Bachelor of Psychological Science (53F)

Overview  2021

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

mode.loadCategory not equal to Part Time
Minimum 3 Years, up to a maximum of 7 Years

Duration

Duration refers to the minimum and maximum amounts of time in which this course can be completed. It will be affected by whether you choose to study full or part time, noting that some programs are only available part time.

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2
Distance Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2

Commonwealth Supported places available

Entry Requirements

See entry requirements

Duration

Minimum 3 Years
Entry requirements

Location

Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Launceston
Semester 1, Semester 2
Distance Hobart
Semester 1, Semester 2
Psychology, the study of human behaviour, impacts every environment in which humans live, work, cooperate and communicate. Whether it’s in the classroom or the courtroom, the family home or the extremes of Antarctica, in Tasmanian communities or international relations, psychology plays a role.

If you want to develop knowledge and skills that will enrich your personal and professional life, or your goal is to become a research scientist, counsellor or registered psychologist, the Bachelor of Psychological Science provides the perfect foundation. When you study the science of psychology you will learn about the biological and psychological principles of human behaviour, and will develop the transferable skills of critical thinking, communication and problem solving that are vital everywhere people interact. These include:

  • marketing
  • business
  • advertising
  • criminal justice
  • neuroscience
  • education
  • public affairs
  • health services
  • human resources, and numerous other areas.

PLEASE NOTE: The first year of this course is available at Cradle Coast Campus in Burnie. When applying please select Launceston or Hobart, once you have accepted your offer you will be able to enrol in units delivered in Burnie. If you would like to discuss, please enquire now.

Career outcomes

It is easy to feel rushed for time, as though we only have one shot at getting something right; however, this is not the case. Lifelong learning requires making mistakes and sometimes even realising that despite how far you’ve come, it’s now time to try something different.

Rob Kirkis, Bachelor of Psychological Science with Honours

There are many career pathways available for students who have completed a degree in psychology, including:

  • Human Resource Management
  • Marketing and Market Research
  • Employment and training services
  • Teaching
  • Community health and welfare
  • Health services support e.g. Drug and alcohol, cancer, disability, rehabilitation
  • Probation and parole services
  • Aged, family and child services
  • Policy and planning
  • Counselling

If you aim to become a registered psychologist you will need to complete an APAC accredited fourth year psychology qualification e.g. Honours in Psychology, and then follow one of the following pathways:

  • Option 1: 5 + 1 Internship Pathway, e.g. Master of Professional Psychology
  • Option 2: APAC-accredited postgraduate professional psychology degree, e.g. Master of Psychology (Clinical)

Further information about these options can be found on the Australian Psychological Society website.

Professional Recognition

Accreditation Status: The Bachelor of Psychological Science (53F) is fully accredited by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC). Further information on accreditation status of psychology courses can be viewed on the APAC website.

APAC Accredited Course

Graduates who complete both an accredited undergraduate sequence and subsequently complete an APAC accredited fourth year psychology qualification will be eligible for provisional registration with the Psychology Board of Australia, with eligibility for full registration following two years of appropriate postgraduate training. Graduates will be eligible for membership of the Australian Psychological Society on completion of an accredited two-year postgraduate program in psychology.

Course structure

Standard Pathway

The standard pathway consists of 24 units (300 credit points):  16 core units in psychology  and 8 elective units.

In today’s information-rich world it is essential to be able to interpret and critically evaluate empirical and popular reports of psychological research, as well as research findings more broadly. We need to be able to recognise the characteristics of valid…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Brain and Behaviour is intended for students of Psychology, Medicine, Pharmacy, and allied science, medical and health professions and introduces major theoretical and empirical areas in psychology, biological bases of behaviour, and their associated practical applications. Lecture topics include nervous…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human behaviour is not universal. Why do individuals behave the way they do? Lecture content will introduce and explore theoretical descriptions of individual differences such as personality and intelligence that can impact behaviour in a variety of contexts, as well…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do humans perceive the world around them, learn, and make decisions? Under what conditions do we do these things well? When and why do things go a bit “pear-shaped”? How can we be better? This unit introduces the study…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

