Engineering units

University of Tasmania
Electrical & Electronics Engineering Units - 1996


To turn back to Engineering units AEA4-



AEA831 Digital Signal Processing

Covers the following topics: signal analysis, frequency and transient responses, transmission over a band-limited medium, modulation techniques; statistical analysis of random signals; sampling, aliasing, the z-transform, design of digital filters, windowing, DFT and FFT.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr AP Boon, Dr DJH Lewis, Dr H Talhami
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 3x1-hour lectures weekly (13 weeks), 3x3-hour laboratory sessions, plus project work
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam (50%), project work and laboratory work (50%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Graduate Diploma of Engineering with Honours
Master of Technology






Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA832 Robotics and Automatic Control


Special notes not offered in 1996  
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA833 Image Processing and Computer Graphics

Covers the following topics: the human visual system, colour images; video communication systems; fundamentals of 2-D signal processing; image enhancement; image coding; introduction to fractals; computer graphics: display systems, 3-dimensional object representation, diagrammatic displays; graphics standards.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof DT Nguyen, Dr A Adams, Dr H Talhami
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern 36 lectures, plus tutorial and laboratory work in 1 semester
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam (50%), project work/assignments (50%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Graduate Diploma of Engineering with Honours
Master of Technology






Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA835 Artificial Intelligence

Acquaints students with expert systems, fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks and provide them with a working knowledge for building expert system applications. The unit includes expert system definition and history, knowledge representation, fuzzy knowledge and dealing with uncertainty, expert system tools and languages, Leonardo expert system, development cycle, testing and maintenance, knowledge acquisition, bottlenecks to the implementation of expert system; fuzzy logic, fuzzy sets, fuzzy associated memory (FAM), composition rules, fuzzy logic embedded control systems, examples of fuzzy control systems; the human neural system, pattern classification and clustering algorithms, neural net topologies and training, neural-like computers, applications of neural nets to speech and image recognition.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr M Negnevitsky, Dr A Adams, Prof DT Nguyen
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2x1-hour lectures, 2x1-hour tutorials weekly (13 weeks) and a 72 hour project
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour written exam in Nov (40%), project (40%) and mid semester test and assignments (20%)
required texts, etc
Firebaugh Morris W, Artificial Intelligence, A Knowledge-Based Approach,  PWS-Kent, 1989.
Fuzzy Logic and Control: Software and Hardware Applications,  PTR Prentice-Hall, 1993.

recommended reading
Course: Graduate Diploma of Engineering with Honours
Master of Technology






Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA836 Corporate Information & Transmission Networks

Covers communication principles: modulation and demodulation, multiplexing, PCM, TDM, transmission technology and media, equalisation. Other topics include information networks: circuit, packet and message switching, network topologies, IEEE 802.X local area networks, LAN operating systems; network management and performance, traffic measurement, queueing models, simulation, network security.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof DT Nguyen, Dr DJH Lewis and others
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 3x1-hour lectures weekly (13 weeks), 3x3-hour laboratory sessions, plus project work
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam (50%), project and laboratory (50%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Graduate Diploma of Engineering with Honours
Master of Technology






Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA837 Integrated Services Digital Networks

Covers fundamentals of digital transmission, telecommunication standards, the OSI reference model, X.25; narrowband ISDN: basic and primary rate interfaces, standards and protocols, duplex digital transmission on two wires; common channel signalling; broadband ISDN: service standards, transport protocols and fast packet switching.

Special notes
teaching staff Prof DT Nguyen, Dr DJH Lewis and others
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern 3x1-hour lectures weekly (13 weeks), 3x3-hour laboratory sessions, plus project work
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam (50%), project and laboratory work (50%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Graduate Diploma of Engineering with Honours
Master of Technology






Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA838 Management of Information Systems


Special notes not offered in 1996  
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA839 Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing


Special notes not offered in 1996  
teaching staff
campus & mode
unit weight
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA840 Computer Programming and Applications

For a description of this unit contact the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [8%]
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA841 Computer Organisation and Interfacing

Covers the following topics: the Unix environment, programming in C, utilities; C programming on PCs and interfacing considerations: registers, IO ports, peripherals, interrupt handling and device drivers; an introduction to program design, modularity, documentation; principles of operating systems, including job scheduling and semaphores.

