out-plant 3-5 replicate lines per experimental density treatment to sea and, over several months, measure the number of kelps per unit area line (which will give an estimate of mortality), growth rates via length (and hole-punch method when sufficiently large), and follow indicators of physiological performance such as pulse amplitude chlorophyll a fluorescence, pigment content, carbon and nitrogen ratio, soluble tissue nitrogen. 
  2. Using the optimal density of kelps per unit line established in aim 1, examine seasonal patterns of kelp growth and productivity.  Each season, 3-5 replicate lines will be out planted to different farm sites and rates of growth, productivity and indicators of physiological health will be assessed (as above).
  3. Determine the inorganic nitrogen uptake characteristics of each selected kelp species on a monthly basis. Using seaweeds growing at farm sites, ammonium and nitrate uptake rates will be measured at a range of initial concentrations, at ambient field temperatures.  Levels of each nutrient at each field site will be determined by taking discrete nutrient samples from near the surface of the kelp blades. The  relative preference index (RPI – the preference of a seaweed to take up a nutrient relative it the nutrient's availability) will be used to assess each month the preferred inorganic nitrogen source for each selected kelp species. 
  4. Effect of water motion on growth and production of kelps.  Using optimal densities, out-plant replicate lines at sites that have the following hydrodynamic characteristics:  a. fast flow, current dominated, b. wave-exposed, and c. slow flows. Once seaweeds reach approx. 20 cm long, measure growth and production using the hole punch method, blade morphology (thickness, width, length), tissue carbon and nitrogen, pigment content. 

In all of the above manipulations, an assessment of the level of biofouling will be made. Samples will also be collected, dried and stored for biochemical the assessment of the composition of natural products such as fatty acids, and contamination from e.g. heavy metals: this biochemical work will be undertaken by a postdoctoral fellow associated with the project.

Eligibility

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Environmental Sciences and/or Master in Marine Biology/Ecology with research experience in phycology

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • Bachelor Degree in Science or Environmental Science and /or Honours (H1 - score of 80% or above) or Masters in marine biology/ecology with research experience in phycology
  • Experience in plant/algal physiology such as measuring photosynthesis, growth, quantification of pigments, nutrient uptake, C:N ratios
  • Experience in early life-cycle biology of seaweeds and/or microalgae

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Experience in seaweed aquaculture
  • Experience in working with industry
  • Publication(s) in high-ranking international peer-reviewed journals with Q1 Scimago journal ranking
  • Strong experimental design and data analysis skills
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Catriona Hurd for further information.

Closing Date

28th April 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Input from rivers and estuarine exchange on to the continental shelf plays an important role in altering physical, biogeochemical and ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. This input may influence stratification, nutrient flux, and local circulation patterns altering lower trophic levels and primary productivity. While previous studies have addressed general aspects of the structure and dynamics of river plumes, most of this work has focused on plumes formed by large and medium-size rivers. Little attention has been paid to small rivers plumes and estuarine exchange, largely because small plumes and estuarine exchange is highly dynamic and varies across short temporal (of order of hours) and spatial scales (1-10kms). This variability hinders precise measurements of plume structure and content even though small rivers influxes of fluvial water and suspended sediments is estimated at about 25% and 40%, respectively (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Milliman et al.,1999).

This project aims to advance our understanding of the role of small river plumes and estuarine exchange in driving the ecological functioning of the coastal ocean. Given the highly dynamic nature of small plumes, this work will employ a multidisciplinary approach encompassing satellite remote sensing and in situ/adaptive sampling with autonomous underwater vehicles to develop high-frequency, high-resolution, 3D sampling of the physical chemical and biological variables of plume structure and content.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Biological oceanography/marine ecology background
  • Experience with programming for statistics and image processing (e.g. MATLAB)
  • Strong quantitative skills
  • Knowledge of bio-optical modelling, remote sensing algorithm development and hydrodynamic modelling
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Andy Fischer, for further information.

Closing Date

30 December 2019

  • Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their application as soon as possible.
  • Applicants wishing to commence candidature in early 2019 should complete the Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application processes as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will develop portable analytical technology for the in-field measurement of soil chemistry.  By using a 3D printer, devices will be rapidly prototyped and then produced in sufficient volume for field evaluation to obtain crucial data on the usability.  A rapid design/use cycle will accelerate the development of a low-cost and practical device for in-field measurement of soil chemistry that can be used by environmental consultants, farmers and home gardeners.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Analytical and/or soil chemistry
  • 3D printing and/or microfabrication

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Prof. Michael Breadmore, School of Natural Sciences (Chemistry), for further information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

This project involves developing a novel synthetic methodology for the synthesis of nitrogen containing complex molecules.  The method will utilise heterocycles as templates by exploiting their reactivity to build up chemical complexity.  This protocol would permit the efficient access to numerous compounds from a common intermediate, an approach that is desirable in any synthesis, but particularly for producing chemical libraries as required for drug discovery.  Targets include the stemona alkaloids stenine, stemoamide and croomine which posses complex molecular architecture and proposed as the active agents in many traditional medicines.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied statistics
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Jason Smith for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022

The Research Project

This project is focused on designing and engineering novel transition metal-based catalysts to establish unprecedented chemical reactions. The potential of these processes to establish new modes of small molecule activation and develop novel synthetic methodology will be explored. The results of this project may lead to the establishment of new strategies for the rapid and direct synthesis of important classes of organic molecules, including natural products and their derivatives.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Organic synthesis
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organometallic chemistry

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2022

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

This project involves the screening of endemic Tasmanian plants to discover new and valuable compounds that can be used to lead drug discovery. By employing a practical pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) method developed in-house, a range of plants will be extensively screened to determine their chemical profiles. The identification of plants containing significant quantities of organic molecules that can facilitate semi-synthesis and/ or feature chemotaxonomic value will also be pursued.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Synthetic organic chemistry, including chromatographic techniques
  • Structural characterisation techniques including NMR, IR and MSA

More Information

Please contact Dr Alex Bissember for more information.

Closing Date

20 September 2019

The Research Project

In this project, we will develop novel strategies to incorporate porous crystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) materials into macroporous organic polymer monoliths, obtaining novel hierarchically porous separation supports.

Polymer/MOF supports will be applied as advanced stationary phases for liquid chromatographic separation. This research project will include:

  • Polymer, MOF, and polymer/MOF hybrids synthesis and characterization
  • The implementation of polymer/MOFs in capillary column format
  • Their application as chromatographic stationary phases for the separation of different types of mixtures of organic molecules of interest
  • In situ modification of the selectivity and porosity of polymer/MOFs

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Analytical chemistry, including chromatographic techniques
  • Synthetic polymer chemistry
  • Coordination polymer synthesis
  • Materials characterization techniques (XRD, FT-IR, BET, TGA)

More Information

Please contact Dr Fernando Maya Alejandro for more information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Stratiform sediment hosted copper deposits are a major source of copper, cobalt and silver. This project will involve the study of the chemistry of pyrite in and around a major sediment-hosted copper deposit. The geology surrounding the deposit will be determined by drill core logging and mapping. This will form the basis of a 3D sampling program to study pyrite textures and LA-ICPMS trace element chemistry in order to map out the geochemical footprint of the deposit.

A 3D model will be developed of pyrite trace element chemistry and paragenesis that will inform the genetic model for the deposit and develop criteria to assist mineral exploration. The successful candidate will have a keen interest in research, economic geology, geochemistry and sedimentary rocks.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Willingness to work in remote field camps if required
  • Drivers licence
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in economic geology and geochemistry or a related subject
  • Drill core logging skills desirable
  • Interest in sedimentology

More Information

Please contact Professor Ross Large for more information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Evaluating the chemical composition of minerals formed during hydrothermal alteration is a rapidly emerging tool for mineral exploration. This PhD project, funded as part of the Geological Survey of Queensland’s “New Discovery” program, will evaluate the textures and trace element chemistry of various mineral phases from different IOCG deposits in Queensland to define both a chemical “fingerprint” and provide “footprints” of these systems to enhance exploration success. The student will work with world-renowned researchers in the Centre for Ore Deposits and Earth Sciences (CODES), as well as closely with government and industry partners. The ideal student will have an interest in ore deposits and a background in geochemistry, microanalysis methods or related techniques.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Ability to carry out field work and work with government and industry partner facilities and follow appropriate health and safety procedures.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geology, economic geology, geochemistry or related subjects
  • Experience with laser ablation ICPMS or other microbeam techniques

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Primary Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre): Shaun Barker (CODES)
Co-Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre): Jeff Steadman (CODES), Jonathan Cloutier (CODES)

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Shaun Barker, School of Natural Sciences (CODES), for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Evaluating the chemical composition of minerals formed during hydrothermal alteration is a rapidly emerging tool for mineral exploration. This PhD project, funded as part of the Geological Survey of Queensland’s “New Discovery” program, will evaluate the textures and trace element chemistry of various mineral phases from different IOCG deposits in Queensland to define both a chemical “fingerprint” and provide “footprints” of these systems to enhance exploration success. The student will work with world-renowned researchers in the Centre for Ore Deposits and Earth Sciences (CODES), as well as closely with government and industry partners. The ideal student will have an interest in ore deposits and a background in geochemistry, microanalysis methods or related techniques.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Ability to carry out field work and work with government and industry partner facilities and follow appropriate health and safety procedures.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geology, economic geology, geochemistry or related subjects
  • Experience with laser ablation ICPMS or other microbeam techniques

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Primary Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre): Shaun Barker (CODES)
Co-Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre): Jeff Steadman (CODES),

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Shaun Barker, School of Natural Sciences (CODES), for further information.

Closing Date

15th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Expedition SO255 dredged the seafloor of the Kermadec intra-oceanic arc and back-arc at multiple locations over >130,000 km2, retrieving pumice and volcanic ash from the shallow seafloor. This project will address dispersal and sediment transport processes from submarine and subaerial silicic volcanism at the scale of an arc. The PhD student will conduct LA-ICP-MS chemical fingerprinting of the volcanic glass and crystals collected during SO255, and compare this data with existing geochemical databases. The style of transport (aerial, as floatsam, or fully underwater) will be inferred using the clast's physical characteristics and the extent of their dispersal. Floatsam dispersion by surface ocean currents will be calculated using oceanic models. 

This project has large implications on regional sediment provenance, but also on geochemistry and petrology of submarine arc volcanism in general. This project is partly linked to the 2012 deep submarine eruption of Havre, and is likely to be merged with future volcanology projects in the Kermadec arc, including participation to a voyage in 2020.

The student would be part of the dynamic Submarine Volcanism Group at the University of Tasmania, and would benefit from a large panel of experts in CODES and Earth Sciences in general.

Eligibility

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Earth Sciences
  • Geoscience
  • Marine Geoscience
  • Geochemistry
  • Volcanology
  • Sedimentology

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • BSc in Earth Sciences/Geosicences

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Authorship in a published peer-reviewed research paper
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Interest/experience in laboratory/research voyage
  • Ability to work as part of a research team / individually / as appropriate to project
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Martin Jutzeler for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

This project will focus on the economic geology potential of a relatively less explored part of the Asia-Pacific region. The candidate will combine furthering the understanding of the regional tectonics and geological setting with a more detailed study of orogenic gold deposit formation in Central Myanmar.

The project will combine field geology with advanced geochemical analytics using the facilities in Earth Sciences/CODES at UTAS.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Broad-based geology
  • Economic geology
  • Geochemistry and analytical experience

More Information

Please contact Professor Khin Zaw for more information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

The Research Project

Mineral chemistry is an emerging applied science being used in mineral exploration. Current methods rely upon a combination of electron microprobe and laser ablation ICPMS methods, which both require substantial laboratory preparation and time. Emerging analytical technologies such as hand held laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offer the potential to transfer mineral chemistry from the laboratory to the field.

This project seeks to determine how accurately and precisely LIBS analytical methods can be used to evaluate the major, minor and trace element chemistry of various mineral species. If successful, this project will have a major impact on the way in which the minerals industry is able to approach and use mineral chemistry during routine mineral exploration. 

The candidate will work with leading scientists on mineral chemistry and mineral exploration at the University of Tasmania, and will interact with mineral industry and instrument manufacturing partners.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geology, chemistry, physics or a related subject

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Shaun Barker for more information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The Cerro Negro epithermal district is in the Deseado Massif of Argentina. Three main areas of mineralized low sulfidation veins have been identified by Goldcorp Inc., namely the Eureka Complex, Vein Zone Complex and the Mariana Complex, with the latter including the Emilia, San Marcos and Mariana Central, Norte, Norte Este, Norte Este B ore zones. The district is considered to be at least in some parts barely eroded (Guido and Campbell, 2011, 2012), thereby potentially limiting the exposure of the epithermal veins beneath near‐surface low temperature clay alteration. Vein exposures may also be restricted at least in part due to the local presence of late‐ to post‐mineralization Jurassic volcanic cover (Vidal et al. 2016).

The primary aims of this PhD project is to compare key mineralogical, hydrothermal alteration and texture features in low sulfidation epithermal veins from the north western and south eastern domain of the district. The research work will involve field mapping, core logging, structure architecture analysis, and volcanic facies study. A series laboratory work will be conducted, including SWIR techniques, mineral, whole rock, and fluid chemistry, as well as isotopic studies. A secondary aim will be detail investigation of geochemical dispersion halos around low epithermal environments.

