Profiles

Sonya Stanford

UTAS Home Associate Professor Sonya Stanford

Sonya Stanford

Associate Dean, Learning and Teaching Performance
College of Arts, Law and Education

Room L259 , Building L

+61 3 6324 3720 (phone)

Sonya.Stanford@utas.edu.au

As the Associate Dean of Learning and Teaching Performance (ADLTP) for the College of Arts, Law and Education, I provide leadership in support of excellent and inclusive student experiences of learning and teaching. My professional background in social work influences the relational approach I adopt in my research, learning and teaching, and administrative activities.

By working collegially with mulitiple teams of people, I strive to advance the College’s strategic mission to ‘increase access, equip and inspire graduates to make transformational contributions to society throughout their professional practice and contemporary careers’ (CALE Strategic Plan 2021). I seek to build, strengthen and sustain relationships internal and external to the university to advance higher education outcomes in Lutruwita/Tasmania and beyond.

I am also an Associate Professor of Social Work, having graduated with a BSW (Hons), MSW (Advanced Practice) and a PhD. Throughout my career, I have been appointed to high-level internal and external academic and professional service roles. I am the recipient of numerous awards recognising my skill teaching across undergraduate and postgraduate programs, most prominently in 2011 as the national “Best Academic Educator” awarded by the Australian Association of Social Work and Welfare Educators and Researchers. More recently, in 2019, I was recognised for 25 years of service at UTAS. In 2020 I received two CALE Commendations for ‘Leadership, Innovation and Adaptability’. Also in 2020, I received the ‘Vice Chancellor’s Award for Leadership’.

Biography

I have over 25 years experience working in higher education. I aim to create and sustain engaged and enduring partnerships with students, colleagues, and community partners that can make Lutruwita/Tasmania a place where individuals and communities can thrive. My undergraduate social work training was grounded in the value of ‘service to humanity’ and this ethos prevails as the driving force in all that I do.

Senior appointments at the University of Tasmania have included Coordinator for Graduate Research for the School of Social Sciences 2016-2017; 4 years as Head of Discipline for Social Work 2017-2020; Acting Head of School of Social Sciences in 2018; and, my current role as ADLTP, which I commenced in November 2020.

Before joining the University of Tasmania in a full time position in 2007, I worked in the areas of sexual assault support and disability support as a counsellor, educator and community liaison officer, working in federal, state and non-government agencies. I worked with people who had experienced sexual violence, family violence, disability, and mental illness. I was in awe of the strength and capacities of the people I worked with; however, it was sorrowful to witness the impact of inappropriate and unjust repsonses to their suffering. Such acts created layer on layer of avoidable trauma for people who battled everyday to stay connected to a hopeful story of their healing, recovery and having a better future. I have been determined to challenge such injustices throughout my career.

My early practice experiences were formative of the course I set as an academic. From my doctoral research I have built a program of social work research that has contributed to the field of critical risk studies by examining the interpretive dimensions of risk and how these impact the wellbeing and outcomes of people who access, and those who deliver, services in the care sector. The use of risk assessments for suicide and family violence are key areas of focus.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Social Work, UTAS, Australia  2007
    • Thesis title: The operations of risk: The meaning, emotion and morality of risk identities in social work practice
  • Master of Social Work (Advanced Practice), UTAS, Australia  1999
    • Thesis title: Women’s experiences of the diagnosis of postnatal depression
  • Bachelor of Social Work (Hons), UTAS, Australia  1992
    • Thesis title: Mothers’ experiences of health, welfare and legal services after a child discloses sexual abuse

Memberships

Professional practice

2015 –                     Mental Health Council (Tasmania)

2001 –                     Australian Association of Social Workers

Other

Selected responsibilities at the University of Tasmania

  • 2021                      
    • Student Focused Working Party
    • Deputy Chair, Online Digital Delivery Group
    • University Course and Unit Proposals Committee
    • University Learning and Teaching Committee
    • CALE Probation Committee
    • CALE Promotion Committee
    • UTAS Probation Committee
    • College Leadership Team
    • Chair, College Learning and Teaching Committee
  • 2020                        
    • School Learning and Teaching Committee, School of Social Sciences
    • CALE Study Leave Review Panel
  • 2019–2020              
    • Academic Lead, Field Education, Social Work
    • Academic Representative for CALE, Academic Senate
    • Executive Committee Member, University Course and Unit Proposals Committee
  • 2019                        
    • Acting Head of School, School of Social Sciences, CALE (June–October)
  • 2018–2020               
    • Chair, Social Work Course Advisory Committee
  • 2018 – 2019             
    • Expert Advisory Group on Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment
  • 2017 – 2020            
    • Head of Discipline for Social Work, School of Social Sciences
    • School of Social Sciences Leadership Team
  • 2017 – 2019            
    • Student Complaints Panel, Graduate Research Complaints Panel and Discipline Panel
  • 2016 – 2017            
    • Coordinator Graduate Research, School of Social Sciences
    • Honours Course Coordinator, Social Work
  • 2015 – 2018            
    • Graduate Research Coordinator, Social Work
  • 2013 – 2015            
    • Faculty of Arts Learning and Teaching Committee
  • 2011 – 2013            
    • Honours Course Coordinator, Social Work
  • 2010 – 2016            
    • Course Coordinator Bachelor of Social Work, Social Work

