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Academy Gallery | Systematic and Memories

Summary

Two exhibitions: Systematic curated by Eliza Burke and Memories curated by Malcom Bywaters and Peta Cook

Start Date

21 Feb 2020 5:30 pm

End Date

27 Mar 2020 5:00 pm

Venue

Academy Gallery, Inveresk

Image credit: Katy Woodroffe, Forbidden Fruit - Only the Cool Water of the Lily Pond can Subdue our Desire, 2019, acrylic and ground pigment on paper, 150 x 150cm.
  Nadège Philippe-Janon, At the Core is Another, (Detail) Materials inc. salt, glass prisms, motors, animation, sound, 2018, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.

Systematic

Explores current artistic approaches to concepts of ‘the system’ showcasing eight Australian artists.

Curated by Dr. Eliza Burke

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Memories

Artists and researchers from the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (University of Tasmania) exploring Memory as a social, cultural, and biological phenomena.

Curated by Dr. Malcom Bywaters and Dr. Peta Cook

OPENING NIGHT:
Friday 21 February 5.30pm - 8pm
at the Academy Gallery
On show 24 February - 27 March 2020

To be opened by Professor Fran McInerney, Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre.


Systematic

Artists: Ian Burns, Tega Brain, Bill Hart, Jacob Leary, Nadège Philippe-Janon, Patrick Pound, Tricky Walsh and Laura Woodward.

Systems are ubiquitous features of modern life. They represent the myriad structures we negotiate in our daily lives and the frameworks we use to build, manage and comprehend a complex world.

Systematic explores current artistic approaches to concepts of ‘the system’ showcasing eight Australian artists whose works constitute self-contained, interactive systems in their own right, or engage with systems principles at conceptual and material levels. The works explore the impact of systems in technological, archival, political and ecological arenas and their meanings as robust but fragile products of human invention.

Systematic is a blend of playful, vibrant and kinetic works that invites viewers to reflect on their own relationship to contemporary systems, the interdependency between the part and the whole, and the creative potential of systemic productivity and failure.

Taking a broad view of ‘the system’, the exhibition comprises works that reference particular kinds of systems and explore questions of connectivity, order and interdependency. Ian Burns’ ‘Circle’ (2016) reconfigures the functions of domestic items – an umbrella, a set of rotary fans and two inflated latex gloves to critique ideas about the circulation of consumer goods and political cycles of human exploitation. Burns exploits the spatial and kinetic qualities of domestic items to explore the impact of political and economic systems on a larger scale.

Systematic is a University of Tasmania Plimsoll Gallery exhibition presented by the Academy Gallery National Touring Program and facilitated by Contemporary Art Tasmania, Hobart.

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Contemporary Touring Initiative program, through Arts Tasmania by the Minister for the Arts, the Hobart City Council’s ‘Creative Hobart’ grants scheme and by the Contemporary Art Tasmania Exhibition Development Fund.

SYSTEMATIC is supported by:

Systematic supported by logos - UTAS, Contemporary Arts Tasmania, Australian Government - Australia Council for the Art, Tasmanian Government, Australian Government - Visual Arts and Crafts Strategy Tasmania, City of Hobart and NETS


Memories: an artistic and scientific exploration of how we connect, communicate, grow and share

Memories are part and parcel of being human.
Memories can be individual, collective, and cultural.
Memories can unite people together in shared reminiscence; fond Memories of the past.
Memories connect us to other people; we cry, celebrate, and laugh over our recollections.
Memories can divide people in different understandings, interpretations and remembrances of the past.
Memories are traces of our past that can resurface, causing both joy and pain.
Memories are built over time, forming connections between our past and present.
Memories help us to make sense of the present and guide our current and future decisions.
Memories can change with time, reforming and altering as we age and as we share them.
Memories are fluid; evolving and changing across the lifespan.
Memories allow us to form culture; generating shared meanings that help to sustain and create Memories.
Memories help to us communicate and practice customs, rituals and commemorations.
Memories can aid to explain and justify why society works the way it does.
Memories can be powerful and can be used to justify power and the status quo.
Memories are connected to history but can obscure other stories. History versus Herstory.
Memories are retained through learning.
Memories involve a complex biological network; neurons firing.
Memories are located across the brain: the amygdala, the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the prefrontal cortex.
Memories can be modified and changed; our brains are not hard-wired but dynamic and ever-changing.
Memories can be reformed.
Memories can change.
Memories can be developed.
Memories can be lost.

Memory is connected to who we are – as individuals, as groups of people, as a society, as a culture. All of these Memories are tied together; influencing and intertwining each other.

Drawing together researchers from the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (University of Tasmania) and artists, this exhibition explores Memory as a social, cultural, and biological phenomena.

An Academy Gallery STEAM exhibition presented in partnership with the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (University of Tasmania).

Artists: Samantha Bews, Ashley Bird, Angela Casey, Scott Cunningham, Leonie Duff, Lola Greeno, Liam James and Katy Woodroffe.

Scientist/Researchers: ISLAND Project, Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (University of Tasmania), Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG), Anthony Cook, Peta Cook, Hannah Fair, Emma Lea, Andrew Phipps, Joanna Sun, Jana Talbot, James Vickers, Adele Woodhouse.

Memories is part of the Academy Gallery Launceston NOW Program. Launceston NOW aims to promote the artwork by Launceston established and emerging artists.

Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, University of Tasmania


Image credit: Katy Woodroffe, Forbidden Fruit - Only the Cool Water of the Lily Pond can Subdue our Desire, 2019, acrylic and ground pigment on paper, 150 x 150cm.
Nadège Philippe-Janon, At the Core is Another, (Detail) Materials inc. salt, glass prisms, motors, animation, sound, 2018, dimensions variable. Image courtesy of the artist.


The Academy Gallery, University of Tasmania wishes to acknowledge the traditional owners, the palawa people and custodians of the land upon which this campus was built.


Academy Gallery
*Gallery Hours: Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm
Academy of the Arts, Inveresk, Launceston
University of Tasmania

Free Admission

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