Bachelor of Social Work with Honours (A4S)

Overview  2023

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 4 Years, up to a maximum of 9 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

Hobart
Semester 1
Launceston
Semester 1
Cradle Coast
Semester 1

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 4 Years, up to a maximum of 9 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Entry requirements

Location

Hobart
Semester 1
Launceston
Semester 1
Cradle Coast
Semester 1

In the right headspace

Social Work graduate Ella Baker-Condon is helping some of society’s most at-risk and in-need people as a social worker for Headspace, a free youth-focused health service.

Now more than ever compassionate and engaged social workers are needed to help improve the life and wellbeing of people and to combat societal inequality.

Social workers need contemporary skills to respond meaningfully to social problems. Our Bachelor of Social Work with Honours has been designed with direct industry input to reflect current and emerging practice trends in the profession.

The Bachelor of Social Work with Honours is a professionally accredited qualification, awarded full accreditation by the Australian Association of Social Workers. It is an entry qualification into the social work profession and has been determined to meet the Australian Social Work Education and Accreditation Standards.

The honours-level course has specialisation options, and you will engage with distinctive Tasmanian, national, and international contexts. Threaded through the course is a focus on decolonising, Indigenising, sustainability, collaboration, and innovation in social work, ensuring that as a graduate, you are well-equipped for new and diverse roles in changing workplaces.

The Bachelor of Social Work with Honours prepares students for generalist social work practice, helping them to develop core knowledge, skills and values that can be applied across practice settings, fields and methods of social work practice. In your third and fourth year of study, you’ll complete a minimum of 1,000 hours of supervised professional field education placement.

Part-time students should be aware that undertaking their professional experience placement part-time may extend their course duration by up to a year. If you are studying part-time, please contact the Field Education team to discuss.


You will graduate as a creative and ethical communicator who respectfully uses knowledge to meet the needs of diverse social work client groups, communities and organisations. You will be able to respond to social justice and human rights challenges in ways that are culturally sensitive, principled, and effective.

  • 1 Recommend improvements to services, policies and professional accountability in social work based on critical analysis, research, and culturally relevant knowledge.
  • 2 Combine decolonising social work knowledge and practices to address inequality and injustice in ways that promote sustainable social change.
  • 3 Adapt and respond to the communication needs and capacities of diverse social work client groups, communities, and organisations.
  • 4 Develop social work leadership approaches that are collaborative, cooperative and useful in micro, meso and macro contexts.
  • 5 Formulate ethical social work responses to local, national and global social justice and human rights challenges.
  • 6 Design interventions and strategies that can contribute to the decolonising agenda in social work by using creative, entrepreneurial, and relational approaches.
  • Learn beyond the classroom

    Studying in Tasmania, our whole Island becomes your campus. Speak with your unit coordinator about how you can gain practical experience by volunteering in research initiatives, becoming an ambassador, or taking part in a work experience program.

    Study overseas at one of our partner institutions

    Our international exchange program offers opportunities to study at universities around the world, and it counts towards your degree. Exchange can allow you to have an affordable educational and cultural experience in a foreign country for a semester, or a full year. To facilitate this, we offer a range of scholarships and financial assistance. You may also be eligible for OS-HELP Loans or scholarship funding to assist with their airfares, accommodation and other expenses.

    UPDATE (MARCH) 2021: Please note, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Face-to-Face Study Abroad & Exchange programs have been postponed until 2022.

    Alternative Virtual Exchange Opportunities can be found on our Virtual Overseas Experiences tab. For more information please contact Global.Mobility@utas.edu.au

    Find out more about Student Exchange.

    Become a Student Ambassador

    Improve your communication, teamwork and leadership skills, meet new people, inspire and help others, and developing lasting friendships and networks as a student ambassador. Our ambassadors proudly represent the University throughout Tasmania in schools, at University and community events, and support a range of recruitment and engagement activities. Through the Student Ambassador Program you will have many opportunities for training and professional development, experience in real-world community engagement and outreach, networking, and public speaking, plus end up with a key point of distinction on your CV.

    In your third and fourth years of study you will need to complete a minimum of 1000 hours of professional experience placement, equivalent to 2 x 14 weeks full-time. Placements are undertaken on a full-time basis. In some circumstances part-time placements may be negotiated, subject to availability.