Selected responsibilities external to the University

  • 2020                        
    • Advisor AASW National Expert Advisory Panel on Field Education
    • Panel Review Member, Master of Social Work Course Review Committee, Australian Catholic University
  • 2019–2021              
    • Associate Editor Australian Social Work
  • 2018–2021              
    • Editorial Board, Australian Social Work
    • Executive Officer (Treasurer), Australian Council of Heads of Schools of Social Work
    • Adjunct Industry Fellow, School of Social Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast
  • 2017–2020              
    • Australian Council of Heads of Schools of Social Work
  • 2017–2018              
    • Addressing Family Violence in Emergencies Steering Committee, Women’s Health Tasmania
  • 2010–2012              
    • Executive Member, Australian Association of Social Work and Welfare Educators

Administrative expertise

Between 2017 and 2020, I was Head of Discipline of Social Work at UTAS. In this role, I pursued an agenda of remodelling social work higher education – in Tasmania and nationally – to increase its relevance for the future workforce needs of the rapidly changing community services sector and to secure the discipline’s viability amidst reforms to higher education priorities and policies.

Currently, as ADLTP, my key areas of focus are:

  • leading the development and delivery of the College’s Learning and Teaching strategy ensuring a critical focus on enhancing teaching, student progression and success, and graduate employability outcomes
  • driving collaborative teaching initiatives and outcomes across the University and external educational partners, fostering a culture of innovation, excellence, and continuous improvement
  • playing a key role in determining and managing the College’s teaching and learning priorities and supporting the development of new educational products whilst bringing enthusiasm and expertise to enable achievement of College and University strategic objectives, and
  • working closely with the Academic Division leadership team to drive and inspire mission-aligned learning and teaching across the entire institution, and actively build and coach capability in others.

Through our five Schools (Humanities, Social Sciences, Law, Education, and Creative Arts and Media), the College offers nearly 60 courses. We have a diverse cohort of students (approximately 7,200 students), with 22% from low SES backgrounds, 4% are Indigenous students, and 13% have disclosed a disability. Over one-third of our students are in one or more of these equity groups. More than one-third of students are first-in-family to attend university and only 12% of students are school leavers (Student Diversity Dashboard, 2021). An important focus of my work is to ensure inclusion, diversity and equity issues are taken into account in all aspects of students’ learning experiences within the College.

Teaching

Teaching expertise

An ethic of care is central to my teaching philosophy as a social work educator. I view social work teaching as an opportunity to reinforce social bonds that enhance dignity and wellbeing through caring teaching practices. In this regard my teaching is a practice of value.

Caring as an ethical standpoint requires a deep understanding of the perspective of others to respond to their needs. Being respectful, kind, and approachable are indicative of what it means to ‘do’ care. Acting in these ways as a social work educator helps students to feel valued and so they learn.

Through being ‘cared for’ by their classmates and by myself, and by us all caring for each other, I encourage students to develop learning cultures that generate interpersonal solidarity. Such conditions also reinforce self-belief, self-worth and inclusivity. In this way, students develop a felt need to critically and reflectively learn about social work practice as intensely relational acts: they are acts of care.

Teaching as caregiving is emotional work that values the affective dimensions of learning; however, ‘caring with’ each other is also complex and often confronting. This is especially the case when students’ and my own assumptions about power and privilege are challenged by unit content and by people discussing their lived experiences. Delicately and purposefully, I cultivate a reflective learning climate that moves students to care for each other by recognising their own personal and social vulnerabilities.

Over my long career as an educator, I have taught and coordinated undergraduate and postgraduate social work programs. I have been instrumental in developing online teaching methodologies and materials and I have led course and curriculum development. I am sought after to conduct national course reviews and I have led accreditations.

My teaching publications have focused on next generation leadership in social work education, the value of principles-based leadership in social work higher education, and the use of social media advocacy by academics to lobby for change to higher education policy.

Teaching responsibility

I have mostly taught interpersonal skills and social work theory and practice at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. As Honours Coordinator, I coordinated and delivered the BSW Honours curriculum, and I have coordinated and delivered Advanced Practice units at Masters level.

