Projects


Cherries

Cherry quality and soil health

(2017)

Chief Investigator: Sally Bound

Funding Body: Horticulture Innovation Australia


Continuation of cherry cracking work

(2015)

Chief Investigator: Penny Measham

Funding Body: HAL


Continuation of collaboration with Washington State Uni (new)

(2015)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

crop load, post-harvest and carbohydrates


Improving Fruit Quality and Consistency in Cherries through maximised nutrient availability

(December 2017)

Chief Investigator: Sally Bound

Funding Body: Horticulture Innovation Australia (HIA)


Optimal management of pre-harvest rot in sweet-cherry

(September 2016)

Chief Investigator: Karen Barry

Funding Body: Horticulture Innovation Australia

The proposed project will generate important results as a solid basis on which to develop decision support and optimal management practice for pre-harvest rot of sweet cherries in Australia. The research aims of this 3 year project are to: - clarify the key pathogens leading to pre-harvest rot in several representative sweet cherry regions in Australia (southern Tasmania, central west NSW, Adelaide Hills SA and southern Victoria. - determine infection pathways for the key pathogens in sweet cherry in Australia, to ensure that management is targeted at the right time. The project will increase knowledge to support (or challenge) the current understanding of rot pathogens in sweet cherry in Australia. Information will provide a basis for future research on optimal fungicide use and other management tools.


Optimising Cherry Firmness, Size and Post-Harvest Shelf Life: Fruit Set and Crop Load, Tree and Fruit Nutrition

(July 2015)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL


Reducing the Impact of Late Season Rainfall

(August 2015)

Chief Investigator: Penny Measham

Funding Body: HAL



Viticulture & Oenology

Comparative Analysis of Wine Tannins in Pinot Noir Grapes

(2014)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close, Bob Dambergs and Angela Sparrow

Funding Body: Grape and Wine Research & Development Corporation


Developing objective measures of quality for sparkling wine

(2019)

Chief Investigator: Dr Fiona Kerslake (TIA)

Funding Body: Wine Australia, University of Tasmania Central Science Laboratory, Hill-Smith Family Vineyards, Apogee Wines Tasmania, Josef Chromy WInes

Building and measuring the quality of fine Australian sparkling wines through identification of the impact compounds responsible for 'autolytic character' in sparkling wine, and novel wine making technologies to hasten autolysis.


Factors that underpin the certainty of yield and quality for cool climate viticulture

(July 2015)

Chief Investigator: Fiona Kerslake

Funding Body: Brown Brothers Milawa Vineyard Pty Ltd

Create an understanding of past and current research findings relevant to yield and quality for cool climate viticulture, to inform Brown Brother's staff and enable application (sub project 1). Enable manipulation of fruit quality, underpinnned by an understanding of the physiological impact of leaf removal (sub project 2). Enable fruitfulness prediction with greater certainty for yield stabilisation (sub project 3).


Improved red wine process efficiency and product quality through enhanced phenolic extraction by controlled phenolic release (CPR) and berry pricking

(February 2017)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: Grape and Wine Research & Development Corporation

Skin contact time for phenolic extraction in red winemaking seriously constrains winery throughput. Winemaker groups consulted about phenolic extraction processes reported that some red grape varieties require prolonged time on skins for adequate extraction (eg. three weeks for Pinot noir  committee member, MPVA). Controlled Phenolic Release (CPR) is a novel winemaking process which couples microwave maceration with managed post-maceration phenolic diffusion. Three years of laboratory-scale research have shown CPR can achieve rapid, effective, predictable extraction of red grape phenolics. A second prototype rapid extraction process, 'berry pricking' was proven effective for Pinot noir in trials conducted on a semi-commercial scale in 2013. Both CPR and berry pricking are in-line processes which align with GWRDC's Program 3.3 objective to increase winery process efficiency, enhance quality and improve profitability. The proponents seek GWRDC support to collaborate with engineers and winemakers in Victoria, NSW and Tasmania to pilot CPR and berry pricking, and identify and disseminate best practice for winemaking using these processes (GWRDC Program 4.1). * CPR and berry pricking with fermentation on skins produced wine with higher phenolic concentration than control wines * Both processes expand effective winery throughput capacity by eliminating cold soak, reducing time on skins * CPR juices completed alcoholic fermentation two days ahead of control fermentations on skins * CPR trialled on fruit with Botrytis infection levels from 1% to 50% reduced mean oxidative risk from 8.2 uL/mL to 0.9 uL/mL (GWRDC Program 1.4) * berry pricking is effected via a minor modification of existing grape destemming equipment.


Pinot Noir provenance: Australian benchmarking to support growing, making, perception of quality , and marketing to add value to the Pinot Noir supply chain

(2020)

Chief Investigator: Dr Anna Carew (TIA)

Funding Body: Wine Australia, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture

This $845,000 3.5 year project will generate robust, tangible scientific and qualitative evidence to explain the unique character, quality and provenance of Australia's emerging premier red wine: Pinot Noir. Once established, the methods developed in this project will be applicable to other red wine varieties


Sense-T Viticulture Stage 2

(2016)

Chief Investigator: Dr Kathy Evans (TIA) Dr Byeong Kan (University of Tasmania)

Funding Body: Australian Government, Tasmanian Government, University of Tasmania, CSIRO, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA)

The Project will provide vineyard managers with an app and online dashboard to monitor on-farm growing conditions and understand disease and other risks for better decision making.


