Chemistry units 3

University of Tasmania
Physical Sciences (Launceston) Chemistry Units - 1996


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Chemistry 3rd year level of units




KJC311 Instrumental Chemistry 3

Provides students with a thorough knowledge of modern instrumental methods commonly used in Analytical Chemistry. The chemical and physical principles underpinning a wide range of instrumental techniques (e.g. computer methods UV, IR, MS, AAS, GFAAS, XRF, ISE, ASV, FIA, CFA, Polarography, TLC, GPC, IC, GC, HPLC and capillary electrophoresis) will be studied in depth. The laboratory program develops practical expertise with methods discussed in lectures. In addition, students are required to plan and carry out an environmental analysis using one or more instrumental techniques. Students gain an appreciation of the working principles, applicability, advantages and disadvantages, sensitivity, sample requirements and errors of the instrumental techniques surveyed in this unit.

Special Notes
teaching staff Prof P Alexander, Assoc Prof DC McWilliam
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 3 hrs lectures, 3 hrs laboratory work a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC212
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment practical work/assignments (40%), 3-hour exam in June (60%)
required texts, etc
Skoog DA and Leary JJ, Principles of Instrumental Analysis, Saunders, 1992.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC322 Inorganic Chemistry 3

Builds on and extends KJC221, and forms a link between organic and analytical chemistry, and physical chemistry (kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical processes). Topics include: the modelling of kinetics and mechanisms for synthesis and stability of complexes; and a systematic study of the heavier transition elements, inner transition lanthanides and actinides, and of organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. Students investigate extraction processes (by digestion and clarification followed by ion-exchange or solvent extraction techniques, and refining by series recrystallisation) to gain an understanding of the strategies used in selecting the most appropriate, economic and environmentally sensitive ways of exploiting scarce resources.

Special Notes
teaching staff Mr G Willson
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 3 hrs lectures, 3-hour practical a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC221
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment exam (50%), continuous assessment including laboratory reports (50%). Satisfactory laboratory attendance and performance is required for the candidate to be eligible for an award
required texts, etc
Lee JD, Concise Inorganic Chemistry, 4th edn, Chapman and Hall, London, 1991.
Hayes PC, Process Principles in Minerals and Materials Production, Hayes Publications, Brisbane, 1993.
Shriver DV et al, Inorganic Chemistry, 2nd edn, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC332 Organic Chemistry 3

Is an extension of KJC231, with further studies in organic chemistry, including molecular structure determination by spectroscopic methods (UV, IR, NMR and mass spectrometry). Topics include: aromatic chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, additional natural product chemistry (including alkaloids, terpenes, acetogenins, steroids and pharmaceuticals); mechanistic organic chemistry, synthetic reactions, polyfunctional compounds, and polymer chemistry.

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr DK Wall
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 3x1-hour lectures and 3 hrs laboratory work a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC231 Organic Chemistry 2
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment Assignment/test (5%), laboratory work (20%), mid-semester exam (15%), final exam (60%)
required texts, etc
Criddle WJ and Ellis GP, Spectral and Chemical Characterization of Organic Compounds, 3rd edn, Wiley Chichester, 1990.
McMurray J, Organic Chemistry, 3rd edn, Brooks-Cole, 1992.
Laboratory Procedures and Experimental Techniques, 3rd edn, (Department of Physical Sciences).
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC341 Physical Chemistry 3

Is for students undertaking a Chemistry major. The unit evaluates the performance of selected practical chemical systems through a rigorous application of the theoretical principles of thermodynamics, kinetics and electrochemistry. Students consolidate their understanding of important practical techniques through investigations of catalytic behaviour in terms of surface chemical phenomena, and through studies of the theoretical aspects of molecular symmetry and spectroscopy

Special Notes
teaching staff Dr B Reedy, Prof P Alexander
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [12.5%]
teaching pattern sem 1 - 2x1-hour lectures, 4-hour laboratory/tutorial session a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC242
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment assignment (20%), practical work (20%), 3-hour exam in June (60%)
required texts, etc
Atkins PW, Physical Chemistry, 5th edn, Oxford University Press, 1994.
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)
Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major - General) (S3C)





Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC353 Science Project (Chemistry)

Enables third-year students in the Chemistry professional major to use their chemical knowledge and to develop analytical expertise in tackling an applied or research exercise which involves a search of computer literature and a concentrated and extended period of laboratory work. These lead to the production of a detailed written report.

Special Notes
teaching staff Assoc Prof DC McWilliam
campus & mode Ltn, int & dist.ed
unit weight [25%]
teaching pattern full year - 6 hrs a week (28 weeks)
prerequisites KJC231, KJC221, KJC212, and KJC242
corequisites KJC332, KJC322, KJC311, and KJC341
mutual exclusions
method of assessment seminar (15%), report (85%).
required texts, etc
recommended reading
Course: Bachelor of Applied Science (Chemistry major -Professional) (S3C)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
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© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.



KJC372 Analytical and Environmental Chemistry

Examines the methods used by chemists in monitoring the environment, particularly aquaculture sites: sample collection and the preparation and preservation of gases, waters and solids for organic and inorganic chemical analysis; and the demonstration of gravimetric, volumetric and instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Topics include: particulates and exogenous substances in air; transfer mechanisms of air-borne substances into the water cycle; natural physical and chemical cycles for water, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen and sulphur; soil/water interactions; sources, nature and control of exogenous substances; pollution; toxins, metallogens, fungicides, herbicides, pesticides, insecticides, piscicides, and disposed industrial domestic and rural products; Eh, pH and dissolved oxygen, measurement and data interpretation; electrochemistry, electrolytes, electrochemical cells, conductivity, principles of aqueous corrosion; techniques of control of corrosion of metals; and laboratory procedures using atomic absorption, and UV/Vis spectrophotometers, ion selective electrodes, and conductivity bridge.

Special Notes this unit is generally only available to Aquaculture and Environmental Technology students

teaching staff Mr G Willson
campus & mode Ltn, int
unit weight [10%]
teaching pattern sem 2 - 2 hrs lectures, 3-hour practical a week (14 weeks)
prerequisites KJC162
corequisites
mutual exclusions
method of assessment exam (50%) and continuous assessment including laboratory reports (50%). Satisfactory laboratory attendance and performance is required for the candidate to be eligible for an award
required texts, etc
Manahan SE, Environmental Chemistry, 6th edn, Lewis, Boca Raton, 1994.
recommended reading
Course: Diploma of Applied Science in Aquaculture (S2A)






Staff of the Department of Physical Sciences
To return to Units Contents Page
To return to Handbooks Home Page

© University of Tasmania, 1996.
Details shown above were correct at the time of publication. While every effort is made to keep this information up to date, the University reserves the right to discontinue or vary courses at any time without notice.

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