Profiles

Kim Beasy

UTAS Home Dr Kim Beasy
Kim Beasy

Kim Beasy

Lecturer in Curriculum and Pedagogy

Room A224, Building A, Newnham Campus

+61 3 6324 3651 (phone)

Kim.Beasy@utas.edu.au

Achievements

  • 2017 - Teaching Merit Certificate (Team)
  • 2016 - Teaching Merit Certificate (Individual)
  • 2016 - ACTS Green Gown Awards – Learning, Teaching and Skills
  • 2016 - ACTS Green Gown Awards – Student Engagement
  • 2015 - ACTS Green Gown Awards – Built Environment
  • 2015 - Commonwealth Office for Learning and Teaching Award for Programs that Enhance Learning
  • 2013 - University of Tasmania, Vice-Chancellor’s Team Award for Exceptional Performance
  • 2013 - Awards Australia, Southern Cross Young Achievers Hydro Tasmania Environment Award - Finalist
  • 2013 - University of Tasmania, Elite Scholarship – PhD

General Responsibilities

Kim is a lecturer with the School of Education and responsible for coordinating ESH305 – Equity, Diversity and Schooling in Semester 1 and ESH103 – Curriculum and Pedagogy in Semester 2.

Kim is an active researcher across curriculum and pedagogic areas and is involved with a number of research projects, including formal and informal sustainability education and LGBTI-inclusive practices in schools and investigating the value in diverse professional development opportunities for teachers. She is Chair of the Education for Sustainability Tasmania Network (a UN recognised regional centre of expertise) and actively involved in community projects that encourage sustainability in the community and inclusive education in schools. Kim has capacity for RHD supervision in 2019.

View more on Dr Kim Beasy in WARP

Current projects

Growing Cultural Wellbeing through Sustainability Skills Cafes:
Collaborators: Emery, S.

This study arises from a regional collaborative project “Sustainability Skills Cafes 2019” (SSCs) which involves coordinating actions to support cultural wellbeing in Tasmania through the organisation Education for Sustainability (EfS) Tasmania and its associated members. The emphasis of the SSCs is on building stronger communities through sharing sustainability skills with a particular valuing of local capabilities and priorities in Tasmania's regions (Beasy, 2018). The investigators will deliver community learning events about sustainability concepts and practices. The event called Sustainability Skills Cafes (SSCs) is being organised over the first half (February-June 2019) for Tasmanian communities through EfS Tasmania which is a network of education providers and organisations with an interest in education for sustainability. Other partners and members include Northern Tasmanian Early Years Group. The intention is for free Sustainability Skills Cafes to be staged monthly in the first half of 2019 in two locations.

The aim of the project is to foster cultural wellbeing in Tasmania by providing opportunities for connecting young people and older people in their local communities. It is envisaged that locally coordinated SSCs that respond to interests and needs within a community can enhance a sense of connection to people, places and cultures, important for cultural wellbeing (Emery, 2018; 2019). This study aims to evaluate the impact of the Sustainability Skills Cafes initiative, gathering data about how local community cultural development initiatives foster cultural wellbeing in Tasmania.

Inclusive practices: Supporting teachers, supporting students
Collaborators: Coleman, B., Grant, R. & Emery, S.

Australian Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) young people report high levels of bullying, harassment, and discrimination at school, resulting in negative educational and health outcomes (see Hillier et al., 2010; Robinson et al., 2014). Previous Australian research has identified significant need for LGBTI-inclusive teaching practice and schooling environments (Jones and Hillier, 2012). However, little is known about the competencies of Tasmanians school staff to provide LGBTI inclusive practice nor how Tasmanian teachers support their LGBTI students.  

To address these knowledge gaps and better inform teaching practice, this project explored the needs of Tasmanian teachers in schooling contexts. In partnership with the Government-funded gender, sexuality and intersex status support and education service, Working It Out, we conducted interviews with teachers in relation to their support of LGBTI students and staff and explore their knowledge, attitudes and approaches to LGBTI-inclusive teaching practice and school cultures. This exploratory study aims to provide evidence-based directives for further professional learning and policy development in this area.

