Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws (63J1)

Overview  2021

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

mode.loadCategory not equal to Part Time
Minimum 5 Years, up to a maximum of 11 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Intensive Session Jun
Launceston
Semester 1
Cradle Coast
Semester 1

Commonwealth Supported places available

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 5 Years
Entry requirements

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Intensive Session Jun
Launceston
Semester 1
Due to the circumstances around COVID-19, you will begin your studies online. However, when Government guidelines change, on-campus studies will be reintroduced.
This version of the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws is for students commencing from 2015 onwards. Students who commenced in 2013 or 2014 should refer to course 63J. Students who enrolled before 2013 should refer to course 63C.

This on-campus 5-year full-time course is offered by the College of Arts, Law and Education and is available at Hobart. The first year only is also offered at the Launceston and Cradle Coast campus. This course may be studied part-time.

The objectives of the combined degree courses are those of the component degrees. Reference should be made to the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws course entries.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Laws will be able to:

  1. Acquire, consolidate, critically evaluate, reflect and synthesise advanced knowledge in one of the humanities and social sciences disciplines and in the discipline of law.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking by identifying, defining and solving problems with intellectual independence.
  3. Make evidence based decisions that take account of diverse contexts and constraints impacting on societies and environments.
  4. Communicate information effectively in written, visual and oral forms with a diverse range of stakeholders.
  5. Work effectively, responsibly, respectfully and safely in individual and/or team contexts.
  6. Demonstrate self-management, flexibility, initiative and resilience in readiness for diverse workplace demands.

Career outcomes

Graduates of combined degrees could expect to find open to them all the career paths that are open to graduates of the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws degree courses.

A law degree is a prerequisite to admission as a legal practitioner. Today, however, employers from a widening range of disciplines value the skills that law graduates possess. A range of career choices lie open to law graduates as a solicitor, barrister, industry legal officer or ministerial adviser, as well as in legal aid, community legal centres, the Attorney-General's department, law reform commissions, consumer affairs, environment, foreign affairs, police, legal drafting, politics, banking, finance, journalism, publishing and teaching.

Professional Recognition

The Law component meets the requirements of the accrediting body, the Tasmanian Board of Legal Education. After graduating from the University, a law student wishing to practise in Tasmania is required to undertake a 6 month Legal Practice course. Under the mutual recognition scheme, after gaining admission and obtaining a practising certificate in Tasmania lawyers can practise in another state of Australia without having to obtain a practising certificate in the latter jurisdiction.

International students should address such enquiries to the relevant authority in their home country.

Course structure

Note: Legal Studies is not available in the Bachelor of Arts component of the combined Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Law (63J1).

Completion of the Bachelor of Arts component of the combined degree requires 200 credit points including:

  • A major (100 credit points)
  • A minor (50 credit points)
  • Discipline units (50 credit points) or in combined Law 25 credit points.
The major in Legal Studies is not available in the combined Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor of Laws.

Are you curious about the depravity of Roman emperors or the vengeful natures of ancient gods? Or why the fall of Rome remains a key point of comparison for modern global politics? When you study Ancient Civilisations you come to understand the everchanging nature of human societies, as well as the deep continuities that bind humanity together. You will explore topics in mythology and religion, drama, history, classical epic, and many more. As such, Ancient Civilisations is dynamic and multidisciplinary: you will gain experience with ancient historiography, literary criticism, material culture, and philosophical enquiry. 

We begin with surveys of the Greek and Roman cultures which introduce skills for interpreting ancient primary sources. Our intermediate units introduce you to classical scholarship and continue to deepen skills in critical analysis of primary sources. At the advanced level, you begin to engage critically with secondary scholarship and build intellectual independence by developing your own research projects. Together, the Ancient Civilisations and Ancient Languages majors make up the Classics discipline, and both majors are taught by renowned Classics lecturers. Our major develops critical thinking, research methods, and intercultural awareness, which prepares you for a range of professional careers that require an understanding of the ethical implications of a project, long-term effects of actions or diverse experiences of policy. Areas where such skills are needed include: Politics and Policy, Education, Human Resources and Non-Government Organisations.

Available: On campus Hobart and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

This unit provides a chronological and thematic overview of the history, literature, and culture of Ancient Greece, from the Dark Ages (c. 1200 BCE) to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BCE). Examples of seminar topics include epic poetry…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a chronological and thematic overview of the history, literature, and culture of ancient Rome, from its foundation in 753 BCE to the reign of the emperor Domitian (81–96 CE). Examples of seminar topics include the Roman monarchy,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

War and the nature of heroism were the central subject of the ancient world's most prestigious literary genre, epic poetry. This unit explores the changing ways in which the experience of war and the character of the epic hero are…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines two of the most well documented periods in classical antiquity: the last century of the Roman Republic and the first century of the Roman Empire. The social, cultural, and political turmoil of this era is viewed through…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points of Elective units.

Core

This unit is a study of the role of myth in Greek and Roman culture through literary texts and ancient art, including an exploration of the relationship between mythological narratives and religious ritual. This unit also traces developments in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Nero: misunderstood emperor, malevolent tyrant, or a monster of the middle order? This unit explores the enigmatic and transgressive literature produced during the reign of Nero (AD 54-68): the writings of the philosopher and tragic poet Seneca, the anarchic Satyricon…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

Examines tragic and comic dramas of classical antiquity, which established the nature of western drama for later ages, including the works of Sophocles and Aeschylus, and the bawdy and irreverent Greek and Roman comedies. Particular attention will be paid to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores the roles of spectacles and the spectacular in ancient Roman society through the study of literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and other heritage sources. Lecture and discussion topics include gladiatorial games, chariot races, animal hunts, military triumphs, theatrical shows,…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Religion permeated all facets of life in ancient Greece and Rome. This unit examines the religious practices of these civilizations through the study of literary, epigraphic, and archaeological sources. Lecture and discussion topics include sacred places and spaces, festivals, ritual…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

When you study Latin and Greek, you will find an exciting new home in the languages that shaped the fundamentals of western thought in the sciences, philosophy, medicine, and literature. Beautiful and fascinating in their own right, these ancient languages provide you with a deeper understanding of modern culture, specialist technical terminologies and many modern languages through their roots in Latin and Greek. Each week you will experience the intense satisfaction of building your brain into a stronger, better, more agile resource. Understanding the precious cultural resources bound up in even 'dead' languages also exposes you to the politics of vulnerable Indigenous languages, such as the returned and reconstructed island language of Tasmania, palawa kani. 

This is a unique course recognised as the most dynamic (and best off-campus) ancient languages course in Australasia. Our introductory units begin with Latin and are designed for students with no experience in ancient or modern languages. These units pay attention to fundamental principles of grammar, informing general understanding of language structure, and guide students through skillfully adapted texts allowing direct access to ancient thought. Our intermediate units continue to develop grammatical skills while gradually incorporating original texts. At advanced level you will read ancient texts in their original language, and begin Ancient Greek in accelerated form. The Ancient Languages Major integrates closely with Ancient Civilisations and connects with several majors in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Legal Studies. Learning Ancient Greek and Latin and reading their centuries of literature are among the great intellectual adventures, and employers recognise the analytical and creative skills such training develops.

Available: On campus Hobart and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units including.

Intended for students who have no previous knowledge of the language. The unit is designed to provide a rapid survey of the Latin language sufficient to enable students to read selected passages of adapted Latin. It includes some historical and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit will focus on further study of Latin grammar (morphology and syntax), such as the uses of the moods and tenses of the verb, further uses of the cases, and the introduction of the passive voice. We will also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit builds on the study of the ancient Latin language undertaken in HTL101 and HTL102. In it, students will complete the JACT Reading Latin textbook, including the passages of unadapted poetry and prose (Catullus, Cicero, Virgil, Horace).…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units.

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Consists of a study of selected Latin texts.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In a time when the term ‘curated’ is thrown around everywhere, the Art and Curatorial Practices major shows how an understanding of art as both artefacts and experiences can shape how creative work is made, analysed and communicated. Curatorial practices, as a term, encapsulates the idea that curatorship question the traditional narratives of art history, and create transformative encounters with creative work. In this major, you will develop visual and spatial literacies in conjunction with high level writing and project management skills, enabling you to conceptualise and carry out curatorial projects in the visual arts. This major immerses you in contemporary curatorial debates and practices, using object-based learning, authentic assessment, and industry contextualisation. You will develop an understanding of art theory and history from a contemporary Tasmanian standpoint, with a commitment to decolonisation, ecological awareness, and place.

