Profiles

James Furlaud

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James Furlaud

Postdoctoral Research Scientist

Sandy Bay Campus

+61 3 6226 2094 (phone)

James.Furlaud@utas.edu.au

James is a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the University of Tasmania. He studies fire eucalypt forests, specifically looking at fuel dynamics and fire behaviour. He is working with the City of Hobart to provide a scientific evaluation of their fuel reduction strategy. Specifically, he is looking at how different types of fuel reduction (i.e. prescribed burning, mechanical thinning, and fuel breaks) affect fire behaviour along the Wildland-Urban Interface of suburbs near bushland.

James did his doctoral degree looking at fire in tall wet eucalypt forests. Tall wet eucalypt forests are one of the most complex flammable ecosystems on earth, and their flammability is poorly understood. They also surround many of Hobart’s outer suburbs. James is using a combination of field-based study and mathematical modelling to better understand fire behaviour and fuel management in these forests. He hopes to use this knowledge to help local councils develop plans to protect their most vulnerable suburbs.

Originally from the United States, a passion for the outdoors led James to a decade of field experience conducting scientific research in forests across the world. He also pursued a keen interest in statistics through a Master’s in forest biometrics at the University of Montana. This combination of field experience and statistical fluency has led to a unique understanding of forest ecology. He hopes to apply this understanding to fire behaviour models so that they may better reflect the complexities of forest fuels, better predicting fire behaviour.

Career summary

Qualifications

DegreeThesis titleUniversityCountryDate of award
BA Grinnell CollegeUSA2009
MScAnalyzing the error structure and simultaneous nature of multi-dimensional, density dependent growth models for ponderosa pineUniversity of MontanaUSA2014
PhDHow Do Wet Forests Burn? Fuels and fire danger in the world’s tallest flowering forestUniversity of TasmaniaAUS2020

View more on Mr James Furlaud in WARP

Current projects

James is working with the City of Hobart to provide a scientific evaluation of their fuel reduction strategy. Specifically he is looking at how different types of fuel reduction (i.e. prescribed burning, mechanical thinning, and fuel breaks) affect fire behaviour along the Wildland-Urban Interface of suburbs near bushland.

Fields of Research

  • Forestry fire management (300706)
  • Terrestrial ecology (310308)
  • Environmental management (410404)
  • Environmental management (410499)
  • Ecological impacts of climate change and ecological adaptation (410102)
  • Public health (420699)
  • Forest ecosystems (300703)
  • Landscape ecology (410206)
  • Ecosystem function (410203)
  • Plant biology (310899)
  • Human geography (440699)
  • Fire ecology (410205)
  • Natural resource management (410406)

Research Objectives

  • Climatological hazards (e.g. extreme temperatures, drought and wildfires) (190401)
  • Natural hazards (190499)
  • Native forests (260204)
  • Terrestrial biodiversity (180606)
  • Air quality (180101)
  • Other environmental management (189999)
  • Public health (excl. specific population health) (200499)
  • Assessment and management of terrestrial ecosystems (180601)

Publications

Total publications

8

Journal Article

(7 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2022Jones PJ, Furlaud JM, Williamson GJ, Johnston FH, Bowman DMJS, 'Smoke pollution must be part of the savanna fire management equation: A case study from Darwin, Australia', Ambio pp. 1-13. ISSN 0044-7447 (2022) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s13280-022-01745-9 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones PJ; Williamson GJ; Johnston FH; Bowman DMJS

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2022Jones Penelope, Furlaud JM, Williamson GJ, Johnston FH, Bowman DMJS, 'Smoke pollution must be part of the savanna fire management equation: a case study from Darwin, Australia', Ambio ISSN 0044-7447 (2022) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s13280-022-01745-9 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Jones Penelope; Williamson GJ; Johnston FH; Bowman DMJS

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2022Prior LD, Foyster SM, Furlaud JM, Williamson GJ, Bowman DMJS, 'Using permanent forest plots to evaluate the resilience to fire of Tasmania's tall wet eucalypt forests', Forest Ecology and Management, (01 February 2022) Article 119922. ISSN 0378-1127 (2022) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.foreco.2021.119922 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Prior LD; Foyster SM; Williamson GJ; Bowman DMJS

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2021Furlaud JM, Prior LD, Williamson GJ, Bowman DMJS, 'Bioclimatic drivers of fire severity across the Australian geographical range of giant Eucalyptus forests', Journal of Ecology, 109, (6) pp. 2514-2536. ISSN 0022-0477 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/1365-2745.13663 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Prior LD; Williamson GJ; Bowman DMJS