An exploration of University academic staff’s self-perception about supporting diverse learners
Collaborators: Reaburn, R., Murphy, C., Mainsbridge, C. & Stanford, S.

In the last few decades, increasing equitable access to higher education has been on the agenda for Governments globally (David, 2007). Yet, completion rates and the indicators of achievement for people from diverse backgrounds remain low which suggests that while getting people through the door of tertiary institutions is important, it is not enough (Posselt, 2016; Smith, 2015). Dominant cultural practices in educational contexts are often complicit in excluding and disadvantaging diverse learners (Savage, 2013). Interactions with academic teaching staff are no exception but are often overlooked in structural reforms aimed at creating equitable learning environments (Milem, Chang & Antonio, 2005; Posselt, 2016).

In this project, we use CALE as a site for a pilot study with the aim of exploring how academic staff perceive their ability and capacity to support diversity amongst learners. We use a mixed methods approach with two stages of data collection including a disseminated online survey to determine perceived beliefs and group interviews. The conceptual framework of the research draws on principles of care ethics (Tronto, 2013, 2010; Gilligan, 2011) and de-colonisation (McLaughlin & Whatman, 2011). Intersectional analysis (Gillborn, 2015; Hankivisky, 2014) will guide exploration of the data.

TC-VITAL Threshold concepts - Visions of inclusive teaching and learning
Collaborators: Cowie, B., Kriewaldt, J., Trevethan, H. & Galstaun, V.

Australian and New Zealand pre-service teachers (PST) work in classrooms that are characterised by diverse learners and expectations of equitable and inclusive practices. Yet, helping PSTs to understand the need for inclusive practices is difficult. As teacher educators, we have found that providing students with literature and explaining to them how this transforms into classroom action is not enough. We want to know what is at the heart of potentially transformative understandings of diversity and inclusion. We are interested in what is threshold within PST’s knowledge of diversity and practices that facilitate inclusion.

Threshold concepts can be described as discipline-specific, illuminating ways of understanding or apprehending phenomena. The term ‘threshold’ refers to the way in which specific concepts or constructs can initially be difficult to comprehend, but once understood will ‘open up previously inaccessible ways of understanding, interpreting or viewing something’ (Meyer and Land, 2003). For these reasons, Meyer and Land theorise threshold concepts as being transformative, troublesome, irreversible, integrative and bounded; and contend that understanding a threshold concept is not only transformative to further learning, but encourages deep reflection on worldview, and on a person’s sense of self. Threshold concept theory (2006) offers a lens for exploring how PSTs construe inclusive practice. We explore how knowledge about understandings of threshold concepts may afford opportunities for PSTs to think anew about diversity and inclusion, and themselves as teachers.

PhD Research (Completed 2018)
Supervisors: Corbett, M., Davison, A. & Hill, A.

Through qualitative methods, my PhD research explored how sustainability was interpreted and practiced across a range of social locations including, life stage, socio economic status and ethnicity. I used spatial and temporal analyses in combination with Bourdieu’s theory of habitus, capital and field, to understand how discourses of sustainability are understood in different ways by different people. In particular, I explored concepts of sustainability with people who were not engaged in hegemonic (dominant) sustainability discourses. I illustrated that many people who are perceived as disengaged from hegemonic discourses of sustainability, are in many ways, actively engaged in practices of sustainability. My doctoral research is pertinent to all educators in early childhood, primary and secondary contexts because it is an exploration of the way discourses act to create real and perceived inclusions and exclusions in different contexts. Understandings generated from my study may provide pedagogical guidance for educators on how to work with and support the situated knowledges of the people and children with whom they work.