The candidate will be supervised by a research team who specialize in magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits, mineral chemistry and mineral exploration at the University of Tasmania. The candidate will also work with industry geologists whilst on site at Cerro Negro.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must meet English speaking and writing requirements.
  • A background in some of the following areas will be ranked highly: field mapping skills, mineralogy and crystallography, geochemistry, analytical chemistry

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Lejun Zhang, or Francisco Testa, School of Natural Sciences, for further information

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Funding

Research funds are available to support necessary costs.

The Research Project

Myanmar is long known as a country, endowed with rich mineral resources and there remains considerable potential for future exploration to identify a diverse range of commodities from tin, tungsten, copper, gold, silver, led, zinc, nickel and gemstones. The Monywa copper district in Myanmar is an high sulphidation copper deposits of Kyisintaung, Sabetaung, Sabetaung South and the much larger Letpadaung. Together these deposits have pre-mining resources totalling 2 billion tonnes of ore with over 7 million tonnes contained copper.

The aims of this project are:

  1. A chronologically ordered, well dated paragenetic sequence of host rocks, alteration styles, mineralization and veins/fracture fills
  2. Allow constraints on the nature of the ore fluids within distinct hydrothermal stages
  3. Clarify the provenance of the involved fluids
  4. Finally, in the light of the newly obtained data, the geological and geochemical characteristics of Cu-Au mineralization of the Monywa-Popa-Wuntho area will be compared and contrasted with other high sulfidation epithermal deposits in the world

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied geology
  • Programming skills

More information

Please contact Professor Khin Zaw for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This PhD project will characterise the geology, hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation features at the El Cobre porphyry Au-Cu district, Veracruz, Mexico. Exploration activities have identified four potential porphyry centres at El Cobre, known as Encinal, El Porvenir, Norte, and Villa Rica. The PhD candidate will examine these porphyry targets and relate them to a more regional context with the neighbouring Caballo Blanco epithermal Au deposit and several other distal lithocaps of similar age. Extensive field mapping, drill core logging and well-constrained sampling will provide the necessary geological framework for subsequent laboratory analysis.

The PhD project aims to: (1) describe and discuss the geology and igneous geochemistry of the volcanic and intrusive phases of the El Cobre district in order to constrain the geological setting of ore formation; (2) document the magmatic and hydrothermal paragenesis that resulted in the formation of the El Cobre porphyry cluster; (3) determine the absolute ages of magmatism, mineralisation and alteration of the porphyry and epithermal features in the El Cobre district; (4) determine magmatic fertility indicators within the El Cobre district and expand into a regional context; (5) constrain the physicochemical environment of ore deposition and hydrothermal alteration; (6) construct new geological and exploration models.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply. The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • B.Sc. Honours or M.Sc. in Earth Sciences or a related subject
Selection Criteria
  • Publication track record (conference abstract, government report, peer-reviewed journal article, etc.)
  • Industry experience
  • Spanish language knowledge would be an asset
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Evan Orovan for further information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

The 1886 Tarawera eruption is one of only four global examples of the high intensity end-‐member of basaltic volcanism and the only one for which there are detailed written eyewitness accounts. The deposits are exposed exceptionally close to the source to within <100 m of the 1886 vents. Such exposure permits a rich and detailed record of eruption dynamics.

The ultraproximal deposits consist of a series of truncated scoria cones confined to <400 m of source. Three units (phreatomagmatic-­‐magmatic-­‐phreatomagmatic) are identified within the stratigraphy at most locations. The contacts between Units 1 and 2 and Units 2 and 3 are time transgressive, with some sub-­‐craters remaining phreatomagmatic long after the onset of “dry” magmatic fragmentation at other sites.

This proposed science will test the following hypotheses: 

  • That craters with thick uniform phreatomagmatic Unit 1 and 3 deposits are coincident with vents that were in the powerful plinian phase of eruption
  • The availability of water drove shifts of eruptive style
  • Mass eruption rates were the principal factor in shifts in eruption style
  • A threshold of conduit excavation was a principal factor in shifts in eruptive style

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A desire for fieldwork
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in Geology, Geochemistry and Volcanology or a related subject

More Information

Please contact Dr Rebecca Carey for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

Funding

The project will be part of a large ARC Linkage Project, which will provide operational funds to undertake the work.

The Research Project

The project will involve developing algorithms to identify bird species present in Tasmanian and Victorian wet eucalypt forests from acoustic recordings. These algorithms will be applied to recordings from a range of sites in order to address a suite of ecological questions about how of the distribution of mature forest in a landscape affects the distribution of bird species.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied statistics
  • High level programming skills

More Information

Please contact Associate Professor Greg Jordan for more information.

Closing Date

9th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will explore a novel algebraic method for calculating evolutionary distances between organisms with circular genomes (e.g. bacteria). The focus of the project is applications of group representation theory to finding computationally efficient approximations to the likelihood function under a given model of genome rearrangement. Several avenues for this are available, including the inclusion of random representations, including only the most influential eigenvalues, approximating matrix elements, and exploring Kronecker product constructions of irreducible representations.

Applicants should have a degree in mathematics (or equivalent), as well as interest in applications to evolutionary biology. Some knowledge of abstract algebra and strong programming skills are highly desirable. Although the project is primarily theoretical in focus, there is scope to apply the results to real molecular data sets.

Eligibility Criteria

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Knowledge and skills that will rank highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics or a related subject.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of abstract algebra.
  • Programming knowledge and experience.
  • Demonstrated interest in molecular biology and/or bioinformatic (phylogenetics in particular).

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Dr Jeremy Sumner for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

The evolution of galaxies over cosmic time is influenced by factors such as environment, interactions, AGN feedback and star formation. We are using a powerful new tracer to investigate nearby starburst galaxies, where large-scale processes are driving the rapid formation of large numbers of stars.

In order to better understand the factors which cause enhanced star formation rates in starburst galaxies we need to form a holistic picture of the process, which includes the dense molecular gas that acts as the fuel. We have recently discovered a new type of methanol maser, associated with the molecular gas in the central regions of starburst galaxies and the primary purpose of this project is to improve our understanding of these masers, in order to determine how they relate to the starburst phenomenon.

This project will involve utilising world-class radio and millimetre interferometers, such as the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Jansky Very Large Array and the Atacama Large Millimetre Array to make sensitive, high-resolution observations of methanol maser transitions and range of other molecular tracers.  These data will be used to better understand the physical conditions in the regions where the maser arise and how these relate to large-scale dynamical and chemical processes within the host galaxy, with the overall aim of providing a new tool to help understand the causes of starbursts and its relation to the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Experience in Radio interferometry is highly desirable.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject.

More Information

Please contact Simon Ellingsen for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

One of the six ‘big questions’ posed in the 2016 Decadal Plan for Australian Astronomy: How do stars and planetary systems form? This PhD project will directly address this fundamental question.

The University of Tasmania is collaborating in a “Legacy” science project being undertaken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) that is building on Australia’s rich tradition of spectral line legacy surveys to deliver a 7-mm dense gas survey of the Fourth Quadrant Galactic Plane in multiple molecular spectral lines and continuum emission. This will address a wide range of astrophysical challenges, including directly testing competing theories of massive star formation and mapping the dense gas structure of the Milky Way through to the far side of the Disk.  By locking in key measurements in our "astronomical backyard", the project will provide a crucial astrophysical template that will allow us to interpret future sensitive, high-resolution surveys of external galaxies with ALMA and the SKA.

This project will involve utilising the Australia Telescope Compact Array to make sensitive, high-resolution observations of the dense-gas molecular tracer CS, along with methanol masers and range of other molecular tracers.  These data will be used to obtain a census of high-mass star forming regions (through CS, SiO, methanol masers and radio continuum observations) and directly test theoretical predictions of high-mass star formation and their precursors, feeding directly into future work on high-mass star formation.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Experience in Radio interferometry is highly desirable.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in physics, astronomy, or a related subject.

More Information

Please contact Simon Ellingsen for more information.

Closing Date

31st July 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor as soon as possible, and start the application process by completing an Expression of Interest at
http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/apply-now

Research Theme

Forests, Trees and Agroforestry
Evolutionary Ecology
Environment, Resources and Sustainability
Data, Knowledge and Decisions

The Research Project

An exciting opportunity is available for a highly motivated student to join the Eucalypt Genetics Group at UTAS in a project that uses state-of-the-art genomic technologies to study adaptation in eucalypts, a field of research that is growing world-wide as the effects of global climate change become more acute.

The project aims to:
1) identify adaptive DNA variants that can be used to monitor whether natural populations are adapting to climate change or whether conservation intervention is required;
2) further refine the innovative 'genomics-assisted provenancing' approach to forest restoration to promote climate change adaptation; 
3) implement approaches to validating genomic predictions of provenance performance in restoration plantings. 

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in plant science, genetics and evolution or a related subject
  • Knowledge of bioinformatics, statistics, scripting/coding, genetics, genomics, plant adaptation and evolution, forest trees (particularly eucalypts).

More Information

The project will be embedded in the Eucalypt Genetics Group at UTAS (led by Profs Brad Potts and René Vaillancourt) which has a world-class interdisciplinary research programme that investigates the evolutionary ecological forces that shape diversity in Eucalyptus.

Supervisory Team

Primary Supervisor Name

  • Dr Dorothy Steane - (Biological Sciences)

Co-Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre)

  • Prof Brad Potts (Biological Sciences)
  • Prof René Vaillancourt (Biological Sciences)

For more information please contact:
Dr Dorothy Steane, School of Natural Sciences 
Prof Brad Potts, School of Natural Sciences
Prof René Vaillancourt,School of Natural Sciences
Assoc Prof. Michael Charleston, School of Natural Sciences

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project is part of a recently funded Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP190102020) to the supervisors and two international experts, Dr Sue Vandewoude (Colorado State University) and Dr Meggan Craft (University of Minnesota).  DP190102020 addresses a crucial issue in understanding the spread of infectious disease in wildlife: that we simply cannot observe an entire population.  We will investigate ways to make better epidemiological predictions in wildlife (such as Tasmanian devils, wombats, and American mountain lions and bobcats – for all of which we have real data), where we know we have only incomplete information about the contact networks by which diseases may spread.  This is one of three related HDR projects that will be supported by this grant.

This PhD project will focus on developing methods to account for uncertainty, or missing information, in the network of contacts that exists among individuals in a population of wild animals such as Tasmanian devils. In order to achieve this, we must make inferences about the nature of contact networks (CNs). We model contact networks with weighted networks (graphs), whose vertices are individual animals, and whose edges are epidemiologically significant contacts between them (i.e., contacts where disease transmission could occur).

The successful student will create efficient methods to propose “super-networks” that could contain given (observed) CNs, and to each assign a likelihood, using a model we have already developed.  This will form part of a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling process to find out characteristics of the most likely true networks for a given observed sub-network. The space of possible networks is huge, growing as nn, where n is the number of vertices, so the sampling needs to be as fast as possible. This may also lead to simulation studies in which disease are “grown” on the super-networks and compared with what we know about spread of infectious disease on observed CNs. Understanding the kind of super-network that is most likely associated with an observed network, and how it affects disease spread, will be critical to understanding making informed management decisions about many threatened species.

Through the international collaboration enabled by this grant you will be able to work with our US partners, and may be eligible for either an international or national conference presentation of your research findings.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Ideally, candidates should have proven ability in discrete mathematics and statistics, and some ability to program in a standard language (e.g., C++, Java, Python, R).
  • Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics or a related subject.
  • An understanding of basic biology is a very desirable bonus.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Michael Charleston, School of Natural Sciences (Mathematics), for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project is part of a recently funded Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP190102020) to the supervisors and two international experts, Dr Sue Vandewoude (Colorado State University) and Dr Meggan Craft (University of Minnesota).  DP190102020 addresses a crucial issue in understanding the spread of infectious disease in wildlife: that we simply cannot observe an entire population.  We will investigate ways to make better epidemiological predictions in wildlife (such as Tasmanian devils, wombats, and American mountain lions and bobcats – for all of which we have real data), where we know we have only incomplete information about the contact networks by which diseases may spread.  This is one of three related HDR projects that will be supported by this grant.

This PhD project will focus on improving the reliability of management decisions for the protection of wildlife suffering infectious disease.  Pathogens often spread via contact networks, which we model as (connected) mathematical graphs whose vertices are host individuals (such as individual Tasmanian Devils) and whose edges are contacts between individuals that could lead to successful transmission of pathogen. However we do not in general know the complete network.

The successful student will develop mathematical and computational simulation tools to generate networks using a range of approaches, such as Erdös-Renyi, small world, proximity graphs, and networks based on home ranges.  On these networks will be simulated pathogen spread.  Once this is ready, you will modify the generated networks in a manner to model management decisions such as culling or selective vaccination, and other extrinsic effects such as increasing foraging range, or intensifying contacts, in response to climate change (and lack of resources). The goal is to then determine which effects can be reliably predicted, if any, without knowing the complete contact network.

