Profiles

Christopher J. White

UTAS Home Dr Chris White

Chris White

Adjunct Senior Lecturer
Civil and Environmental Engineering

Room Cent 470, Engineering, Sandy Bay Campus

+61 3 6226 7640 (phone)

+61 3 6226 7247 (fax)

chris.white@utas.edu.au

Dr Chris White is a Lecturer in Environmental Engineering in the School of Engineering and ICT. Has a joint engineering and climate impacts background, covering both science and application. He specialises in understanding natural hazards and risk, climate change, sub-seasonal to seasonal forecasting of extreme events and surface water hydrology. He is Vice-President of ICCLAS – one of the ten commissions of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) – where he is furthering the analysis and prediction of the extreme hydrometeorological events using improved modelling approaches and techniques, ensemble hydrological forecasting and flood / drought prediction.

Biography

Chris White graduated in Environmental Engineering with First Class Honours in 2003 and holds a PhD in flood frequency analysis from the University of Southampton (UK). He has worked on several global and regional climate change and adaptation projects, including the development of the CSIRO Mk3.6 CMIP5 climate change projections for the Queensland Climate Change Centre of Excellence (QCCCE) and an EU–funded Interstate Water Resource Risk Management project for the Aral Basin in Central Asia.

He was responsible for the extreme events component of the Climate Futures for Tasmania project at the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC) that delivered the first high-resolution climate change projections for the state. The project was the national winner of the Resilient Australia Awards in 2012. Following this, Chris worked for the Bureau of Meteorology in the Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research (CAWCR), a partnership between the Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO, where he was involved in the assessment of the POAMA dynamical prediction system for the forecasting of extremes events across Australia on sub–seasonal to seasonal (S2S) timescales. In 2013, he was awarded a Churchill Fellowship from the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust to explore applications of these forecasts.

Since early 2014, Chris has been a Lecturer in Environmental Engineering at the University of Tasmania. Chris is currently leading the revision of the Tasmanian State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment (TSNDRA) for the Tasmanian Government.

Career summary

Qualifications

DegreeThesis TitleUniversityCountryDate of Award
PhDThe use of joint probability analysis to predict flood frequency in estuaries and tidal riversUniversity of SouthamptonUK2007
BEng (1st Class Hons)Environmental EngineeringUniversity of SouthamptonUK2003

Memberships

Professional practice

  • 2015 - present: Engineers Australia
  • 2014 - present: International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS)

Administrative expertise

  • Masters coordinator for the Engineering discipline
  • Engineers Australia liaison officer for the School of Engineering and ICT

Teaching

Environmental Engineering; Surface Water Hydrology; Natural Hazards; Risk Assessment

Teaching expertise

Chris is the unit co-ordinator for KNE470 Environmental Engineering and KNE486 Advanced Environmental Engineering.

Teaching responsibility

Research Appointments

  • 2015 - present: Vice President – International Commission of the Coupled Land Surface – Atmosphere System (ICCLAS)

Research Invitations

  • 2015: Stockholm University, Rossby Visiting Fellowship scheme

View more on Dr Chris White in WARP

Expertise

Natural Hazards

  • Natural disaster risk assessments
  • Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)
  • Weather and climate hazards
  • Coincident and compound extreme events

Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (S2S) Weather Prediction

  • Climate variability, predictability and prediction on sub–seasonal to seasonal timescales
  • The use of forecasts to provide usable weather and climate information to decision makers
  • Forecast verification, presentation and visualisation

Hydrometeorology, Hydrology, Flooding and Water Resources

  • Flood risk assessments
  • Interaction of tides and fluvial flows, including joint probability theory
  • Integrated flood management (IFM)

Global and Regional Climate Variability and Change Impacts

  • Extreme events, particularly heat waves, flooding and extreme rainfall
  • Dynamical downscaling of climate change projections

Climate Services

  • Production, translation, transfer and application of weather and climate knowledge and information in decision making and climate–smart policy and planning
  • Communication of risk and forecast uncertainty for decision makers

Assessment of the use and value of weather forecasts for the assessment of societal impacts, with an emphasis on hazardous, high–impact weather

Research Themes

Chris specialises in understanding natural hazards and risk from both a causative and impacts perspective. His main research interests centre on understanding and predicting extreme weather events (notably heatwaves, extreme rainfall and flooding, and coastal inundation) on both the extended-range forecasting timescale (e.g. the sub–seasonal to seasonal) and on the climate timescale (e.g. up to the end of the century using regional high–resolution climate projections). He is also interested in understanding coincident extreme events, such as the complex interaction between tidal and riverine processes.