Fields of Research

  • Sociology (160899)
  • Continuing and Community Education (130101)
  • Environmental Education and Extension (050203)

Research Objectives

  • School/Institution Community and Environment (930402)
  • Environmental Education and Awareness (960703)
  • Environmental Health (920405)

Publications

Total publications

33

Journal Article

(8 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Beasy K, Emery S, Crawford J, 'Drowning in the shallows: an Australian study of the PhD experience of wellbeing', Teaching in Higher Education pp. 1-21. ISSN 1356-2517 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13562517.2019.1669014 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery S; Crawford J

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2019Grant RF, Beasy K, Coleman B, 'Homonormativity and celebrating diversity: Australian school staff involvement in gay-straight alliances', International Journal of Inclusive Education pp. 1-16. ISSN 1360-3116 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2019.1592249 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Grant RF; Coleman B

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2018Ellison JC, Beasy KM, 'Sediment carbon accumulation is southern latitude saltmarsh communities of Tasmania, Australia', Biology, 7, (2) Article 27. ISSN 2079-7737 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3390/biology7020027 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ellison JC

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2018Grant R, Beasy K, Emery S, Coleman B, 'Beyond safety': teachers and school staff approaches to LGBTI-inclusion in Tasmanian schools', International Journal of Inclusive Education pp. 1-17. ISSN 1360-3116 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2018.1555866 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Grant R; Emery S; Coleman B

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2018Verlie B, Emery S, Osborn M, Beasy K, Coleman B, et al., 'Becoming researchers: making academic kin in the Chthulucene', Australian Journal of Environmental Education, 33, (3) pp. 145-159. ISSN 0814-0626 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1017/aee.2017.24 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Emery S; Coleman B; Kezabu K

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2016Beasy K, Page L, Emery S, Ayre I, 'Evolution or Revolution in EE/ES research? A collaborative dialogue from first-year PhD students', Australian Journal of Environmental Education, 32, (1) pp. 11-16. ISSN 0814-0626 (2016) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1017/aee.2016.3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Page L; Emery S; Ayre I

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2016Coleman B, Brett P, Beasy K, 'Geospatial technologies and twenty first century citizenship: opportunities and barriers in the humanities and social sciences classroom', The Social Educator, 34, (1) pp. 16-27. ISSN 1328-3480 (2016) [Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Coleman B; Brett P

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2013Beasy KM, Ellison JC, 'Comparison of three methods for the quantification of sediment organic carbon in salt marshes of the Rubicon Estuary, Tasmania, Australia', International Journal of Biology, 5, (4) pp. 1-13. ISSN 1916-9671 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5539/ijb.v5n4p1 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ellison JC

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Chapter in Book

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Emery S, Beasy K, Coleman B, 'Fostering EfS Connections for Community Wellbeing: Working Meaningfully with What We've Got', Universities as Living Labs for Sustainable Development. World Sustainability Series, Springer, WL Filho, AL Salvia, RW Pretorius, LL Brandli, E Manolas, F Alves, U Azeiteiro, J Rogers et al. (ed), Cham, Switzerland, pp. 435-447. ISBN 978-3-030-15603-9 (2019) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-15604-6_27 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery S; Coleman B

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2019Swee CLG, Beasy K, 'Education for Sustainability: Concepts and Meanings of Education for Sustainability', Intrinsic Capability: Implementing Intrinsic Sustainable Development for an Ecological Civilisation, World Scientific Publishing, F Birkin, T Polesie (ed), New Jersey, USA, pp. 125-149. ISBN 9789813225572 (2019) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1142/10586 [eCite] [Details]

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2018Beasy K, 'Exploring Interpretations of Sustainability Across Diverse Social Contexts', Structuring the Thesis: Matching Method, Paradigm, Theories and Findings, Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd, D Kember, M Corbett (ed), Singapore, pp. 197-205. ISBN 978-981-13-0510-8 (2018) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1007/978-981-13-0511-5_19 [eCite] [Details]

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Conference Publication

(9 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Beasy K, 'Sustain-a-what?', Queechy High School, 17 May, Launceston, Tasmania (2019) [Keynote Presentation]

[eCite] [Details]

2018Beasy K, Emery S, Coleman B, Grant R, 'Supporting gender non-conforming students: learnings from school staff from Australia', ECER 2018 Abstracts, 4-7 September 2018, Bolzano, Italy (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery S; Coleman B; Grant R

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2018Beasy KM, Dyer L, Grant RF, Coleman BJ, Emery SG, 'Visualising LGBT-inclusive practices: A resource informed by teachers and support staff', #GEACONF2018, December, Newcastle, Australia (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Dyer L; Grant RF; Coleman BJ; Emery SG