Through the international collaboration enabled by this grant you will be able to work with our US partners, and may be eligible for either an international or national conference presentation of your research findings.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Ideally, candidates should have proven ability in discrete mathematics and statistics, and some ability to program in a standard language (e.g., C++, Java, Python, R).
  • Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics or a related subject.
  • An understanding of basic biology is a very desirable bonus.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geology, economic geology, geochemistry or related subjects
  • Experience with laser ablation ICPMS or other microbeam techniques

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Michael Charleston, School of Natural Sciences (Mathematics), for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project is part of a recently funded Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP190102020) to the supervisors and two international experts, Dr Sue Vandewoude (Colorado State University) and Dr Meggan Craft (University of Minnesota).  DP190102020 addresses a crucial issue in understanding the spread of infectious disease in wildlife: that we simply cannot observe an entire population.  We will investigate ways to make better epidemiological predictions in wildlife (such as Tasmanian devils, wombats, and American mountain lions and bobcats – for all of which we have real data), where we know we have only incomplete information about the contact networks by which diseases may spread.  This is one of three related HDR projects that will be supported by this grant.

This PhD project will focus on improving the reliability of management decisions for the protection of wildlife suffering infectious disease.  Pathogens often spread via contact networks, which we model as (connected) mathematical graphs whose vertices are host individuals (such as individual Tasmanian Devils) and whose edges are contacts between individuals that could lead to successful transmission of pathogen. However we do not in general know the complete network.

The successful student will develop mathematical and computational simulation tools to generate networks using a range of approaches, such as Erdös-Renyi, small world, proximity graphs, and networks based on home ranges.  On these networks will be simulated pathogen spread.  Once this is ready, you will modify the generated networks in a manner to model management decisions such as culling or selective vaccination, and other extrinsic effects such as increasing foraging range, or intensifying contacts, in response to climate change (and lack of resources). The goal is to then determine which effects can be reliably predicted, if any, without knowing the complete contact network.

Through the international collaboration enabled by this grant you will be able to work with our US partners, and may be eligible for either an international or national conference presentation of your research findings.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Ideally, candidates should have proven ability in discrete mathematics and statistics, and some ability to program in a standard language (e.g., C++, Java, Python, R).
  • Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics or a related subject.
  • An understanding of basic biology is a very desirable bonus.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Michael Charleston, School of Natural Sciences (Mathematics), for further information

Closing Date

31st July 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The aim of this project is to develop stochastic models for the evolution of gene families across multiple species that incorporate a range of processes involved in gene content evolution. We aim to develop a suite of theoretical and algorithmic techniques for their analysis, and apply them to genome data in order to derive useful insights, including biologically meaningful parameters, and predictions of the phenomenological behaviour.

Such models would allow us to compare predictions of various models to data in a phylogenetic context and should give much greater power to distinguish which processes are most important in the maintenance of genetic diversity.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area is required.
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in maths or a related subject.
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding or related area is required.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply:
  • Mathematics
  • Statistics
  • Operations research
  • Computer science
Selection Criteria. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Have a first-class Honours degree in mathematics or a related area or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Barbara Holland, for further information.

Closing Date

7th April 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

All organisms are faced with the need to allocate acquired resources to maintenance, growth, and reproduction. The range of resource allocation strategies and subsequent life-histories (i.e. age at first reproduction, frequency and timing of reproduction, offspring number and size) vary considerably among species, even within the same genus. Such variation is particularly common among plants; for example, plant species are often classified as annuals, biennials or perennials. Patterns of floral and seed production are also highly variable. Costs and benefits associated with modifying aspects of the life-history are expected to change depending on local environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, light, moisture, pollinator diversity and abundance). Predicting how life-histories are expected to change under selection is not straightforward as plant communities can exhibit complex feedbacks and selection can act over multiple time-scales (e.g. plasticity acting within-season, and longer-term phenotypic selection). Clearly, a better understanding of how selection acts on plant life-history traits is necessary if we are to better predict plant-community responses to environmental change, both in terms of long-term trends and interannual variation.

This project involves further development of life-history theory, primarily focussed on plants. Dynamic programming and game-theory are likely to provide a mathematical framework for the investigation.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in Mathematics or a related subject.
  • Evidence of knowledge of biology/ecology is desired.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Dr Shane A. Richards, School of Natural Sciences (Mathematics), for further information.

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Closing Date

9th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

All organisms are faced with the need to allocate acquired resources to maintenance, growth, and reproduction. The range of resource allocation strategies and subsequent life-histories (i.e. age at first reproduction, frequency and timing of reproduction, offspring number and size) vary considerably among species, even within the same genus. Such variation is particularly common among plants; for example, plant species are often classified as annuals, biennials or perennials. Patterns of floral and seed production are also highly variable. Costs and benefits associated with modifying aspects of the life-history are expected to change depending on local environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, light, moisture, pollinator diversity and abundance). Predicting how life-histories are expected to change under selection is not straightforward as plant communities can exhibit complex feedbacks and selection can act over multiple time-scales (e.g. plasticity acting within-season, and longer-term phenotypic selection). Clearly, a better understanding of how selection acts on plant life-history traits is necessary if we are to better predict plant-community responses to environmental change, both in terms of long-term trends and interannual variation.

This project involves further development of life-history theory, primarily focussed on plants. Dynamic programming and game-theory are likely to provide a mathematical framework for the investigation.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree in plant science, ecology or agricultural science or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills. 

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics, Zoology, Plant Biology or Agricultural Science. 
  • Evidence of knowledge of biology/ecology is desired

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Shane Richards, for further information.

Closing Date

15th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Under contract with Geoscience Australia, UTAS operates a continent-wide network of geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes. Our antennas in Katherine (NT), Yarragadee (WA) and Hobart (TAS) contribute to measuring global reference frames and Earth orientation.

VLBI observations to satellites have the aim of improved space ties, meaning to better connect VLBI and GPS in establishing the most precise coordinate system of the Earth. The University of Tasmania is leading efforts towards realising this exciting new observing technique, supported by the Australian Research Council with project funds and a PhD scholarship.

This project includes work on VLBI observations to satellites and spacecraft, perform the observations, process the data and analyse results. The candidate should resolve current issues with signal strengths and receiver characteristics and develop new processing chains, in order to exceed current accuracies.

The successful candidate should be prepared to work in developing existing programs and software, as well as responsibly use the University’s radio telescopes. She/he is expected to perform independent research, assisted by the supervisory team. The project further offers the opportunity to take an active role in supporting daily operations as part of a global telescope network.

Eligibility

Candidates from a variety of disciplines backgrounds are eligible to apply. The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • BSc in Earth Sciences/Geosicences
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Selection Criteria
  • Education in geodesy and spatial sciences. 
  • Familiarity with space geodetic techniques.
  • Education in Physics or Astronomy.
  • Knowledge of Linux and good programming/software skills.
Assessment Criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Guifre Molera Calves for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Markov-modulated fluid queues, in which the amount of customers/data in a buffer is modelled using a continuous variable, have been studied extensively via matrix-analytic methods. In the analysis of networks of fluid queues however, the results for a few special two-node cases could only be obtained. However, the operator-analytic methods, a generalization of the matrix-analytic methods for single queues, is a promising approach that could lead to novel numerical schemes.

An example is a system of two fluid queues, with contents that are being driven by a background Markov chain in such a way that the content of the second queue also depends on the content of the first queue. The main questions in this context are: (i) how complex can we allow such models to be, while still being able to find the joint stationary distribution, and (ii) what approximations can be devised in cases where analytic solutions are not possible.

This project will focus on theory and algorithms for the analysis of stochastic fluid networks, and is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the advancements in this field. You will work on simulations, theoretical models, and algorithms.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong technical, research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area is required.
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in maths or a related subject.
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding or related area is required.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Malgorzata O'Reilly, for further information.

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Closing Date

31st May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project will focus on developing stochastic models for the analysis of health care systems. and is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the improvement of the management of health care systems. We aim to develop of a suite of algorithmic techniques and make the code publicly available to the research community.

You will work on simulation and/or theoretical models using statistical analysis of real data. You will have an opportunity to be part of a rich collaborative environment and interact with mathematicians and clinicians involved in health care modelling.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong technical, research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Knowledge and skills in applied probability, probabilistic operations research, statistics or related area is required.
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in maths or a related subject.
  • Knowledge and skills in simulation and coding or related area is required.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Malgorzata O'Reilly, for further information.

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Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This project is part of a recently funded Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP190102020) to the supervisors and two international experts, Dr Sue Vandewoude (Colorado State University) and Dr Meggan Craft (University of Minnesota).  DP190102020 addresses a crucial issue in understanding the spread of infectious disease in wildlife: that we simply cannot observe an entire population.  We will investigate ways to make better epidemiological predictions in wildlife (such as Tasmanian devils, wombats, and American mountain lions and bobcats – for all of which we have real data), where we know we have only incomplete information about the contact networks by which diseases may spread.  This is one of three related HDR projects that will be supported by this grant.

This PhD project will address the question of how predictions of disease spread are affected when we do not know the complete contact network.  We model contact networks with weighted networks (graphs), whose vertices are individual animals, and whose edges are epidemiologically significant contacts between them (i.e., contacts where disease transmission could occur). Additionally, we model pathogens spreading through a population as a mathematical tree (connected, acyclic graph) whose vertices are instances of infection of host individuals and whose edges correspond to infection spread events.

The successful student will extend existing algorithms (developed by A/Prof Charleston and others) to map the pathogen trees into host contact networks and to assign a likelihood value to each potential mapping according to canonical models.  You will then subsample from contact networks and pathogen trees on them, to mimic real observation, and compare most likely predictions of disease spread with what actually occurred, using simulated and some observed data. Through the international collaboration enabled by this grant you will be able to work with our US partners, and may be eligible for either an international or national conference presentation of your research findings.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Ideally, candidates should have proven ability in discrete mathematics and statistics, and some ability to program in a standard language (e.g., C++, Java, Python, R).
  • Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in mathematics, statistics, computer science, bioinformatics or a related subject.
  • An understanding of basic biology is a very desirable bonus.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Michael Charleston, School of Natural Sciences (Mathematics), for further information.

The Research Project

This project aims to synthesise knowledge and develop seismic tools which will characterise the basement beneath the East Antarctic Ice sheets in order to provide more robust constraints for ice sheet models at basin and continental scales. Important factors including elevation, slope angle, sedimentary basins and the presence of water. A significant component of the project will be a compilation of existing seismic and other geophysical and spatial data from across East Antarctica. This will involve communication with other Antarctic nations with a significant presence in East Antarctica to form an improved GIS database. The ongoing research will then take the form of computer simulations of seismic waveforms, and a comparison to likely ice-rock scenarios beneath major ice sheets.

At UTAS the successful applicant will join one of the leading international groups that use seismology to investigate Earth environment systems. The research environment within Physics at UTAS is a vibrant and supportive place to develop geophysics, applied mathematics, and computational physics skills with real-world applications and strong links to the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies. While the research for this project is computer-based, there may be opportunities to travel to Antarctica on partner projects for suitably skilled applicants.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in geophysics, physics or applied mathematics or related fields
  • Experience with GIS-type computing environments and scientific computing
  • Aptitude for high-performance computing

Aptitude for interdisciplinary collaboration

More Information

For more information contact the Primary Supervisor, Professor Anya Reading, School of Natural Sciences (Physics), for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

The Research Project

The evolution of black holes and their host galaxies are intricately linked. One manifestation of this link is the active phase of the black hole lifecycle, when the previously dormant supermassive black holes at the centres of galaxies emit jets of relativistic plasma. These jets burrow through the surrounding gas, significantly affecting the evolution of their host galaxy; they also emit synchrotron radiation observable with radio telescopes. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for triggering and truncation of jet activity is a key science driver for next-generation astronomical instruments, including the Square Kilometre Array. The SKA and pathfinders will collect a wealth of relevant data over a wide range of radio frequencies. The challenge is to interpret these data within a robust theoretical framework.

This PhD project will use a combination of analytical models and numerical simulations to link models describing two different spatial scales: within and outside the gaseous disk of the galaxy hosting the radio jets. The models will be applied to existing and upcoming observational data, including from the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), to infer the lifetimes and energetics of black hole jets.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Candidates with physics or astronomy experience are particularly encouraged. Programming skills would be an advantage for this project.

More Information

Please contact Dr Stanislav Shabala for more information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Eucalypts are keystone species in numerous Australian ecosystems, many of which are under threat. As climates change, restoration programs must maximise the capacity of regenerating ecosystems to adapt to new environments. The choice of germplasm for ecological restoration requires careful consideration to maximise survival in a rapidly changing climate. One consideration is the long-term adaptive potential of the genetic material being used. Various strategies have been developed, particularly focused on maximising genetic diversity of seed sources.

The University of Tasmania has partnered with Greening Australia to establish a series of large, long-term experiments to test a variety of restoration strategies in the degraded agricultural landscapes of the midlands of Tasmania. Using these field trials and wild populations of native Eucalyptus species, the research project will use morphometric, functional trait and genomic approaches to assess adaptation capacity and test strategies for optimising survival and performance of restoration plantings now and into the future.

