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Stories of social enterprise

UTAS Institute for Regional Development Research Associate Kylie Eastley, IRD Director Robyn Eversole and Launceston City Council Deputy Mayor Ald. Jeremy Ball at the Two Hands Coffee Cart, an example of a social enterprise, in Launcestonís Civic Square yesterday for the launch of the publication  Tasmanian Social Enterprises: Capturing Their Stories.

A new publication profiling the stories of Tasmania's expanding social enterprise sector has been launched in Launceston.

Tasmanian Social Enterprises: Capturing their stories profiles 13 organisations across the state, all of whom generate profits for public benefit from enterprises as diverse as a wildlife sanctuary and commercial printing business.

Kylie Eastley, Research Associate at the UTAS Institute for Regional Development (IRD), is author of the report. The stories have been compiled with the support of the Tasmanian Leaders program and Tasmanian Regional Arts.

"Following the release of the Tasmanian Social Enterprise Study this time last year, there was a general call from the sector to build awareness about successful social enterprises, and there is no better way to do so than through stories," said Ms Eastley.

"Many of the organisations profiled have been working away quietly in communities, developing the skills of people marginalised by circumstance, giving them the opportunity to be employed and productive contributors in ways that really matter," Ms Eastley said.

IRD Director Dr Robyn Eversole said the publication would support the work of the newly formed Tasmanian Social Enterprise Network which has 150 organisations registered. It forms part of ongoing research by the IRD into social enterprise.

"The publication is designed as a resource for organisations seeking to establish a social enterprise and highlights the critical success factors as well as the challenges, both big and small," she said.

Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Development) and Director of the Cradle Coast Campus Professor Janelle Allison said social enterprise represented a third component in regional economies.

"This publication will help us understand more about their social and economic impact in communities across the state," she said.

The launch was conducted by the Deputy Mayor of Launceston City Council Ald Jeremy Ball and was catered for by the social enterprises Two Hands Coffee Cart and Big Bickies.

Image: UTAS Institute for Regional Development Research Associate Kylie Eastley, IRD Director Robyn Eversole and Launceston City Council Deputy Mayor Ald. Jeremy Ball at the Two Hands Coffee Cart, an example of a social enterprise, in Launceston's Civic Square yesterday for the launch of the publication: Tasmanian Social Enterprises: Capturing Their Stories.

Published on: 23 May 2012 4:33pm