Chemistry units 2

University of Tasmania
Physical Sciences (Launceston) Chemistry Units - 1996


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Chemistry 2nd year level of units




KJC212 Analytical Chemistry 2

Encompasses a theoretical and practical treatment of qualitative and quantitative analytical chemistry. Methods for sampling, digestion of samples and separation of sample constituents are surveyed. Classical methods of analysis (gravimetric and titrimetric) are studied in detail throughout this course. Students are introduced to instrumental methods of analysis through a study of selected techniques (ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, potentiometry, gas chromatography and liquid chromatography). The laboratory component provides students with a quantitative expertise, with the analysis of real samples (particularly aquacultural ones) forming an integral part of the unit. Students gain the ability to plan and conduct a chemical analysis of a simple unknown.

Special Notes
teaching staff Prof P Alexander
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 3x1-hour lectures, 3 hrs lab/tutorial a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC103
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment practical/quizzes (40%), 3-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Harris DC, Quantitative Chemical Analysis,4th edn, WH Freeman, 1995.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC221 Inorganic Chemistry 2

Builds on KJC103, giving students an understanding of chemical extraction technology by covering the principles governing the physical isolation of mineral resources, and the chemical and electrochemical reduction of metals. The application of these principles enables students to quantify stochiometric and physical variables as tools for process control. The impact of industrial effluents upon the environment is recognised and solutions to problems by control methods are highlighted. Studies of bonding and the structure of solid state lay a foundation for coordination chemistry which can be applied in analytical chemistry and chemistry of the life sciences. The unit forms a link between physical chemistry (kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical processes) and analytical chemistry.

Special Notes
teaching staff Mr G Willson
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 3 hrs lectures, 3-hour practical a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC103
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment exam (50%), continuous assessment including laboratory reports (50%). Satisfactory laboratory attendance and performance is required for the candidate to be eligible for an award
required texts, etc
Lee JD, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 4th edn, Chapman and Hall, London, 1991.
Hayes PC, Process Principles in Minerals and Materials Production, Hayes Publications, Brisbane, 1993.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC231 Organic Chemistry 2

Is designed for students who may later take more advanced chemistry units and possibly specialise in organic chemistry, or for students majoring in the life sciences and preparing for a course in biochemistry. The unit covers: the various classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds through the chemical and physical properties and interconversion of functional groups; the various types of organic reactions and their uses; industrial chemistry, polymers, and an introduction to spectroscopic techniques; the correlation of structure and reactivity; stereochemistry; and the chemistry of some natural products, including lipids and carbohydrates.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr DK Wall
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 3x1-hour lectures and 3 hrs laboratory work a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC103
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment assignment/test (5%), laboratory work (20%), mid-semester exam (15%), final exam (60%)
required texts, etc
McMurray J, Organic Chemistry, 3rd edn, Brooks-Cole, 1992.
Laboratory Procedures and Experimental Techniques, 3rd edn, (Dept of Physical Sciences).
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
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To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC242 Physical Chemistry 2

Provides a theoretical basis for understanding the behaviour of chemical systems. Criteria for rapid and spontaneous chemical change are derived using the principles of thermodynamics and kinetics. Phase equilibria and electro-chemistry are also studied. The unit focuses on the mathematical and conceptual simplifications associated with Physical Chemistry theories. Students gain the ability to make theoretical predictions about the behaviour of physicochemical systems, while appreciating the uncertainties intrinsic to their projections.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr B Reedy, Prof P Alexander
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2x1-hour lectures, 4-hour laboratory/tutorial session a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC103 and KXA172
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment assignment (20%), practical work (20%), 3-hour exam in Nov (60%)
required texts, etc
Moore WJ, Basic Physical Chemistry, Prentice/Hall International Inc, 1983.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC263 Biochemistry 1

Is for undergraduates majoring in Chemistry, Medical Laboratory Science and other life sciences. The unit is an indepth study of the biochemistry of primary metabolites (proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids and lipids) and metabolic reactions and pathways; enzymes and enzyme kinetics; biochemical and metabolic disorders; bioenergetics. In the laboratory, analytical biochemical techniques are used to study biochemical reactions. A concurrent or prior study of KJC231 would be of great advantage to students taking this unit.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr DK Wall
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [25%]
teaching pattern full year - 3 lectures and 3 hrs laboratory work a week (28 weeks)
prerequisites KJC103
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment 2 assignment/tests (5% each), exam in June (30%), exam in Nov (40%), laboratory work (20%)
required texts, etc
Lehninger AL, Nelson DL and Cox MM, Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd edn, Worth Publishers, NY, 1993.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Aquaculture) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Sports Science) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Biochemistry minor) (S3C)



Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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