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Clare Miller

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Clare Miller

Clare Miller

Lecturer in Geoenvironment & Geometallurgy, Earth Sciences

Room 302 , Geology-Geography Building

+61 3 6226 2425 (phone)

Clare.Miller@utas.edu.au

Dr. Clare Miller is a Lecturer in the School of Natural Sciences in the College of Sciences and Engineering at UTAS. Her research focuses on the mineralogical controls on the mobility of metal(loid)s in mine waste and environmental systems (i.e. lakes, wetlands, soils). Through field-based sampling and microanalytical laboratory techniques, Clare’s research aims to minimize the impacts of natural resource development on ecosystems and human health. As an early career researcher, Clare’s philosophy of research, teaching and engagement is rooted in a collaborative and multidisciplinary approach to understanding complex geoenvironmental systems. She collaborates with a variety of geoscientists in fields that include: paleolimnology, organic and inorganic low-temperature geochemistry, mine water geochemistry, stable and unstable isotope geochemistry, biology.

Clare's research focuses on three main areas: (1) informing remediation activities at legacy mines sites; (2) developing innovative strategies to mitigate the impacts of mining on environmental and community health; (3) understanding the impacts of climate change on mining activities, metal mobility, and baseline geochemical conditions.

Biography

As an environmental geochemist, Clare’s early career and research has focused on understanding dynamic environmental systems through multidisciplinary research to support the responsible development of natural resources. She has experience working as a contaminant hydrogeologist in the oil and gas industry in Western Canada. In this position, her work focused on subsurface characterization and delineation of groundwater contamination for a wide range of industrial contaminants. Clare has also worked with Natural Resources Canada (NRCAN) as a geochemical consultant on a collaborative project with Environment and Climate Change Canada investigating the impacts of climate warming on water quality. She held an industry placement with the Canada Mining Innovation Council on projects focused on the reduction of mining impacts on the environment and communities. Her graduate work in the Northwest Territories, Canada, focused on the effects of climate change on geochemical baselines and the long-term fate of legacy mining contaminants in sub-Arctic lakes.

As an early career researcher, Clare has begun to explore different ways of knowing. Through her graduate degree, she worked to build effective engagement and collaboration skills with indigenous communities, through participation in workshops and “on the land” camps led by indigenous community elders. She hopes to continue this journey through her research and teaching in Australia.

Career summary

Qualifications

Degree

Thesis Title 

University 

Country 

Date of Award

PhD

Arsenic mobility in a changing northern climate: Implications for geochemical baselines and long-term stability of contaminants in lake systems

Queen’s University

Canada

20/01/2020

BScH

Removal of arsenic trioxide from a simulated human gastrointestinal system through adsorption onto Fe-oxides

Queen’s University

Canada

30/04/2013

Teaching

Teaching expertise

Clare has teaching experience across a range of geoscience subject areas in both the classroom and field-based settings in geological field methods, earth systems engineering, hydrogeology, and engineering site investigation. Through her teaching, Clare aims to model a passion for inquisitive, field-based, experiential learning and to challenge students to be curious, creative. and holistic researchers.

Based on her experiences with community engagement in northern Canada, Clare was invited as a guest lecturer for senior undergraduate engineering students and hired to prepare and facilitate a faculty development workshop at Queen's University introducing and exploring how geological scientists and geological engineers can engage meaningfully with communities.

During her graduate studies, Clare was honoured with several teaching awards:

  • Beach Meadows Teaching Assistant Award, 2019
  • Greg Heath Teaching Assistant Award, 2018
  • Gord and Katherine Keep Teaching Assistant Award, 2017
  • Hemmera Teaching Assistant Award, 2017
  • Griff Murphy and Anny Raymond Teaching Assistant Award, 2016

View more on Dr Clare Miller in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Inorganic Geochemistry (040202)
  • Natural Resource Management (050209)
  • Climate Change Processes (040104)

Research Objectives

  • Rehabilitation of Degraded Mining Environments (961205)
  • Environmentally Sustainable Mineral Resource Activities (849899)
  • Environmental Education and Awareness (960703)

Publications

Total publications

5

Journal Article

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Miller CB, Parsons MB, Jamieson HE, Ardakani OH, Gregory BRB, et al., 'Influence of late-Holocene climate change on the solid-phase speciation and long-term stability of arsenic in sub-Arctic lake sediments', Science of The Total Environment, 709 Article 136115. ISSN 0048-9697 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.136115 [eCite] [Details]

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2019Miller CB, Parsons MB, Jamieson HE, 'Lake-specific controls on the long-term stability of mining-related, legacy arsenic contamination and geochemical baselines in a changing northern environment, Tundra Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada', Applied Geochemistry, 109 Article 104403. ISSN 0883-2927 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.apgeochem.2019.104403 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