This major will prepare you to work in areas such as curating and administrating in emerging, independent and events-based arts, as well as equipping you for further study in postgraduate coursework and research. The major will provide training in project management and develop your effective communication strategies and digital literacy. Unit choices allow you to explore how art and curatorial practices can facilitate the voices of diverse communities, become part of tourism and cultural heritage interpretation, and bring the past into the present through digital humanities. In your curatorial practice project, you will develop and pitch an idea for your own curatorial project to a panel of industry experts, ready to take your next step through connections with art institutions and experimental, independent art organisations.

You will need to complete 25 credit points of Introductory units. This may include either of the Indigenous Lifeworlds units.

Creating artwork involves encounters with objects, materials, ideas, cultures and other life forms. This unit will involve visits to Museums, Art Galleries and public artworks to investigate the many forms of collection and archive within a community. Public collections include…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Ecologies place us in relationship with other living beings and our physical surroundings, as well as being a way we can talk metaphorically about having a place within a wider network. This unit will introduce you to place, ecology and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units

Exhibitions are not only a way to present creative works. They are also a way to make meaning, generate ideas and communicate with an audience. This unit will present key contemporary, historical, philosophical and cultural debates and guide you through…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit invites you to find your way through the field of contemporary art. You will unpick moments of change and transition within a broader context of local, national, and global histories of art, and to see yourself as an…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including 25 credit points from Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

Research is providing increasing evidence for the positive benefits of engagement with the arts for individual and community wellbeing at all stages of life and can provide a non-pharmaceutical adjunct to health interventions. This unit explores case studies of successful…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

FXA303 Curatorial Practice
Elective

Scenography and Theatre Design are integral to contemporary performance. In this unit you will explore how Theatre Design and Scenography create performance environments that both convey meaning and generate performance. Theatre Design incorporates the crafts of costume, set, lighting and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will enable students to understand how tourism and cultural industries have dramatically changed our lives. Cultural industries have grown significantly, with examples such as museums, regional festivals and wilderness adventures. At the same time there is an increasing…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will challenge your perceptions of how heritage is manufactured. You will explore, analyse, and debate local and national issues within a global frame. Through critically reflecting on how heritage is ‘made’ by historians, archaeologists, Indigenous peoples, museums, politicians,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Religion permeated all facets of life in ancient Greece and Rome. This unit examines the religious practices of these civilizations through the study of literary, epigraphic, and archaeological sources. Lecture and discussion topics include sacred places and spaces, festivals, ritual…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

China is one of the world’s oldest civilisations. It is one of the most dynamic and fastest growing economies in the world. China has played an increasingly significant role in world economy and politics over the past decades. Learn more about the histories and cultures of China as you immerse yourself in Mandarin. Our program is geared toward practical use of the Chinese language and takes a holistic approach to developing your literacy in Chinese through the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. We cater for complete beginners to advanced speakers and offer many opportunities to enhance your studies by overseas study visits. The major consists of six core language units supplemented by an extensive introduction to the culture of contemporary China. At the University of Tasmania, we teach in an exciting combination of face-to-face and online modes combining the best of personal attention with the best of digital assistance to keep you motivated and constantly refining your language skills wherever you are.

A knowledge of China with Mandarin language skills means a huge variety of diverse careers are open to you. As Australia's relations with China have expanded enormously so has the demand for skills in Chinese language and an appreciation of Chinese cultural forms. Particular industries where this demand is strongest include: diplomacy, tourism, accounting and finance, translators and interpreters, law, technology, business and education.

Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

If you have prior experience with Chinese, you may be able to commence study at a more advanced level. Contact UConnect if you think you may fit this category.

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Chinese. This introductory unit is for anyone who is interested in the Chinese language and/or has the need to learn Chinese for business or academic purposes.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Building on the foundation skills taught in HMC101/XBR119, HMC102 further develops competence in beginners spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). The focus is to improve speaking and listening, reading and writing skills.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

HMC219 is designed to further develop competence in intermediate spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). The unit builds on students’ study in HMC101/XBR119 and HMC102. It introduces new grammar and vocabulary as well as examples of real-world language use to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

HMC220 is designed to further develop students’ skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening of Chinese language from the foundation of HMC101/2 Chinese 1A and 1B and following on in sequence from HMC219 Chinese 2A. The focus is to expand…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including 25 credit points of Language units and 25 credit points of Culture or Language completed through approved in-country study or cross-institutional units of study. Please see your Course Coordinator for details.

Language

This unit develops competence in advanced spoken and written Chinese (simplified characters). It is a workshop style, participatory language unit. The unit includes 1) discussions regarding grammar and 2) student and teacher-led exercises in speaking and listening, reading and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

HMC320 is the continuation of HMC319. This is a workshop style, participatory language unit. The unit includes 1) discussions regarding grammar and 2) student and teacher-led exercises in speaking and listening, reading and writing. This unit builds on your previous…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Electives

This unit aims to develop students’ practical skills and techniques of translation from English to Chinese. It is suitable for students who have successfully completed HMC319 and HMC320, or international students who are native speakers of Mandarin Chinese and its…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is an introduction to contemporary China. The aim of this unit is to enable students to understand and critically analyse domestic and international current events and core topics related to China, which may include politics, the economy, international…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit aims to introduce students to the basic theories and principles in translation and the fundamental skills in the translation of various genres including texts drawn from areas such as business and trade, law, science and technology, and news.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Engagement with music, visual arts, dance and other creative art forms can change people’s lives, bringing joy, restoring self-confidence and improving mental and physical wellbeing. In this major, you can learn about global developments in this emerging interdisciplinary field and develop an understanding of how and why the arts can help to relieve suffering, improve wellbeing, and foster resilience. You will have opportunities to explore your own artistic creativity and challenge yourself to apply your knowledge and skills through finding arts-based solutions to the health and wellbeing challenges of the 21st century.

In your first year you will learn the fundamentals of how interactions with different forms of the creative arts are processed by the brain, evaluate innovative arts-based programs that have been developed to improve function and wellbeing and reflect on your own experience of the creative process. In the second year you will continue to explore your creativity and learn visual and digital skills for arts-based interventions along with a range of strategies to promote emotional wellbeing. During your third year you will develop further contextual knowledge and skills for working with diverse groups of people of all ages and deepen your understanding of how engagement with the arts affects the brain and body. You will also research specific applications of the arts to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities, while developing your own proposal for trialling a concept and designing an arts project for a specific group or need.

Studying this innovative major in Tasmania will give you access to leading researchers in creative arts practices, dementia, sociology and health, within a state that leads the world in alternative responses to ageing. By completing this major you are eligible to receive membership of the peak creative arts therapy association ANZACATA. Graduates in this field find employment in diverse settings including arts organisations, hospitals, aged care facilities, rehabilitation centres, and prisons.

Available: Online

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

Practical interventions employing arts-based activities, including music, theatre, dance and visual arts, are increasingly being employed nationally and internationally to improve mood and well-being, physical activity and cognitive processing for people with dementia. Arts-based programs have also been shown to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit will provide an introduction to existing evidence-based research on the benefits of engagement with the arts in ageing, and strategies to mitigate risk factors for dementia employing creativity. The unit offers opportunities for students to undertake creative tasks…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

This Unit extends your understanding of the emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal, social and environmental dimensions of health and wellness. The content focuses on critical aspects of social and emotional learning (SEL) to ensure you can successfully implement a program of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We know the impact that photographic and digital images can have on us, individually and collectively. When images and words come together to tell a story they can be entertaining, revelatory, breath-taking, and even powerful agents of change. In this…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units.

Ever wonder why that tune gets stuck in your head, or when you listen to your favourite song your foot starts tapping, or why its easier to remember the words of a song when you sing the tune? How do…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Research is providing increasing evidence for the positive benefits of engagement with the arts for individual and community wellbeing at all stages of life and can provide a non-pharmaceutical adjunct to health interventions. This unit explores case studies of successful…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores historical and current case studies of creative arts practitioners from a range of cultural contexts living with physical or mental illness and the ways this is reflected or subsumed in their work. This engagement with creative work…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit applies a critical sociological perspective to health, illness and medicine. Each year the unit will use topical examples to explore expert and public knowledges about health and illness, the social distribution and patterning of health and illness, inequalities…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Crime is an issue that governments and communities face every day. To stop crime, we must examine how and why it happens. Criminology is the study of crime, criminality and criminal justice systems; it focuses on criminalisation as a process, the causes of crime, the social context of offending, crime prevention, systems of social control, and the punishment and rehabilitation of offenders. In this major you will explore the meaning of justice and the best ways to respond to crime and criminality while debating the role of the media, the contribution of parliaments and what really happens at crime scenes and in court rooms. Our case studies include examples from across the world as well as what happens in our local communities. We look at everything from cybercrime, murder and theft through to corruption and environmental crime. Over the course of this major you will come to understand the main features of criminology as an academic discipline and be able to apply criminological theories, concepts and evidence. You will learn to analyse the causes and responses to crime as well as critically evaluate explanations of crime at local, national and global levels. This major will provide the knowledge and skills to work in criminal justice agencies and develop initiatives and agendas for change. Some specific areas where you may find work include policing, crime prevention, corrections and policy research. Units can be studied both on-campus and online.

Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston, and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

In this unit you will focus on sociological approaches to crime and the criminal justice system with the objective of understanding research and debates about: (i) the criminal justice system (police, courts, corrections); (ii) patterns of crime (measuring crime victims…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is a foundational unit in Criminology. You will focus on criminological approaches to understanding crime and criminalisation. The unit will introduce various categories of crime (e.g. property crime and violent crime) and debates about what counts as crime and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

This unit is designed to provide an opportunity for you to participate in engaging topics in Criminology. The topic offered will vary each year to reflect the expertise of staff. It will showcase emerging research and practice of an area…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to the emerging field of 'forensic studies'. While forensic science usually refers to technical and vocational expertise, forensic studies explores the 'forensic sciences' as a social phenomenon.The main emphasis of forensic studies is on providing…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

This unit is designed to introduce students to the issues and processes associated with working with offenders, particularly those in prisons or under the supervision of community corrections. The unit explores issues pertaining directly to how best to work with…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartWinter school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to the philosophies, principles and practices of juvenile justice and child protection. The interface between juvenile justice and child protection is well established, institutionally, historically and in terms of shared clients, and an informed…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

Provides a sociological perspective on the relationship between law and society through a critical analysis of the basic processes of law, issues of social power and legal institutions, and law reform and social change. The unit focuses on understanding legal…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Forensic science is becoming an integral component of the criminal justice system. However, the role of forensic science in the criminal justice system is only now beginning to emerge as an area of research interest among criminologists.This unit provides a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Explores the nature of environmental crime and its social regulation. The unit has three main topical concerns: First, to investigate the nature of environmental crime from the point of view of legal, ecological and justice perspectives, with an emphasis on…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Certain types of crimes are perpetrated across national borders and require a unified regional or global response to combat them. This unit will critically examine the transnational system of criminal justice that attempts to regulate cross border crime, asking questions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In the Education Major, you will develop an understanding of educational theory and practice, particularly as it applies to adult learning in professional, community and informal settings. In the first half of the major, you will learn about the ‘what’, ‘how’ and ‘why’ of teaching. You will be introduced to Australian and international standards for teaching across different sectors, as well as the educational theory that underpins those standards. You will develop the foundational capabilities for planning, facilitating and assessing effective learning encounters.

In the second half of the major, you will learn how to apply your foundational knowledge and skills to respond in diverse educational contexts and the inclusive teaching practices required to engage learners in varied environments. You will consider issues of equity and diversity in education, develop greater understanding of the social and emotional dimensions of learning, and create effective approaches to teaching in digital and rural or isolated settings. At the end of this major you will be able to plan and deliver education and training in workplace, community, digital and non-formal learning contexts, taking an inclusive approach to the policies and practices that are necessary to deliver quality education.

NOTE: This major does not fulfil the requirements for teacher registration in Australia. Should you wish to progress to a Master of Teaching – an accredited course leading to registration – you are required to complete undergraduate content knowledge for entry to the Primary teaching stream or two specific area specialisations for the Secondary teaching stream. Please refer to the UTAS website for further detail on these eligibility requirements for the Master of Teaching.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units. This may include either of the Indigenous Lifeworlds units.

This unit introduces students to a range of frameworks and accreditation standards for trainers and teachers in applied learning settings. It equips students with the fundamental tools required to maximise learning in range of educational environments. The concepts of collegial…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces you to educational psychology and the theories of learning, relating them to contemporary teaching practices. As a result of studying this unit, you will understand why contemporary teaching practice is focused on learning rather than just educational…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

This unit considers the knowledge and skills required to facilitate engaging learning environments within applied learning settings. It will examine the theoretical underpinnings of learner and teacher engagement in a range of contexts, including face to face and online, and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit you are introduced to the principles of assessment of student learning, evaluation of learning programs, moderation of assessment, and reporting to education stakeholders. You will develop an understanding of various assessment, moderation, and evaluation strategies that are…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced level units.

The growth of eLearning in schools, VET providers and workplaces means that every educator should feel comfortable working in this environment. In this unit, you will design and develop a pedagogically sound eLearning strategy suitable for your current or intended…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed for students who wish to gain experience and skills to prepare them for teaching in rural locations within Tasmania, or remote locations in other Australian states or international locations, where schools may be small and classes…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, you will explore teaching and schooling from a sociological perspective. The unit introduces you to the way schools are shaped by wider political contexts that enable and constrain what education is and what schooling can be. This…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This Unit extends your understanding of the emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal, social and environmental dimensions of health and wellness. The content focuses on critical aspects of social and emotional learning (SEL) to ensure you can successfully implement a program of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

When you study language and culture through the best and most compelling books and stories of the ages you will learn to read the world around you actively and critically. You will come to understand how texts work as well as the key elements of poetry, narrative, theatre and filmmaking. Reading texts from the medieval period to the present, from fiction and poetry to theatre, film, television and the Internet, you will discover how to analyse texts and genres in their cultural, historical and contemporary contexts. Through reading, viewing and writing you will discover how to reflect, imagine and create while learning to develop your own voice as a writer. Through mastering different styles you will establish an understanding of how to write in different disciplines and for different purposes.

A major in English and Writing prepares students for any field in which careful reading, clear thinking, and persuasive writing are valued. Our emphases on textual analysis and writing skills make English a traditionally strong undergraduate major for any professions requiring advanced communication skills

Available: On campus Hobart, and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units, including 12.5 credit points from Core units and 12.5 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

This unit introduces you to methods of close reading, formal analysis, and creative writing. We work on developing strategies to analyse literary texts and screen texts in detail, to break them down into their component parts, and explain how they work…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
Launceston5 Week Session Jun

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Electives

Why are certain texts regarded as classics within the English literary canon and how do we encounter them today? This unit considers the importance of tradition to the ways we value, understand and circulate popular and literary texts. Students who…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
Launceston5 Week Session Nov

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

English Writing introduces students to, and consolidates their knowledge of, the conventions of English grammar and composition. The unit focuses on fashioning the skills required of an academic writer. The unit covers:the processes and mechanics of academic writing;grammar, syntax, voice,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units, including 12.5 credit points from Core units and 12.5 credit points from Elective units.

Core

How much of a tale is in the telling? This unit introduces concepts, terms and skills used in the analysis of literary narrative, and applies them to texts drawn from a wide range of genres, periods and nations. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

This unit considers the 19th-century fascination with narratives of scandal, transgression, criminality, and irrationality, referred to as narratives of “sensation”. The unit may cover genres like the gothic, colonial adventure fiction, detective fiction, and the “sensation novel”, and the appearance…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

To produce successful fiction, a writer needs not only to have great ideas but also to have the skill to bring those ideas alive on the page. In this unit, students are encouraged to work on their capacity for imagination…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Are you an aspiring teacher, librarian, writer or publishing professional? Or are you just fascinated by writing for young people? This unit explores the diverse and challenging world of writing for children and young adults. Through a variety of genres—such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers students the opportunity to think critically about some of the most popular texts in Western culture. What makes a bestseller? What are the defining features of major popular genres and how have they changed over time? What…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This intermediate elective in English aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills to develop theoretically informed arguments in response to screen texts and genres. Students will explore key approaches and methodologies for analysing films and/or television series, develop…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including 25 credit points from Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

This unit will consider major authors and texts, developments and trends in Australian Literature. It examines Australian literature as a regional, national, and international literature with a set of distinct and vibrant cultures. Students will consider the histories, preoccupations, and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

From bookshops to classrooms, book clubs to libraries, literary festivals and the literary media, pulp fiction, pop fiction, lit fiction, online and offline: How do we engage with literary texts today? How does literature become a brand? How are the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

This unit examines the development of literary theory from the middle of the twentieth century to the present. It aims to provide students with the skills to read theory critically and to develop informed arguments in response to critical, literary…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores how different worlds are imagined in speculative fiction, film, and critical theory. Taking an historical approach, the unit traces the trajectory of utopian/dystopian texts and theories through the last five hundred years, concentrating on the dystopian visions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides opportunity to study a selection of Shakespearean plays and their stage and screen performance afterlives. Starting from a close consideration of Shakespeare's dramatic language, the unit will consider the multiple possibilities the plays offer for realisation in…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This advanced elective in English explores the history of modernism. Students will examine exemplary texts that are representative of key movements in the literature and culture of the modernist era. The writers and texts explored in this unit set the…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit prepares student writers to submit their works of fiction and creative non-fiction for publication. Lectures will focus on publishing outlets and opportunities, conditions in the contemporary publishing industry, publishers' expectations, layout, copy-editing and editorial polish. An assessment task,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

French is a major commercial and scientific language used across the European Union and other continents, and widely used in international relations and diplomacy; journalism and media; science and technology; the creative arts; and tourism. A number of the world’s significant humanitarian organisations, including the United Nations, the International Red Cross and Doctors (and Reporters) without Borders, use French as an official language, and more people in Africa speak the language than in Europe. The rich culture that derives from French has international and far-reaching influence, spanning medieval texts to contemporary arts – from Descartes to Simone de Beauvoir, the Palais de Versailles to the Tour Eiffel and Edith Piaf to Céline Dion – making French a continually fascinating and useful area of interdisciplinary study.