As an Engineer, he is particularly keen on making this type of climate, weather and natural hazards science more usable though the exploration of improved applications, communication and promotion of appropriate risk information, particularly for emergency management and disaster risk reduction activities.

His current research focuses on the analysis and prediction of the extreme hydrometeorological events using improved ensemble hydrological forecast models on the sub-seasonal to seasonal timescale – a traditionally difficult timescale for models to forecast skilfully.

Awards

  • 2013: Churchill Fellowship, Winston Churchill Memorial Trust
  • 2012: Resilient Australia Award (joint), Australian Attorney–General

Current projects

Chris is currently leading the revision of the Tasmanian State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment (TSNDRA), and is heading the development of floodplain risk assessment guidelines for Tasmania. Both projects are funded through the State Emergency Management Program (SEMP).

Fields of Research

  • Surfacewater Hydrology (040608)
  • Natural Hazards (040604)
  • Climate Change Processes (040104)
  • Environmental Engineering (090799)
  • Meteorology (040107)
  • Environmental Engineering Modelling (090702)
  • Risk Engineering (excl. Earthquake Engineering) (091507)
  • Environmental Engineering Design (090701)
  • Interdisciplinary Engineering (091599)
  • Surface Processes (040607)
  • Agricultural Systems Analysis and Modelling (070105)
  • Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (111705)
  • Global Change Biology (069902)
  • Urban and Regional Studies (excl. Planning) (160404)
  • Health Policy (160508)
  • Environmental Science and Management (050299)

Research Objectives

  • Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts) (960307)
  • Climate Change Adaptation Measures (960301)
  • Climate Change Models (960303)
  • Natural Hazards in Coastal and Estuarine Environments (961002)
  • Expanding Knowledge in Engineering (970109)
  • Natural Hazards (961099)
  • Weather (960203)
  • Natural Hazards in Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Environments (961005)
  • Global Effects of Climate Change and Variability (excl. Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica and the South Pacific) (excl. Social Impacts) (960310)
  • Environmental Health (920405)
  • Effects of Climate Change and Variability on the South Pacific (excl. Australia and New Zealand) (excl. Social Impacts) (960309)
  • Respiratory System and Diseases (incl. Asthma) (920115)
  • Social Impacts of Climate Change and Variability (960311)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
  • Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Coastal and Estuarine Environments (960402)

Publications

Total publications

56

Journal Article

(24 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Campbell SL, Fox-Hughes PD, Jones PJ, Remenyi TA, Chappell K, et al., 'Evaluating the risk of epidemic thunderstorm asthma: Lessons from Australia', International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16, (5) Article 837. ISSN 1661-7827 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16050837 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Campbell SL; Jones PJ; Remenyi TA; Chappell K; Johnston FH

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2018Ramm TD, Watson CS, White CJ, 'Describing adaptation tipping points in coastal flood risk management', Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, 69 pp. 74-86. ISSN 0198-9715 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2018.01.002 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Watson CS

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2018Ramm TD, Watson CS, White CJ, 'Strategic adaptation pathway planning to manage sea-level rise and changing coastal flood risk', Environmental Science and Policy, 87 pp. 92-101. ISSN 1462-9011 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.envsci.2018.06.001 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Watson CS

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2018Campbell S, Remenyi TA, White CJ, Johnston FH, 'Heatwave and health impact research: a global review', Health and Place, 53 pp. 210-218. ISSN 1353-8292 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2018.08.017 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Campbell S; Remenyi TA; Johnston FH

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2017Mantegna GA, White CJ, Remenyi TA, Corney SP, Fox-Hughes P, 'Simulating sub-daily Intensity-Frequency-Duration curves in Australia using a dynamical high-resolution regional climate model', Journal of Hydrology, 554 pp. 277-291. ISSN 0022-1694 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.09.025 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Remenyi TA; Corney SP; Fox-Hughes P

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2017Ramm TD, Graham S, White CJ, Watson CS, 'Advancing values-based approaches to climate change adaptation: a case study from Australia', Environmental Science and Policy, 76 pp. 113-123. ISSN 1462-9011 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.envsci.2017.06.014 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Watson CS

