In Situ Persistence and Migration of Biochar Carbon and Its Impact on Native Carbon Emission in Contrasting Soils under Managed Temperate Pastures

Soil CO2 collection Elliott TasmaniaBiochar is produced in heated environments where little or no oxygen leads to incomplete combustion of biomass. The global interest in using biochar for organic waste management, carbon capture, and as an amendment to improve soil health, soil carbon, and agricultural productivity has risen rapidly over the last decade.

While biochar is an important component of the global soil carbon pool, our knowledge of how soil types interact with different chars to influence fate and persistence under planted field conditions is limited.

A collaborative field-based study between researchers from the Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute in NSW, Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, Wollongbar Primary Industries Institute, and CSIRO Agriculture examined fate, persistence, and loss dynamics of biochar in contrasting soil systems with varying SOC content, clay content, and earthworm activity under ‘high input’ pasture systems.

The results of this study indicated that carbon stability of a wood based biochar was influenced by interactions with different soil types and climate, both of which affected the mean retention time of the labile components.

Citation: Singh BP, Fang Y, Boersma M, Collins D, Van Zwieten L, Macdonald LM (2015) “In Situ Persistence and Migration of Biochar Carbon and Its Impact on Native Carbon Emission in Contrasting Soils under Managed Temperate Pastures”. PLoS ONE 10(10): e0141560. doi:10.1371/journal. pone.0141560

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Published on: 05 Sep 2016 2:20pm