Available: On campus Hobart

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of French. The unit places its main stress on the development of a sound basic knowledge of the structure of the language and on practice in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Places its main stress on the development of a sound basic knowledge of the structure of the language and on practice in the four basic language skills bringing students to a degree of linguistic competence equivalent to level A2 of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

Is an advanced post-TCE course which places its main emphasis on the development of a sound command of the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Is an advanced post-TCE course which places its main emphasis on the development of a sound command of the four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including, 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points of Elective units

Core

Builds on the competency achieved by students in HEF216, providing further training in selected topics in French grammar and in translation.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Builds on the competency achieved by students in HEF315, providing further training in selected topics in French grammar and in translation.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Elective

The late eighteenth century saw the beginning of revolutionary political, economic and cultural change that marked the emergence of modern nation states and cultures. France was site of the first modern political and social revolution, and came to dominate Europe…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Pick up the story in 1000 when the Vikings have given a kick-start to Europe's economy and the warrior mentality of the early Middle Ages is giving way to the rising aristocrats. From this starting-point, the unit will examine the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

When you study Gender & Diversity you will be immersed in an interdisciplinary exploration of the meaning and impact of gender, race, and sexuality on all our lives. Assumptions about sex, gender and race have influenced everything from our most fundamental understandings of what it is to be human to ancient poetry to contemporary fashion. You will become familiar with a variety of theoretical approaches to the subject and will be given a range of methodological tools to help you understand those cultural assumptions and practices which have shaped our lived experiences as gendered, racialised beings.

The core units in Gender & Diversity examine questions of identity, power and change, including how understandings of human bodies and sexuality have changed over time. You will analyse the various ways that masculinities and femininities are enacted in the world, and develop a critical awareness of the gendered and racial dynamics which influence these masculinities and femininities. All human beings live within a particular gender order and racial system: to study gender & diversity is to become more aware of the possibilities and constraints of these structures and their effect on your life and the world’s people and processes.

Knowledge gained in this major will prepare you for work in all kinds of settings where an appreciation of diversity matters. This includes the community sector, equity and diversity units in businesses and institutions, discrimination law and human resources.

Available: On campus Hobart and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

How do assumptions about gender influence our understanding of what it means to be a human being? In this unit we explore a variety of different ways that human beings have been imagined and thought about across time in western…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Gender & World explores the shape(s) and impact(s) of gendered assumptions on human interactions in diverse areas of the world and in different historical periods. This unit focuses on how people have acted and do act on the basis of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units

What does masculinity mean, and why does it exist in so many different forms? In this unit we explore the meaning and manifestations of a variety of different masculinities. We query the cultural expectations regarding masculinity that accompany boyhood, adolescence,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Feminist philosophy, psychoanalysis, existential phenomenology and queer theory have raised stimulating questions about the body. This unit examines how the body is theorised, how it interacts with questions of culture and class, and explores the implications of our understanding of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points from Core units and 25 credit points Chosen from Elective units.

Core

This unit aims to deconstruct the monolithic perception of Japanese culture and to understand Japan in terms of its relationship with its near and more distant neighbours throughout Asia and the Pacific. Incorporating the approach of queer studies, which places…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

Power describes the capacity of an individual or group to influence the opinions, decisions and actions of others. This unit explores the role of media in the communication of power in society and, importantly, the counter-movements that challenge power. In…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the development of literary theory from the middle of the twentieth century to the present. It aims to provide students with the skills to read theory critically and to develop informed arguments in response to critical, literary…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit explores how different worlds are imagined in speculative fiction, film, and critical theory. Taking an historical approach, the unit traces the trajectory of utopian/dystopian texts and theories through the last five hundred years, concentrating on the dystopian visions…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit applies a sociological lens to the terrain of racial, religious and ethnic relations in Australia. It introduces theories of race, ethnicity, indigeneity and whiteness and applies these to historical and contemporary race and religious relations and the empirical…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is a study of the role of myth in Greek and Roman culture through literary texts and ancient art, including an exploration of the relationship between mythological narratives and religious ritual. This unit also traces developments in the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Taking 'erotic text' in a broad sense, this unit explores the many functions - but especially the malfunctions - of desire in ancient literature. We will read some of Ovid's Heroides, fictional verse-letters written by heroines of Greek myth to…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit you will transform your classroom into a moment of historical controversy and intellectual ferment. Using sophisticated role immersion games (Reacting to the Past) as a way to learn, the class becomes an historical arena; students become characters…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

The Geography: Place, People and Environment major gives you the skills to address the greatest challenges of our time, including climate change, sustainable development, economic inequality, resource conflict, social and environmental justice, decolonisation, and community well-being. Tasmania offers you exciting opportunities to experience first-hand this island’s diverse and unique cultures, places, peoples, landscapes and environments. Real-world and hands-on learning experiences equip you with geographical techniques essential for complex problem-solving and devising place-based solutions at different scales.

You will develop skills for 21st century jobs that require flexibility, innovative thinking and lifelong learning. You will learn to: critically assess, research and integrate arguments and information; work ethically, independently and in teams; and engage in ongoing professional development. You will expand your knowledge of environments and peoples, and the ways they interact from the local to the global. You will graduate with expertise relevant to government policy, social and economic planning, political advocacy, environmental management, natural and cultural conservation, and community development.

Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This introduction to geography and environmental studies integrates physical and social science inquiry. You study earth evolution, human development and their interaction, in light of questions about sustainability. You apply this knowledge to issues of vital importance around the world…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This foundation unit in Geography and Environmental Studies develops your knowledge of the ways in which people turn space into place, how patterns of landforms, soils, plants and animals form on the surface of the earth, and how cultures, societies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

This unit helps you develop geographical tools to investigate and transform human worlds. The unit demonstrates the value of human geographical inquiry by exploring contemporary issues of equality, justice, conflict and cooperation. You will analyse case studies on topics including…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Society needs professional environmental managers who have the knowledge and skills to effectively tackle problems of sustainable resource use, climate change and biodiversity conservation. Environmental managers also play an important role in helping communities identify and move towards sustainable and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including 25 credit points from Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

Political ecology is a diverse area of study, professional practice and activism that integrates issues of justice, sustainability and development. Political ecology seeks explanations of root causes and transformative solutions in relation to environmental problems. Analysing nature and society as…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Over six hundred million people live on the world's 43 island nation-states and on hundreds of sub-national island jurisdictions. The 'island-continent' of Australia comprises over 12,000 islands, islets and rocky outcrops, while the island-State of Tasmania is an archipelago of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

This unit will equip students with an interdisciplinary understanding of energy systems. Its focus is on how science and policy are interacting to shape Australia’s energy futures. The Australian energy sector is experiencing a period of change, prompted by the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Conservation of geological features and landscapes is a global priority. This unit considers strategies to sample, understand, and address geoconservation and geotourism issues. By way of a series of field-based and problem-based learning experiences, the following skills and knowledge will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The conservation of nature needs to occur at the landscape scale as well as within protected areas. Landscapes can be wilderness areas, rural areas with highly varied land use or urban areas. Whatever their type - there are landscape processes,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides an introduction to legal, administrative, social and scientific aspects of environmental impact assessment (EIA) using case studies. The unit emphasises the practical aspects of environmental impact assessment in Tasmanian contexts, but EIA processes and legislation are similar…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

German is the language of some of the world’s best-known innovators, scientists, entrepreneurs, philosophers, musicians and artists. It is spoken by approximately 100 million people in major European countries like Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Germany has the largest population in the European Union and German remains the language with the most native speakers in Europe. It is also a major community language in Australia; migration from German-speaking countries has been a part of Australia from the early nineteenth century to the present.

Germany is a modern and culturally diverse country. The largest economy in the European Union and the fourth-largest economy in the world, its emphasis on progress and innovation has manifested itself in Australia through well-known companies like Bayer and Volkswagen. The German labour market is opening up for graduates and welcomes specialists from abroad. German language skills are an asset in many careers across international relations, business, engineering and medicine, teaching, science and music.