I am currently the Course Coordinator for A0F Undergraduate Certificate in Social Care https://www.utas.edu.au/courses/cale/courses/a0f-undergraduate-certificate-in-social-care

Research Appointments

2019 ­– 2020              Associate Editor Australian Social Work

2019 – 2020             Editorial Board member Australian Social Work

2017 – 2018             Coordinator Graduate Research School of Social Sciences

2015 – 2018             Graduate Research Coordinator Social Work

2016 – 2017             Coordinator Bachelor of Social Work (Honours)

View more on AssocProf Sonya Stanford in WARP

Expertise

Risk – Risk Assessment – Professional Ethical Dilemmas – Social Work – Mental Illness & Suicide – Family Violence ­­– Neoliberal Welfare

Using primarily qualitative research methods, I have examined how professionals’ interpretations of risk interface with social justice and human right issues particularly in situations where risk issues are most acute, such as when responding to suicide. My modeling of how risk generates frontline practice dilemmas has led to procedural reforms in organisations. For example, my co-authored work on the reluctance of mental health practitioners to undertake formal suicide risk assessments prompted changes to how staff were supported to undertake this challenging work. My research has also been used overseas in support of advancing cultural change in child protection agencies. My articles and books have informed other published research that considers creative and innovative responses to complex practice issues where issues of risk loom large.

Collaboration

I co-lead the University’s interdisciplinary ‘STOP Violence Network’ that has active projects in Tasmania with the Sexual Assault Support Service and Baptcare. In 2020, I was a member of the University’s ‘Transdisciplinary Approaches to Psychological Trauma’ research group. Previous international research collaborations have focused on creating more socially just approaches to identifying and responding to mental illness in policy and practice contexts in Australia, the UK and the United States.

Fields of Research

  • Counselling, wellbeing and community services (440902)
  • Social work (440999)
  • Higher education (390303)
  • Clinical social work practice (440901)
  • Mental health services (420313)
  • Sociology of education (390203)
  • Social change (441004)
  • Causes and prevention of crime (440201)
  • Applied sociology, program evaluation and social impact assessment (441001)
  • Urban sociology and community studies (441016)
  • Health policy (440706)
  • Political economy and social change (440404)
  • Teacher education and professional development of educators (390307)
  • Communication technology and digital media studies (470102)
  • Humanities and social sciences curriculum and pedagogy (excl. economics, business and management) (390107)
  • Police administration, procedures and practice (440211)
  • Health and community services (420305)
  • Continuing and community education (390301)
  • Social program evaluation (440903)
  • Sociology of health (441011)
  • Sociology of family and relationships (441009)
  • Correctional theory, offender treatment and rehabilitation (440202)
  • Health services and systems (420399)
  • Medicine, nursing and health curriculum and pedagogy (390110)
  • Social theory (441005)
  • Educational technology and computing (390405)
  • Mental health nursing (420504)
  • Organisational planning and management (350711)

Research Objectives

  • Pacific Peoples community services (210999)
  • Mental health services (200305)
  • Expanding knowledge in human society (280123)
  • Violence and abuse services (230114)
  • Teacher and instructor development (160303)
  • Higher education (160102)
  • Mental health (200409)
  • Allied health therapies (excl. mental health services) (200301)
  • Families and family services (230107)
  • Women's and maternal health (200509)
  • Assessment, development and evaluation of curriculum (160301)
  • Criminal justice (230403)
  • Ability and disability (230101)
  • Professions and professionalisation (230502)
  • Children's services and childcare (230104)
  • Gender and sexualities (230108)
  • The media (130204)
  • Community services (230199)
  • Specific population health (excl. Indigenous health) (200599)
  • Neonatal and child health (200506)
  • Employment patterns and change (230501)
  • Behaviour and health (200401)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community services (210199)
  • Equity and access to education (160201)
  • Health policy evaluation (200205)
  • Crime prevention (230402)
  • Workforce transition and employment (160206)
  • Ageing and older people (230102)
  • Learner and learning (160199)
  • Employment services (230106)
  • Teaching and instruction technologies (160304)
  • Rehabilitation and correctional services (230408)
  • Nursing (200307)
  • Evaluation of health and support services (200299)
  • Pedagogy (160302)

Publications

I have been published in top-ranking international journals (e.g. British Journal of Social Work, ranked 6/50, SCImago) and by leading publishers (Palgrave Macmillan, Routledge, Springer). Although most of my time in recent years has been devoted to leadership roles and teaching, I have continued to make important scholarly contributions to the field of critical risk studies and to the scholarship of teaching and learning. Recently, I was an Associate Editor of Australian Social Work (Taylor & Francis), an international peer-reviewed journal that has an impact factor of 1.95.