    The University will organise your placements. Before you begin placement, you will need to preparation activities and tasks. You will be allocated a field educator/social worker, with a minimum of 2 years full time equivalent post-graduation experience in the field. Your professional placement experience provides you with the opportunity to learn how to translate theories of social work into practice.

    It is possible in some circumstances for students to complete a placement in their place of work.

    Recognition of Prior Learning is possible for the first placement. Students who are given RPL for the first placement are unable to complete the final placement in their place of employment.

    See more information and resources at Field Education Placements.

    Career outcomes

    Social Workers support people to address challenges and improve their overall wellbeing. You could be working one-on-one offing direct counselling, helping families, facilitating rehabilitation groups, supporting community awareness, or advocating for policy changes.

    The skills and expertise our Social Work graduates gain equips them for a diverse range of rewarding careers, including:

    • child safety practitioner
    • project manager
    • youth worker
    • mental health practitioner
    • researcher
    • policy analyst and advisor
    • community development worker
    • migrant and refugee settlement workers
    • case manager
    • drug and alcohol counsellor
    • palliative care social worker
    • relationships counsellor
    • disability advocate.
    Postgraduate study

    If you successfully complete this course, you may be also be eligible to apply for a range of other postgraduate courses including Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas and Masters by coursework and research.

    Course structure

    Completion of the Bachelor of Social Work requires 400 credit points including:

    • 200 credit points of Core units
    • 100 credit points of Discipline Electives (Studies of the Individual and Studies of Society)
    • 100 credit points from the Research or Professional Honours pathway. Entry into the research pathway is by invitation only.

    Sociology is essential for understanding the turbulence, change, diversity and mobility of the modern world. Sociology offers a precise way to understand, track and assess how ever-changing aspirations, technologies and economies impact on our social relations and cultures. In Sociology…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit introduces you to the foundations of social work practice in human service organisations. You will develop critical analytical skills to explore historical and contemporary inequalities of power and privilege based on, for example, race, gender, sexuality, geographic location…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit explores Indigenous lived realities through an Indigenous lens. Using the theoretical concept of the lifeworld, the focus is the Palawa/Aboriginal People of Lutruwita/Tasmania but includes a comparative study of Noongar (WA) and Navajo (US) Peoples to demonstrate the…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Human behaviour is not universal. Why do individuals behave the way they do? Lecture content will introduce and explore theoretical descriptions of individual differences such as personality and intelligence that can impact behaviour in a variety of contexts, as well…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Complete two of the following units (25cp)

    How do assumptions about gender influence our understanding of what it means to be a human being? In this unit we explore a variety of different ways that human beings have been imagined and thought about across time in western…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    In today’s information-rich world it is essential to be able to interpret and critically evaluate empirical and popular reports of psychological research, as well as research findings more broadly. We need to be able to recognise the characteristics of valid…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Brain and Behaviour provides an introduction to key topics in psychology with an emphasis on their biological basis. Topics include biological psychology, sensation and perception, learning, motivation, emotion, human development, language, and states of consciousness. Key theories and related research…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    How do humans perceive the world around them, learn, and make decisions? Under what conditions do we do these things well? When and why do things go a bit “pear-shaped”? How can we be better? This unit introduces the study…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Complete two of the following units (25cp)

    Gender & World explores the shape(s) and impact(s) of gendered assumptions on human interactions in diverse areas of the world and in different historical periods. This unit focuses on how people have acted and do act on the basis of…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit introduces students to central concepts and methods used by sociologists to study society. Like HGA101, this unit develops an understanding of sociology by examining the major social institutions and processes, and sociological modes of inquiry. The unit explores…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This is a foundational unit in Criminology. You will focus on criminological approaches to understanding crime and criminalisation. The unit will introduce various categories of crime (e.g. property crime and violent crime) and debates about what counts as crime and…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    HGA138: Society Culture and Health explores the ways in which social and cultural factors and power relations shape the distribution of health and illness and experiences of health and illness in contemporary Australia. The unit will help you to develop…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    Online11 Week Session Oct