Against this context, the German major at UTAS comprises the study of both German language and culture, including literature, history and society. You can commence at beginner level or a higher level if you are a background speaker. All levels of study are aligned with the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR: A1 to C2). This guarantees the international comparability and transferability of your acquired language skills. There will also be various opportunities to participate in exchanges and apply for scholarships to complete units of study in a German-speaking country, or engage in cross-institutional study in Australia. Generous scholarships are provided by German institutions such as the DAAD.

Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

If you have prior experience with German, you may be able to commence study at a more advanced level. Contact UConnect and inquire if you may fit this category.

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of German. While a key goal of this unit is the acquisition of communication skills in German, the unit centres on the study of the lives, interests…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is the continuation of HEG101 German 1A. It is an intensive beginners' unit, which in conjunction with HEG101 aims to provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the main structures of the German language. During the four contact hours…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

This is an intermediate unit for students with prior knowledge of German, the continuation of HEG102 Introduction to German 1B. This second-year language unit broadens students' German language competency. The four language skills are stressed and further training is provided…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an intermediate unit for students with prior knowledge of German, the continuation of HEG207 German 2A. This second-year language unit broadens students' German language competency. The four language skills are stressed and further training is provided in reading…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit point Core unit and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

This is an advanced intermediate unit for students with prior knowledge of German. This third-year language unit broadens students' German language competency. The four language skills are stressed and further training is provided in reading and aural comprehension, speaking and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an upper intermediate unit for students with prior knowledge of German, the continuation of HEG315 Advanced German 3A. This third-year language unit broadens students' German language competency. The four language skills are stressed and further training is provided…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Elective

This unit focuses on late-20th /early 21st Europe, analysing the degree to which pre-modern ideas of Europe continue to permeate its modern, institutional existence. Through introducing students to the rationale behind the establishment of the EU, the euro etc, this…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Continental philosophy encompasses a wide range of philosophical schools, including Existentialism, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Deconstruction, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thought, all of which have shaped our understanding of the human condition, not only in philosophy proper, but also in art, literature,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The past is an extraordinary place. When you study history you will come to understand the whole world by understanding the long-term changes and continuities that shaped today. Historical knowledge is a vital component of cultural literacy, broadens your mind, fosters the capacity for empathy and equips you to be a global citizen. Historians are like very open-minded detectives: questioning, analysing and interpreting evidence from the past. When someone cries 'fake news', you will have the skills to find evidence from a range of sources to reconsider the claims of the present. You will also have the inexplicable joy of encountering the unexpected and the unknown. It has never been more urgent to understand the past so that we have the ability to make new futures.

Through the History major at the University of Tasmania you will gain a sophisticated sense of your location in time and place, and will become skilled in historical research, critical analysis and communication of ideas. You will develop skills in researching a variety of historical evidence that is becoming increasingly accessible in digital forms. You will learn to analyse sources and issues, and fluently express your ideas in discussions, essays and other forms of communication. History is very present in Tasmania, with its many sites and markers of a deep and complex past linking the island to Australia and the world. Our units are all available in both on-campus and online modes. 

Available: On campus Hobart and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

Spanning over four centuries, from the Italian Renaissance in the late Middle Ages to the rise of European nationalism in the nineteenth century, this unit explores the history of Early Modern Europe a crucial period in shaping both Europe and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the dramatic changes in world history from 1500 to 1900. It examines how rising population levels, technological change, trade and warfare shaped the modern world. The unit employs a series of case studies to examine the impact…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

Core

In this unit we explore the multitude of forces that have shaped the continent’s history from ancient times through to the present. We consider the extent to which Australia, and particularly Tasmania, has been moulded by factors such as violence,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

From the trenches of the First World War to the end of the Second World War, this unit explores global history through the lens of an ‘Age of Catastrophe’. The first half of the twentieth century was an age convulsed…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the creation of the United States of America by focusing on two significant conflicts. We begin by studying the origins and outcomes of the eighteenth century American War of Independence - an event that was both a…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit we witness the birth of the Middle Ages, paying attention to the interactions between Barbarian warrior culture, Roman culture, and Christian culture. We examine the Franks, Anglo-Saxons, Huns, Vandals, Goths, Vikings, and other medieval peoples. Barbarians moved…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points of Elective units.

Core

History is a vast and endlessly fascinating subject of study that has many areas of specialisation. This unit will focus on a particular period, place, and/or historical theme. In doing so you will develop a deep critical engagement with key…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will challenge your perceptions of how heritage is manufactured. You will explore, analyse, and debate local and national issues within a global frame. Through critically reflecting on how heritage is ‘made’ by historians, archaeologists, Indigenous peoples, museums, politicians,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

Pick up the story in 1000 when the Vikings have given a kick-start to Europe's economy and the warrior mentality of the early Middle Ages is giving way to the rising aristocrats. From this starting-point, the unit will examine the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The late eighteenth century saw the beginning of revolutionary political, economic and cultural change that marked the emergence of modern nation states and cultures. France was site of the first modern political and social revolution, and came to dominate Europe…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Food is both universal - we all need to eat - and specific: what people have eaten depends on time and place. The choices people have made about what they consider edible, safe, tasty, desirable, suitable and ethical, reflect and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

While historians often study particular times and places in detail, it is important to also step back and see the big picture. In this unit we study continuity and change at a global level and/or over long periods of time.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit you will transform your classroom into a moment of historical controversy and intellectual ferment. Using sophisticated role immersion games (Reacting to the Past) as a way to learn, the class becomes an historical arena; students become characters…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

You may know about Bali and Komodo dragons but after studying Indonesian you will also know that our closest neighbour has an extraordinary literary history and that knowing Indonesian is an intellectual passport to one of the most exciting and diverse cultures in South-East Asia. A better understanding of Indonesia and fluency in the language are assets for Australians. Many of Australia's key national interests, from security and borders to agriculture and trade, are heavily dependent on Indonesia. As we strengthen our strategic relations with Indonesia, the importance of your knowledge will also grow.

Being non-scriptic and non-tonal, Indonesian is a relatively easy language to learn. It is also very accessible since it is spoken by more than 250 million people in Indonesia, and understood by the Malay-speaking population in other parts of Southeast Asia. You can study Indonesian beginner or more advanced levels. Our approachable teaching staff, with the help of high-quality interactive teaching materials, will support you to attain high fluency in the language and at the same time gain insights into various aspects of Indonesian society. You can also gain credit towards your degree by having an unforgettable experience in the in-country programs that we manage in collaboration with Australian and Indonesian institutions.

Careers and institutions that use Indonesian speakers in Australia include NGOs, Foreign Affairs, Creative Industries, community groups and public policy.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units

This is an introductory unit for students with no prior knowledge of Indonesian. This unit will provide students with the skills to communicate and interact with Indonesian people on a range of topics, to find their way around in Indonesia,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This introductory unit builds on HMN101. It is suitable for students who have some prior Indonesian language learning. The main aim is to provide you with the vocabulary, sentence shells and cultural skills that will enable you to ask and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units

This is an intermediate Indonesian unit and is suitable for students who have some significant prior Indonesian language learning. The main aim is to provide you with the vocabulary, sentence shells and cultural skills that will enable you to communicate…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an intermediate Indonesian unit builds on HMN207. It is suitable for students who have some significant prior Indonesian language learning. Through more advanced reading, you will be introduced to more complex content. You will be provided with skills…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units

This is an advanced Indonesian unit. It is suitable for students who have significant prior Indonesian language learning and/or background speakers. This unit enables students to read, understand, and produce more technical and formal Indonesian. The unit covers content such…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This is an advanced Indonesian unit that builds on HMN313. It is suitable for students who have significant prior Indonesian language learning and/or background speakers. This unit enables students to read, understand, and produce more technical and formal Indonesian. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

When you study International Relations you will be considering some of the biggest problems in our globalised world. The major in International Relations will give you the tools required to understand and have an impact on current global challenges and opportunities. In the first year you will learn about the vast array of actors, institutions and ideas that shape world politics. In the second and third years you have the opportunity to explore further key areas of global politics like international security and law, human rights, the global politics of China or the international political economy.

Studying international relations will develop your skills in researching and comparing cross-national politics and societies; analysing and evaluating complex systems; and autonomously researching, writing and presenting. These transferable skills will equip you to work in government, private businesses, NGOs, public institutions or wherever solutions to global challenges are sought.

Available: On campus Hobart and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units including 12.5 credit points from Core units and 12.5 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

We live in an uncertain and challenging era where global issues increasingly affect our local daily lives. Forty years of uneven globalisation has been accompanied by the rise of corporations, regional and international institutions, and international nongovernmental agencies. As important…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

This unit is concerned with the study of security in all the breadth that this notion has gained over the past decades. Starting from an analysis of the classical understanding of security which links state sovereignty with warfare we will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers an introduction to the most important themes and issues in the international relations of China. Students will gain a basic understanding of how the major frameworks of international relations interpret the rise of China as a global…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units, including the 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points of Elective units.