Reviewer activities

British Journal of Social Work

Australian Social Work

Social Work Education

Health Sociology Review

European Journal of Social Work

Total publications

47

Highlighted publications

(1 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2010Journal ArticleStanford S, ''Speaking Back' to Fear: Responding to the Moral Dilemmas of Risk in Social Work Practice', British Journal of Social Work, 40, (4) pp. 1065-1080. ISSN 0045-3102 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcp156 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 78Web of Science - 73

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Journal Article

(9 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Crisp BR, Stanford SN, Moulding N, 'Educating social workers in the midst of COVID-19: the value of a principles-led approach to designing educational experiences during the pandemic', The British Journal of Social Work, 51, (5) pp. 1839-1857. ISSN 0045-3102 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcab108 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3

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2021Mesinga J, Pyles L, Stanford S, 'Special Issue: Embodiment and Social Work', 74, (2) ISSN 0312-407X (2021) [Edited Journal]

[eCite] [Details]

2021Spiranovic C, Hudson N, Winter R, Stanford S, Norris K, et al., 'Navigating risk and protective factors for family violence during and after the COVID-19 perfect storm'', Current Issues in Criminal Justice, 33, (1) pp. 5-18. ISSN 1034-5329 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/10345329.2020.1849933 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Spiranovic C; Hudson N; Winter R; Norris K; Bartkowiak-Theron I; Cashman K

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2016Lemon G, Stanford S, Sawyer A-M, 'Trust and the dilemmas of suicide risk assessment in nongovernment mental health services', Australian Social Work, 69, (2) pp. 145-157. ISSN 0312-407X (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2015.1131843 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4

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2016Sawyer AM, Stanford S, Campbell J, 'Mental Health Social Work: Perspectives on Risk, Regulation, and Therapeutic Interventions', 69, (2) pp. 129-132. ISSN 0312-407X (2016) [Edited Journal]

DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2015.1129428 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

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2013Stanford S, Taylor S, 'Welfare Dependence or Enforced Deprivation? A Critical Examination of White Neoliberal Welfare and Risk', Australian Social Work, 66, (4) pp. 476-494. ISSN 0312-407X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/0312407X.2013.832789 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Taylor S

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2011Stanford SN, 'Constructing moral responses to risk: a framework for hopeful social work practice', British Journal of Social Work, 41, (8) pp. 1514-1531. ISSN 1468-263X (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcr030 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 43Web of Science - 36

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2010Stanford S, ''Speaking Back' to Fear: Responding to the Moral Dilemmas of Risk in Social Work Practice', British Journal of Social Work, 40, (4) pp. 1065-1080. ISSN 0045-3102 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcp156 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 78Web of Science - 73

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2008Stanford SN, 'Taking a stand or playing it safe: revisiting the moral conservatism of risk in social work practice', European Journal of Social Work, 11, (3) pp. 209-220. ISSN 1369-1457 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13691450802075063 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 31Web of Science - 27

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Book

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Pease B, Vreugdenhil A, Stanford S, 'Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work: Transforming the Politics and Practices of Caring', Routledge, United Kingdom, pp. 296. ISBN 9781138225589 (2018) [Edited Book]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Pease B; Vreugdenhil A

2017Stanford SN, Sharland E, Heller NR, Warner J, 'Beyond the Risk Paradigm in Mental Health Policy and Practice', Macmillian Education UK, United Kingdom ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Edited Book]

[eCite] [Details]

Chapter in Book

(8 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Howard A, Stanford SN, Glover A-M, 'New Generation Leadership: Looking After Tomorrow', Strategic Leadership in Social Work Education, Springer Nature, M Connolly, C Williams, and D Coffey (ed), Switzerland, pp. 135-147. ISBN 978-3-030-25051-5 (2019) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-25052-2_10 [eCite] [Details]

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2018Pease B, Vreugdenhil A, Stanford S, 'Towards a critical ethic of care in social work', Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work: Transforming the Politics and Practices of Caring, Taylor & Francis Group Ltd, B Pease, A Vreugdenhil and S Stanford (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 3-15. ISBN 9781138225589 (2018) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Pease B; Vreugdenhil A

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2018Sawyer A, Stanford S, 'The Risks of Care and Caring about Risk in Mental Health', Critical Ethics of Care in Social Work: Transforming the Politics and Practices of Caring, Routledge, B Pease, A Vreugdenhil and S Stanford (ed), New York, pp. 63-73. ISBN 9781138225589 (2018) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Sawyer A