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2017Ramm TD, White CJ, Chan AHC, Watson CS, 'A review of methodologies applied in Australian practice to evaluate long-term coastal adaptation options', Climate Risk Management, 17 pp. 35-51. ISSN 2212-0963 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.crm.2017.06.005 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Chan AHC; Watson CS

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2017White CJ, Carlsen H, Robertson AW, Klein RJT, Lazo JK, et al., 'Potential applications of subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) predictions', Meteorological Applications, 24, (3) pp. 315-325. ISSN 1350-4827 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/met.1654 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 30Web of Science - 27

Co-authors: Holbrook NJ; Remenyi T; Hodgson-Johnston I; Meinke H

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2016Johnson F, White CJ, van Dijk A, Ekstrom M, Evans JP, et al., 'Natural hazards in Australia: floods', Climatic Change, 139, (1) pp. 21-35. ISSN 0165-0009 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-016-1689-y [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19

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2016McInnes KL, White CJ, Haigh ID, Hemer MA, Hoeke RK, et al., 'Natural hazards in Australia: sea level and coastal extremes', Climatic Change, 139, (1) pp. 69-83. ISSN 0165-0009 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-016-1647-8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Holbrook NJ; Oliver ECJ

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2016Perkins-Kirkpatrick SE, White CJ, Alexander LV, Argueso D, Boschat G, et al., 'Natural hazards in Australia: heatwaves', Climatic Change, 139, (1) pp. 101-114. ISSN 1573-1480 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-016-1650-0 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Oliver ECJ

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2016Walsh K, White CJ, McInnes K, Holmes J, Schuster S, et al., 'Natural hazards in Australia: storms, wind and hail', Climatic Change, 139, (1) pp. 55-67. ISSN 0165-0009 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-016-1737-7 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6

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2016Westra S, White CJ, Kiem AS, 'Introduction to the special issue: historical and projected climatic changes to Australian natural hazards', Climatic Change pp. 1-19. ISSN 0165-0009 (2016) [Non Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10584-016-1826-7 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5

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2015Franks SW, White CJ, Gensen M, 'Estimating extreme flood events - assumptions, uncertainty and error', IAHS Proceedings and Reports, 369 pp. 31-36. ISSN 0144-7815 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5194/piahs-369-31-2015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Franks SW

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2015Perkins SE, Argueso D, White CJ, 'Relationships between climate variability, soil moisture and Australian heatwaves', Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 120, (16) pp. 8144-8164. ISSN 2169-897X (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/2015JD023592 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 38Web of Science - 40

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2015White CJ, Franks SW, McEvoy D, 'Using subseasonal-to-seasonal (S2S) extreme rainfall forecasts for extended-range flood prediction in Australia', IAHS Proceedings and Reports, 370 pp. 229-234. ISSN 0144-7815 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5194/piahs-370-229-2015 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Franks SW

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2015Newby M, Franks SW, White CJ, 'Estimating urban flood risk - uncertainty in design criteria', IAHS Proceedings and Reports, 370 pp. 3-7. ISSN 0144-7815 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.5194/piahs-370-3-2015 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Franks SW

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2014Bennett JC, Grose MR, Corney SP, White CJ, Holz GK, et al., 'Performance of an empirical bias-correction of a high-resolution climate dataset', International Journal of Climatology, 34, (7) pp. 2189-2204. ISSN 0899-8418 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/joc.3830 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 29Web of Science - 25

Co-authors: Bennett JC; Grose MR; Corney SP; Holz GK; Bindoff NL

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2014White CJ, Hudson D, Alves O, 'ENSO, the IOD and the intraseasonal prediction of heat extremes across Australia using POAMA-2', Climate Dynamics, 43, (7-8) pp. 1791-1810. ISSN 0930-7575 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00382-013-2007-2 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 21Web of Science - 19

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2014White CJ, Tanton TW, Rycroft DW, 'The impact of climate change on the water resources of the Amu Darya Basin in Central Asia', Water Resources Management, 28, (15) pp. 5267-5281. ISSN 0920-4741 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s11269-014-0716-x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 17

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2013Corney S, Grose M, Bennett JC, White C, Katzfey J, et al., 'Performance of downscaled regional climate simulations using a variable-resolution regional climate model: Tasmania as a test case', Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, (21) pp. 11936-11950. ISSN 2169-897X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/2013JD020087 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 26Web of Science - 25