Core

This unit is concerned with the question of the changing/evolving nature of violence in the international realm. Part one of the unit will trace the emergence of modern thought about violence through theoretical 'traditions' and the writings of Niccolo Machiavelli,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit looks at the diverse forms of international, global and transnational cooperation and asks critically how they have developed over time and space. It examines the structures of power and equality/inequality in international relations and how these are reflected…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Elective

This unit focuses on late-20th /early 21st Europe, analysing the degree to which pre-modern ideas of Europe continue to permeate its modern, institutional existence. Through introducing students to the rationale behind the establishment of the EU, the euro etc, this…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Offers a systematic study of various forms of `disorder` in the post-Cold War era, with a particular focus on terrorism. States are increasingly confronted with unpredictable, internal and trans-national threats to their security, for example: new and diverse forms of…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Global Political economy is conventionally understood as the study of how politics and economics mutually shape each other and the global system. Influenced by 18th and 19th century humanistic thought of liberalism (Adam Smith) , economic nationalism (Friedrich List) and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit is designed to deepen your understanding of contemporary issues related to religion, ethnicity and conflict in Southeast Asia. In the introductory section of the unit, you will familiarise yourself with the history, social and political structure of countries…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Every day you may consume and hear things about Japanese popular cultures, but do you really know Japan? The third-largest economy in the world, Japan is a world leader in popular culture fields such as anime, manga and gaming. What does the popularity of the filmmaking of Hayao Miyazaki (Studio Ghibli) tell us about the world today? What are the differences and similarities between Sailor Moon and Disney’s princesses? Has the world of Pokémon Go changed people's understanding of reality and digital space? The Japanese major is a gateway to Japanese popular cultures and global literacy. Gaining critical insights through this lens can impact your understanding of your own culture in surprising ways.

The Japanese program at the UTAS offers, concurrently with the pathways to master the Japanese language, the opportunity to enhance your critical thinking skills in global contexts. Our staff support and work closely with a vibrant student community, in which students are regularly encouraged to actively participate to enhance their study and deepen their understanding of Japanese language and culture. With a wide range of overseas study and internship options supported by generous scholarships, the program produces graduates going on to a variety of careers in fields spanning diplomacy, media, education, public service, trade, and the arts.

We welcome from absolute beginners to more advanced students, and encourage a diversity of expression, subjects and ideas. Come and join us and grow as an effective global citizen equipped with a better understanding of the fundamental changes taking place in our dynamic region of the world and beyond.

Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

This is an introductory unit for students with little or no prior knowledge of Japanese. This unit has an emphasis on the interactive use of the Japanese language. It develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. The unit also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Develops competence in basic spoken and written Japanese. This unit builds on the work you learned in HMJ101. This unit, the second half of introductory Japanese, develops competence in basic spoken and written skills with an emphasis on the interactive…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

Building on from HMJ102, the unit further develops basic grammatical knowledge and oral/aural skills. Students will learn to communicate orally in Japanese on a series of everyday life topics including foods and beverages, shopping, travel, and housing. Attention is also…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Building on from HMJ204, the unit further develops basic grammatical knowledge and oral/aural skills. Students will learn to converse in Japanese on a series of everyday life topics including: transport, health, life and careers, communication and the media. Upon completion…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units.

This unit aims to deconstruct the monolithic perception of Japanese culture and to understand Japan in terms of its relationship with its near and more distant neighbours throughout Asia and the Pacific. Incorporating the approach of queer studies, which places…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This joint capstone unit is designed as an extension of Japanese 3A and aims to equip students with sufficient skills to read and respond not only to the structured readings of a textbook but to a range of other primary…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Building on previous Japanese language study, this joint capstone unit aims to develop students' oral skills and production skills both in spoken and written formats. Students will develop conversation skills beyond everyday life situations through pair work and group work…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

From our 24-hour news cycle and endless streaming services to social media posts building brands and inspiring social change, media and communication connect every aspect of our personal and professional lives. Media and communication graduates are sought by many industries looking for people whose understanding of media goes beyond their own favourite shows and social media accounts. An understanding of media and communication opens doors to a wide range of exciting careers.

Our island campus of Tasmania is the start of your journey. The Media School is uniquely co-located with leading media organisations in Hobart. You will bump shoulders and share facilities with practitioners from the news, communication and the screen industries. Outside, you’re a short walk from Parliament House, the courts, museums, galleries and performance spaces, and Hobart’s docks, which are the world’s scientific gateway to Antarctica.

This major is tailored for students curious about media from a cultural and sociological perspective. Who are the content makers and who are the audiences? Who are the influencers and how are do we understand their influence? Students will learn skills in media analysis and develop their skills in research and professional writing.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

From film and television to computers and smart phones, media and screen culture has evolved in the twenty-first century to being a ubiquitous feature of daily life. This unit introduces you to the complex and diverse relationships between media texts and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The shift from mass communication to mass self-communication is one of the most important shifts in recent human society. Mobile communication networks allow us to produce and share content like never before which is challenging and changing our notions of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

We know the impact that photographic and digital images can have on us, individually and collectively. When images and words come together to tell a story they can be entertaining, revelatory, breath-taking, and even powerful agents of change. In this…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The connection between technology and culture has never been greater. Screen, digital media, and networking platforms are changing the practices and forms of expression that represent and reflect culture and society. By investigating the production, use and circulation of various…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

Power describes the capacity of an individual or group to influence the opinions, decisions and actions of others. This unit explores the role of media in the communication of power in society and, importantly, the counter-movements that challenge power. In…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the representation of crime in the media and its role as a primary source of information for public discourse about crime, criminality and criminal justice in contemporary society. You will engage with key critical criminology and media…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

What does it mean to act in a global media landscape? In this unit, you will examine the evolving relationship between theatre and technology, exploring how performance can offer new ways to understand, critique, and engage with global media networks…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the different ways in which our everyday lives are connected increasingly to global events, issues and problems. Through three core modules – Approaches to Globalisation; Global Challenges and Threats; and, Global Futures – you will discover why…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to deconstruct the monolithic perception of Japanese culture and to understand Japan in terms of its relationship with its near and more distant neighbours throughout Asia and the Pacific. Incorporating the approach of queer studies, which places…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The public policy arena presents a complex framework of actors, politics, instruments, and practices. This unit examines the broad range of theories, models, influences, and players that shape the development of Australian public policy. It aims to equip students with…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will challenge your perceptions of how heritage is manufactured. You will explore, analyse, and debate local and national issues within a global frame. Through critically reflecting on how heritage is ‘made’ by historians, archaeologists, Indigenous peoples, museums, politicians,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will equip students with an interdisciplinary understanding of energy systems. Its focus is on how science and policy are interacting to shape Australia’s energy futures. The Australian energy sector is experiencing a period of change, prompted by the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Music played an important role in the earliest of human civilizations as a key element of ritual, religion, healing, cultural expression and entertainment. The development of musical styles and genres has been shaped by political and societal change, reflecting the individual and collaborative outputs of those who create music, as well as the influences from patrons, audiences and the commercial music industry. Throughout this major you will learn about the characteristics and evolution of a wide variety of musical styles and significant works; assess the potential impact of recording and sound production on musicians and audiences; compare and reflect on the perspectives of creators, performers, critics and listeners; and develop a rich and interdisciplinary understanding of the role and function of music and music-making in communities past and present.