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2017Hendry N, Robards B, Stanford S, 'Beyond social media panics for 'at risk' youth in mental health practice', Beyond the Risk Paradigm in Mental Health, Palgrave Macmillan, S Stanford, NR Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), United Kingdom, pp. 135-154. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Sharland E, Rovinelli Heller N, Stanford S, Warner J, 'Conclusion: remoralizing risk in mental health policy and practice', Beyond the Risk Paradigm in Mental Health Policy and Practice, Palgrave, S Stanford, N Rovinelli Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), Basingstoke, UK, pp. 174-190. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Stanford S, Rovinelli Heller N, Sharland E, Warner J, 'Moving beyond neoliberal rationalities of risk in mental health policy and practice', Beyond the risk paradigm in mental health policy and practice, Palgrave, S Stanford, N Rovinelli Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), Basingstoke, UK, pp. 45-58. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Warner J, Rovinelli Heller N, Sharland E, Stanford S, 'The historical context of the risk paradigm in mental health policy and practice: how did we get here?', Beyond the risk paradigm in mental health policy and practice, Palgrave, S Stanford, N Rovinelli Heller, E Sharland and J Warner (ed), Basingstoke, UK, pp. 1-16. ISBN 9781137441355 (2017) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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2012Stanford S, 'Critically Reflecting on being 'at Risk' and 'a Risk' in Vulnerable People Policing', Policing Vulnerability, The Federation Press, I Bartkowiak-Theron and NL Asquith (ed), Annandale, NSW, pp. 20-32. ISBN 978-186287-897-6 (2012) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

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Conference Publication

(14 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Williamson M, Stanford S, Canty J, '34 | The benefits of a disrupted 'place' for a placement: the potential of virtual student units during a global pandemic', 2020 virtual Australian and New Zealand Social Work and Welfare Education and Research (ANZSWWER) & National Field Education Network (NFEN) Workshop: 'Social Work in a Climate of Change', 18-20 November 2020, Virtual Conference, Online (Sydney, Australia), pp. 43-43. (2020) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Williamson M; Canty J

2018Murphy C, Beasy K, Mainsbridge C, Page L, Reaburn R, et al., 'Exploring academic staffs' self-perception about supporting diverse learners', Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE), 2-6 December 2018, University of Sydney, Australia (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Murphy C; Beasy K; Mainsbridge C; Page L; Reaburn R

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2018Stanford S, 'Designing the future of social work in Tasmania through collective effort and shared responsibility', Teaching Matters 2018, 21 November 2018, University of Tasmania, pp. 7-8. (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Moulding N, Stanford S, ''Futuring' Social Work Through Next Generation Leadership', Leading Social Work Education in the 21st Century: An International Colloquium, 18-21 September 2017, Monash University Prato Centre, Italy (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Stanford S, 'Echoes from the past: Seeking the future of Tasmanian social work education using codesign', ANZSWWER 2017 Symposium, 7-8 September 2017, Auckland (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Stanford S, Sawyer A, 'Suffering Risk in Person-Centred Mental Health Care', ANZSWWER 2017 Symposium, 7-8 September 2017, Auckland (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2013Stanford SN, 'A Reflective Approach to Risk in Everyday Mental Health Practice', Mental Health Social Work and Risk: Messages from Research, 28 May 2013, Goldsmiths University of London (2013) [Keynote Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2013Stanford SN, 'Australian Social Work Education', International Social Work Eduction, 30 May 2013, Goldsmiths University of London (2013) [Plenary Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2012Stanford SN, 'Risk Identities in Mental Health Practice: Practioner and Consumer Perspectives', Beyond the Risk Paradigm: Restoring the Client's Pace in Human Service Intervention, 23-25 May 2012, Monash University Centre, Prato, Italy, pp. 1-15. (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2009Bland R, Stanford SN, 'Teaching to Do or Teaching to Be in Social Work', Social Work: From Scientism to Sophism - the Ethics of Evidence and the Evidence of Ethics, 5-8 November 2009, Sunshine Coast, Queensland, pp. 1. (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bland R

2009Stanford SN, 'Resolving the Moral Dilemmas of Risk in Social Work Practice', 20th Asia Pacific Social Work Conference: Many Voices, Many Communities, Social Justice for All, 10-11 November 2009, Auckland, New Zealand, pp. 20. (2009) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2008Stanford SN, 'Change, care, contexts & power: A conceptual framework for teaching in Social Work', Strength in Unity Conference, 9-12 November 2008, Luna Park, Sydney (2008) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2005Stanford SN, 'The Moral Discourse of Risk in Social Work', Risky Business, 11 November 2005, University of Tasmania, pp. 1-17. (2005) [Non Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2004Stanford SN, 'Reading an Ethics of Risk in Social Work', Global Social Work 2004: Reclaiming Civil Society, 2-5 October 2004, Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide (2004) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2011Stanford SN, 'Clinical Review of Practice' (2011) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