Co-authors: Corney S; Grose M; Bennett JC; Holz G; Bindoff NL

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2013White CJ, Fox-Hughes P, 'Seasonal climate summary southern hemisphere (summer 2012-13): Australia's hottest summer on record and extreme east coast rainfall', Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Journal, 63 pp. 443-456. ISSN 1836-716X (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.22499/2.6303.009 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Fox-Hughes P

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2013White CJ, McInnes KL, Cechet RP, Corney SP, Grose MR, et al., 'On regional dynamical downscaling for the assessment and projection of temperature and precipitation extremes across Tasmania, Australia', Climate Dynamics, 41, (11-12) pp. 3145-3165. ISSN 0930-7575 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00382-013-1718-8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 28Web of Science - 27

Co-authors: Corney SP; Grose MR; Holz GK; Bindoff NL

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2012Grose MR, Corney SP, Katzfey JJ, Bennett JC, Holz GK, et al., 'A regional response in mean westerly circulation and rainfall to projected climate warming over Tasmania, Australia', Climate Dynamics, 40, (7-8) pp. 2035-2048. ISSN 0930-7575 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00382-012-1405-1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15

Co-authors: Grose MR; Corney SP; Holz GK; Bindoff NL

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Conference Publication

(10 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2015Fox-Hughes P, White CJ, 'A synoptic climatology of heavy rainfall in Hobart', 36th Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium: The art and science of water, 7-10 December, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 1010-1017. ISBN 9781922107497 (2015) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

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2015Johnson F, White CJ, Van Dijk A, Ekstrom M, Evans JP, et al., 'How and why are floods changing in Australia?', 36th Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium: The art and science of water, 7-10 December, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 1284-1291. ISBN 9781922107497 (2015) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

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2015Ramm T, White CJ, Franks SW, 'Accounting for uncertainty in cost benefit analysis: a generalised framework for natural hazard adaptation in the coastal zone', 36th Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium: The art and science of water, 7-10 December, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 510-517. ISBN 9781922107497 (2015) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ramm T; Franks SW

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2011Brown KAS, Ling FLN, Robinson KA, White CJ, Peterson J, et al., 'Investigating detailed impacts of climate change on flood inundation: a case-study from Tasmania', Proceedings of the 19th International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, 12-16 December, Perth, Australia, pp. 1-7. ISBN 978-0-9872143-1-7 (2011) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

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2011Brown KAS, White CJ, Peterson J, West N, Ling F, 'Using high-resolution regional climate projections to investigate the impact of climate change on flood inundation: a case-study from Tasmania', Proceedings of the 34th International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research World Congress 34th IAHR World Congress 2011, 26 June-1 July, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 1-8. ISBN 9780858258686 (2011) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

2011Rand S, Gee P, White CJ, Corney S, Bindoff NL, 'The analysis of infrastructure asset susceptibility using high resolution climate projection modelling', Proceedings of the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA) International Public Works Conference, 10-11 March 2011, Canberra, Australia, pp. 1-8. (2011) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Corney S; Bindoff NL

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2010Corney SP, Katzfey J, McGregor J, Grose MR, Holz GK, et al., 'Improved regional climate modelling through dynamical downscaling', IOP Conf. Series: Earth and Environmental Science 11: 17th National Conference of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society , 27-29 January 2010, Canberra EJ (2010) [Refereed Conference Paper]

DOI: 10.1088/1755-1315/11/1/012026 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Corney SP; Grose MR; Holz GK; Bennett James; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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2010Grose MR, Corney SP, White CJ, Holz GK, Bennett James, et al., 'Assessing rainfall trends and remote drivers in regional climate change projections: the demanding test case of Tasmania', IOP Conf. Series: Earth and Environmental Science 11: 17th National Conference of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society , 27-29 January 2010, Canberra EJ (2010) [Refereed Conference Paper]

DOI: 10.1088/1755-1315/11/1/012038 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Grose MR; Corney SP; Holz GK; Bennett James; Bindoff NL

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2010Rand S, Gee P, White CJ, Corney SP, Bindoff NL, 'The Analysis of Infrastructure Asset Susceptibility Using High Resolution Climate Projection Modeling', Practical Responses to Climate Change National Conference 2010, Abstracts, 29 September-1 October 2010, Melbourne, Australia EJ (2010) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Corney SP; Bindoff NL