2018Beasy KM, Grant RF, Coleman BJ, Emery SG, 'Context matters: Supporting staff working with LGBT students in schools', #GEACONF2018, December, Newcastle, Australia (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Grant RF; Coleman BJ; Emery SG

2018Emery S, Beasy K, Coleman B, 'Fostering EfS connections for community wellbeing: working meaningfully with what we've got', World Symposium on Sustainable Development at Universities (WSSD-U-2018) Programme Book, 28-30 August 2018, Penang, Malaysia, pp. 8. (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery S; Coleman B

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2018Emery S, Beasy K, Crawford J, Green W, 'Drowning in the shallows: an Australian study of the PhD experience', ECER 2018 Abstracts, 4-7 September 2018, Bolzano, Italy (2018) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery S; Crawford J; Green W

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2016Beasy K, Cotter T, Peterson C, 'Surveying sustainability culture across University staff and students', Proceedings of the 16th International ACTS Conference, 2-4 November 2016, Sunshine Coast, Australia, pp. 1-9. (2016) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Peterson C

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2016Beasy K, O'Dowd M, 'Negotiating personal and collective futures across diverse social contexts', Proceedings of the 22nd International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference (ISDRS 2016), 13-15 July 2016, Lisbon, Portugal, pp. 168-180. ISBN 978-972-674-791-8 (2016) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: O'Dowd M

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2016Beasy KM, Peterson CJ, Tomlinson A, Tiernan B, 'Curriculum for the future: Sustainability is a must!', Teaching Matters 2016 Conference Programme, 7 December 2016, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 8. (2016) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Peterson CJ; Tomlinson A

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Beasy KM, Bathish L, 'Every Child Succeeds Report: The greater Launceston area', Anglicare Tasmania, Australia (2018) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

2010Ellison JC, White ME, Poole MD, Beasy KM, McNab SLP, et al., 'Geomorphology report on coastal erosion at the Detention River estuary, Hellyer, North West Tasmania', Crown Land Services Branch, Depatment of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, 1 (2010) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ellison JC; Poole MD; McNab SLP; Walford H

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Thesis

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Beasy K, 'Encounters with sustainability in Tasmania: An interpretive inquiry' (2018) [PhD]

[eCite] [Details]

Other Public Output

(10 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Beasy K, Emery SG, 'Speed dating the Sustainable Development Goals', Education for Sustainability Tasmania, Tasmania, Australia, 16 September (2019) [Internal Newsletter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery SG

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2019Beasy K, Kilpatrick S, West M, McGinniss L, 'Sustainability in the pub success!', University of Tasmania - News and Events, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, 19 June (2019) [Internal Newsletter]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Kilpatrick S; West M

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2019Boyd D, Emery S, Beasy KM, 'UK expert Dianne Boyd partners with UTAS to bring 'skills cafes' to Launceston', The Examiner, Fairfax Media Limited, Launceston, Tasmania, 3 June (2019) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Emery S

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2019Crawford J, Beasy KM, Emery S, 'Do we understand the complexity of being a doctoral candidate? Probably not', Teaching in Higher Education Journal Blog, 25 September (2019) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Crawford J; Emery S

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2018Beasy K, 'UTAS' climate change week seeks to rally community behind climate action', The Examiner, Launceston, Tasmania, October, p. 1. (2018) [Newspaper Article]

[eCite] [Details]

2018Beasy K, Grant R, 'More than just lip service: done right, awareness-raising days can pack a punch', The Conversation, Victoria, Australia (2018) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Grant R

2018Beasy K, Grant R, Emery S, Coleman B, 'Inclusive Practices: Supporting Schools, Supporting Students', Summary Report, University of Tasmania, Australia (2018) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Grant R; Emery S; Coleman B

2017Beasy KM, 'Recycling's future: can you still make a difference?', Life Matters, ABC Radio National, Sydney, Australia, 25 August 2017 (2017) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

2017Beasy KM, 'Pupils learn rubbish rules', The Advocate, Fairfax Regional Media, Australia, 10 November 2017 (2017) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Beasy KM, 'Kids come together to learn that you 'Dont Mess with Burnie'', ABC Northern Tasmania News Report, ABC Radio, Australia, 9 November 2017 (2017) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