This project offers an excellent opportunity to contribute to real world science using traditional quantitative genetic and functional trait analyses, advanced DNA technologies and novel computer-modelling approaches.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Genomics
  • Quantitative genetics
  • Functional trait analysis
  • Bioinformatics
  • Modelling
  • Applied statistics

More Information

Please contact Dr Dorothy Steane for more information.

Closing Date

30th April 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

Knowledge of species' responses to past climate change can be used to predict their resilience to current and projected climate change. However, species have varying sensitivity to environmental stressors. Therefore, to identify which species track the impact of environmental change in the past, with a view to monitoring in the present and predicting the future, we must assess a variety of taxa. This project addresses a key knowledge gap for Antarctic biota by genetically assessing responses of 6 flighted seabird species to past climate change, and combining these with inferences already made for penguins and seals in a meta-analysis. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of genetic variation can also guide the selection of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas through the identification of populations that are demographically-independent, represent long-term refugia, or contain genetic (and potentially taxonomic) novelty.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • An ability to perform and interpret population genetics analyses is highly desirable

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Honours/MSc degree in population genetics or phylogenetics
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in biology
  • Interpersonal communication skills
  • Time management
  • Ability to work both independently, and as part of a team

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Chris Burridge for more information.

Closing Date

31st July 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor as soon as possible, and start the application process by completing an Expression of Interest at
http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/apply-now

Research Theme

Forests, Trees and Agroforestry
Evolutionary Ecology
Environment, Resources and Sustainability
Data, Knowledge and Decisions

The Research Project

An exciting opportunity is available for a highly motivated student to join the Eucalypt Genetics Group at UTAS in a project that uses state-of-the-art genomic technologies to study adaptation in eucalypts, a field of research that is growing world-wide as the effects of global climate change become more acute.

The project aims to:
1) identify adaptive DNA variants that can be used to monitor whether natural populations are adapting to climate change or whether conservation intervention is required;
2) further refine the innovative 'genomics-assisted provenancing' approach to forest restoration to promote climate change adaptation; 
3) implement approaches to validating genomic predictions of provenance performance in restoration plantings. 

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in plant science, genetics and evolution or a related subject
  • Knowledge of bioinformatics, statistics, scripting/coding, genetics, genomics, plant adaptation and evolution, forest trees (particularly eucalypts).

More Information

The project will be embedded in the Eucalypt Genetics Group at UTAS (led by Profs Brad Potts and René Vaillancourt) which has a world-class interdisciplinary research programme that investigates the evolutionary ecological forces that shape diversity in Eucalyptus.

Supervisory Team

Primary Supervisor Name

  • Dr Dorothy Steane - (Biological Sciences)

Co-Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre)

  • Prof Brad Potts (Biological Sciences)
  • Prof René Vaillancourt (Biological Sciences)

For more information please contact:
Dr Dorothy Steane, School of Natural Sciences 
Prof Brad Potts, School of Natural Sciences
Prof René Vaillancourt,School of Natural Sciences

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Themes

  • Environment, Resources & Sustainability
  • Data, Knowledge and Decisions

The Research Project

Our research into the phylogenetic relationships among eucalypts, using genome-wide markers and multiple geographically widespread samples, has revealed numerous puzzling discrepancies, most likely due to recent radiation, incomplete lineage sorting of given genomic markers, and/or reticulate (non-tree-like) evolution.  However, these evolutionary processes are difficult to distinguish, and the relative contribution of each is likely to vary across the continent and among groups of species. This cross-disciplinary project will exploit this molecular phylogeny of eucalypts to tease apart these evolutionary processes and reconstruct the relative timing of the evolution of key traits, to test whether these traits are correlated with each other in time and whether they are associated with major changes in environment.

The project will be embedded in the Eucalypt Genetics Research Group at UTAS, which has a world-class interdisciplinary research programme that investigates the evolutionary and ecological forces that shape diversity in Eucalyptus. It involves cross-disciplinary collaboration with mathematicians in the Theoretical Phylogenetics Group at UTAS, which has a special interest in applying mathematics and statistics to problems in evolutionary biology and ecology.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in plant science, genetics and evolution, mathematics or a related subject
  • Knowledge of phylogenetics, genomics, bioinformatics, plant adaptation and evolution, forest trees (particularly eucalypts)

More Information

Please contact the below staff for more information:

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

An exciting opportunity is available for a highly motivated student to join the Eucalypt Genetics Research Group at UTAS in a project that uses state-of-the-art genomic technologies to characterise genomic regions associated with speciation, introgression and adaptation in Australia’s iconic eucalypts.

A major international effort has recently seen a eucalypt become the second forest tree genome sequenced. The PhD project links the expanding international knowledge on the eucalypt genome to the evolutionary dynamics of wild populations in Australia to provide insights into the nature of species and processes which have shaped their evolution.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in plant science, genetics and evolution or a related subject
  • Knowledge of genomics, next-generation sequencing, hybridisation, plant adaptation and evolution, forest trees (particularly eucalypts), population genetics, bioinformatics

More Information

Please contact the below staff for more information:

Closing Date

18 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

Efficient water use and drought tolerance are among the most desirable traits required for the development of resistant cereal crop plants in the future, yet cereal species are typically very difficult to characterize using traditional methods employed in woody species. For this reason there is little understanding of the potential to use traits such as resistance to xylem and photosystem damage as breeding tools. This project aims to use newly developed techniques to explore novel water management characteristics in cereal crop species.

The project will use optical techniques to explore variation in xylem cavitation and photosystem damage in barley, wheat and rice species. This new methodology provides an ability to characterize within-species variation in drought sensitivity at a scale suitable for genetic characterization and trait mapping using genetic resources currently available in Australia.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Plant physiological training
  • Water relations
  • Image analysis
  • Plant genetics

More information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Timothy Brodribb, for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2020

Funding

This project includes substantial operational funds and logistical support, funded by a five year Australian Research Council (ARC) grant to Professor Barry Brook (ARC Australian Laureate Fellow).

An additional top-up award of AUD$5,000pa will also be considered for outstanding applicants.

The Research Project

The University of Tasmania has world-leading research strengths in eco-evolutionary dynamics, ecosystem science and the impacts of global change on biodiversity. This project will use a combined approach to analyse, model and forecast the impact of different drivers of land-use change on biodiversity at local to regional scales.

The PhD project will involve field work, compilation and analysis of existing information (historical and database sources), and development of new meta-modelling approaches to assess biodiversity responses. A key outcome of the research will be to help develop solutions that resolve inherent trade-offs between ongoing human development and the competing need to protect habitats, ecosystems, and species. This vexed problem is highly relevant to Tasmania (and Australia more broadly), given the newsworthy issues surrounding the need to balance the socio-economic benefits of forestry and hydropower with the natural heritage and tourism-related values embodied in its World Heritage forested lands.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that are particularly desirable and will be ranked highly include:

  • Ecological, evolutionary or conservation biology theory and practice (including fieldwork)
  • Experience in ecological modelling, programming, and/or statistical coding
  • Geographical Information Systems and Remote sensing, database management

More Information

Please contact Professor Barry Brook for more information.

Closing Date

1 July 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Nodulation is the formation of root organs that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The capacity to form nodules offers a huge advantage to the host plant. The bacteria inside these nodules are able to fix N2 into ammonia (NH3), a form of nitrogen that plants are able to absorb and use effectively for their growth and development. However, these symbioses are restricted largely to legumes and do not form in the major staple crops (wheat, rice, maize, most fruits and vegetables). This means staple food production is heavily reliant on nitrogen fertiliser that leads to pollution of waterways and significant greenhouse gas emissions. New solutions are required to feed a growing world population. This includes the ultimate aim of transferring this symbiosis to the major crops.

This project aims to understand how legume plants form nodules, unique root organs that form de novo from inner root cells in response to signaling and entry of bacteria at the root surface. Plant hormones are small, potent and often mobile compounds that control plant growth and development, including nodule organogenesis. In this project we will focus on defining the legume-specific hormone responses that trigger nodule organ development. This will provide foundational knowledge to underpin the ultimate goal of deploying this symbiosis in major non-legume crops.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Plant physiology, molecular biology and/or hormone biology
  • Plant development

More Information

Please contact Dr Eloise Foo for more information.

Closing Date

31st July 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor as soon as possible, and start the application process by completing an Expression of Interest at http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/apply-now

Research Theme

Forests, Trees and Agroforestry 
Evolutionary Ecology
Environment, Resources and Sustainability
Data, Knowledge and Decisions

The Research Project

This Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) will provide fundamental information on the genetic architecture of phenotypic traits that will be critical for the adaptation of natural and industrial Eucalyptus globulus forests to future climates. The project will explore the application of new analytical procedures to estimate the effects of genetic variants on phenotypic traits, using pedigree links between phenotyped individuals and individuals which have been the subjects of whole genome sequencing.  Key target traits will include drought tolerance, as well as other growth and performance traits. The student will gain valuable experience with industry collaborators through our partnership with the Southern Tree Breeding Association (STBA) and PlantPlan Genetics.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in forestry, plant science, genetics or a related subject.
  • Computer programming experience is desirable, for example, a statistical scripting language such as R, and programming languages such as C or FORTRAN.
  • Knowledge of bioinformatics, statistics and modelling, forest tree (particularly eucalypts) breeding, genomics.

More Information

The project will be embedded in the Eucalypt Genetics Group at UTAS (led by Profs Brad Potts and René Vaillancourt) which has a world-class interdisciplinary research programme that investigates the evolutionary ecological forces that shape diversity in Eucalyptus.

Supervisory Team

Primary Supervisor Name

  • Prof René Vaillancourt (Biological Sciences)

Co-Supervisor Name (Discipline/Centre)

  • Prof Brad Potts (Biological Sciences)
  • Dr Dorothy Steane (Biological Sciences)

For more information please contact:
Prof René Vaillancourt,School of Natural Sciences
Dr Dorothy Steane, School of Natural Sciences 
Prof Brad Potts, School of Natural Sciences
Dr Richard Kerr, PlantPlan Genetics Pty Ltd

Closing Date

1 July 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

The ancient practice of grafting, joining a shoot to the root of another plant, has become an integral tool in research and horticulture. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms governing this process remain ambiguous. Grafting is particularly important in improving plant resilience and fruit quality in commercial fruit trees. This proposal will investigate what controls graft compatibility between species with a view to improve the success and array of available graft combinations.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Plant physiology, molecular biology and/or hormone biology
  • Plant development

More Information

Please contact Dr Eloise Foo for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Knowledge of species' responses to past climate change can be used to predict their resilience to current and projected climate change. However, species have varying sensitivity to environmental stressors. Therefore, to identify which species track the impact of environmental change in the past, with a view to monitoring in the present and predicting the future, we must assess a variety of taxa. This project addresses a key knowledge gap for Antarctic biota by genetically assessing responses of 6 flighted seabird species to past climate change, and combining these with inferences already made for penguins and seals in a meta-analysis. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of genetic variation can also guide the selection of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas through the identification of populations that are demographically-independent, represent long-term refugia, or contain genetic (and potentially taxonomic) novelty.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • An ability to perform and interpret population genetics analyses is highly desirable

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Honours/MSc degree in population genetics or phylogenetics
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in biology
  • Interpersonal communication skills
  • Time management
  • Ability to work both independently, and as part of a team

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Dr Chris Burridge, School of Natural Sciences (Discipline of Biology), for further information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible .

The Research Project

Given the rapid rate of global change, it is critical that we test the common assumption that high biodiversity makes ecosystems resilient to disturbances. Observational studies documenting change after disturbance cannot identify ecological processes connecting diversity and ecosystem function, making field experiments that manipulate identical disturbances in ecosystems with different biodiversity essential.

Freshwater stream ecosystems are excellent model systems to test these ideas. This project will use field experiments that manipulate flow disturbances in streams replicated in low (south-west WA) and high biodiversity (Tasmania) regions and across gradients of chronic background stress imposed by agriculture to investigate how biodiversity sustains functional ecosystems, and how much diversity can be lost before the resilience of a stream is irrevocably compromised. Both benthic biodiversity and ecosystem processes will be measured.

There will be laboratory and smaller-scale field investigations to further unravel the underlying mechanisms, and the results will support food-web and community assembly modelling as the initial step to providing a synthetic platform to make predictions and test further hypotheses. The project is a collaboration between the University of Tasmania, Murdoch University (hosting the WA PhD student) and Massey University (New Zealand), and is funded by the Australian Research Council Discovery Program.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Research degree. The following eligibility criteria also apply:

  • Ability to undertake field of ecology; current driving licence, prefer manual and 4WD experience
  • High level quantitative skills
  • Good written and verbal scientific communication skills
  • Ability to work as part of an interdisciplinary research team
  • Proven ability to work individually in remote locations including supervising volunteer field assistants

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Ecology
  • Zoology
  • Botany/Plant Science
  • Limnology
  • Aquatic Sciences

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • First Class or high Upper Second Class Honours or equivalent Masters degree
  • Peer-reviewed publications in any of the listed disciplines
  • Evidence of ability to work with freshwater benthic invertebrates and/or benthic algae
  • Evidence of ability to work as part of an interdisciplinary team
  • Willingness to undertake field research in remote locations and co-ordinate/supervise volunteer assistants

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Leon Barmuta for further information.