     
Plus four elective units

The lectures examine aspects of overt social behaviour, such as two-person encounters, behaviour in small and large groups and inter-group relations. Research in social cognition, which studies people’s perceptions and interpretations of the social world, will also be presented. Lecture…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The field of psychology has an aim that, on the surface, appears straightforward: to understand human behaviour. However, human behaviour is varied and complex, and achieving this goal presents a considerable challenge. Researchers must be familiar with and adhere to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to major theoretical and empirical perspectives on the psychology of health and wellbeing. It examines the psychosocial determinants of health and wellness as well as psychological theories of health protection and illness prevention. Issues relating to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides intermediate level coverage of material introduced in Brain and Behaviour (PSY112) and Psychological Processes (PSY125). Lectures will extend upon introductory material related to the biological basis of behaviour, including the structure and function of the nervous system,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

    
Plus four elective units

This unit provides coverage of human development over the lifespan (infancy to old age) including cognitive and social-emotional domains of development. The major periods of development are examined, including infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, emphasising predominant developmental aspects for different…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to introduce students to a range of psychiatric disorders including psychological symptoms, theoretical models, assessment and evidence-based treatments. Consideration is given to a range of cognitive-behavioural strategies employed by clinical psychologists in the treatment of various mental…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Psychology, the study of human behaviour, is wondrous in its complexity. Individual behaviour is affected and influenced by many factors, including biological, neurological, psychological and cultural. Psychologists can and do measure all of these factors and understand that the relationships…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will provide an introduction to psychology and law. The progression of lecture topics in this unit will roughly follow the course of an investigation and trial of a criminal case, covering issues such as eyewitness memory; false memories;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers a systematic approach to understanding psychological symptoms and psychopathology. Theoretical models of psychopathology, as well as psychological assessment and evidence-based interventions will be explored. Consideration is given to a range of psychological assessment and intervention strategies and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This advanced unit builds on the intermediate material covered in PSY224 (Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience) which forms a basis for understanding neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Lectures in neuropsychology will cover the neuroscience of major neuropsychological disorders and syndromes (e.g., neurodegenerative…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Language is what makes us human. It influences our thoughts and affects our lives in even more ways that we might expect. In this advanced unit, students are introduced to the most important and strongly debated issues in the psychology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Extreme environments are so named due to the unique challenges they pose to human performance. In this online unit you will learn about the factors that characterise an environment as extreme, and how living and/or working in an extreme environment…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

      

Graduate Entry Pathway

The Graduate Entry Pathway consists of sixteen core psychology units.  

In today’s information-rich world it is essential to be able to interpret and critically evaluate empirical and popular reports of psychological research, as well as research findings more broadly. We need to be able to recognise the characteristics of valid…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Brain and Behaviour is intended for students of Psychology, Medicine, Pharmacy, and allied science, medical and health professions and introduces major theoretical and empirical areas in psychology, biological bases of behaviour, and their associated practical applications. Lecture topics include nervous…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1
Cradle CoastSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Human behaviour is not universal. Why do individuals behave the way they do? Lecture content will introduce and explore theoretical descriptions of individual differences such as personality and intelligence that can impact behaviour in a variety of contexts, as well…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

How do humans perceive the world around them, learn, and make decisions? Under what conditions do we do these things well? When and why do things go a bit “pear-shaped”? How can we be better? This unit introduces the study…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2
Cradle CoastSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The lectures examine aspects of overt social behaviour, such as two-person encounters, behaviour in small and large groups and inter-group relations. Research in social cognition, which studies people’s perceptions and interpretations of the social world, will also be presented. Lecture…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

The field of psychology has an aim that, on the surface, appears straightforward: to understand human behaviour. However, human behaviour is varied and complex, and achieving this goal presents a considerable challenge. Researchers must be familiar with and adhere to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit introduces students to major theoretical and empirical perspectives on the psychology of health and wellbeing. It examines the psychosocial determinants of health and wellness as well as psychological theories of health protection and illness prevention. Issues relating to…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides intermediate level coverage of material introduced in Brain and Behaviour (PSY112) and Psychological Processes (PSY125). Lectures will extend upon introductory material related to the biological basis of behaviour, including the structure and function of the nervous system,…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit provides coverage of human development over the lifespan (infancy to old age) including cognitive and social-emotional domains of development. The major periods of development are examined, including infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, emphasising predominant developmental aspects for different…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit aims to introduce students to a range of psychiatric disorders including psychological symptoms, theoretical models, assessment and evidence-based treatments. Consideration is given to a range of cognitive-behavioural strategies employed by clinical psychologists in the treatment of various mental…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Psychology, the study of human behaviour, is wondrous in its complexity. Individual behaviour is affected and influenced by many factors, including biological, neurological, psychological and cultural. Psychologists can and do measure all of these factors and understand that the relationships…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit will provide an introduction to psychology and law. The progression of lecture topics in this unit will roughly follow the course of an investigation and trial of a criminal case, covering issues such as eyewitness memory; false memories;…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This unit offers a systematic approach to understanding psychological symptoms and psychopathology. Theoretical models of psychopathology, as well as psychological assessment and evidence-based interventions will be explored. Consideration is given to a range of psychological assessment and intervention strategies and…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