2010White CJ, Sanabria A, Corney SP, Grose MR, Holz GK, et al., 'Modelling Extreme Events in a Changing Climate using Regional Dynamically- Downscaled Climate Projections', International Environmental Modelling and Software Society (iEMSs) 2010 International Congress on Environmental Modelling and Software Modelling for Environment's Sake, 5-8 July 2010, Ottawa EJ (2010) [Refereed Conference Paper]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Corney SP; Grose MR; Holz GK; Bennett James; Bindoff NL

Contract Report, Consultant's Report

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Bindoff NL, Love P, Grose MR, Harris RMB, Remenyi TA, et al., 'Review of climate impact change work undertaken, research gaps and opportunities in the Tasmanian context', Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Australia (2018) [Contract Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bindoff NL; Love P; Grose MR; Harris RMB; Remenyi TA

2016Remenyi TA, Harris R, White CJ, Corney S, Jabour J, et al., 'Projecting Volunteer Resource Requirements Under Extreme Climate Futures Technical Report', Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, and the University of Tasmania, Australia (2016) [Consultants Report]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Remenyi TA; Harris R; Corney S; Jabour J; Kelty S; Norris K; Denny L; Julian R; Bindoff N

Other Public Output

(20 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2018Ramm TD, White CJ, Watson CS, Graham S, 'Can your community cope with rising tides?', The Australian Journal of Emergency Management, Emergency Management Australia, Australia, 33, 1, pp. 5-6. (2018) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Watson CS

2017Quigley M, Ickowicz A, Verdejo-Garcia A, Galton-Fenzi B, White CJ, et al., 'Listen up: a plan to help scientists get their research heard by decision-makers', The Conversation, Australia, 1 February 2017 (2017) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

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2017Ramm TD, White CJ, Watson CS, Graham S, 'Pathways into the unknown: can your community cope with rising tides?', OzEWEX: The Australian Energy and Water Exchange Research Initiative, Australia, 14 September (2017) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Watson CS

2017Ramm TD, White CJ, Watson CS, Graham S, 'Steering local government in Australia towards better informed long-term coastal adaptation decisions', weADAPT.org - the Collaborative Platform on Climate Adaptation, 19 September (2017) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ramm TD; Watson CS

2017Colyvan M, Kitto K, Quigley M, Bennetts L, Durance P, et al., 'Addressing Risk in Conditions of Uncertainty, Ignorance, and Partial Knowledge', (chapter in 'An Interdisciplinary Approach to Living in a Risky World'), Australian Academy of Science, Australia, pp. 5-7. (2017) [Report Other]

[eCite] [Details]

2016Johnson F, White CJ, Westra S, 'Planning for a rainy day: there's still lots to learn about Australia's flood patterns', The Conversation, Australia, 8 November 2016 (2016) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

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2016Perkins-Kirkpatrick S, White CJ, 'We've learned a lot about heatwaves, but we're still just warming up', The Conversation, Australia, 10 November 2016 (2016) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

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2016White CJ, Evans J, Walsh K, 'To understand how storms batter Australia, we need a fresh deluge of dataTo understand how storms batter Australia, we need a fresh deluge of data', The Conversation, Australia, 14 November 2016, pp. 1-4. (2016) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

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2016White CJ, Ramm T, Irvine C, 'Floodplain Risk Assessment Guidelines for Municipal Councils in Tasmania', University of Tasmania & Tasmania State Emergency Service, Australia, pp. 1-28. (2016) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ramm T

2016White CJ, Remenyi T, McEvoy D, Trundle A, Corney SP, '2016 Tasmanian State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment', University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, pp. 1-177. (2016) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Remenyi T; Corney SP

2016White CJ, Remenyi T, McEvoy D, Trundle A, Corney SP, '2016 Tasmanian State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment: All Hazard Summary', University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS (2016) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Remenyi T; Corney SP

2016White CJ, Trundle A, McEvoy D, Corney S, Remenyi T, 'After Tasmania's year of disasters, bushfire tops the state's growing list of natural hazards', The Conversation, Australia, 15 September 2016, pp. 1-5. (2016) [Magazine Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Corney S; Remenyi T

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2014White CJ, '2013 Churchill Fellowship', Improving long-range forecasting of extreme weather events in Australia and the communication of the associated risk to decision makers, The Winston Churchill Memorial Trust of Australia, Hobart, TAS (2014) [Award]

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2012Cechet RP, Sanabria LA, Divi CB, Thomas C, Yang T, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: Severe Wind Hazard and Risk Technical Report', Geoscience Australia, Canberra, ACT, GA Record 2012/43 (2012) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bennett JC; Corney SP; Holz GK; Grose MR; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