Closing Date

30th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Tasmanian devils are threatened by transmissible cancer, devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), which has spread to almost their entire geographic range and has caused more than 90% population decline. A gap in knowledge for wildlife diseases globally, and DFTD specifically, is how the spatial connectivity between individuals at large landscape scales maps onto the social contacts between individuals at a local scale that lead to transmission. To understand how the disease spreads across the landscape requires integrating data on who-contacts and bites-who in the population with finescale information about how individuals move at landscape-scale throughout the year.

The project integrates spatial and social data to understand disease transmission and spatial spread. The field project involves placing collars on the adult population of devils at field sites with different histories of time since disease outbreak. The collars will record both the location of the animals and the identity of any other collared devils that come within close range. The field sites are in remote but beautiful locations in Tasmania. The statistical methods will involve constructing social networks and analysing movement data. The project is part of an international, transdisciplinary research program on evolution in the devil—DFTD host—pathogen system involving ecologists, epidemiologists and genomicists at the University of Tasmania, Griffith University, Washington State University and the University of Idaho, funded by a grant from the US National Institute of Health/National Science Foundation.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • A good understanding of the field of ecology
  • High level quantitative skills
  • Ability to work as part of an interdisciplinary research team
  • Proven ability to work individually in remote locations including supervising volunteer field assistants
  • Current driving licence, prefer manual and 4WD experience

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Applicants should send a CV and Experession of Interest (one page maximum) to A/Prof Menna Jones before 30th May 2019

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Menna Jones for more information about this project, or take a look at A/Prof Menna Jones's research profile here.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Some of the most important wildlife diseases are caused by environmentally transmitted parasites. Yet, solutions to remain elusive and a major frontier in disease ecology, despite decades of research. Emblematic of this broad issue is sarcoptic mange disease of wombats. Sarcoptic mange, caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei, is the most important disease of wombats. The parasite (introduced to Australia by European settlers and their domestic animals) causes significant animal welfare issues to wombats, and occasional local conservation issues. Owing to welfare concerns and the visible nature of diseased wombats, many individuals and community groups across Australia are attempting to manage mange disease, but significant knowledge gaps and feasibility issues limit attempts.

This disease ecology focussed PhD project seeks to address these issues by tackling two major themes: (1) developing a deeper understanding of the transmission of S. scabiei, which is widely considered to occur via the suitable environment in wombat burrows; and (2) test new treatment strategies for mange control in wombats, building upon existing knowledge, modelling and empirical data generated in this thesis.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • The successful applicant will have strong interest, and ideally background, in wildlife disease issues and solutions to those.
  • Well-rounded applicants with who have an enthusiastic and realistic appreciation of the full suite of skills necessary to become an early career scientist (organisation, logistics, fieldwork, modelling, writing, publishing, presenting, etc.) are encouraged to apply.
  • The successful applicant will be expected to demonstrate innovative thinking and problem-solving skills, and capacity to take projects from inception to publication.
  • The candidate will join a diverse and multidisciplinary team studying a range of wildlife and disease ecology issues in Scott Carver's laboratory.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Primary Supervisor, Dr Scott Carver for further information.

.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

A collection of private (e.g., Electrolytic Zincworks) and government bodies (e.g., Hydro-Electric Commission) chose to build factories and stations in Tasmania due to its geographic and socioeconomic landscapes. These same factors encouraged the construction of housing for workers. Due to their inherently controlled design and construction processes and often overt ideological framing, company housing schemes offers ideal vehicles through which to interrogate design objectives including formal variety, linguistic coherence, and typological tolerance. This project will involve work in archives and in the field, analysis of texts, production of analytical drawings and other visualisations, and the generation of arguments related to rationalisation and house design. Outputs will include curated exhibitions, visual analyses, and scholarly papers.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Steen or Dr Helen Norrie for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2018

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

Like many examples of its kind, the Tasmanian Department of Housing actively addressed social and economic issues in the post-war period through social housing policy. The architects and bureaucrats charged with catering for demographic shifts and increased urbanisation approached their task with strategic intent. This project will look to articulate their intent, and examine the effectiveness of their processes – both in terms of methodology and designs. It will look back at the history of social housing in post-war Tasmania with ambitions of uncovering a set of guidelines to influence current policy on affordable housing. The methodology of this project will involve archival research, and may include design–research or other social-science practices.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Steen or Dr Helen Norrie for more information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

The small, meagrely populated and remote island of Tasmania has a rich architectural culture. State capital Hobart has been home to many notable practitioners. The diversity of these architects is reflective of the city’s intrinsic characteristics. Many are marked by their national and international relations; many others have diachronic connections to the place. The small but connected professional body, in constant dialogue with the University of Tasmania’s architectural degrees (including the radical Environmental Design degree), has a vibrant but largely untold history. This project looks to reveal this history by conducting interviews with those involved, mapping associations, writing narratives, and developing a theory of interaction and influence.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Steen or Dr Helen Norrie for more information.

Closing Date (Note: this has been brought forward to 23 April)

23 April 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

Tasmania has an established range of appearance hardwood products, mainly drawn from native forest resources. However, this product range has limitations: its appeal in the current architectural and interior design market is limited by its longevity and conventional acceptance; the native hardwood resources from which it is drawn is reducing; and opportunities for incorporating new resource and product options are being forgone.  

In order to generate renewed interest in the design potential of Tasmania’s hardwood products, this project will pursue a multidisciplinary approach to develop new timber products and product combinations that can be manufactured in Tasmania from native, reclaimed and plantation hardwood resources. It will explore innovative solutions for new application types by exploiting developments in resource availability and material processing, new timber modification and assembly technologies, and the potential of advanced computer-controlled manufacturing. It will seek new ways of extending the existing (but diminishing) native forest resource by including more plentiful materials to develop hybrid, engineered and product designed options that may compete with international engineered products.  

To enhance product appeal, this project will also exploit treatment and coating opportunities including but not limited to densification, thermal modification, and finishing systems either as individual treatments or in combination. Both internal and external applications will be investigated.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have a First or Upper Second-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research, analytical and design skills
  • The incumbent’s selection will be based on their expertise in product design and development, and their interest in sustainability and manufacturing with wood.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Nathan Kotlarewski for more information.

Closing Date (Note: this has been brought forward to 23 April 2019)

23 April 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Timber-rich construction systems are increasingly being used in commercial buildings. Mass timber panels are often used as primary structural and fabric elements in these solutions. The production of mass timber is being planned for northern Tasmania, using timber sawn from the available plantation hardwood estate. However, milling fibre-managed Tasmanian plantation eucalypt logs into dry and graded boards, converting these boards into glue laminated timber (glulam), cross laminated timber (CLT) and similar products, and using these products in buildings are all novel activities.  

This PhD project will focus on the potential to make and deliver efficient mass timber systems for building applications. The project will examine the use of mass timber for internal and external walls, floors, roof panels, and for architectural componentry using thin panels for internal and external joinery applications. High levels of engineering and manufacturing skills will need to be developed to service these target markets.

Outcomes from the project will advance the knowledge in the areas of structural design and manufacturing of mass timber elements using plantation hardwood. It will provide recommendations on board assembly and panel performance with various compositions and configurations. It will also produce structural results for the performance of glulam, CLT and similar products.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have a First or Upper Second-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • The Applicant’s selection will be based on their expertise in timber and/or production engineering systems.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Kyra Wood for more information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Creativity, Culture & Society

The Research Project

The relatively underdeveloped island of Tasmania saw significant expansion in the second half of the twentieth century. The geopolitical context out of which these developments grew is both unique and clearly defined. Tasmania thus offers a case study with which to investigate the theoretical foundations to Modernist architecture. By examining a series of case studies, the project looks to reveal the mechanisms by which a coherent language, perhaps even a tradition, developed. The project will include archival research; field work; historical–theoretical investigations; diagrammatic analyses. In additions to a written thesis, project outcomes may include exhibitions.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Dr Andrew Steen or Dr Helen Norrie for more information.

Closing Date (Note: this has been brought forward to 23 April 2019)

23 April 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Tasmanian hardwood species generally have limited natural durability, low resistance to bushfire attack and are relatively soft and these characteristics limit the material’s utility in key appearance and external markets.

As the timber’s material properties can be modified by chemical or thermal treatment, or by densification, this unique project will investigate if desirable material characteristics of Tasmanian hardwood species, Tasmanian oak and plantation hardwoods, can be improved so a product may be acceptable for several different markets.

Presently demonstrating durability constrains innovation. The only acceptable processes are long-term exposure tests (untreated and treated species), and the measured retention of preservative chemical in the wood. Accommodating or overcoming these constraints will be an important aspect of this project’s research.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have a First or Upper Second-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • The incumbent’s selection will be based on their expertise in physical and/or organic chemistry and their interest in wood science.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Kyra Wood for more information.

Closing Date

30 June 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

The University of Tasmania (UTAS) sees a clear opportunity to use its proposed state building program to stimulate and advance development of higher value timber products for use in construction in Tasmania. This project explores two key innovation questions: Firstly, how can the Tasmanian forestry industry adapt and use real-time testing from the NTP to transform industry opportunities? And secondly, how can the proposed new buildings be harnessed as ‘living laboratories’ to integrate and gather test data to support and advance the Tasmanian forestry and products sector?

This project will harness a multi-professional approach and existing UTAS industry-focused expertise to identify innovative techniques that will provide an industry up-lift using: Design thinking methodologies to identify opportunities and new solutions. This present an opportunity for a highly motivated PhD candidate to join a dedicated team of designers/architects and develop design propositions based on ‘living laboratories’ and highlighting the beneficial use of timber in building solutions, to support sustainable living environments.

Given the broad scope of this project the focus of the PhD candidate’s research will be determined after considering the applicants’ background and interests.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have a First or Upper Second-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • The Applicant’s selection will be based on their expertise in architecture and built environment systems.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Gregory Nolan for more information.

Closing Date (Note: this has been brought forward to 23 April 2019)

23 April 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

The quality of the hardwood drying strongly influences the profitability of milling. Timber boards dried without induced drying degrade can be sold at a premium, as differentiated appearance product for architectural applications. Timber with degrade features such as checking, collapse and splits must compete against commodity softwoods in structural and industrial markets, where their value does not cover log procurement and processing costs. The outcome for the producer is a loss of the product market value and this loss is forgone, while the producer still bears the high cost of production.

The project will aim to advance a prototype sensing technology suite, and an accompanying ‘app’ simulation decision support tool that were recently developed by Centre for Sustainable Architecture with Wood (CSAW) and the data analytics group Sense-T. These capabilities have been designed to predict timber moisture content during air-drying in the holding yard, which will improve the management of native and plantation grown hardwood eucalypt species. This prototype now requires further research work in Tasmania, which will validate its capabilities.

This presents an opportunity for a Masters by research student who will be involved in testing and validating the equipment suite. The incumbent will also assist in the development of a timber drying support tool application (App) for hardwood species in climates across Australia.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Master of Research degree.

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have a First or Upper Second-Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications, or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • The Applicant’s selection will be based on their expertise in physics and/or mechatronics and their interest in climatology and wood science.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Kyra Wood for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2020

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

Governments and communities have invested large amounts of project funds and efforts in vulnerability assessment and planning for adaptation to climate change. This research project investigates the long term effectiveness of this investment in improvement of resilience, reduction of vulnerability, and effectiveness of the adaptation options.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

More Information

Please contact Joanna Ellison for more information.

Closing Date

30 May 2020

The Research Project

Dr Kate Booth is inviting expressions of interest from those interested in undertaking a PhD. Located within one of the strongest geography schools in Australia, potential co-supervisors include:

Kate’s research is underpinned by an interest in place and places and the possibility of political dissent. Her work spans economic, social and cultural geography, and planning. She supervises students with a wide range of perspectives and topics. Working with Kate will allow you to define and develop your own area of interest. In addition, joining Kate’s team provides access to:

  • Tourism Tracer – world-first tracking and survey data of tourist movements within Tasmania. This rich dataset offers opportunity for analysis and critical interpretation in light of theories of space and place, mobility studies, and science and technology studies. Tourism Tracer is led by Dr Anne Hardy (University of Tasmania).
  • When Disaster Strikes: Geographies of Under-insurance – ground breaking research on the co-production of insurance in everyday life and in the context of socio-natural change. Team members: Dr Kate Booth, Professor Bruce Tranter and Chloe Lucas (University of Tasmania), Dr Christine Eriksen and Dr Eliza de Vet (University of Wollongong), and Associate Professor Shaun French (University of Nottingham, UK).

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial academic research experience evidenced by peer-reviewed publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Background in human geography
  • Demonstrated capacity in critical thinking
  • Evidence of an ability to understand, apply and critique theory

More Information

Please contact Dr Kate Booth for more information.

Closing Date

8th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The combined stress of ongoing climate change and extreme events such as heatwaves and droughts has been implicated in the decline of vegetation communities around the world. In some cases, already stressed communities cross a tipping point after an extreme weather event, resulting in widespread mortality or dieback. In other cases, a single event is sufficient to cause a biological response even in previously undisturbed environments (eg. following extreme high temperatures).  