Music supports, enriches and accompanies our daily life experiences: come and explore this integral aspect of cross-cultural identity in the modern world.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units

This unit introduces you to the ways in which music and music-making can be shaped by environment. It encourages you to reflect upon the impact of place on musical practices. You will have the opportunity to explore the distinctiveness of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Music festivals, films and genres such as stadium rock and contemporary circus exemplify how music and the visual combine for spectacular effect. In this unit, through the exploration of a diverse range of contemporary and historical musical works, concepts and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units

This unit focusses on the interrelationship between music and politics by exploring aspects such as musical activism, propaganda, censorship and the underground. You will investigate the creation, reception and transmission of music from diverse styles, cultures, periods and global perspectives…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

What will it mean to be a musician in the future? How might music continue to evolve and adapt to change? How will audiences of the future access their preferred genre? Who will fund music production and consumption? Will live…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

In this capstone unit you will develop and undertake your own self-directed project in any field of musical activity. Negotiated with and overseen by teaching staff, your tailored experience provides an exciting opportunity to bring together everything you have learned…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

If you’ve ever predicted the outcome of Masterchef eliminations based on the soundtrack, put on your headphones for a better video game experience, or been transported by birdsong to a different place and time in a nature documentary, you will…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

This unit provides students with an overview of the developmental characteristics of learners and music learning in a one-to-one or small group instrumental/vocal setting. Students develop an understanding of a range of teaching, learning and assessment theories and methodologies relevant…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Scenography and Theatre Design are integral to contemporary performance. In this unit you will explore how Theatre Design and Scenography create performance environments that both convey meaning and generate performance. Theatre Design incorporates the crafts of costume, set, lighting and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Ever wonder why that tune gets stuck in your head, or when you listen to your favourite song your foot starts tapping, or why its easier to remember the words of a song when you sing the tune? How do…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Research is providing increasing evidence for the positive benefits of engagement with the arts for individual and community wellbeing at all stages of life and can provide a non-pharmaceutical adjunct to health interventions. This unit explores case studies of successful…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Studying Philosophy allows you to ask (and occasionally answer) the very biggest of questions. What makes for a meaningful life? What can we know? What is the nature of the world, or of ourselves in it? What kind of societies are just? Philosophy explores fundamental questions about the human condition, relevant for people at all times and in all places, but equally arising out of the specifics of each life – whether in Tasmania or anywhere else. It considers problems and concerns arising from art, literature, science, law, religion, and many other human endeavors, along with the basic matter of an ethical engagement with the world. Philosophy also gives you skills in analysis, reasoning, and clear and cogent communication – highly valued attributes across all study areas in the Bachelor of Arts as well as contemporary professions.

In this major you will encounter philosophical issues from different perspectives across both Eastern and Western philosophical traditions. In the first year, you will study some of the central branches of philosophy – ethics and political philosophy, metaphysics, and epistemology. In the second year you will explore the history of philosophical thinking, in ancient Greece, the Buddhist tradition and the early modern world in Europe. By third year you will be investigating current issues: reading major modern philosophical texts, examining the connections between philosophy and other fields of inquiry, and bringing philosophical work to bear on contemporary problems.

Available: On campus Hobart, Launceston and online

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units

This unit introduces students to moral and political philosophy. Drawing on a range of topics, themes, and methods, this unit explores foundational questions within both moral and political philosophy. As such, this unit provides an introduction to philosophy, the world’s…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Through an examination of historical and contemporary philosophical texts, from Western and Eastern traditions, this unit explores the nature of persons and the nature of the world as we experience it. These themes will be pursued by asking questions such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units

This unit will discuss the doctrines and concepts central to two different, but related traditions: Zen Buddhism and Taoism. It will examine the historical rise and development of these traditions through a critical study of the classics of Bodhidharma, Lao…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit surveys the main Western philosophical traditions from the Renaissance up to the 19th century. At the centre stand the metaphysical and epistemological systems of the Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz) and the Empiricists (Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume),…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Logic is the theory of good reasoning. This unit introduces students to some of the types of reasoning that are regularly used in everyday life, in philosophy and in many other fields. Students will be introduced to a variety of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

We are all constantly faced with moral questions and questions about human values more generally, but what is morality and what are the foundations of human values? On what grounds do we and should we, base our decisions about morality…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

This unit is built around a close examination of key philosophical texts. Students will acquire a specialist understanding of debates and positions within a select field of philosophy, and will identify and engage with philosophical issues in detail. The unit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Philosophers regularly collaborate with neuroscientists and psychologists, mathematicians and physicists, ecologists and biologists, artists and filmmakers, as well as medical practitioners and researchers. These collaborations are often fruitful and offer new, unexpected insights. Most disciplines involve philosophical questions or benefit…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

Introduces students to the principal traditions of Buddhist philosophy. The unit begins with an examination of the discourses of the Buddha in the Pali tradition and an examination of the common core of all Buddhist philosophical schools. It then studies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This is an introduction to political philosophy. Political philosophy is the branch of philosophy concerned with political values, such as freedom, equality, community, rights, duties, and democracy. Political philosophy is as old as philosophy itself. However, this unit will focus…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Science is our most successful attempt to understand the world around us, and it plays an extremely important role in contemporary society. As such, we should not ignore the possibility that science may have something to contribute to traditional philosophical…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Continental philosophy encompasses a wide range of philosophical schools, including Existentialism, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Deconstruction, Critical Theory, and Postmodern Thought, all of which have shaped our understanding of the human condition, not only in philosophy proper, but also in art, literature,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In this unit, students will undertake an independent project requiring an investigation of an approved Humanities topic. Students will learn and demonstrate research skills in a multi-disciplinary cohort, but will also select and refine an individual research topic of their…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

When you study Politics and Public Policy you become immersed in the world of political ideas, institutions and actors. You will study current events and recent political developments, learn how Australia’s and other countries’ political institutions work, and engage with the political ideas and concepts that shape our communities.

In the first year you will learn about political institutions and policy processes. In the second and third years you will learn to compare political systems and policies, focus more closely on a policy area that interests you (environmental or marine politics and policy, for example), and have the opportunity to undertake an internship with the Tasmanian Parliament or Tasmanian State Service. 

Studying Politics and Public Policy in Tasmania will give you the opportunity to directly engage with state policy makers and to observe firsthand the politics of debating and accepting particular shifts in policy; you will learn to analyse social and organisational structures, and understand complex concepts, as well as legal and political communication. Throughout your studies you will deepen your reading, debating, writing and researching skills. The skills acquired in this major will prepare you for work in civil society settings, public services, political institutions, the media and other complex organisations. 

Available: On campus Hobart and online.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units including 12.5 credit points of Core units and 12.5 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

This unit provides an introduction to contemporary political concepts, debates and practices. It examines the Australian political system and compares it with other major liberal democracies such as the United States. It focuses on important policy challenges confronting advanced democracies…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

Elective

We live in an uncertain and challenging era where global issues increasingly affect our local daily lives. Forty years of uneven globalisation has been accompanied by the rise of corporations, regional and international institutions, and international nongovernmental agencies. As important…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units

This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the study of political ideas focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative, Marxist, fascist,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Advanced units including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points chosen from Elective units.

Core

The public policy arena presents a complex framework of actors, politics, instruments, and practices. This unit examines the broad range of theories, models, influences, and players that shape the development of Australian public policy. It aims to equip students with…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit has two central goals. First, it aims to provide students with an introduction to comparative politics. Second, it seeks to provide students with advanced knowledge of politics in contrasting parts of the world. The unit consists of three…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

 
Elective

This unit takes an environmental justice perspective in introducing students to the dynamics that shape contemporary environmental policy (including green politics) with broad appeal to students of politics and policy, justice studies, environmental studies and science. The roles of politics…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit utilises various analytical approaches concerning the development, implementation, evaluation and legitimacy of Antarctic and oceans governance at both the international and national levels.Three broad interrelated issue areas are examined: [i] the evolution of the Antarctic Treaty System; [ii]…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to American politics. The unit begins with an overview of United States political history, culture and institutions before focusing on the nature and impact of recent presidencies. It examines key issues which dominate contemporary…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit offers you the opportunity to better understand the role that food plays in Australia’s ecological political economy. Taking a critical, coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) approach, you will study the structure and operation of our modern ‘linear’,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement as part of their undergraduate studies. Internships vary across programs in the School of Social Sciences but may (for instance) be undertaken in a number of public sector agencies,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit permits students to undertake an internship or work placement in the Parliament as part of their undergraduate studies. Students interested in an internship should contact the relevant course coordinator for details about which opportunities may be available in…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Why do we behave the way we do? Why do we think, react and interact as we do? When you study psychology, you will begin to understand the science behind human behaviour – and how this science can be used to solve practical problems in all sorts of situations. Psychological science covers everything from how the brain functions, to how social and environmental factors shape our thoughts, feelings, and behaviours.

Students who graduate with a major in psychology have a wide range of career options beyond working as a counsellor or psychologist. UTAS psychology graduates have gone on to work in fields such as human resources, defence forces, health and legal agencies, and many other settings. And our research is just as varied – from working with expeditioners in the Antarctic, to communities in remote Australia; from learning how children develop language, to understanding how gaming influences behaviour. We work with organisations such as the department of health and police force, and with individuals, for example, people experiencing the effects of brain injury, substance addiction, or mental illness. Studying psychology at UTAS provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge to address issues relevant to regional, rural, and metropolitan societies at the local, national, and global level.

Students considering becoming a Psychologist need to complete an accredited undergraduate sequence of study in Psychology (11 units) to progress to fourth year and postgraduate study in Psychology. The requirement for the accredited undergraduate sequence is completion of the Psychological Science major (8 core units)) and 4 additional prescribed elective Psychology units. The Psychological Science sequence offered through Bachelor of Psychological Science (53F), Bachelor of Arts (A3A), Bachelor of Science (P3O), and Bachelor of Psychological Science and Bachelor of Laws (63Y) are fully accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC). 