2012McInnes KL, O'Grady JG, Hemer M, Macadam I, Abbs DJ, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: extreme tide and sea-level events technical report', Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania (2012) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: O'Grady JG; Corney SP; Grose MR; Holz GK; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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2010Bennett James, Ling F, Graham B, Grose MR, Corney SP, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: water and catchments technical report', Climate Futures for Tasmania: water and catchments technical report, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania (2010) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bennett James; Ling F; Graham B; Grose MR; Corney SP; Holz GK; Post D; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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2010Corney SP, Katzfey J, McGregor JL, Grose MR, Bennett James, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: climate modelling technical report', Climate Futures for Tasmania: climate modelling technical report, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania (2010) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Corney SP; Grose MR; Bennett James; Holz GK; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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2010Grose MR, Barnes-Keoghan I, Corney SP, White CJ, Holz GK, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: general climate impacts technical report', Climate Futures for Tasmania: general climate impacts technical report, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania (2010) [Government or Industry Research]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Grose MR; Corney SP; Holz GK; Bennett James; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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2010Holz GK, Grose MR, Bennett James, Corney SP, White CJ, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: impacts on agriculture technical report', Climate Futures for Tasmania: impacts on agriculture technical report, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania (2010) [Government or Industry Research]

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Co-authors: Holz GK; Grose MR; Bennett James; Corney SP; Phelan DC; Rawnsley RP; Parsons D; Lisson S; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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2010White CJ, Sanabria LA, Grose MR, Bennett James, Holz GK, et al., 'Climate Futures for Tasmania: extreme events technical report', Climate Futures for Tasmania: extreme events technical report, Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania (2010) [Government or Industry Research]

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Co-authors: Grose MR; Bennett James; Holz GK; Gaynor SM; Bindoff NL

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Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