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Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

6

Total funding

$32,795

Projects

The influence of diverse demographic, political and value characteristics in group decision-making for sustainability: A pilot study (2019)$8,028
Description
The project investigates the gap between the claims organisations make to be practicing sustainability and macro level indicators showing growing economic volatility, social inequality and environmental degradation.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($8,028)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Beasy KM; Gale F
Year
2019
Resourcing inclusive practice: Supporting teachers, supporting students (2018)$2,703
Description
This project seeks to explore, via the production of an interactive web-based resource, alternative ways of communicating practice and engaging teachers in culturally responsive pedagogies; particularly in regard to gender and sexuality inclusivity. Previous Australian research has identified significant need for LGBTI-inclusive teaching practice and schooling environments (Jones and Hillier, 2013). However, few context-specific resources are available to support Tasmanian school staff in LGBTI-inclusive pedagogies and practice.In collaboration with the Australian Government funded gender, sexuality and intersex status support and education service Working It Out (http://www.workingitout.org.au/), we will develop a web-based resource to support teachers in developing culturally responsive pedagogies, with a specific focus on supporting LGBTI student communities. The project will draw on data collected from school teachers in the partner project Inclusive practices: Supporting teachers, supporting students, which investigates the knowledge, attitudes and approaches of teachers to LGBTI-inclusive teaching practice and school cultures. Outcomes of this project comprise a prototype for an interactive web-based resource that interprets and communicates teacher experiences and strategies for inclusive teaching techniques. The web-based resource will use gaming and multimodal design techniques in its structure and content to express the data spatially. The aim of the prototype is to produce material that can inform a larger project and funding bid. This larger project will increase the data set and develop the prototype to: a) include the experiences of student cohorts as well as teachers, and b) make the resource publicly available online. The project is considered to meet GEA priorities as it will:Provide a resource that promotes and propagates pedagogical strategies for LGBTI inclusivity that are approachable on an individual scale,actively engage users in a critical interpretation of the experience of others in regards to practices of inclusion,act as an access point for a collation of current understandings and techniques in regards to inclusive pedagogies, andrespond specifically to a local and national context for which few resources are available.
Funding
Gender and Education Association ($2,703)
Scheme
Funding - Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Beasy KM; Dyer L
Year
2018
Kids4Kids Conference: Do Not Mess with Burnie (2018)$1,828
Description
The Kids4Kids Conference: Dont Mess With Burnie is a community engagement event aimed at promoting environmental education and understandings of sustainability amongst primary school children in Burnie. The event included a day-long series of workshops and activities designed to engage students in learning about local waste management, management of coastal debris and the use of natural resources in and around Burnie. The Kids4Kids Conference: Dont Mess with Burnie event provided an opportunity for children and their teachers to engage with staff from the University of Tasmania through a positive, respectful and purposeful project, while the event contributed to the universitys efforts to play a critical role in education in the region. The focus of the event on childrens learning about the environment and sustainability is particularly relevant for the region. The regions economy strongly relies on agriculture, forestry, manufacturing, mining and tourism (Cradle Coast Authority, 2017). Conservation and management of the environment, therefore, is critical to the on-going economic prosperity of the region and this event highlights the roles of individuals, schools, businesses and the university is ensuring the sustainability of the regions environment resources.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,828)
Scheme
Grant-Schools Engagement Grants
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Coleman BJ; Beasy KM
Year
2018
An exploration of University academic staffs self-perception about supporting diverse learners (2018)$9,387
Description
In the last few decades, increasing equitable access to higher education has been on the agenda for Governments globally. Yet, completion rates and other indicators for achievement for people from diverse backgrounds remain low. This project looks at this issue from the perspective of academics. How do academics perceive their ability and capacity to support diverse learners?
Funding
University of Tasmania ($9,387)
Scheme
Grant-CAL Hothouse Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Reaburn RL; Beasy KM; Mainsbridge C; Murphy C; Stanford SN
Year
2018