Note: PSY112, PSY125, PSY223 and PSY224 must be completed in addition to the Psychological Science major as Electives for students to be eligible for Psychology Honours. Students in a Double Degree may have these units count towards their Bachelor of Arts Discipline Electives.


Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In today’s information-rich world it is essential to be able to interpret and critically evaluate empirical and popular reports of psychological research, as well as research findings more broadly. We need to be able to recognise the characteristics of valid…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human behaviour is not universal. Why do individuals behave the way they do? Lecture content will introduce and explore theoretical descriptions of individual differences such as personality and intelligence that can impact behaviour in a variety of contexts, as well…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

The field of psychology has an aim that, on the surface, appears straightforward: to understand human behaviour. However, human behaviour is varied and complex, and achieving this goal presents a considerable challenge. Researchers must be familiar with and adhere to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The lectures examine aspects of overt social behaviour, such as two-person encounters, behaviour in small and large groups and inter-group relations. Research in social cognition, which studies people’s perceptions and interpretations of the social world, will also be presented. Lecture…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units.

This unit provides coverage of human development over the lifespan (infancy to old age) including cognitive and social-emotional domains of development. The major periods of development are examined, including infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, emphasising predominant developmental aspects for different…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to introduce students to a range of psychiatric disorders including psychological symptoms, theoretical models, assessment and evidence-based treatments. Consideration is given to a range of cognitive-behavioural strategies employed by clinical psychologists in the treatment of various mental…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Psychology, the study of human behaviour, is wondrous in its complexity. Individual behaviour is affected and influenced by many factors, including biological, neurological, psychological and cultural. Psychologists can and do measure all of these factors and understand that the relationships…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers a systematic approach to understanding psychological symptoms and psychopathology. Theoretical models of psychopathology, as well as psychological assessment and evidence-based interventions will be explored. Consideration is given to a range of psychological assessment and intervention strategies and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

When you study sociology, you will come to appreciate how the world around you influences the way you think, feel and act while acquiring a better understanding of yourself and your role in this world. This is what sociology does. It makes sense of the many challenges that human societies face in the modern world and the ways in which people and societies confront those challenges. Studying Sociology will provide you with the knowledge to understand how these challenges have emerged, the skills to analyse the complexities of how those challenges effect different social groups, and the capacity to evaluate options for creating more sustainable and socially just societies.

Sociology questions the established, taken-for-granted views of reality, to provide clearer and more complex understandings of social life. This major offers an exciting range of social topics to engage with including how globalisation and global issues influence everyday life, the significance of cities and urbanisation in the early 21st century, the role of social divisions, inequality and power in shaping our life chances, and the diverse ways in which gender, sexuality, ethnicity and race contribute to the construction of our identity. You will start with an introduction to sociological theory and foundational issues before advancing into the intermediate core units on diverse social theory and social research methods. By the third year, you will be able to utilise your sociological theory and social research approaches to engage with critical issues facing us right now.

Sociology equips you with the skills to think critically about the world around you and the ability to apply different perspectives in your decision-making and planning. This is an essential requirement in any career needing cultural awareness and research expertise.

Available: On campus Hobart and online

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.

This unit introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit uses the theoretical concept of ‘Lifeworlds’ (lived social, cultural, political and economic realities) to frame an exploration of the Lifeworlds of palawa People in lutruwita/Tasmania, inclusive a small comparative component relating to Noongar and Navajo Peoples. The Lifeworld…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

Perspectives on the Social World provides students with an understanding of the concepts and approaches developed by sociologists to explain major social changes in Western democracies from the end of the 18th century to the present.The unit is divided into…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced unit including 25 credit points of Core units and 25 credit points of Elective units.

Core

The unit examines the complex social relations of living in cities. For the first time in human history, over half of the world’s population live in cities. Yet, how do we make sense of the social, environmental, economic and cultural…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores the different ways in which our everyday lives are connected increasingly to global events, issues and problems. Through three core modules – Approaches to Globalisation; Global Challenges and Threats; and, Global Futures – you will discover why…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Elective

This unit will enable students to understand how tourism and cultural industries have dramatically changed our lives. Cultural industries have grown significantly, with examples such as museums, regional festivals and wilderness adventures. At the same time there is an increasing…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit applies a sociological lens to the terrain of racial, religious and ethnic relations in Australia. It introduces theories of race, ethnicity, indigeneity and whiteness and applies these to historical and contemporary race and religious relations and the empirical…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides a critical introduction to issues and debates relating to crime in the context of sport. From doping to corruption in the world game, sport and crime are inextricably linked. Sharing a number of themes and issues such…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSpring school (extended)

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit applies a critical sociological perspective to health, illness and medicine. Each year the unit will use topical examples to explore expert and public knowledges about health and illness, the social distribution and patterning of health and illness, inequalities…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do we learn to 'do' gender correctly? Is gender 'natural'? In this unit, you will develop a critical lens through which to understand the social forces and structures of power that shape us as gendered individuals and construct the…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit examines the position and experiences of young people in contemporary society, and challenges some of the negative discourses that surround 'youth'. It provides an analysis of the social construction of 'youth' and highlights diversity through an examination of…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
LauncestonSpring school

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

In the Theatre and Performance major you will develop skills through practice-led learning, to become creative, critical and resilient practitioners. At the same time you will explore the history and theory of theatre and performance, delving into the history of theatre, and the future of performance practice, enriching your capacity to create innovative work that responds to the twenty-first century world.

Through critical and reflective engagement you will learn how to manage creative projects, lead collaborative processes and develop communication and problem-solving skills. You will develop practical and technical skills for performance within wider artistic, social, political and environmental contexts while exploring the best of contemporary theatre practice. Through our Creative Curriculum units, you will have the opportunity to extend your skills through work-integrated learning placements in acclaimed Tasmanian festivals like Dark MOFO, Mona Foma, Ten Days on the Island, The Unconformity or Junction Arts Festival.

You will be studying at the Annexe in Launceston or at the Hedberg in Hobart which are dedicated working theatres and studios. Through the unique blend of practice-based and theoretical offerings in this major, you will learn how to pursue a sustainable practice, and gain highly transferable skills which are valuable in a range of career pathways within the creative industries and beyond.

Available: On campus Hobart and Launceston.

Complete 25 credit points of Introductory units.

What foundational skills does a performer need? Leading theatre performers make the craft seem effortless. This unit is a practical exploration of foundational performance skills, including movement, voice and space, and how these performance skills are applied in diverse performance…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit focuses on introductory skills and knowledge central to technical production for the theatre. It includes an introduction to the duties and skills required by technical support staff in theatre venues as well as the organisational skills appropriate to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 25 credit points of Intermediate units.

In this unit you will encounter practice-based approaches to interpreting, designing and performing scenes from a canonical performance text under the direction of the Unit Lecturer. Throughout semester you will apply performance skills learnt in introductory units FPB130 and FPB132…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit explores that ways that dramatic texts ‘speak’ as documents for performance. By exploring a number of texts, both classical and contemporary, this unit considers the range of interpretive practices that move the text from page to stage. The…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Complete 50 credit points of Advanced units.

This unit enables students to undertake small exploratory performance-based projects through a laboratory-style experience. Students will explore various skills and strategies essential to realise identified projects collaboratively or individually for an invited audience. Students will critically reflect on their experience.…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

What does it mean to act in a global media landscape? In this unit, you will examine the evolving relationship between theatre and technology, exploring how performance can offer new ways to understand, critique, and engage with global media networks…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Experimental Production 2 is dedicated to the development, rehearsal and performance of a complete theatre production and builds on the skills and knowledge learnt in FPB316 Experimental Production 1. Classes are conducted as rehearsals of a performance text or other…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Scenography and Theatre Design are integral to contemporary performance. In this unit you will explore how Theatre Design and Scenography create performance environments that both convey meaning and generate performance. Theatre Design incorporates the crafts of costume, set, lighting and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Students complete a total of 4 discipline units, this is the place in the curriculum where you choose units to complement your Major study and where you tailor the degree even further to your interests. You may choose to take additional units from the majors and minors listed in the BA schedule. You can use discipline units to study a second minor, go on overseas exchange, or study University breadth units, enhance your leadership potential, and more.

The choice of possible discipline units is deliberately extensive. To search for possible units please search by the discipline that you are interested in from the majors or minors listed above.

Year 1

This unit introduces students to the Australian legal system, and the study of law. As the foundational unit for the UTAS law degree, Introduction to Law acquaints students with the key actors, institutions and concepts underlying the Australian legal system.…

Credit Points: 12.5

This unit is currently unavailable.