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit introduces students to moral and political philosophy. Drawing on a range of topics, themes, and methods, this unit explores foundational questions within both moral and political philosophy. As such, this unit provides an introduction to philosophy, the world’s…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    In this unit students will investigate different approaches to justice. The unit introduces students to theorists such (Plato, Socrates, Kant, Hobbes Locke, and Rawls) Through a justice discourse students will consider the nature and characteristics of justice. Students will also…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The course of climate change can be altered, and science tells us the next decade will be crucial. Averting a climate catastrophe depends on rapid action to reduce greenhouse gases, as well as widespread adaptation to minimise the impact of…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    OnlineSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    KGA171 Global Geographies of Change introduces you to the study of Geography and Environment by integrating physical and social science inquiry. You study earth evolution, human development and their interaction, in light of questions about sustainability. You apply this knowledge…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This foundation unit in Geography and Environmental Studies develops your knowledge of how people depend on nature, and how increasingly the conservation of nature depends on people. We will explore these relationships through a values lens: how nature is important…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Complete all of the following units (50cp)

    Examines how social issues in contemporary Australia are constructed and interpreted across their social, cultural, political and moral dimensions. The unit examines the role of discourses in the construction of social issues, social groups and social arenas as social problems…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit provides a critical introduction to the philosophies, principles and practices of juvenile justice and child protection. The interface between juvenile justice and child protection is well established, institutionally, historically and in terms of shared clients, and an informed…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The unit explores the historically evolved norms and laws as they relate to atrocity crimes and global justice issues, including slavery, climate change, migration and refugees, and labour exploitation. The unit provides a framework by which to understand why the…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Human rights are fundamental rights that are inherent to every individual. They are underpinned by concepts of human dignity and the essential equality of all people. The unit takes an interdisciplinary approach to the development, application and cultural relativity of…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    Online5 Week Session Jan B

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit extends your understanding of the emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal, social and environmental dimensions of health and wellness. The content focuses on critical aspects of social and emotional wellbeing (SEW) to ensure you can successfully promote SEW in a…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    This unit is currently unavailable.

    What does masculinity mean, and why does it exist in so many different forms? In this unit we explore the meaning and manifestations of a variety of different masculinities. We query the cultural expectations regarding masculinity that accompany boyhood, adolescence,…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Perspectives on the Social World provides students with an understandingof the concepts and approaches developed by sociologists to explain major socialchanges in Western democracies from the end of the 18th century to the present. Theunit is divided into three parts:…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit is designed to introduce students to the issues and processes associated with working with offenders, particularly those in prisons or under the supervision of community corrections. The unit explores issues pertaining directly to how best to work with…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartWinter school
    OnlineWinter school

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The unit offers a broad overview of the major theories and approaches to the study of crime and deviance. It provides a survey of diverse and competing interpretations of criminal and deviant acts, the situations and contexts within which crime…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    We are all constantly faced with moral questions and questions about human values more generally, but what is morality and what are the foundations of human values? On what grounds do we and should we, base our decisions about morality…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit explores broad ranging and contemporary aspects of Australian politics and policy, including democratic principles and Australian institutions, values and Australian culture, the Australian electoral system and campaigns, forms of political representation and the role of lobby groups, the…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit studies the processes that create and maintain indigenous disadvantage within society: locally, nationally and internationally. It introduces several critical theories to examine indigenous issues, to develop your analytical capacity through their application to a case study, or broad…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    This unit is currently unavailable.

    This unit introduces students to the study of political ideas focusing on some of the major ideological frameworks that have and continue to guide political action in the modern era. In the unit, students will consider liberal, conservative, Marxist, fascist,…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    All aspects of human life are geographical. Our lives take place in space. Spatial practices and ideas are central to individuals andsocieties: they help determine who and what belongs where, who controls and owns which resources, and who has what…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Complete one of the following units (12.5cp)

    This unit introduces students to the world of social research. It answers questions about how to produce knowledge through empirical research, and discusses the methods used to solve practical problems. The unit covers a wide range of social research methodologies and approaches,…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    OnlineSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The field of psychology has an aim that, on the surface, appears straightforward: to understand human behaviour. However, human behaviour is varied and complex, and achieving this goal presents a considerable challenge. Researchers must be familiar with and adhere to…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Complete all of the following units (100cp)

    This unit explores how social work theories and contexts inter-relate as a basis for a framework for identifying the purpose and practice of social work. Historical and contemporary social work theories are examined, relying on diverse knowledges, including First Nations…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    Online5 Week Session Jun

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Social Work Practicum 1 is a cornerstone unit in the 3rd year of the Bachelor of Social Work with Honours degree. Students are required to undertake at least 14 weeks full-time equivalent (FTE) of placement in a setting that provides…