This project will investigate if signs of stress can be identified before extreme biological responses occur in vegetation communities across Tasmania.

The project will use satellite data and aerial photography to identify vegetation responses such as dieback or mortality. The new Bureau of Meteorology Atmospheric high-resolution Regional Reanalysis for Australia (BARRA) will then be used to assess the weather conditions preceding and prevailing at the time of the response.

Tasmania is well suited to such research -we have diverse and unique ecosystems covering a range of elevations and climate zones; excellent vegetation mapping resources and fine-scaled weather and climate data such as BARRA which provides high-resolution reconstructions of the atmosphere at 1.5km spatial resolution and hourly time steps over the last two decades. The project provides a challenging research program with opportunities for diverse skill development, including skills in meteorological analyses, manipulating and visualising large geophysical datasets and Geographical Information Systems and Remote sensing.

Eligibility

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Practical skills in Geographical Information Systems and Remote sensing
  • Experience in statistical data analyses, computer scripting/programming (eg R, MatLab)
  • Demonstrated ability to write scientific publications        
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Rebecca Harris for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Dr Dave Kendal is seeking expressions of interest from prospective RHD students interested in understanding how and why we can better incorporate the community into environmental/nature policy and management decision-making. Global, national and local nature conservation policy has been through a period of being heavily framed as scientific, rational and evidence based. However, this framing largely excludes other ways of knowing nature, and the wide variety of ways that nature is important to people. Much public policy is being reframed to incorporate a wide range of values of the public, and management decision-making is increasingly including objectives other than species conservation and biodiversity protection. Dave has been a member of Australia's Threatened Species Scientific Committee and has a broad range of experiences managing research projects and supervising RHD students exploring topics related to public involvement in nature conservation.

Potential co-supervisors within Geography include: Prof Jason Byrne, Prof Jamie Kirkpatrick, A/Prof Aidan Davison, Dr Vanessa Adams, Dr Rebecca Harris

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Dr Dave Kendal for further information.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible .

The Research Project

Dr Dave Kendal is seeking expressions of interest from prospective HDR students interested in understanding the reciprocal effects of people on urban nature. Dave has a broad range of experiences managing research projects and supervising HDR students exploring topics such as:

  • What drives decision making in urban parks and street tree management? How can we incorporate the views of the public into urban landscape management?
  • Which urban trees will be best suited to our future climates? What traits of trees influence the benefits they provide to people and wildlife?
  • What roles does nature play for urban dwellers? How do values shape the way people think about and interact with urban nature and its management?
  • What role do cities play in the conservation of threatened species? Can species conservation co-occur with other urban landscape uses such as recreation and the provision of ecosystem services?

Dave has a particular interest in understanding how landscapes and people might be changing with social-ecological change. Potential co-supervisors within Geography include: Prof Jason Byrne, Prof Jamie Kirkpatrick, A/Prof Aidan Davison, Dr Vanessa Adams, Dr Rebecca Harris

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Dr Dave Kendal for more information.

Closing Date

30 October 2019

The Research Project

Machine learning approaches have been used for developing predictive models such as recommender systems, which seek to predict the preference that a user would give to an item. In recent years a new algorithm named Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) has been developed for training Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). With ELM, there are no iterations for adjusting connection weights and parameters tuning as in back propagation based ANNs.

While ELM has demonstrated superior performance in developing smaller recommender systems, one drawback of it is that, given an application with a big dataset, the number of neurons in its single hidden layer are typically very large and hence training the network can be computationally impractical. The ELM algorithm’s complexity is at least O(KM2), where K is the number of training instances and M is the number of hidden units. ELM also makes use of batch training, which leads to large memory consumption.

The project aims to evaluate several different solutions (such as representation learning and Deep ELMs) for these problems, and propose a new algorithm for maintaining the strengths of ELM but overcoming its weaknesses in performance and efficiency. Such a solution would be very valuable for developing more effective recommender systems in the current big data era.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Machine learning algorithms
  • Data mining and data analytics

More Information

Please contact Dr Shuxiang Xu for more information.

Closing Date

30 October 2019

The Research Project

Sentiment analysis (also known as opinion mining) refers to the use of natural language processing and text analysis to identify and extract subjective information in source materials. Sentiment analysis is widely applied to reviews and social media for a variety of applications, ranging from marketing to customer service. Sentiment analysis aims to determine the attitude of a speaker or a writer with respect to some topic or the overall contextual polarity of a document. The attitude may be his or her judgment or evaluation, affective state (the emotional state of the author when writing), or the intended emotional communication (the emotional effect the author wishes to have on the reader).

The rise of social media such as blogs and social networks has fuelled interest in sentiment analysis. With the proliferation of reviews, ratings, recommendations and other forms of online expression, online opinion has turned into a kind of virtual currency for businesses looking to market their products, identify new opportunities and manage their reputations. Companies look to automate the process of filtering out the noise, understanding the conversations, identifying the relevant content, and actioning it appropriately. This project aims at employing Machine Learning algorithms to automatically detect sentiment in user reviews of interested online business websites.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement
  • Candidates must demonstrate experience and strong interest in Machine Learning or general computational intelligence

More Information

Please contact Dr Shuxiang Xu for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Game mechanics are constructs of rules or methods designed for interaction with the game state, thus providing gameplay. All games use mechanics; however, theories and styles differ as to their ultimate importance to the game.
Different games may have the same mechanic (e.g. jumping) but differ in the exact implementation of that mechanic. The differences between these basic mechanics can be slight, or vast, and the differences between all of the core mechanics in a game can lead to games feeling entirely different for the player.

This study proposed developing techniques to sample the differences between mechanics across a range of games and to reverse engineer the techniques used to create them. From the collected mechanics a taxonomy could then be built to classify these games by the gameplay techniques they employ.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Algorithms
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognition

More information

Please contact Dr Ian Lewis for more information.

Closing Date

30th June 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Computers are starting to be used to recognise affect which can provide better assistance to human users. Models to be used to recognise human emotion which will lead to another form of computer-assisted learning, perceptual information retrieval, interaction, and human health. Affective Computing is the term used to define IT systems and devices, which support the collection of data about human emotions through their facial expression, their voice tone, activities and interaction with other humans. Unlike other traditional types of computing, “affective computing” provides a method to “read” and “understanding” the emotion state of the user. Therefore, enhancement of the links between human and human as well as the interaction between users and their computers is worthy of investigation.

The learning domain as an applied area is a relatively new area in terms of finding out the user’s emotional status in order to equip teacher/teaching modules to react and enhance the user’s learning experiences and learning outcomes.

The aim of this project is to investigate if there is any way for the early detection of possible difficulties of learners. If the detection is possible, teacher/teaching module can assist to solve the problem promptly via an application based on deep learning algorithms.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Degree-level undergraduate education in Computer Science or a related subject.
  • Must have a couple of peer-reviewed publication in Q1/Q2 journals or conference proceedings.
  • Understanding in Artificial Intelligence and computer science is essential, competent programming skills are desirable.
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as R, Phtyon, Matlab, or similar languages.
Assessment criteria

Applicants will be assessed and ranked according to the quality of their basis for entry research degree and institution, prior peer-reviewed publications, academic awards, project-specific skills, training or relevant industry experience, referee’s reports and supervisory support.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Soonja Yeom, School of Technology, Environments and Design (ICT Discipline), for further information.

.

Closing Date

31st December 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Computers are starting to be used to recognise affect which can provide better assistance to human users. Models to be used to recognise human emotion which will lead to another form of computer-assisted learning, perceptual information retrieval, interaction, and human health. Affective Computing is the term used to define IT systems and devices, which support the collection of data about human emotions through their facial expression, their voice tone, activities and interaction with other humans. Unlike other traditional types of computing, “affective computing” provides a method to “read” and “understanding” the emotion state of the user. Therefore, enhancement of the links between human and human as well as the interaction between users and their computers is worthy of investigation.

The learning domain as an applied area is a relatively new area in terms of finding out the user’s emotional status in order to equip teacher/teaching modules to react and enhance the user’s learning experiences and learning outcomes.

The aim of this project is to investigate if there is any way for the early detection of possible difficulties of learners. If the detection is possible, teacher/teaching module can assist to solve the problem promptly via an application based on deep learning algorithms.

Eligibility:

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Experience with programming  in deep learning
  • Critical thinking
  • Programming skills

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact the Soonja Yeom for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The maintenance of paved roadways and rail corridors is a crucial factor in the management of Tasmania's transport infrastructure.  Timely correction of faults is necessary to maintain safety and reduce repair costs. Traditionally roads are surveyed by inspectors to capture the longitudinal and transverse profiles, the condition of surface and edges. If detected, surface defects are assessed and if possible are either addressed on the spot or are assigned a priority rating for repair work. These manual surveys are costly and time-consuming.  Automated solutions consist of several different types of equipment such as laser scanners, ground penetrating radars, accelerometers, acoustic and pressure sensors, still and video cameras and positioning systems.  While these systems can improve ongoing costs, they need to be specifically developed for each application and the initial outlay can be prohibitive for some applications.  

This project will endeavour to create a low cost automated system for defect detection that can be used in a number of different transport contexts.  The primary method for achieving this will be the use of deep convolutional neural networks operating on video data only.

Candidates from the following disciplines are eligible to apply
  • ICT
  • Computer Science
The following eligibility criteria apply to this project

Please refer to the entry requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Research degree: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Knowledge of Deep Learning Techniques
  • Experience working with video data
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Robert Illington for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Higher Education is transforming with advancement of internet technologies and globalisation. Students are becoming more diverse, heterogeneous and large. The traditional way of university teaching, with one teaching material for all, cannot work and is currently making several students dissatisfied. Due to increases in the competition from online courses such as MooCs, it is becoming more and more important for higher education institutions to provide their students with a good learning experience. They need to increase student retention and make them engaged. Moreover, they have to deal with limited resources, thus making personalised education which an individual student will look for, an impossibility.

Due to these challenges, big data analytics have been seen as a solution. We have technology and access to more data about each student than before. Thus, if one can process this large data and generate insights, the education personalisation is not an unreachable goal. The sentimental analysis, data mining, machine learning and recommendation systems are already helping in areas such as Medical care system.

The aim of this project is to develop BigData analytical models and techniques for improving learning among students and improving education processes.

Eligibility

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates having knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Strong Algorithmic Skills
  • Programming Skills
  • Distributed Systems

More information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

BigData applications for their execution requires not only consideration of their computation requirements but also of their data. IoT (Internet of Things) applications have led to further importance of fast execution of big data applications. Many solutions have been proposed to run them in a single cloud. However, due to distribution of big data across several regions and each region having their own privacy policy, multi-Cloud environments become important for efficient and privacy preserving execution. However, these environments also bring challenges as large data needs to be transferred between different Cloud computing environments using the Internet which can adversely affect the execution performance and also needs more specialised security frameworks to preserve privacy of the data. In this PhD project, new mechanisms and frameworks will be investigated which can allow execution of BigData applications across multiple Cloud environments for IoT applications.

Eligibility

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates having knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Strong Algorithmic Skills
  • Programming Skills
  • Distributed Systems

More information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

For environment conservation, on-going bird monitoring is required which is done through acoustic sensors installed across different forests in Australia. Currently, analysis of this is done by few specialists who need to hear long recordings to detect species of birds and then do further analysis. This is really infeasible when one talks about petabytes of data to analyse. However, current machine learning methods which can scale to bigdata and detect bird species are not available. This PhD project will investigate such machine learning methods that can detect bird species in real time.

Eligibility

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates having knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics

Contact for more information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Human centred design and the more focused area of human computer interaction have emerged as key approaches when making information accessible to people across a range of human conditions, including but not limited to people with low literacy skills and people suffering from one or more cognitive conditions. This project leverages the information grounds framework developed at the University of Washington (Seattle, USA) and revisited in our research group to understand the specific needs of a target population and then derive ways to address the specific needs of individuals in addition to groups.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research skills in addition to an interest in and passion for the human condition
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Human Centered Design/Human Computer Interaction
  • Information Systems/Library and Information Science (LIS)
  • Psychology

More Information

Please contact Professor Christopher Lueg for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Theme

  • Better Health
  • Data, Knowledge & Decisions

The Research Project

Given the important challenges associated with the processing of brain signals obtained from neuroimaging modalities, fuzzy sets, neural networks and evolutional systems have been proposed as a useful and effective framework for the modelling and understanding of brain activity patterns as well as to enable a direct communication pathway between the brain and external devices (brain computer/machine interfaces). However, most of the research so far has focused on lab-based applications in constrained scenarios, which cannot be extrapolated to realistic field contexts. Considering the decoding of brain activity, the computational Intelligence models, including fuzzy sets, neural networks, and evolutional computation, provide an excellent tool to overcome the challenge of learning from brain activity patterns that are very likely to be affected by non-stationary behaviors and high uncertainty. The application of computational Intelligence methods to learning and modeling​ has recently demonstrated its remarkable usefulness for coping with the effects of extremely noisy environments, as well as the variability and dynamicity of brain signals. Additionally, neurobiological studies have suggested that the behavior of neural cells exhibits functional patterns that resemble the properties of intelligent computation to encode logical perception. This paves the way for developing new computational intelligence techniques based on intelligence abstractions that foster the capabilities for modeling and understanding brain function from a quantitative point of view.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a {Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Research} degree.