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Conference Publication

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Miller CB, Huntsman P, Bouwhuis RF, Asemaninejad A, Rutledge K, et al., 'The development of a national water quality database to assess shifting baselines in a changing climate', SETAC Europe 30th Annual Meeting, 3-7 May 2020 (2020) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2019Miller CB, Huntsman P, Bouwhuis RF, Rickwood CJ, 'Tracking water quality in a changing climate', SETAC North America 40th Annual Meeting, 3-7 November 2019, Toronto, Canada (2019) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2016Miller CB, Parsons MB, Jamieson HE, Galloway JM, Patterson RT, 'Geochemical baselines and metal(loid) mobility in a changing northern climate, Courageous-Mackay Lake Greenstone Belt, Slave Geological Province, NWT', Yellowknife Geoscience Forum, 15-17 November 2016 (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

3

Total funding

$54,104

Projects

Geophysical investigation of historic Aberfoyle tailings site, northeast Tasmania (2020)$8,382
Description
The Tasmanian State Government has committed AUD$1 million over 4 years to Mining Sector Innovation Program funding (Tasmanian Government, 2017; TMEC, 2017). The aims of this fund are promoting the use of cutting-edge technologies and implementation of best practice management by the Tasmanian mining industry. This funding provides support and research projects across four key streams: 1. Innovative use of geoscientific data using new technologies;2. Investigating innovative solutions for mine rehabilitation and remediation;3. Developing best practice Acid Mine Drainage management guidelines, and4. Improving the understanding of landslip reactivation and implications for emergency responseThe proposed honours project aligns with both innovation in the use of new technologies and solutions for mine rehabilitation and remediation. The Aberfoyle Mine near Rossarden, northeast Tasmania, produced 11,000 tons of tin and 3,500 tons of wolfram from 1931 to 1982. The processed pyritic-rich tailings are stored in nine tailings dams. Recent site rehabilitation was carried out using earth capping over the tailings dam and implementation of vegetation trials. Rehabilitation aimed to decrease the effects of erosion and windblown dust on the tailings but of limited success. The lack of water retention, effects of metal contamination and drought stress, has caused the failure of revegetation trials. In a previous study conducted by McLaine et al. (2017) and McLaine (2017), the tailings were characterised using a mineralogical and geochemical approach. This study found that the tailings have high potential to generate Acid and Metalliferous Drainage (AMD) and exhibit Cd, Cu and Zn concentrations significantly above the national guidelines. Furthermore, surface soil is contaminated with deleterious elements that become more concentrated with depth. This study recommended detailed geophysical investigations be carried out to investigate the properties of soil capping across the abandoned tailings dams at the Aberfoyle site.
Funding
Department of State Growth (Tas) ($8,382)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cracknell M; Miller CB; Cooke DR; Roach MJ
Year
2020
Hydrogeological studies of acid mine drainage at Blue Lake, Endurance Mine, north east Tasmania (2020)$28,750
Description
Mineral Resources Tasmania (MRT) was allocated AUD $1 million in funding through the Tasmanian Governments Mining Sector Innovation Initiative Program (MSIIP) to support new and continued mining activities within the state. The funding with specifically to address activities in four key areas:1.Innovative uses for geoscientific data using new technologies; 2.Investigating innovative solutions for mine rehabilitation and remediation; 3.Developing best practice Acid Mine Drainage management guidelines, and 4.Improving the understanding of landslip reactivation and implications for emergency response.This project is funded as part of stream 2, investigating innovative solutions for mine rehabilitation and remediation. This project will use innovative techniques such as:Remote sensing data capture (e.g. use of drones and photogrammetry or LIDAR imagery)Numerical flow modelling using drill hole data to model subsurface characteristics and groundwater flowMineralogical and geochemical techniquesDetection of AMD in the subsurface using electromagnetic (EM) methods
Funding
Department of State Growth (Tas) ($28,750)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Miller CB; Cracknell M; Cooke DR
Year
2020
Geochemical analysis of Ruby Lagoon and Blue Lake sediments at Endurance tailings site, north east Tasmania (2020)$16,972
Description
Mineral Resources Tasmania (MRT) has been allocated funding as part of the Tasmanian Governments Mining Sector Innovation Initiative Program (MSIIP). The initiative is aimed at developing techniques and expanding industry technologies to support the states capacity in globally competitive mining activities. MRT was allocated $1 million to address four key project areas:1.Innovative uses for geoscientific data using new technologies. 2.Investigating innovative solutions for mine rehabilitation and remediation. 3.Developing best practice Acid Mine Drainage management guidelines, and 4.Improving the understanding of landslip reactivation and implications for emergency response.
Funding
Department of State Growth (Tas) ($16,972)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Miller CB; Cracknell M; Cooke DR
Year
2020