This advanced unit builds on the intermediate material covered in PSY224 (Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience) which forms a basis for understanding neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Lectures in neuropsychology will cover the neuroscience of major neuropsychological disorders and syndromes (e.g., neurodegenerative…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1
LauncestonSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Language is what makes us human. It influences our thoughts and affects our lives in even more ways that we might expect. In this advanced unit, students are introduced to the most important and strongly debated issues in the psychology…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 2
LauncestonSemester 2

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Extreme environments are so named due to the unique challenges they pose to human performance. In this online unit you will learn about the factors that characterise an environment as extreme, and how living and/or working in an extreme environment…

Credit Points: 12.5

LocationStudy periodAttendance optionsAvailable to
HobartSemester 1

Key: On-campus    Off-Campus    International students    Domestic students

Need help choosing you first year units? Try the Unit Selection Guide.

Entry requirements

We encourage you to apply for the courses you most want to study. If you’re not eligible to enter your chosen course right now, the UTAS admissions team will work with you to find the best pathway option.

Enquire online for advice on the application process and the available pathways to study at UTAS.

DOMESTIC APPLICANTS

Domestic applicants who recently completed secondary education (completed in the past two years)

Applicants are ranked by ATAR and offers made based on the number of places available. In 2020, the lowest ATAR to receive an offer into this course was 65.15. The lowest ATAR to receive an offer may change from year to year based on the number of applications we receive.

Applicants who have recently completed senior secondary studies but have not received an ATAR may still be eligible for admission. We will consider your individual subject results on a case-by-case basis when we assess your application.

Domestic applicants with higher education study

To be eligible for an offer, applicants must have:

  • Partially completed an undergraduate course (or equivalent). Applicants must have completed at least two units of study (equivalent to 25 UTAS credit points). If an applicant has failed any units the application may be subject to further review before an offer is made

Graduate Entry Pathway

To be eligible for an offer into the graduate entry pathway you must have completed a Bachelor degree (or equivalent) or higher in any discipline in the past 10 years.

Domestic applicants with VET / TAFE study

To be eligible for an offer, you must have completed a Diploma, Advanced Diploma, or Certificate IV in any discipline.

Domestic applicants with work and life experience

Applicants without senior secondary, tertiary or VET / TAFE study can complete a personal competency statement. Applicants may be eligible for an offer if they have relevant work and / or life experiences which demonstrate a capacity to succeed in this course.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATION

If your ability to access or participate in education has been affected by circumstances beyond your control, you can apply for special consideration as part of your application. We will consider a range of factors for special consideration, including economic hardship, a serious medical condition or disability.

We can only approve applications for special consideration where we are confident that you have the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed in your studies. If your application is not approved, the UTAS admissions team will work with you to find the best alternative pathway to your chosen course.

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS

Admissions information for international applicants, including English language requirements, is available from the International Future Students site. You can also enquire online to check your eligibility.

Detailed admissions information and advice for all undergraduate courses, including comprehensive, course-level student profiles, is available from UTAS Admissions.

Fees & scholarships

Domestic students

Domestic students enrolled in a full fee paying place are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the fees you pay for each unit you enrol in. Full fee paying domestic students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Detailed tuition fee information for domestic students is available at the Domestic Student Fees website, including additional information in relation to a compulsory Student Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF).

International students

2021 Total Course Fee (international students): $102,350 AUD*.

Course cost based on a rate of $32,950 AUD per standard, full-time year of study (100 credit points).

* Please note that this is an indicative fee only.

International students

International students are charged the Student Services and Amenities Fee but this fee is incorporated in the annual rate. International students do not have to make any additional SSAF payments.

Scholarships

For information on general scholarships available at the University of Tasmania, please visit the scholarships website.

How can we help?

Do you have any questions about choosing a course or applying? Get in touch.

Domestic
1300 363 864
International
+61 3 6226 6200
Email
Course.Info@utas.edu.au
Online
Online enquiries

Next steps