    Credit Points: 37.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The unit focuses on key contexts of social work practice in the human services. By developing this understanding, you will gain knowledge of how you can practice effectively and influence these contexts to enhance outcomes for social work clients. Through…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Social workers acknowledge that we live in extra-ordinary times of uncertainty, disruption to the ‘business as usual’ and growing social, cultural, political, economic and environmental disparities. This unit equips you with intersectional analysis skills, theoretical knowledge and practice skills to…

    Credit Points: 25

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Communication and Assessment Skills in Social Work provides a broad overview of human development theories and direct practice skills underpinning work with individuals. Additionally, you are taught communication skills to support assessment report and case note writing. Two key themes…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    In the fourth year, students are considered for either a Research Honours or Professional Honours specialisation.
    Complete all of the following units.

    Social Work Thesis A extends your understanding of the purpose and practices of research that you gain in HGW423 Social Work Research Practice. You will do this by conceptualising and beginning to implement a research topic that focuses on improving…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Social Work Research Practice examines research methodologies that are utilised by social workers in working towards a more just, humane and inclusive society. Themes of decolonisation, collaboration and sustainability create a focus for designing research processes that are participative and…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit extends understanding of what it means to initiate responses to social problems, take responsibility for enacting and leading these responses, and being a part of ventures that do the same. Collaborative and collective social work leadership approaches and…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The final year Social Work Practicum is one of the capstone units in the Bachelor of Social Work with Honours degree. Students are required to undertake at least 14 weeks full-time equivalent (FTE) of placement in a setting that provides…

    Credit Points: 25

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    Hobart16 Week Session Jul
    Launceston16 Week Session Jul
    Cradle Coast16 Week Session Jul

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This capstone unit provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of your learning that was applied to design and implement interventions, including research, across your entire social work degree including a specific focus on your final placement. You…

    Credit Points: 25

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit examines the intersection between trauma and justice and is informed by a commitment to social justice, decolonising, and an ethic of care. At a macro level, you will learn how social workers can promote policy, legislation and practice…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Administrative unit to be used for recording Honours grades and marks…

    Credit Points: 0

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    HobartSemester 2
    HobartSummer school
    LauncestonSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 2
    LauncestonSummer school (early)

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    Social Work Research Practice examines research methodologies that are utilised by social workers in working towards a more just, humane and inclusive society. Themes of decolonisation, collaboration and sustainability create a focus for designing research processes that are participative and…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    OnlineSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit extends understanding of what it means to initiate responses to social problems, take responsibility for enacting and leading these responses, and being a part of ventures that do the same. Collaborative and collective social work leadership approaches and…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This capstone unit provides you with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of your learning that was applied to design and implement interventions, including research, across your entire social work degree including a specific focus on your final placement. You…

    Credit Points: 25

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 2
    LauncestonSemester 2
    Cradle CoastSemester 2

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    This unit examines the intersection between trauma and justice and is informed by a commitment to social justice, decolonising, and an ethic of care. At a macro level, you will learn how social workers can promote policy, legislation and practice…

    Credit Points: 12.5

    LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
    HobartSemester 1
    LauncestonSemester 1
    Cradle CoastSemester 1

    Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    The final year Social Work Practicum is one of the capstone units in the Master of Social Work (Qualifying). Students undertake 500 hours (minimum) of placement in a setting that is relevant to social work practice. Placements are undertaken on…

    Credit Points: 37.5

    This unit is currently unavailable.

    Entry requirements

    We encourage you to apply for the courses you most want to study. If you’re not eligible to enter your chosen course right now, the admissions team will work with you to find the best pathway option.

    Enquire online for advice on the application process and the available pathways to study.

    Domestic applicants who have recently completed secondary education (in the past two years)

    Applicants are ranked by ATAR and offers made based on the number of places available. In 2022, the lowest ATAR to receive an offer into this course was 69.7 The lowest ATAR to receive an offer may change from year to year based on the number of applications we receive

    If you do not receive the minimum ATAR please refer to Alternative entry pathways below.

