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CSL supported research wins Menzies 'Best of the Best' in 2019 Excellence awards

The paper titled ‘Two of a kind: transmissible Schwann cell cancers in the endangered Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)’ demonstrates that the two known Devil facial tumours, DFT1 and DFT2, have originated from a similar cell type and that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis are likely to be different between the two.

Both of these pieces of information are important for understanding the susceptibility of Devils to transmissible tumours and in developing strategies to mitigate the risk and progression of the disease in this endangered species. Historically, most of the genetics and genomics work relating to Tasmanian Devils and the DFT disease has been led by research groups overseas and interstate. The skills demonstrated in executing this research to such a high standard are a notable achievement.

The paper's authors include CSL Senior research Fellow, Richard Wilson and has now been selected for publication in a print issue of Cellular & Molecular Life Sciences.

Two of a kind: transmissible Schwann cell cancers in the endangered Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)’ Patchett AL, Coorens THH, Darby J, Wilson R, McKay MJ, Kamath KS, Rubin A, Wakefield M, Mcintosh L, Mangiola S, Pye RJ, Flies AS, Corcoran LM, Lyons AB, Woods GM, Murchison EP, Papenfuss AT, Tovar C. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2019 Aug 2. doi: 10.1007/s00018-019-03259-2.

Published on: 05 Oct 2020 2:46pm