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Study with us

Take your passion for ideas further than you ever imagined.

We offer the opportunity to undertake a research degree within any of our disciplines and areas of research expertise. We provide a supportive, vibrant, and collegiate environment, rich in diversity, promoting a high-performance research culture. Your experience with us will be enriching and memorable with many opportunities to work with peers and academics on your areas of interest.

Our degrees offer a distinctive blend of theoretical and practice -based programs including industry-based partnerships, to equip students with higher-level conceptual and professional skills. Choose a research topic that reflects your interests and identify a supervisor from discipline staff with the expertise to guide you in your research. We supervise across a range of methodologies and conceptual/theoretical approaches, and encourage scholarship that draws on ideas from across diverse fields.

Research Degrees at the University of Tasmania
Find out about entry requirements, application procedures, scholarships, and finding a supervisor

Closing dates for College of Arts, Law and Education (CALE) Scholarship Rounds
31st October and 1st March

Featured Projects

If you sit for work, you should be concerned about your health

If you sit for work, you should be concerned about your health

University of Tasmania Active Work Laboratory (UTAWL) research is investigating if changing the built environment of office spaces, whilst educating desk-based workers about the health problems associated with prolonged sitting, will facilitate healthy human movement experiences during the workday.

Artfully decoding delicious imagery

Artfully decoding delicious imagery

Nathan Taylor is a PhD candidate at the School of Creative Arts, whose research is exploring contemporary food imaging.

Bringing seafood governance to the surface

Bringing seafood governance to the surface

Coco Cullen-Knox is a PhD candidate at the School of Social Sciences, whose research explores the roll of environmental campaigning and media in the governance of seafood.

Making forensic science easier for non-scientists to understand

Making forensic science easier for non-scientists to understand

Loene Howes completed a PhD at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES) in the School of Social Sciences. Loene came to the University of Tasmania because Forensic Studies is a key strength of research at TILES, and a unique program in Australia. Loene now works at the University as a researcher and lecturer.

Available Research Degree Projects

A research degree candidate may develop their own research project in collaboration with their supervisor or apply for one of our currently available projects below:

Applicants who are interested a specific project should first contact the supervisor listed and then find out more about our Entry Requirements, Scholarships if relevant, and then Apply Now.

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Closing Date

10th June 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Globally, the World Health Organization estimates 600 million cases of foodborne illnesses per year, resulting in 420 thousand deaths. Food safety matters. But food safety is more than statistics about the sick and the dead, more than the technologies of sanitation practices and food handling techniques. Food safety is complex sets of knowledge, of ways of thinking and acting, embedded in institutional practices and discourses, by governments, by industry, and by everyday people. This project is will focus on how people (especially consumers) have thought about food safety over time. By taking a cultural history approach to food safety the project will consider how food safety creates – materially, symbolically and experientially – a set of ways of thinking and acting, resulting in knowledge that is embedded in institutional practices and discourses.

Projects may focus on a specific geographical exemplar, or on connections between points, or on a specific issue /product. Please note, however, that although a geographic and temporal focus is not stipulated, this is a historical project and requires a background in History or Food Studies. The Imagined Food Safeties project stems from key themes in Dr Tarulevicz's ARC Discovery Grant, such as technology, and transnational flows of products and ideas.

Eligibility

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Nicki Tarulevicz for further information.

Closing Date

30th November 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

A significant issue that looks set to dominate modern online technologies, is the intersection between trade secrecy and data protection. Data related to online technologies and their users are routinely collected, and may be biometric, geographic and social. This data is often protected through trade secrecy law, which provides a limited form of protection to those who hold information that satisfies the relevant legal tests for protection. Against this legal regime, the data collected in online environments raises significant privacy concerns. The law of privacy differs between jurisdictions, and most recently the GDPR has put privacy concerns directly in the spotlight. Rights to access personal data enshrined in modern privacy laws are directly at odds with the law of trade secrecy. There is thus, a real conflict between these legal regimes, and uncertainty as to how this conflict might be managed.

Eligibility

Applicants from the following disciplines are eligible to apply:

  • Law

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Jane Nielsen for further information.

Closing Date

12th December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project aims to contribute to the effective communication of forensic science. Within the scope of the project is the communication of forensic science at various stages of the criminal justice process – at major incident scenes, during investigations, and in trials and inquests.

The project builds upon research previously conducted at the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES), which examined communication with police, lawyers and judges via expert reports and related interactions. Focusing on meeting practitioners’ information needs at different stages of the process, this project extends the existing research in ‘critical forensic studies’ within TILES into the burgeoning domain of ‘forensic intelligence’ and proposes closer examination of innovative and developing communication strategies that aim to prioritise understanding while maintaining scientific accuracy.