Inclusive practices: Supporting teachers, supporting students (2017)$8,849
Description
Australian Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) young people report high levels of bullying, harassment, and discrimination at school, resulting in negative educational and health outcomes (see Hillier et al., 2010; Robinson et al., 2014). Previous Australian research has identified significant need for LGBTI-inclusive teaching practice and schooling environments (Jones and Hillier, 2012). However, little is known about the competencies of Tasmanian school staff to provide LGBTI inclusive practice nor how Tasmanian teachers support their LGBTI students. To address these knowledge gaps and better inform teaching practice, this project will explore the needs of Tasmanian teachers in schooling contexts. This study will address the following research questions: 1. How are teachers supporting LGBTI students in Tasmanian schools? 2. What are the needs of teachers in creating and sustaining inclusive school environments?In partnership with the Government-funded gender, sexuality and intersex status support and education service, Working It Out, we will conduct focus groups and interviews with teachers in relation to their support of LGBTI students and staff and explore their knowledge, attitudes and approaches to LGBTI-inclusive teaching practice and school cultures.This exploratory study aims to provide evidence-based directives for further professional learning and policy development in this area. Given the 3 year Safe Schools Coalition Australia program is ending in October, it is timely and crucial that informed, evidence-based resources be developed to explore practices that promote inclusive classrooms in Tasmania. Our findings will also inform and enhance partnering organisations ability to support pre-service teachers, Tasmanian teachers and school communities in embracing diverse and inclusive learning cultures.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($8,849)
Scheme
Creativity, Culture & Society Research Development
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Coleman BJ; Beasy KM; Grant RF; Emery SG
Year
2017
Arting our way towards a healthy food culture (2017)$2,000
Description
This project seeks to explore the instrumental value of art as education in encouraging a healthy food culture in Tasmania. Based on the 2014-15 National Health Survey, Tasmania had the highest rate of persons aged 18 years and over who were overweight or obese (67.5%). Equally concerning, Tasmania was found to have Australias highest rates of many long-term health conditions including heart disease, hypertension and kidney disease. Research investigating these deeply concerning statistics suggests that the low socioeconomic status of Tasmania, as well as the states aging demographic, increase issues relating to food security which in effect results in adverse health (Le et al., 2013). Yet, this research contends that accessibility of local, nutritious food should to be considered alongside the food culture of Tasmania.There is a strong correlation between peoples food preferences and their social context including the economic, social and cultural capital to which they have access (Hawkes et al. 2015; Bourdieu, 1984). The consumption of food is a complex socially and culturally located practice. In support of this, recent research has shown that obesity can be predicted by an analysis of what people are tweeting on Twitter about their eating habits (Abbar, Mejova and Weber, 2015). Arts too, are embedded in processes of cultural production and reproduction, at once both reflecting and provoking culture (Kuttner, 2015). Yet, engaging with art occurs within a social, political, artistic, and cultural context (Kuttner, 2015; Kasser and Ryan, 1996). We propose that social context influences the interpretations and meanings people give and make of art.Increasingly, art is being used as a means of raising awareness of food insecurity and sustainable food practices (Smith, 2016; Zenith Community Arts Foundation, 2011). However, there remains limited research exploring the effectiveness of art as education (Crossick and Kaszynska, Gilmore, 2015). In this research project, we will explore how social context influences interpretations of the Imagining Food exhibition and explore how art about food could be used as a tool in promoting a healthy food culture more broadly.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($2,000)
Scheme
Grant-Cultural Value Research Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Corbett MJ; Beasy KM
Year
2017

Research Supervision

Current

5

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDTowards Inclusive Education for Refugee Children: Exploring barriers of inclusion of culturally and linguistically diverse [CALD] students in Tasmanian primary schools2018
PhDThe Study of English Literature for Chinese University Students as a Valued Humanities Subject2019
PhDHow Schools in Tasmania are Accommodating the Physical, Social and Emotional needs of Transgender and Gender Diverse Students through Policy and Practice2019
PhDChild Marriage in Nigeria: Causes, consequences, parents attitudes and the reasons for persistence2019
PhDResponding to the Winds of Change: An exploration of how Ghanaian public universities are responding to the pressures/dilemma, change processes and strategic choices for excellence and relevance2019