11

Total funding

$2,067,454

Projects

An assessment of the viability of prescribed burning as a management tool under a changing climate - Stage 2 (2018 - 2019)$136,533
Description
Recent research by the ACE CRC suggests there may be fewer opportunities for prescribed burning in the future as autumn and spring become warmer and drier. Changes to vegetation may also need to be considered when planning fuel management. In workshops associated with the research, Tasmanian fire managers identified several aspects that would enhance the research to help them make decisions about the timing of prescribed burning in the future. These are to:i)assess changes in plant productivity throughout the year, to indicate potential changes to fuel growth in the future;ii)further refine the vegetation model to incorporate fire intensity and improve the representation of fuel treatments;iii)model the future distributions of target species and vegetation communities (eg. Athrotaxis, alpine/subalpine communities) that may not persist under climate change;iv)assess combinations of extreme events that may occur simultaneously or successively to influence bushfire behaviour or amplify its severity in the autumn/spring periods.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($136,533)
Scheme
Grant - Tasmanian Bushfire Mitigation Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Harris R; Remenyi TA; Love PT; Bindoff NL; White CJ; Williamson G; Bowman DMJS; Fox-Hughes P
Period
2018 - 2019
High-Resolution Reanalysis for Tasmania project: Stage 3 (2018 - 2019)$50,000
Description
A reanalysis is a consistent reconstruction of the state of the atmosphere through time. This data allows users to compare weather parameters such as wind, rainfall or temperature (or derived quantities such as fire danger) through time and across the area of the reanalysis, and provides a complete description of the weather in the reanalysis domain. This project will generate a reanalysis dataset for Tasmania at 1.5 km grid spacing with hourly time steps for a 25-year period, producing a high-resolution meteorological and climatological data to inform emergency management and disaster risk activities in Tasmania. The Bureau of Meteorology has agreed to produce the reanalysis for Tasmania for ACE CRC, forming part of a wider project that will generate a nationwide Australian reanalysis product at a lower 12 km resolution. In the first phase of the project (Stage 1), the Bureau of Meteorology will provide a 5-year high-resolution NWP climatology for Tasmania at a spatial resolution of about 5 km and at an hourly time step. Both ACE CRC and the Bureau of Meteorology have declared their intention to provide the 25-year high-resolution reanalysis at 1.5 km resolution for Tasmania (Stage 2) if the Tasmania State Emergency Service provides the required additional funding in 2016.Project partners will evaluate the dataset, both at the broad scale and for specific sub-regions and time periods in considerable detail to ensure the quality of the data, with the resulting approximately 70 terabytes of data stored by TPAC. Partners will engage with stakeholders to highlight the implications of the results for emergency management in Tasmania. On completion, project and technical reports will be presented, and peer-review journal articles prepared.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($50,000)
Scheme
Grant - Tasmanian Bushfire Mitigation Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ; Bindoff NL; Corney SP; Remenyi TA; Harris R; Fox-Hughes P; Jakob D; Steinle P
Period
2018 - 2019
Australia's wine future - adapting to short-term climate variability and long-term climate change. (2016 - 2019)$1,167,184
Description
The project will assess the impact of climate change on Australia's wine industry, and provide information to assist Australian grape growers adapt to a changing climate. The project will:I. provide high resolution climate information in an accessible and useful form to the wine regions of Australia;2. develop region-specific indices of "heat wave";3. develop variety-specific indices of heat accumulation (GDD);4. report the changes in these indices between current and future periods;5. report changes in precipitation and potential evapotranspiration between current and future periods;6. identify new varieties that could be planted in each region as the climate shifts, including varieties not currently grow1in Australia;7. estimate the temperature threshold at which returns from different varieties may diminish in different regions andidentify the point at which a transition to alternative varieties may be needed;8. identify regionally relevant adaptation options in addition to variety switching;9. identify the relationship between relevant climate variables and large scale climate drivers such as El Nifio-SouthernOscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation;10. report changes in the frequency and intensity of the large scale climate drivers under future climate change.
Funding
Australian Grape and Wine Authority ($1,064,821)
Scheme
Grant-R&D Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Harris R; Hayman P; Remenyi TA; Kerslake FL; O'Kane TJ; Katzfey J; Thomas D; Petrie P; Sadras V; Krstic M; Bindoff NL; Close DC; White CJ; Corney SP
Period
2016 - 2019
Advanced long-term planning and decision analysis to improve the resilience of communities against changing coastal risk (2016 - 2018)$23,400
Description
The central aim of the research is to advance the development and analysis of improved long-term coastal adaptation strategies under conditions of uncertainty. This will help manage coastal risks by improving the management of infrastructure and land use in vulnerable coastal communities. Improved management will reduce the direct and indirect damages caused by increased extreme events and losses from permanent inundation. Including social risk perceptions and values will be an important consideration in formulating the approach.
Funding
Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC ($23,400)
Scheme
Scholarship
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ
Period
2016 - 2018
High-Resolution Reanalysis for Tasmania Project: Stage 2 (2016 - 2017)$74,889
Description
A reanalysis is a consistent reconstruction of the state of the atmosphere through time. This data allows users to compare weather parameters such as wind, rainfall or temperature (or derived quantities such as fire danger) through time and across the area of the reanalysis, and provides a complete description of the weather in the reanalysis domain. This project will generate a reanalysis dataset for Tasmania at 1.5 km grid spacing with hourly time steps for a 25-year period, producing a high-resolution meteorological and climatological data to inform emergency management and disaster risk activities in Tasmania. The Bureau of Meteorology has agreed to produce the reanalysis for Tasmania for ACE CRC, forming part of a wider project that will generate a nationwide Australian reanalysis product at a lower 12 km resolution. In the first phase of the project (Stage 1), the Bureau of Meteorology will provide a 5-year high-resolution NWP climatology for Tasmania at a spatial resolution of about 5 km and at an hourly time step. Both ACE CRC and the Bureau of Meteorology will then provide the 25-year high-resolution reanalysis at 1.5 km resolution for Tasmania (Stages 2 and 3) if the Tasmania State Emergency Service provides the required additional funding in 2016 and again in 2017.Project partners will evaluate the dataset, both at the broad scale and for specific sub-regions and time periods in considerable detail to ensure the quality of the data, with the resulting approximately 70 terabytes of data stored by TPAC. Partners will engage with stakeholders to highlight the implications of the results for emergency management in Tasmania. On completion, project and technical reports will be presented, and peer-review journal articles prepared.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($74,889)