Special notes
teaching staff
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 36 lectures, 9 hrs laboratory, plus project work and assignments
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam and midyear test (50%), assignments and project work (50%). Students much achieve at least 40% in the exams and tests and 50% in the assignments and project work
required texts, etc
Wong P, ANSI C on Unix,PMS, 1995.

recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA860 Transient Behaviour in Power Systems

The course is designed to build on concepts learned in undergraduate work in order to develop a more complete understanding of power system transients, their effects and methods used to mitigate these effects. Project work will be undertaken during the course. Power System Transients: modelling, overvoltages, lightning surges, insulation coordination. Power System Dynamics: primer movers, governing and automatic generation control, load flow fundamentals, synchronous machine model, transient stability concept, dynamic stability concept, machine control tuning AVR and PSS. Power System Protection: introduction to power system protection, transmission line protection, machine protection application, harmonics, concept of quality of power supply, power system interference, electric and magnetic fields.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr MR Piekutowski, Mr JD Crowley and Mr MJI Green
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment exam and assessment.
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA861 Optimisation in Power Systems

Equips participants with the conceptual tools required for power system planning and operations. Emphasis is placed on the emerging technology associated with the efficient and economic management of modern power system operation. Power System Planning: concept of power system, generation planning, new technologies in generation, transmission planning, analytical tools in power system planning, power system equipment, supply and demand side planning, distribution planning, distribution system reinforcement. System Reliability: introduction, reliability calculations, generation and transmission system reliability. Energy Management Systems (EMS): concept of EMS, state estimation, generation dispatch and unit commitment. Power System Economics: economic evaluation and decision making, project comparison, tariffs. Expert Systems Applications in Power Systems: knowledge representation, interfence mechanism, examples of the expert system applications, difficulties with expert system development.

Special notes
teaching staff Dr MR Piekutowski, Mr JD Crowley, Mr MJI Green and Dr M Negnevitsky
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%].
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA862 Modelling and Control of Processes

Starts with a review of basic control theory to provide the framework for transient and steady state analysis of feedback systems. A discussion of the dynamic characteristic of the process to be controlled is followed by the presentation of typical control systems components, so that the correct controller parameters can be selected to meet the desired specifications. With the advent of cheaper and more powerful microcomputers, digital controllers are now widely used. The unit therefore concludes with an introduction to computer-controlled systems and examines some methods for the synthesis of digital controllers.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr G Thé, Mr J Arneaud
campus & mode Hbt, int
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam (40%), assignments (30%), design exercise (30%)
required texts, etc
Phillips CL and Harbor RD, Feedback Control Systems,  2nd edn, Prentice Hall.

recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



AEA863 Industrial Measurement Systems

By the end of the course students will have selected transducers for given measurement problems and explained the physical principles upon which several transducers are based. Students are enabled to explain the several sources of electromagnetic noise and describe the techniques used to avoid EMI. They will be able to describe the techniques in use for the acquisition, transmission and storage of data and for communication between dispersed parts of a data acquisition and control system. They will have applied this to practical measurement problems. Students will be able to describe the current state of PLC technology and will have programmed at least one type of PLC using both a hand programmer and a high-level language via a PC.

Special notes
teaching staff Mr J Arneaud and Mr PA Watt
campus & mode
unit weight [16.67%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 24x1-hour lectures, 12x1-hour tutorials, 18 hrs laboratory, 24 hrs mini-project, 12 seminar/tutorial sessions
prerequisites
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 3-hour exam (40%), laboratory reports and assignments (20%) and mini-project (including report/thesis) (40%)
required texts, etc
Dally JW, Riley WF and McConnell KG, Instrumentation for Engineering Measurements,  2nd edn, J Wiley, 1993.
Warnock JG, Programmable Controllers Operation and Application,  Prentice Hall, 1988.

recommended reading
Course: Master of Technology







Staff of the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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