Taking grapevine yield forecasting into the digital age

(2019)

Chief Investigator: Dr Joanna Jones

Funding Body: Wine Australia

Testing the novel technique of spectral analysis to identify bud fruitfulness



Apples & Pears

Management of the national apple program, Productivity, Irrigation, Pests and Soils, ‘PIPS’

(December 2014)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

The PIPS program is a national research program centred on apple and pear orchard productivity. It comprises 3 research projects (Tree Structure, IPM and Soils, Water and Nutrients) and an industry development project (Technical and Industry Communications). The Program is a collaboration between DPI-Vic, DEEDI (QLD) and Plant and Food Research (NZ). The program will provide integrated research, development and extension to support increased efficiency within the apple and pear orchard, while providing orchardists with the tools to assist the long term sustainability of their orchards.

Objectives:

  1. Effective and efficient management to ensure synergies within a truly integrated national PIPS program.
  2. Facilitate strategic level advice on program resource allocation and direction
  3. Leverage of resources to provide additional capacity in targeted research for industry

PIPS; Integrated pest management

(November 2014)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

The project includes research on: the use of a parasitoid wasp to assist mating disruption in minimising pesticide use for codling moth control; the use of a predatory syrphid fly for management of woolly apple aphid; amalgamation of DPI and PFR scab modelling and testing of the model; and a desktop study of pest management interactions.


PIPS; Soils, water and nutrients

(May 2014)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

The project will: establish soil carbon status in Australian orchards and infer temporal trends; determine the role of soil carbon in water availability and nutrient mineralisation; investigate management techniques to enhance soil health; measure and predict evapotranspiration in netted apple orchards and high-density pear orchards with varying canopies and tree structures; and investigate the effects of water deficits on fruit composition.


PIPS; Technical and Industry Communications

(December 2014)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

This project will provide a delivery mechanism for the integrated research outcomes delivered from within the R&D component of the PIPS program.

Objectives:

  1. To coordinate project and program outputs into a unified industry development program
  2. To communicate program outputs to industry

PIPS; Tree Structure

(December 2014)

Chief Investigator: Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

The project aims to improve orchard productivity and optimise fruit quality by improving tree functional efficiency as part of the ongoing drive in development of high density orchard systems. A secondary objective is to understand whether changes in canopy management can contribute to more efficient water use. The project has a national approach with regional application. New canopy management tools developed from understanding these tree structural-functional responses should guide horticultural thinking towards ideas of 'eco-efficient precision management of the biology of crop production'.


Precision Fertigation for Improved Apple Orchard Productivity

(2014)

Chief Investigator: Nigel Swarts, Marcus Hardie and Dugald Close

Funding Body: HAL

This collaborative project aims to determine the influence of nutrient and water use efficiency on apple trees through fertigation to facilitate the consistent production of high quality fruit. This project will: investigate the effect of water stress and water surplus on Nitrogen (N) uptake; investigate the effect of N and Potassium (K) fertigation treatments on tree and fruit nutrition; investigate the influence of fertigation on N storage and remobilisation; investigate the influence of application type, soil type and rainfall on N leaching; and undertake preliminary investigations of remote sensing of N deficiencies using Canopy Chlorophyll Content Index (CCCI) capability from remote sensing.



Berries

Identification and management strategies for true bugs in Tasmanian strawberries

(July 2015)

Chief Investigator: Michele Buntain

Funding Body: HAL


Selection of clearwing resistant blackcurrant

(October 2016)

Chief Investigator: Michele Buntain

Funding Body: HAL

The objective of this study is to select blackcurrant progeny with clearwing resistance. Seedlings bred from clearwing resistant parents will be field tested under conditions of high clearwing pressure in Tasmania. The output from the work will be seedlings with confirmed clearwing resistance. The longer term outputs will be the release of new clearwing resistant blackcurrant varieties to industry. The outcome is an industry with access to clearwing resistant varieties ensuring a sustainable industry with less reliance on insecticides and with greater productivity due to reduced crop loss to this damaging pest.



Walnuts

Determining and Establishing Quality Parameters for Australian Walnuts

(2014)

Chief Investigator: Kathy Evans/David McNeil

Funding Body: HAL



Essential oils and plant extracts

Flavour and aroma from fruit juicing waste (new)

(2014)

Chief Investigator: Bob Menary

Funding Body: HAL



Across Industry

Reducing nitrous oxide emissions in key perennial tree crop industries

(June 2016)

Chief Investigator: Nigel Swarts

Funding Body: Department of Agriculture

This project will research benchmarking and mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions - carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) - in two key Australian horticulture industries  apples and cherries. This proposal addresses research gaps in three main areas:

  1. reducing N2O emissions (primary focus)
  2. increasing soil carbon (secondary focus)
  3. the interaction between N2O emissions and soil carbon.

Soil science and landscape management

(June 2016)

Chief Investigator: Marcus Hardie

Funding Body: DPIPWE

This contract provides a framework for co-operation between the DPIPWE and UTAS/TIA for the delivery of specialist professional services in the fields of soil and land management and soil science, such as providing input into the implementation of the landscape monitoring protocol for the Water Access Program, providing technical comments and advice (as required) on Reserve Activity Assessments (RAA) and Requests for Comment (RFC) that link to salinity, landscape health or other aspects of soil science. See schedule in contract for more information.