The following eligibility criteria also apply:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector

Selection Criteria

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Foundational programming skills
  • Statistics

More Information

Please contact Zehong Cao for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

BigData applications for their execution requires not only consideration of their computation requirements but also of their data. Many solutions are proposed to run them in single cloud. However, due to distribution of big data across several regions and each region having their own privacy policy, Multi-Cloud environments becomes important for efficient and privacy preserving execution. However, these environments also bring challenge as large data need to be transferred between different Cloud computing environments using internet which can adversely affect the execution performance and also needs more specialised security frameworks to preserve privacy of the data. In this PhD project, new mechanisms and frameworks will be investigated which can allow execution of BigData applications across multiple Cloud environments.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Distributed systems
  • Programming skills
  • Mathematical skills, particularly optimisation

More Information

Please contact Dr Saurabh Garg for more information.

Closing Date

30 September 2019

Research Themes

  • Data, Knowledge & Decisions
  • Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Harvesting trees that contain internal defects such as knots and cracks is neither financially nor environmentally sustainable. In native forest, high quality sawlogs can only be produced from knot free logs and forest habitats and ecology can only be maintained by selecting and retaining suitable habitat trees. Similarly in hardwood plantations it is impossible to produce sawlogs from knotty or cracked timber. For both types of forests challenges remain in being able to identify internal defects in a timely and cost-effective manner prior to harvesting.

This current project aims to:

  • Proof of concept through trials in native and plantation eucalypt forests
  • Build a predictive imputation model for different types of tree species and different growing conditions across Australia

The field assessment involve using various non-destructive techniques including ultrasonic and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) that use electromagnetic and ultrasonic sound waves respectively to penetrate the internal structure of standing trees. These assessment techniques will assist forest growers to more accurately evaluate the quality of growing stems in the field. A wide selection of growing conditions and forest types will be assessed to generate data that can then be used to generate a software algorithm for predictive imputation of likely internal defect rates within particular forests under particular growing conditions.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Thorough understanding of NDE principles and techniques
  • Demonstrated experience supporting new software/hardware development and mobile applications
  • Minimum of 1 year of experience in at least 2 of the following test methods: Ultrasonic, Magnetic Particle, Eddy Current, Shearography, or Thermography
  • Must have a couple of peer-reviewed publication in Q1/Q2 journals or conference proceedings
  • Technical background in computational solid mechanics
  • Experience with modeling and simulation tools
  • Ability to assess tool capabilities and limitations when selecting and utilizing tools to perform simulations
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as C++, Python, Matlab, or similar languages

More Information

Please contact Dr Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri for more information.

Closing Date

31 October 2019

  • Applicants should contact the supervisor (Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri), and submit their application as soon as possible.
  • Applicants wishing to commence in 2019 should complete the Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application processes as soon as possible.

Research Theme

  • Data, Knowledge and Decisions
  • Better Health

The Research Project

Non-invasive detection of illnesses by human breath analysis is an emerging field of bio-medical diagnostics representing a rapid, economic, and simple alternative to standard blood analysis and endoscopy. The bulk matrix of the breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and inert gases. Acetone is a selective breath marker to type-1 diabetes. It is produced by hepatocytes via decarboxylation of excess acetyl-coenzyme A. The operation of a direct-reading, selective chemical sensor is based on the existence of a selective recognition event that results in a change in a measurable parameter. Most of the common commercial gas sensors are based on semiconductors, polymer materials and the methods used for sensing are optical methods, calorimetric methods, gas chromatography and acoustic methods.

In this project a titanium-based gas sensor will be developed for selective detection of acetone for easy diagnosis of diabetes by breath analysis. The synthetized titanium material can be composed with a semiconductor to investigate its material characterization. The prepared materials will be characterized using FTIR, XRD, FESEM-EDX, TEM, XPS and BET and other required characterizations.

The core of this project will involve developing an appropriate user-centred design for patients to be able to  process, understand and interpret electronic signals or data produced by the gas sensor. The input part then consists of transducers that gather and transform information from the physical world with the last step of the transformation resulting in an electrical signal.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Degree-level undergraduate education in ICT, chemistry or a related subject
  • Must have a couple of peer-reviewed publication in Q1/Q2 journals or conference proceedings.
  • Experience with modelling and simulation tools.
  • Ability to assess tool capabilities and limitations when selecting and utilizing tools to perform simulations.
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as C++, Python, Matlab, or similar languages.

More Information

Please contact Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Much of real world network data are visualised as node-link diagrams for sense making purposes. In drawing networks, link or edge crossings should be avoided since they are confusing. To achieve this, people have proposed to draw curved edges, rather than straight-line edges, to reduce the visual clutter. Curves also make diagrams look more visually pleasing. In contrast to the expectations, recent research have found that curved-edge diagrams do not necessarily lead to better human task performance. However, it is not known why and how curved-edge diagrams are not better in helping people read networks, and when curved-edge visualisations are better.

To answer this question, this project will use the latest eye tracking technology to understand how people execute visual queries moment by moment. More specifically in this project, the student will conduct literature review, and design and conduct a series of user studies to investigate 1) how people read straight-line and curved-edge networks; and 2) why and when one edge style is better than another.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience with publications
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Applied statistics
  • Programming skills

More Information

Please contact Dr Tony Huang for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Increasingly, collaboration across distance requires communication about specific physical objects, such as valuable cultural artifacts or pricey merchandise. This project builds on well-published PhD research looking into the annotation of museum artifacts to generalise the approach to a range of situations where remote collaboration is anchored in physical objects present at particular locations.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research skills in addition to an interest in and passion for the human condition
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Human Computer Interaction/Interaction Design
  • Design and Development, including Prototyping
  • Digital Libraries/Digital Humanities

More Information

Please contact Professor Christopher Lueg for more information.

Closing Date

31 May 2019

The Research Project

Modern 3D renderers capture and store many images for a variety of uses. These images often include depth information and are used for effects such as reflections, ambient occlusion, and time-warping. Given the abundance of image-based data available this project will investigate novel ways that this information can be used.

The project will consider the use of layered depth images to improve existing techniques such as transparency and image warping; and novel uses for depth and layered depth images including global illumination, image-based rendering, ambient occlusion approximation, post-process anti-aliasing, and stereoscopic image generation.

The impact of these techniques on the design of the rendering framework and rendering hardware will also be considered.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Algorithms
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognition

More Information

Please contact Dr Robert Ollington for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

We have developed an automated blood oxygen level controller for preterm infants that has recently been undergoing clinical trials. This PhD project aims to make further advances by investigating enhancements to our current oxygen control algorithm and technology. The project will focus on topics such as development of advanced sensing technology for respiration and oxygenation using imaging based systems and electronic sensing technology. This will include development of advanced image processing and/or sensor signal processing algorithms.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply, including Biomedical, Mechatronic and Electrical/Electronics Engineering.

More Information

Please contact Dr Tim Gale for more information.

Closing Date

30 September 2019

Research Themes

  • Data, Knowledge & Decisions
  • Environment, Resources & Sustainability

The Research Project

Demand for effective and efficient approaches to map, monitor and manage underwater environments continues to grow. Industrial, climatological and environmental activities increasingly require ever-more accurate modelling and analysis of underwater environments. Many technological approaches have already been developed to address challenges imposed by darkness, depth/pressure and salinity. However water turbidity (cloudiness) continues to be a major inhibitor underwater, especially where there is a requirement for real-time data.

This project aims to contribute to the science of methods for data capture and analysis of real-time vision in turbid circumstances. To test these methods the research team have forged collaboration with an industrial partner who is actively engaged in industrial underwater timber harvesting. This project presents a unique opportunity to enhance the activities and advancing the science of real-time vision in turbid waters.

Recent improvements in underwater video systems and in processing algorithms for image filtering and detection suggest a new research opportunity. The plan is to mount a video camera system on the harvester head to capture video-images that will be processed in real-time to provide improved vision clarity in these turbid underwater environments. It is anticipated that this improved vision combined with improved sonar mapping will enable the harvester to locate, manoeuvre and safely harvest submerged tree stems at greater depth than is currently possible.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Thorough understanding of information systems, big data, acoustic
  • Demonstrated experience supporting new software/hardware development and mobile applications
  • Experience with modelling and simulation tools
  • Ability to assess tool capabilities and limitations when selecting and utilizing tools to perform simulations
  • Proficiency with modern programming languages such as C++, Python, Matlab, or similar languages

More Information

Please contact Dr Mohammad Sadegh Taskhiri for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Practical applications of knowledge base systems to multidisciplinary domains with "big data" are typically limited to standard machine learning approaches – you take the domain data, develop a model and then apply it, with little further modification of the model possible. Unfortunately, such techniques limit the future practicality or maintenance of the developed system – additional knowledge or knowledge maintenance is a hard, cumbersome task that requires redeveloping the learnt model from scratch.

The project will focus on the development of hybrid method that can maintain knowledge base for new pattern found in the future. It will investigate how to improve existing machine learning algorithms in determining patterns (classification) in data sets by using a modified. The proposed system increases accuracy of results and greater computational efficiency for large datasets ("big data".) Then the system then supplements the model produced by using an incremental knowledge acquisition system, RDR (Compton and Jansen 1988)). Standard RDR incrementally adds to this machine-learnt knowledge base by allowing a (non ICT) domain expert to incrementally, independently supplement this knowledge model by way of adding new rules (for classification), and correcting or deleting incorrect classifications. This means the resulting system should be able to adapt quickly to new data – a deficiency from which traditional machine learning systems suffer.

Our future theoretical enhancements to the system include adding the capability of allowing simultaneous multiple classifications (Kang 1995). Existing machine learning algorithms for classification technically can only conclude with one classification at a time for a given data case – whereas some expert domains can greatly benefit from multiple classification. This is an exciting possibility for future research.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

More Information

Please contact Dr Byeong Kang for more information.

Closing Date

24 May 2019

The Research Project

Soils, though often modelled as continuum, are particulate in nature. Professor Andrew Chan has performed extensive research on the interaction of particles and fluid using the discrete element method and Lattice Boltzmann method. This project is to extend current research to three-dimensions, non-circular particles and implementation on a parallel computer. The method can then be applied to various practical engineering problems such as liquefaction of soil, undersea slope failure, behaviour of saturated soil under earthquake and dynamic loading as well as undersea extract of ores.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Programming skills
  • Engineering mechanics

More Information

Please contact Professor Andrew Chan for more information.

Closing Date

31 May 2019

The Research Project

Reinforcement Learning has been successfully applied to a variety of problems ranging from the practical to the abstract. However, despite considerable effort resulting in partially effective solutions, problems where the action space is very large and/or continuous remain very difficult for RL-based approaches.

By utilising previous work on Concurrent Q-Learning, this project aims to rephrase the problem from a search of action-space to a search of goal-space, which it is hoped will be a more tractable problem. Rather than learning which action of many will take the agent closer to the goal, the agent will learn to map the desired change in state directly to actions. This mapping can be learned by observing the effect of actions in general rather than learning the effect of each possible action when in each possible state.

There are many real world problems where such a solution would be extremely valuable. For example, a robot with many degrees of freedom has a high dimensional and potentially continuous action space. Traditional RL-techniques for such a robot would learn very slowly and the final solution would likely be an approximation (discretisation) of the true solution at best.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Algorithms
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognition

More Information

Please contact Dr Robert Ollington for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

The Internet of Things (IoT) has encouraged the rapid growth of ubiquitous displays, yet research into how multiple displays are currently being used and how they could be more effectively used is limited to niche markets. E-learning is one area that stands to benefit from this growing number of displays, be that in the classroom or in the home. The future use of this technology will be influenced by a myriad of features ranging from the combinatorial use of multiple displays of different form factors, to the semantic division of the content that is to be communicated, and the target audience to which this content is to be communicated to.

This work will investigate how ubiquitous displays in e-learning environments can increase student engagement with the learning content, other students, and the teaching team. The work will also investigate the factors that encourage and oppose take-up of ubiquitous display technologies in the classroom, including the perceptions and the cost realisation of the technologies.

This work lies at the intersect of three separate themes:

  • HCI
  • Wearable and shared displays
  • E-learning

The outcomes will contribute significantly to improving our understanding of the use of multiple display technology in e-learning environments.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Human Computer Interaction
  • User Centred Design, Prototyping, Testing and Evaluation

More Information

Please contact Dr Winyu Chinthammit for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2021

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

In this project, HDR students implement (based on TensorFlow) of state-of-the-art Machine Learning (ML) algorithms to easily train intelligent agents for various games. The research goal is to speed up the learning process of multiple agents and allow each agent receives higher rewards in a game scenario. These trained agents can be presented in the demo workshop and can be used for multiple purposes, including testing of game builds and controlling behavior​.

In this project, we used the Unity platform, a new open-source toolkit, which has been developed for creating and interacting with simulation environments. Specifically, the Unity ML Agents Toolkit is an open-source Unity plugin that enables games and simulations to serve as environments for training intelligent agents. This project will use this toolkit to develop dynamic multi-agent interaction, and agents can be trained using reinforcement learning, imitation learning, neuro-evolution, or other machine learning methods through a simple-to-use Python API.

