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Creative Arts Forum | Jane Bamford

Summary

Arts Forum is a public program of the School of Creative Arts

Start Date

18th May 2018 12:30pm

End Date

18th May 2018 1:30pm

Venue

Dechaineux Lecture Theatre

RSVP / Contact Information

All current students and members of the public are welcome


detail from Action for 2pm Sunday 6 July 1835, 2005. Postering action over 10 consecutive nights, Melbourne, November 2005

Image credit: detail from Action for 2pm Sunday 6 July 1835, 2005. Postering action over 10 consecutive nights, Melbourne, November 2005


Jane Bamford 

Jane Bamford is a ceramic designer maker based south of Hobart. After joining a ceramic studio in Hamamatsu-Shi, Japan to fire a traditional anangama wood kiln, Jane completed a BFA at UTAS Centre for the Arts majoring in ceramics. She was later selected for an Associateship at the Jam Factory Craft and Design Centre in Adelaide. Jane’s ceramic practice has spanned 25 years and she has worked in her own studio production, educational facilities and exhibited throughout Australia and internationally. This year she has been selected as a finalist in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize with a work examining climate change’s impact on Tasmanian marine environment. She is currently undertaking an Art/Science residency at UTAS School of Creative Arts.

Clay as Habitat is an insight into a scientific based, research driven art and design project resulting in site specific marine ceramic artificial spawning habitat (ASH) installations into the Derwent River. The aim of this project is to further secure from extinction the Spotted Handfish. In 2018 Jane will produce a body of work for the CSIRO Spotted Handfish Program. The CSIRO project is headed by Dr Tim Lynch, Senior Research Scientist and key stakeholders include NESP, DPIPWE, UTAS, Seahorse World, Sea Life Melbourne Aquarium, Zoos and Aquarium Association and MAST.

In this Art Forum presentation Jane will provide an overview of her ceramic art practice and examine how observation, connection to place and environmental awareness led her to produce work on issues like climate change’s impact on Tasmanian marine environments and the reestablishment of Spotted Handfish spawning habitat. Creating ceramic ASH is a significant project which intersects her ceramic art practice with current scientific research and practice. It is rare that an art practice has the opportunity to engage so directly with the natural environment in a manner that is beyond interpretive and has very real achievable positive environmental outcomes.

Jane is undertaking her Clay as Habitat project as part of the School of Creative Arts Artist In Residence Program.


Arts Forum is a weekly series of free public lectures held at the School of Creative Arts, Hunter Street Campus, during the semester. The series provides a unique opportunity to hear local, national and international visiting artists, scholars and presenters from diverse sectors of the Creative Arts discuss their area of professional practice. All current students, prospective students, and members of the public are welcome.