2007Stanford SN, 'Working for Change: The Role and Practice of Social Work at the LGH', Department of Health and Human Services, Tasmania (2007) [Consultants Report]

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Major Creative Work

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Cook PS, Vince J, Stanford S, 'May contain traces of…', Burnie Regional Art Gallery (2017) [Repeat Exhibition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cook PS; Vince J

2017Cook PS, Vince JZ, Stanford SN, 'May contain traces of…', 10 Days on the Island, Academy Gallery - Inveresk (2017) [Other Exhibition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Cook PS; Vince JZ

2011Willis KF, Schneiders MA, Stanford SN, 'Tree of Hope: 5 Years on - Exhibition', New Gallery, Newnham (2011) [Curated Exhibition]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Willis KF; Schneiders MA

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Other Creative Work

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Downes R, Meemaduma P, Stanford SN, 'The Levendale Film Project', Mosaic Support Services, Hobart Tasmania, pp. 1 (2019) [Minor Creative Work]

[eCite] [Details]

Thesis

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2007Stanford SN, 'The Operations of Risk: The Meaning, Emotion & Morality of Risk Identities in Social Work Practice' (2007) [PhD]

[eCite] [Details]

1999Stanford SN, 'Women's Experiences of the Diagnosis of Post-natal Depression' (1999) [Masters Coursework]

[eCite] [Details]

Other Public Output

(6 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2022Rodgers J, Spiranovic C, Hudson N, Barnes A, Winter R, et al., 'Sexual Violence in Southern Tasmania: Research Report for Sexual Assault Support Service Tasmania', Research Report, Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies and Sexual Assault Support Service Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 1-68. (2022) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Rodgers J; Spiranovic C; Hudson N; Barnes A; Winter R; Bartkowiak-Theron I; Asquith N; Cashman K; Norris K

2014Stanford SN, 'A no-win situation? Public forum on risks in mental health practice', 936 ABC Hobart, Breakfast with Ryk Goddard', ABC Hobart, Australia, 1, 1 (2014) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Stanford SN, 'Public forum in Launceston examines risks in mental health practice', Public forum in Launceston examines risks in mental health practice, WIN Television, Australia, 1 (2014) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

2011Stanford SN, Schneiders MA, Willis KF, 'Tree of Hope - 5 Years On', The Examiner, Newspapers in Education, Fairfax Media, Launceston, Tasmania, 25 October 2011, pp. 25-28. (2011) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Schneiders MA; Willis KF

2010Stanford SN, 'Submission to the Parliament of Tasmania Select Committee on Child Protection', Submission to the Parliament of Tasmania Select Committee on Child Protection, Launceston, Tasmania (2010) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

2003Stanford SN, 'Parenthood covered in Tassie forum', Melbourne Community Voice, Evolution Publishing, Melbourne, 136, July 25 2003 (2003) [Newspaper Article]

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Grants & Funding

A distinguishing feature of my recent track record is the emphasis I have placed on establishing new research collaborations. Since 2017, I have partnered with 40 researchers signifying a more intensive focus on interdisciplinarity in my research program, embracing my role as a mentor by co-authoring publications and writing grant proposals with early career researchers, and extending my network of national and international collaborators.