Additionally, this project is mutually beneficial for both students and AI researchers as it provides a central platform where advances in AI can be evaluated on Unity's rich environments and then made accessible to the industry and research developer communities.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • The project is open to domestic and international candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Candidate from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply
Selection Criteria
  • Data Mining and Predictive Analytics Skills
  • Strong programming skills
  • Statistics experience
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Zehong Cao for further information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

The Research Project

Virtual Reality (VR) systems are being released in 2016 by a number of high-profile vendors with Google Cardboard, Samsung Gear, Sony PlayStation VR, Oculus Rift, and HTC Vive.

It is assumed that Serious Games will benefit from the increase in immersion and presence that the user feels when using VR, but study is required to see whether this effect leads to greater benefits for the purpose that the game is trying to achieve, be it education, behaviour change, rehabilitation, or data collection.

It is proposed to use a variety of techniques including physiological measures, participant observation, self-efficacy studies, surveys, and direct data comparisons to study the effects of players in serious games while in VR and while using more traditional systems.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to Australian (domestic) and International candidates
  • The PhD must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills
  • Applicants must meet English requirements, or be able to do so before commencement

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Algorithms
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Cognition

More Information

Please contact Dr Ian Lewis for more information.

Closing Date

29 April 2019

The Research Project

Waterlogging is one of the most hazardous natural constraints affecting agricultural crop production. In Australia, the annual loss in barley production is around $12 million in high rainfall zones and $10 – 15 million in other regions of Australia where waterlogging occurs 1-2 times in a 5 year cycle. The most economical way of reducing the damage caused by waterlogging is to introduce waterlogging tolerance into current varieties.

The research program from the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA) has set up a reliable facility to screen for waterlogging tolerance. Using this facility, they have identified a new QTL controlling one of the major tolerance mechanisms, i.e. aerenchyma formation, in roots under waterlogging conditions. The new QTL from a wild barley accession not only produces a greater proportion of aerenchyma but makes a greater contribution to the overall waterlogging tolerance. This gene has already been mapped with more than 100 co-segregating markers being identified.

This project will target on:

  • Fine map the waterlogging gene on chromosome 4H in cultivated barley varieties (Yerong and YYXT)
  • Characterise the candidate gene through RNAseq, RT-PCR and gene transformation
  • The haplotypes of the gene will be investigated in a natural population
  • The mechanism of waterlogging tolerance will also be illustrated
  • The gene marker will be provided to breeder for use in barley breeding programs

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Plant molecular biology
  • Plant genetics

More Information

Please contact Professor Meixue Zhou for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

Genome wide association studies (GWAS) using over 300 wheat accessions have revealed some tentative QTL for acid soil tolerance. These QTL are located to different positions to the known tolerance genes. To confirm that these QTL are different, different crosses will be made and the F2 populations will be screened for both acid soil tolerance and markers closely linked to previously reported genes. These populations which showed no correlation between acid soil tolerance and the selected markers will be genotyped and new QTL will be identified. Physiological studies will be conducted to assist the search of candidate genes.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Molecular biology
  • Plant science

More Information

Please contact Professor Meixue Zhou for more information.

Closing Date

31 December 2019

Funding

This project will include a AUD$27,082pa living allowance scholarship for three years, with a possible six month extension, and a tuition fee scholarship for up to four years. 

The Grains Research and Development Corporation of Australia will provide operational funds to support the research.

Research Theme

Environment, Resources and Sustainability

The Research Project

Genome wide association studies (GWAS) using over 300 wheat accessions have revealed some tentative QTL which are different from the gene introgressed from wheat grass. In this project, potential QTL for barley yellow dwarf (BYD) resistance in wheat will be identified/confirmed through doubled haploid populations. Further fine mapping will be conducted on the major QTL for BYD resistance.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The project is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Molecular biology
  • Plant science

More Information

Please contact Professor Meixue Zhou for more information.

Closing Date

31st July 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

Increasing the legume component pastures is beneficial for animal production and health, and environmental sustainability due to the fixation of nitrogen by legume-associated bacteria.

Sensitivity to drought is a major limitation to broader perennial legume adaptation across much of the high rainfall permanent pasture region of SE Australia. Strong evidence exists that elevated levels of phosphorus and lime improves pasture persistence and recovery following drought. Potassium (K) is also implicated in pasture response to drought due to its known internal function in osmoregulation, including the control of water loss through stomata. However, little previous research has explored the extent to which increased K nutrition may improve drought tolerance of pasture legumes, or through which mechanisms increased persistence might be achieved. Micronutrients such as molybdenum (Mo) and boron (B) are also very important in legume growth and persistence, but their effect on drought tolerance is also unknown.

This project will use a series of glasshouse and field experiments to examine the effect of K, Mo and B on the response of a drought-sensitive forage species that is of international significance, white clover (Trifolium repens L.).

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply:
  • Pasture science
  • Agronomy
  • Plant nutrition
Selection Criteria. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Experience in pasture science is preferred
  • Demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Beth Penrose, for further information.

Closing Date

8th May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

It has been estimated that there are over 1500 centre pivot irrigators in Tasmania, one of the fastest uptakes of centre pivot technology anywhere in the world. Part of the reason for such rapid growth is the belief that centre pivot irrigation is 95-98 % efficient. However, the recent Water for Profit, Dairy Smarter Irrigation projects together with emerging data from irrigation consultants demonstrate that in many places current centre pivot irrigation is ineffective resulting from insufficient infiltration and wetting of the topsoil. Growers are describing the issue as the 'green drought' in which irrigation is only able to keep plant alive, not increase soil moisture sufficiently to allow for productive growth.

This PhD project will seek to will quantify the effectiveness and efficiency of current irrigation practices in Tasmanian dairy production systems, with emphasis on ways to improve centre pivot irrigation effectiveness in low infiltration rate and compacted soils. Research will consist of three components (i) benchmarking existing irrigation practice, effectiveness, efficiency and soil hydrological behaviour, (ii) improved soil management and compaction relief technology, and (iii) retrofitting and optimising existing centre pivots to better match engineering and management to soil constraints.

Eligibility

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply. The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:

  • The scholarship is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class or second class upper Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector.
  • Must have (or be able to obtain) an Australian driver's license

See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Selection Criteria
  • Must have knowledge or skills in one or more of; soil science, dairy production, irrigation science
  • Field based research experience; preferably in soil science or irrigation science
  • Ability, to measure, collect and analyse field based data.
  • Ability to use, or acquire the ability to use, soil water modelling tools or irrigation models
  • Ability to present research in written and oral formats
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Marcus Hardie for further information.

Closing Date

31st May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

This PhD project will seek to characterise genetic variation of native pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) to withstand two key stressors; dieback and drought. Native pepper is naturally distributed throughout parts of south eastern Australia, including all of Tasmania. It is a "keystone" understorey species that is pivotal to vegetation structure in many plant communities. The species is also remarkable for its ability to transgress geographic dryland barriers, despite a primitive vascular system, which suggests genetic variation or plasticity in drought tolerance.

Native pepper is harvested from native forest but also grown in plantations. Our studies have demonstrated that many cultivars are highly susceptible to Phytophthora cinnamomi, the cause of dieback and rapid plant death. This project we will seek to characterise genetic variation for superior resistance to Phytophthora cinnamomi and tolerance to drought, using novel screening methods. These include transcriptomics to examine disease resistance responses and optical methods to visualise xylem cavitation of plants under water stress.

Project supervisors will include Dr Karen Barry (UTAS, TIA), Dr Matthew Wilson (UTAS, TIA), Prof. Tim Brodribb (UTAS, School of Natural Sciences) and Prof. David Cahill (Deakin University).

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The project is open to Australian and New Zealand (domestic) candidates and to International candidates.
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
  • Must be physically fit to participate in field work in remote locations
  • Must have (or be willing to obtain) an Australian driver's license
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply:
  • Plant pathology
  • Plant physiology
  • Horticulture
Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Relevant research experience, including molecular biology
  • Strong technical and communication skills
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Karen Barry, for further information.

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Closing Date

1st February 2020

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

Campus

Cradle Coast

The Research Project

The project will explore the nexus between profitability, sheep and beef productivity, greenhouse gas mitigation and carbon sequestration of livestock businesses in an increasingly variable climate. The candidate will be required to conduct an integrated assessment including farm case studies in regions of Tasmania, including the Midlands and King Island. The study will identify farming systems adaptations that are profitable, environmentally sustainable and targeted towards future market opportunities.

Adaptation options will explore pasture feedbase including new legumes and grasses, animal genetics, new technology (e.g. virtual fencing) and management options, as well as options to capture value from emerging carbon markets. Through computer modelling data analysis and work with farmers, the project will inform future research and development investment in grazing systems with higher resilience to climate change and challenges across eastern Australia and provide a series of farm systems that can be used to either demonstrate or research options to raise profitability in each region.

The following eligibility criteria apply to this project:
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Knowledge of agriculture, including livestock or pasture systems
  • Understanding of modelling
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

if requesting additional information from Dr Matthew Harrison, please also send your CV.

Type

Living allowance plus operational funds

Value & Duration

This scholarship provides $27.596 (2019 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. The scholarship also includes $9,166 pa operational funds to support the PhD research project.

Further information is available on the Scholarships webpage.

Closing date

31st December 2019

The Research Project

Serradellas (Ornithopus spp.) are promising alternative, annual pasture legumes with an expanding role in southern Australia.  Traditionally, yellow serradellas (O. compressus) have been used in light, acid soils where their production can exceed that of benchmark pasture legumes such as subterranean clover.  However, development of improved yellow and French serradella (O. sativus) cultivars has, since 2009, underpinned an expansion of serradella use in phase-farming systems.  More recently, serradellas have been found to be highly phosphorus-efficient and it is anticipated that serradella-based grazing systems may require up to 30% less phosphorus fertiliser than subterranean clover-based pastures. This has both national and global significance given Australia’s dependence on phosphorus fertiliser and the importance of the world’s finite phosphate rock reserves for food security.  

Further expansion of serradella use into the permanent pasture zone depends on the suitability of cultivars for high yields and persistence in the southern Australian climate.  However, the optimum time of flowering for reliable seed production, the regulation of flowering response to climate and the physiology of seed growth in the serradellas is largely unknown.  

This project will address these gaps in knowledge and will define how new serradella varieties can be developed for use in the permanent pasture systems of southern Australia.

The student is expected to be based at CSIRO in Canberra for the duration of their PhD, with regular contact with their UTAS supervisors and annual trips to UTAS.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Pasture science
  • Plant physiology
  • Genetics and breeding

Funding

This scholarship is jointly funded by CSIRO Agriculture and Food and the University of Tasmania.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor.

To determine eligibility, applicants should also contact the Research Hub for their proposed area of research and request an Expression of Interest Form (EOI).  Further information on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

If a Graduate Research Administration Officer (GRAO) subsequently invites you to complete an application after you have submitted an EOI, please visit the Apply Now website and complete an application via the University of Tasmania's Online Application System. 

Please indicate under Scholarship Support that you wish to be considered for a living allowance scholarship.  

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More information

Please contact Dr Richard Simpson (CSIRO, Canberra) (richard.simpson@csiro.au) or Dr Beth Penrose (beth.penrose@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Closing Date

31st May 2019

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

The Research Project

The overall objective of this project is to improve the efficacy of Trichoderma biopesticides, which have demonstrated ability to reduce incidence of Botrytis cinerea disease ("grey mould") in fruit crops such as sweet cherry and grapevine. The conventional practice to control this pathogen is with fungicides, however it is frequently known to develop fungicide resistance and many major markets are seeking to reduce pesticide use and residue. It has been predicted that within the next 30 years the market size of biopesticides will equal that of synthetic crop protection products. The approach of this project is to investigate the survival biology of Trichoderma harzianum and understand how it interacts with Botrytis cinerea in the field. The PhD project will involve both laboratory and field studies to determine what limits survival and therefore how to optimise efficacy of the biopesticide. Both conventional and molecular plant pathology techniques will be utilised. The project will also investigate whether viral infection may be limiting survival and performance of the biopesticide. The outcomes of this project will be knowledge that can be implemented by manufacturers of Trichoderma biopesticides to improve their efficacy and therefore reduce disease in horticultural crops.

This project is funded by the National PhD Leadership Program in Horticulture. See here for more information:

http://www.utas.edu.au/tia/study/national-phd-leadership-program-in-horticulture

The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to Australian Citizens or Permanent Residents
  • Research must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a first-class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector. See the following web page for entry requirements: http://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong technical, research and analytical skills.
  • Applicants must have good oral and verbal communication skills.
  • Commitment to industry engagement and collaboration
  • Leadership potential
Candidates from the following disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:
  • Plant pathology; horticulture and/or crop protection
Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Karen Barry, for further information.

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Featured Projects

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Laura Jackson is a postgraduate student in the ARC Industrial Transformation Research Hub for Transforming the Mining Value Chain at CODES, University of Tasmania.

Laura is trying to find predictive methods for determining the potential impacts of mine waste on the environment.