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2021Furlaud JM, Prior LD, Williamson GJ, Bowman DMJS, 'Fire risk and severity decline with stand development in Tasmanian giant Eucalyptus forest', Forest Ecology and Management, 502 Article 119724. ISSN 0378-1127 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.foreco.2021.119724 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Prior LD; Williamson GJ; Bowman DMJS

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2020Cawson JG, Hemming V, Ackland A, Anderson W, Bowman D, et al., 'Exploring the key drivers of forest flammability in wet eucalypt forests using expert-derived conceptual models', Landscape Ecology, 35, (8) pp. 1775-1798. ISSN 0921-2973 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10980-020-01055-z [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15

Co-authors: Bowman D

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2017Furlaud JM, Williamson GJ, Bowman DMJS, 'Simulating the effectiveness of prescribed burning at altering wildfire behaviour in Tasmania, Australia', International Journal of Wildland Fire, 27, (1) pp. 15-28. ISSN 1049-8001 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1071/WF17061 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 25Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Williamson GJ; Bowman DMJS

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Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Furlaud J, Bowman DMJS, 'Understanding post-fire fuel dynamics using burnt permanent forest plots', Understanding post-fire fuel dynamics using burnt permanent forest plots, Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, Melbourne, Australia, Report no. 569, pp. 1-17. (2020) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bowman DMJS

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

6

Total funding

$225,014

Projects

Higher Education Student and Staff Mobility between Universidade de Vigo (E VIGO01) and University of Tasmania (Australia) (2022)$12,100
Description
Research exchange between UTAS and Universidade de Vigo to conduct international research on the difference between fire regimes of native Eucalyptus forests in Tasmania and naturalised Eucalyptus forests in Spain
Funding
ERASMUS + ($12,100)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Furlaud J; Bowman DMJS
Year
2022
The Social and Biophysical Effects of Alternative Strategies to Reduce Bushfire Danger in Hobart (2021 - 2022)$199,039
Description
This project aims to evaluate the social and biophysical effects of innovative bushfire risk reduction strategies undertaken by the City of Hobart. It further aims to recommend ways to maximise the effectiveness of future interventions.
Funding
Tasmanian State Emergency Services ($199,039)
Scheme
Grant-Natural Disaster Resilience Grants Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Bowman DMJS; Williamson G; Furlaud J; Lucas CH
Period
2021 - 2022
Remeasurement of Burnt TERN Ausplots in New South Wales (2021)$2,500
Description
We will collect data from Long Term Ecological Research Plots (LTER) in tall wet forests that burned in the 2020 fires. Data will be used to continue to build a pre-fire and post-fire database of fuels, fire danger, and fire severity.
Funding
Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC ($2,500)
Scheme
Grant-Quick Response Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Furlaud J; Bowman DMJS
Year
2021
Ecological Effects of 2019 Tasmanian Fires - Remeasurement of Burnt Permanent Plots (2019)$6,375
Description
This Project remeasures 12 permanent plots that burned in the 2019 fires. These plots were originally measured in 2016 and remeasurement will provide validation for previous published theoretical models and will quantify the reduction in fire resulting from wildfires.
Funding
Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment ($6,375)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Bowman DMJS; Prior LD; Furlaud J
Year
2019
Ecological Effects of 2019 Tasmanian Fires -Remeasurement of Burnt Permanent Plots (2019)$2,500
Description
This Project remeasures 12 permanent plots that burned In the 2019 fires. These plots were originally measured in 2016 and remeasurement will provide validation for previous published theoretical models and will quantify the reduction in fire resulting from wildfires.
Funding
Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC ($2,500)
Scheme
Grant-Quick Response Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Bowman DMJS; Prior LD; Furlaud J
Year
2019
Immediate post-fire vegetation re-measurement of TERN plots burnt during 2015-16 fire season (2016)$2,500
Description
In the 2015-16 fire season, four of the TERN Ausplot tall wet forest plots burnt in bushfires. Two burned in northern Queensland, one in southwest Western Australia, and one in Northern Tasmania. That these plots were measured at a high level of detail less than a year before they burned presents an opportunity to rigorously measure the severity of the fires and the immediate post-fire vegetation response.
Funding
Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC ($2,500)
Scheme
Grant-Quick Response Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Bowman DMJS; Furlaud J
Year
2016