The role of forensic science in achieving justice raises important questions about the nuances, ambiguities and tensions inherent in the public understanding of science, the nature of expertise, and the institutional structure of the criminal justice system. The specific research questions and methodology of the project will depend on the disciplinary background, knowledge and skills of the PhD candidate. The research design will be developed with the candidate in collaboration with research advisers and relevant industry stakeholders.

Eligibility

Please refer to the Entry Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include:

  • Criminology,  Forensic Studies, Law,  Police Studies, Psychology,  Sociology
  • Social research skills (qualitative  and/or quantitative) 
  • Experience working with criminal justice agencies

More Information

Please contact Dr Loene Howes (Loene.Howes@utas.edu.au) or Professor Roberta Julian (Roberta.Julian@utas.edu.au) for more information.

Closing Date

31st December 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

Twenty-first century social work is about transformative disruptive innovation that supports and generates regenerative sustainable ways of life. The biggest challenge to transformative disruptive innovation is the need to relinquish many of the 'business as usual' practices that are no longer promoting sustainable life in this planet. This project seeks to explore the role of social work in facilitating the relinquishing of unsustainable practices, examining with focus how transformative disruptive innovation assists people to deeply adapt to the changes brought about by climate change.

The student interested in this project will be interviewing social workers involved in transformative disruptive innovative projects, learning from them what works and what facilitates deep adaptation in the community. Candidates interested in this project will be leading knowledge contributions from social work that add to what we are learning is helping humanity transition to new ways of life and new paradigms in how we care for each other and for the planet we live in.

Eligibility
  • An undergraduate degree in Social Work
  • Social Work field experience
  • Knowledge in community development and capacity building

See the following web page for entry requirements: www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now website.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact, Joselynn Baltra-Ulloa or Anthea Vreugdenhil for further information.

Closing Date

30th September 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Catherine Palmer, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is one part of a larger ARC Discovery project on alcohol and women's sport in Australia led by Catherine Palmer (Utas) and Steve Jackson (University of Otago, NZ). The larger project examines the nexus between women and alcohol in Australian sport. It investigates the meanings drinking may have for sportswomen and female fans, builds new theoretical frameworks, and develop informed policy initiatives for rethinking drinking, gender and sport.

The PhD project will map awareness and understandings of the relationship between women, sport and alcohol by sporting bodies, clubs, health promotion agencies and policy makers. The candidate will undertake empirical, qualitative research into the perspectives, experiences and attitudes of sports fans, sportswomen and sponsors, and policy makers towards alcohol and women's sport in Australia.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates.
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have or been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant research experience in an appropriate field.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply.

Please see the following web page for entry requirements: https://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

The following criteria will be used to competitively assess applicants for this project/scholarship:

  • Honours mark, or equivalent.
  • Relevance of previous studies to this project. Relevant disciplines included, but are not limited to, Sociology, Gender Studies, Sport Studies.
  • Demonstrated interest in, or work related to, either sport, alcohol, or gender.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now webpage.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Catherine Palmer for more information.

Closing Date

30th September 2020*

Applicants should contact the primary supervisor Catherine Palmer, and submit their Expression of Interest (EOI) and Application as soon as possible.

*unless filled earlier

The Research Project

This project is one part of a larger ARC Discovery project on alcohol and women's sport in Australia led by Catherine Palmer (Utas) and Steve Jackson, University of Otago, NZ. The larger project examines the nexus between women and alcohol in Australian sport. It investigates the meanings drinking may have for sportswomen and female fans, builds new theoretical frameworks, and develop informed policy initiatives for rethinking drinking, gender and sport.
The PhD project will examine the emergence of women's sport in Australia and the role that alcohol plays in women's experiences as fans of players. The PhD project explores a theoretical and empirical gap – that women's drinking in sport has largely eluded sociological inquiry. The candidate will undertake empirical, qualitative research into the perspectives, experiences and attitudes of sports fans, sportswomen and sponsors and policy makers towards alcohol and women's sport in Australia.

Eligibility

The following eligibility criteria apply:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates.
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis.
  • Applicants must already have or been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant research experience in an appropriate field.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • The degree must be taken on campus in Hobart.

Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are eligible to apply.

Please see the following web page for entry requirements: https://www.utas.edu.au/research/degrees/what-is-a-research-degree

Assessment Criteria

The following criteria will be used to competitively assess applicants for this project/scholarship:

  • Honours mark, or equivalent.
  • Relevance of previous studies to this project. Relevant disciplines include, but are not limited to, Sociology, Gender Studies, Sport Studies.
  • Demonstrated interest in, or work related to, women, sport or alcohol.

Application Process

Applicants who require more information or are interested in this specific project should first contact the listed Supervisor. Information and guidance on the application process can be found on the Apply Now webpage.

Information about scholarships is available on the Scholarships webpage.

More Information

Please contact Catherine Palmer for more information.