Funding Summary

Number of grants

17

Total funding

$361,468

Projects

Evaluation of Baptcare Family Violence Programs (2022)$9,149
Description
This project will involve an evaluation of Baptcare's implementation of the Caring Dads and Mothers in Mind programs in Tasmania to prevent family violence. The evaluation will comprise a desktop analysis of deidentified client data and a system wide mapping of family violence service provision in Tasmania.
Funding
Baptcare LTD ($9,149)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Winter RE; Hudson CE; Spiranovic CA; Stanford SN; Bartkowiak-Theron IMF; Cashman K; Norris K
Year
2022
Devonport data gathering on barriers to women reengaging in the workforce and community (2022)$12,786
Description
The project will gather data to enhance knowledge about the extent to which women in Devonport are struggling to reconnect with business and community, and the reasons underlying that struggle.
Funding
Devonport City Council ($12,786)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Lester EA; Seivwright AN; Kocar S; Stanford SN
Year
2022
Sexual violence in southern Tasmania (2021)$42,124
Description
The project will conduct the first Tasmanian study of its kind focusing on giving diverse communities in Tasmania a voice on what they see as the scale, nature, barriers to seeking help and solutions to sexual violence.
Funding
Sexual Assault Support Services ($42,124)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Asquith NL; Winter RE; Cashman K; Norris K; Stanford SN; Bartkowiak-Theron IMF; Hudson CE; Spiranovic CA
Year
2021
Baptcare PhD scholarship (2021 - 2024)$50,494
Funding
Baptist Care ($50,494)
Scheme
Grant-PhD Scholarship
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Period
2021 - 2024
Needs assessment and feasibility study into the potential for a Veteran Wellbeing Centre or wellbeing services to be located in Tasmania (2020 - 2021)$120,000
Funding
Commonwealth Department of Veterans Affairs ($120,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stirling CM; Neil A; Mond JM; Bridgman H; D'Alessandro SP; Stanford SN; Norris K; Cleary M
Period
2020 - 2021
High quality educational research into the use of e-portfolios (portfolios) to promote curriculum integration and lead evidence of attaining professional standards (2018)$13,144
Description
Significant changes in the Australian higher education sector, including deregulated enrolments andsubsequent unregulated growth in professional qualifying programs (e.g. Social Work, Education andAssociate Degrees), have created major challenges for universities and their industry partners. Of particularconcern is the need for, and increasing difficulty in securing, sufficient numbers of high quality professionaleducation placements and work-integrated learning opportunities (Allen & Wright, 2014).This proposed research project asks What are the advantages of using portfolios in work-integrated andprofessional qualifying university programs, for students, the University and the placement agencies, aimingto explore how student portfolios contribute to the redesign of one of the most resource-intensive aspects ofplacements (Beckers, Dolmans, & van Merrinboer, 2016): the evidence-based assessment of studentachievement of professional practice standards (e.g. https://www.aasw.asn.au/careers-study/asweas-2017-launch and https://www.aitsl.edu.au/teach/standards).UTAS' new portfolio software for MyLO, and web-based documentation management system, provide anopportunity for the partners to integrate curricula with authentic field/placement study and work-integratedlearning (Degrees of Difference, 2016; Venville, Cleak & Bould, 2017).Portfolios offer a highly flexible formative and/or summative pedagogic approach (Gmiz-Snchez, Gallego-Arrufat, & Crisol-Moya, 2016), and are accessible to work-based supervisors, enabling co-design, delivery,moderated assessment of student achievement (and evaluation) of the curriculum (Mahar & Strobert, 2010;Schuwirth & van der Vleuten, 2011).The project capitalises on complementary expertise from the Discipline of Social Work (Social Sciences) andthe School of Education, with the University College, and responds to well-documented social welfare andeducational needs in the State (West, 2013).This new partnership will use a literature scoping review, surveys of students and peers/colleague supervisorsand case study approach (see timelines below) to thoroughly document the current baseline, compared withthe use of portfolios to augment learning in practice, to provide the foundation for the development of an ARCLinkage grant application.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($13,144)
Scheme
Grant - CALE Hothouse Alignment Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Quentin-Baxter M; Vreugdenhil AJ; Masters JE; Stanford SN; Downing JJ; Carr AR; McDonald T
Year
2018
An exploration of University academic staffs self-perception about supporting diverse learners (2018)$9,387
Description
In the last few decades, increasing equitable access to higher education has been on the agenda for Governments globally. Yet, completion rates and other indicators for achievement for people from diverse backgrounds remain low. This project looks at this issue from the perspective of academics. How do academics perceive their ability and capacity to support diverse learners?
Funding
University of Tasmania ($9,387)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Reaburn RL; Beasy KM; Mainsbridge C; Murphy C; Stanford SN
Year
2018
Reducing the impact of intergenerational trauma through collaborative learning. Pilot Study. (2018)$10,000
Description
This pilot project asks What effect does a collaborative approach to learning have on reducing the impact of intergenerational trauma, to explore how Early Childhood Educators, Social Workers and Health Professionals (professionals) collaborate to develop parental capacity for connection, felt-safety and self-regulation, and how these can be applied by both parent and professional when caring for the child. A Trust-Based Relational Intervention (TBRI) approach (Purvis et al., 2013) will be piloted in the Ravenswood Child and Family Centre where the impact of intergenerational trauma is recognised. Professionals and parents will be paired to work together in a weekly group situation to learn how to develop the skills identified as critical to the relationship. A mixed-methods approach will be used to analyse the learning journey of each participant. A focus on personal skill development, and evidence of the impact of this learning on the children in their care will inform the research question, and planning for an external research proposal to develop future training approaches (Razuri et al., 2016).
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,000)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stephenson EA; Stanford SN; Yost HF; Hay JK; Frey R
Year
2018
Combatting loneliness and suicide risk by activating third places: developing evidence-based interventions to build community resilience and wellbeing (2018)$19,814
Description
Grant-CCS Research ThemeAlarmed by burgeoning national rates of suicide, Lifeline Tasmania has approached UTAS to identify Tasmania -specific interventions as preventative measures against suicide. Tasmania has known suicide hotspots. Research suggests social isolation and loneliness are risk factors for mortality (Holt-Lunstad et al., 2015). Lifeline data indicates that a significant proportion of its crisis line calls are related to loneliness and isolation. Loneliness stems from population mobility, declining community participation, and demographic change (e.g. increasing single-occupant households) (Masi et al., 2011). A key question is: Can place-based interventions (third places) bolster social connectedness and community resilience to reduce loneliness and suicide risk in Tasmania?.Third places (e.g. community gardens & dog-parks) provide opportunities for informal social interaction and building connectedness (Matthews, 2018). Obligation-free informal interactions in third places can foster social interaction, engender sense of community and build friendships (Rosenbaum et al., 2007). Ideally third places are within walking distance of peoples homes and enable multiple activities. But what if vulnerable populations have reduced personal mobility? We presently lack research identifying efficacious ways to design mobile or pop-up third places to reach such at risk populations.Led by a multi-disciplinary team of experienced and ECR researchers, this project will employ a systematic quantitative literature review and follow up key stakeholder workshops (e.g. Lifeline, TasCOSS, Neighbourhood Houses Tasmania, Local Government Association Tasmania (LGAT) & Mental Health Council) to identify best practices and develop interventions for pilot-testing with at-risk populations. The literature review and workshop findings will be published in two Q1 journals (e.g. Health and Place). Study findings will inform a grant application to the Tasmanian Community Fund for a multi-year project to build and pilot-test an effective mobile third place and a Linkage Grant application to undertake evidence-based assessment of the efficacy of different interventions (i.e. community garden vs. dog park).
Funding
University of Tasmania ($19,814)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Byrne JA; Stanford SN; Hookway NS
Year
2018
Determination_2018 (2018)$10,224
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,224)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2018
Indigenous Student Success Program (2018)$14,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($14,500)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2018
Reducing Vulnerability to Suicide (2013)$12,000
Funding
University of Tasmania ($12,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2013
AHURI Top-Up Scholarship (Proudfoot, F) (2012 - 2014)$21,000
Description
This project will investigate the experiences of social housing practitioners providing tenancy management services to Aboriginal tenants.
Funding
Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute ($21,000)
Scheme
Scholarship-Top-Up
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Proudfoot F; Habibis D; Walter MM; Stanford SN
Period
2012 - 2014
2012: Beyond the risk paradigm: restoring the client's place in human service intervention - Italy (3 June to 4 June 2013) (2012)$1,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,500)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2012
Clinical Review of Practice (2011)$3,652
Funding
General Practice North ($3,652)
Scheme
Consultancy
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2011
Social Inclusion and 'Recovery' from Severe Mental Health Problems: The Consumer Experience (2010)$10,685
Funding
University of Tasmania ($10,685)
Scheme
Grant-Institutional Research Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2010
2009 R1 - 20th Asia Pacific Soical Work Conference 2009 (2009)$1,009
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,009)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Stanford SN
Year
2009