    Domestic applicants with higher education study

    To be eligible for an offer, you must have:

    • Completed a course at Associate Degree level or higher at any Australian higher education provider (or an equivalent overseas qualification); or
    • Completed at least two units of study (equivalent to 25 UTAS credit points) of a course at Associate Degree level (or an equivalent overseas qualification). If you have failed any units your application may be subject to further review before an offer is made; or
    • Completed the UTAS Diploma of University Studies; or
    • Competed the UTAS University Preparation Program, or an equivalent enabling program offered by another Australian university.
    Domestic applicants with VET / TAFE study

    To be eligible for an offer, you must have:

    • completed a Certificate IV, Diploma or Advanced Diploma (or an equivalent qualification) in any field.
    Domestic applicants with work and life experience

    If you have not successfully completed senior secondary, tertiary or TAFE/VET study, but have relevant work and life experience you can complete a personal competency statement.

    Special consideration

    If your ability to access or participate in education has been affected by circumstances beyond your control, you can apply for special consideration as part of your application. We will consider a range of factors, including economic hardship, serious medical condition or disability.

    We can only approve applications for special consideration where we are confident that you have the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in your studies. If your application is not approved, the UTAS admissions team will work with you to find the best alternative pathway to your chosen course. Special consideration is not available for international applicants.

    Course participation requirements

    This course includes compulsory field placements. In order to participate in field placements, all students must:

    • obtain a Tasmania Police Schedule 1 National Police Record Check and Working with Vulnerable Persons and Children Check; and
    • complete a Safety in Practice Agreement

    All international students will need to meet the minimum English Language Requirements, University General Entry Requirements and any course specific requirements such as pre-requisite subjects, if applicable.

    English Language Requirements

    This degree requires an IELTS (Academic) of 7.0, with no individual band less than 7.0. No equivalent tests accepted for this course.

     

    General Entry Requirements

    Admission to undergraduate courses at the University of Tasmania requires the completion of qualifications equivalent to a 12th year of education in Australia.

    Please review the equivalent undergraduate entry requirements to see the minimum requirement relevant to your country. The ATAR information for this course is located in the “For Domestic Students” section of the entry requirements on this page.

    You can also meet the General Entry Requirement for this course with the following qualifications or prior studies:

    • Completion of an equivalent AQF Certificate IV or above
    • Complete or incomplete (minimum 25 credit points) of previous tertiary study at Bachelor level or higher

    If you do not meet the minimum requirements, we offer the Foundation Studies Program.

    Course Specific Requirements

    This course includes compulsory field placements. In order to participate in field placements, all students must:

    • obtain a Tasmania Police Schedule 1 National Police Record Check and Working with Vulnerable Persons and Children Check; and
    • complete a Safety in Practice Agreement
    How to apply for a credit transfer

    Applications for credit can be made in your course application. Find out more information about how to apply for a credit transfer/advanced standing at Recognition of Prior Learning.

    Talk to us on 1300 363 864 or enquire online about your credit transfer.

    If you do not meet the General Entrance Requirements or course-specific requirements, there are alternate entry pathways to the Bachelor of Social Work with Honours:

    Completion of the Diploma of University Studies (Social Work) pathway will allow for up to 50 credit points of credit towards the Bachelor of Social Work with Honours.

    Talk to us on 1300 363 864 or enquire online about your alternative entry pathway.

    Detailed admissions information and advice for all undergraduate courses, including comprehensive, course-level student profiles, is available from UTAS Admissions.

    Fees & scholarships

    Domestic students

    Options for this course

    Cost shouldn’t get in the way of you studying.

    If you’re a domestic undergraduate student, you may be eligible for a Commonwealth Supported Place in this course. This means your fees will be subsidised by the Australian Government. You’ll only need to pay the student contribution amount for each unit you study within the course.

    You may also be able to defer payment of the student contribution amount by accessing a HECS-HELP loan from the Government. If eligible, you’ll only have to pay your tuition fees once you start earning above a specific amount.

    Further information is available at Scholarships, fees and costs.

    Student contribution

    Student contribution amounts are charged for each unit of study. This means that how much you’ll pay will depend on which units you choose. Find out more about student contribution amounts.

    Further information

    Detailed fee information for domestic students is available at Scholarships, fees and costs, including additional information in relation to the compulsory Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF).

    International students

    2023 Total Course Fee (international students): $138,882 AUD*.

    Course cost based on a rate of $32,950 AUD per standard, full-time year of study (100 credit points).

    * Please note that this is an indicative fee only.

    International students

    International students are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the annual rate. International students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

    Scholarships

    For information on general scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.

    How can we help?

    Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

    Domestic
    1300 363 864
    International
    +61 3 6226 6200
    Email
    Course.Info@utas.edu.au
    Online
    Online enquiries

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