Profiles

Julian Worrall

UTAS Home Professor Julian Worrall

Julian Worrall

Head of School
Professor of Architecture
Architecture & Design

Room 216 , Architecture & Design

+61 3 6324 4476 (phone)

julian.worrall@utas.edu.au

Biography

Julian Worrall took up the position of Professor of Architecture at the University of Tasmania in 2019. He is a prominent exponent of urban and architectural innovation sourced in the study of the built environments of East Asia, particularly those of Japan, with an international career spanning scholarly research and education, critical writing, and design practice,

Julian’s doctoral research was undertaken in architectural and urban history at the University of Tokyo, with a study of the production of urban public space in modern Tokyo through the technology of rail. This work led to research interests in concepts of modernity, publicness, and the socio-spatial effects of technology. Aspects of these perspectives informed his first book 21st Century Tokyo (Kodansha International, 2010). Subsequent research has encompassed urban and rural revitalisation through cultural means; relational approaches to architectural design and spatial practice; and themes of publicness, displacement, neutrality, and temporality in contemporary architecture and urbanism. These contribute to an overarching research agenda of an intellectual and creative vision of ‘alternative modernities’, encompassing architectural, urban, social, cultural, and aesthetic dimensions.

Julian’s academic career has included academic positions teaching architecture and urbanism at Waseda University, Sophia University, and the University of Adelaide, and he has contributed as guest lecturer or critic at numerous other institutions internationally. His teaching encompasses design studio, architectural and urban history, research seminars, and study tours. He is presently supervising or co-supervising six doctoral candidates in both research by design and traditional methodologies.

A registered architect, Julian has worked as a designer with internationally prominent design practices, including Klein Dytham in Tokyo and OMA in Rotterdam, and maintains a practice entity (Julian Worrall Spaces) which most recently completed a weekend house in Japan (Ubara Beachouse, 2017). He serves on Design Review Panel of the Office of Design and Architecture South Australia (ODASA) and the Architectural Design Committee of the University of Tasmania.

Julian’s critical writings have been widely published including in Domus, Icon, Abitare, Arch Plus, and Architecture Australia , and as the architecture critic for the Japan Times newspaper. He has contributed to major institutions and exhibitions of architectural culture, including at La Biennale (Venice); MoMA (New York); V&A Museum (London); MAK (Vienna); Strelka (Moscow); Shibaura House (Tokyo); and Festa (Christchurch).

View more on Professor Julian Worrall in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Architectural design (330102)
  • Architectural history, theory and criticism (330104)
  • History and theory of the built environment (excl. architecture) (330402)

Research Objectives

  • Expanding knowledge in built environment and design (280104)

Publications

Total publications

2

Journal Article

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Worrall J, 'Install House, Partners Hill', Architecture Australia, 109, (4) pp. 78-83. ISSN 0003-8725 (2020) [Professional, Non Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Chapter in Book

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2020Toland A, Christ MC, Worrall J, 'DigitalXPlace', Placemaking Fundamentals for the Built Environment, Palgrave Macmillan, D Hes and Chernandez-Santin (ed), Singapore, pp. 253-274. ISBN 978-981-32-9623-7 (2020) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-981-32-9624-4_12 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2

Tweet

Research Supervision

Current

1

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDConstructing Identities: A camera-led psychological investigation into islandness. The role of place: specifically cultural memory and landscape in shaping identity where isolation (separateness) and insularity (self-containment) are intertwined2019