RESEARCH WEEK SEMINAR | Celebrity Chefs, Consumption Politics and Food Labelling: Exploring the Contradictions

Summary

RESEARCH WEEK SEMINAR

Start Date

30th Aug 2016 5:30pm

End Date

30th Aug 2016 6:30pm


Institute for the Study of Social Change logo

Seminar presented by

Dr Michelle Phillipov, University of Tasmania

Michelle Phillipov

This seminar examines the media campaigns of British celebrity chefs Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall that promote ‘free range’ chicken and eggs as more ethical, sustainable and desirable alternatives to their conventionally grown counterparts. It reveals how both chefs’ (otherwise well intentioned) interventions in the complex and highly contested space of ‘free range’ labelling and certification often occurs without sufficient sensitivity to the specificities of the particular labelling and certification systems they are promoting. Instead, ‘free range’ is typically presented as a single, idealised and uncontested standard. This exposes Oliver and Fearnley-Whittingstall to a range of contradictions resulting from the need to present complex information on healthy, animal friendly and sustainably produced food in simple, unambiguous and entertaining messages, and highlights the limits of consumption politics as means to effect widespread change within our food systems. This research emerges from the Sustainable Food Systems Flagship research project run though the Institute for the Study of Social Change at the University of Tasmania.

Michelle Phillipov is an ARC DECRA Research Fellow and Senior Lecturer in Journalism, Media and Communications. Her DECRA research explores the current 'mainstreaming' of food politics that has occurred in television cooking shows, cookbooks, advertising, news and online media, and examines the relationships between the media and food industries that have resulted from this intensified media focus on food. More broadly, Michelle's research explores the pleasures and politics of 'extreme' media and cultural forms, including food, health and music. She is the author of Death Metal and Music Criticism: Analysis at the Limits (Lexington Books, 2012) and Fats: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2016).

W H E N
Tuesday 30 August, 5.30pm to 6.30pm

W H E R E
Harvard Lecture Theatre 1, Centenary Building, Sandy Bay Campus

C O N T A C T
Dr Louise Grimmer