Research Supervision

I supervise Honours and HDR candidates with an interest in risk-related issues (such as family violence, suicide), mental health issues, and social work theory and practice.

Current

2

Completed

9

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDImpact of Issues of Trust for Frontline Workers Doing Suicide Risk Assessments in Non-Government Mental Health Services2016
PhDBetrayal-by-Systems: Psychological contract breach, institutional betrayal, and moral injury in the Australian Army2020

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
MastersA Robust Collective Professional Identity: The role of social work practice frameworks
Candidate: Susan Louise Wilkins
2022
PhDThere was a Brick Wall, and there was the Ocean: Stories of surviving childhood domestic abuse
Candidate: Narelle Whatley
2020
PhDReligious Institutions, Social Change, Symbols and Same-Sex Marriage
Candidate: Joshua Adam Boland
2020
PhDWhiteness and Social Work: Critical reflections on the practice of White social workers who work with people of refugee background
Candidate: Kate Deborah Vincent
2020
PhDYoung People Engaging with Risk through Everyday Practices on Facebook
Candidate: Kate Margaret Warren
2019
PhDSocial Work in Neoliberal Times: Accommodation, resistance and disruption
Candidate: John David Wallace
2019
PhDCultural Difference: How race shapes the management of Indigenous tenants within social housing service provision
Candidate: Fiona Jan Proudfoot
2018
PhDShining a Light on Care in Direct Social Work Practice
Candidate: Jenny Kathryn Hay
2016
PhDA Relational Encounter: The lived experience of direct social work practice with people of refugee background
Candidate: Ann Joselynn Baltra-Ulloa
2014