Scheme
Grant - Tasmanian Bushfire Mitigation Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ; Bindoff NL; Corney SP; Remenyi TA; Harris R; Fox-Hughes P; Jakob D; Steinle P
Period
2016 - 2017
Development of a Floodplain Risk Assessment Process for Tasmania (2015)$94,244
Description
This project aims to develop a methodological process for the assessment of floodplain risks in Tasmania. The process will be consistent with the Australian Emergency Handbook 7 and the National Emergency Risk Assessment Guidelines. It will be demonstrated through four case studies representing a range of diverse geographical contexts within Tasmania. A key emphasis will be an explicit focus on uncertainties throughout the floodplain risk assessment process and will provide advice regarding appropriate methodologies for the identification, analysis, and evaluation of risks including the empirical quantification of the consequences and likelihoods of risks. The process will be trialled to produce assessment of existing, future, and residual risks for the four case study areas. The outputs from the assessments will be able to be integrated into all-hazards municipal level risk assessments and associated emergency risk management processes.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($94,244)
Scheme
Grant-SEMP
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ
Year
2015
An assessment of the viability of prescribed burning as a management tool under a changing climate (2015 - 2016)$130,000
Description
The project will investigate three aspects that could affect the viability of prescribed burning under climate change.1. Changes in the seasonality of factors that determine when prescribed burning can be applied;2. Changes in the frequency and seasonality of daily weather patterns related to prescribed burning;3. Changes to broad vegetation types caused by the interaction between climate change and frequency of burning (natural or prescribed).
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($130,000)
Scheme
Grant - Tasmanian Bushfire Mitigation Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Harris R; Remenyi TA; Bindoff NL; White CJ
Period
2015 - 2016
Projecting Volunteer Resource Requirements Under Extreme Climate Futures (2015)$86,800
Description
This project will consider the impacts of a changing climate on emergency service volunteer resources in Tasmania.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($86,800)
Scheme
Grant-Emergency Volunteer Fund
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Remenyi TA; Harris R; White CJ; Corney SP; Bindoff NL; Kelty SF; Denny LJ; Julian RD; Norris K; Jabour JA
Year
2015
Natural Disaster Risk Assessment for Tasmania Project (2015)$131,000
Description
Tasmania suffers from natural disasters consistent with its climate and geographical location. Historical records show that natural disasters in Tasmania have a significant impact in terms of loss of life, property and infrastructure. In 2012, the State Emergency Service (SES) Tasmania produced the states first comprehensive natural disaster risk assessment report - the Tasmanian State Natural Disaster Risk Assessment (TSNDRA). The report was based on the National Emergency Risk Assessment Guidelines (NERAG). A revision of the TSNDRA 2012 report has been identified by the State Government as a priority project for Tasmania in 2015. This report will build upon the 2012 TSNDRA report and identify both existing and newly identified hazard-specific gaps. A series of hazard-specific workshops will be held, including flood, bushfire, storm and landslide, as well as other hazards such as coastal, biosecurity and pandemic that were identified but not covered in TSNDRA 2012. The project will provide Tasmania with a revised state-wide natural disaster risk assessment in line with the new NERAG guidelines and across the full range of sources of uncertainty. A public version of the report will be produced, together with a summary report and fact sheets. This report will become an invaluable resource for natural hazard risk assessment and hazard risk management practitioners, and those involved in natural hazards mitigation and policy at all levels of government and emergency management. The project will also include the provision of an updated High Level Risk Treatment Plan for the State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC) to enable them to work with agencies across Tasmania to inform strategies to successfully mitigate the states current and future vulnerability to natural disasters.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($131,000)
Scheme
Grant-SEMP
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ; Bindoff NL; Corney SP; Remenyi TA
Year
2015
Using long range extreme events forecasts for disaster risk reduction (2015)$13,404
Description
The aim of this project is to explore the usability of longrange extreme events forecasts for disaster risk reduction, including emergency risk management and human health and wellbeing activities. It will explore potential applications, products and services of longrange forecasts of extreme events for DRR, emergency risk management and human health and wellbeing activities. The project will develop a decisionmaking framework that can incorporate longrange forecasts, and will assess the production, translation, transfer and use of this information for sectorspecific decisionmaking and planning.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($13,404)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ
Year
2015
High-Resolution Reanalysis for Tasmania Project: Stage 1 (2015 - 2016)$160,000
Description
A reanalysis is a consistent reconstruction of the state of the atmosphere through time. This allows users to compare weatherparameters such as wind, rainfall or temperature (or derived quantities such as fire danger) through time and across the area of the reanalysis, and provides a complete description of the weather in the reanalysis domain. The Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI), Victoria, commissioned the Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada, to create a reanalysis for Victoria, with a resolution of 4 km and 1 hour. A Tasmanian project would leverage off the experience, and some of the background data, of the Victorian reanalysis. The project will generate a reanalysis dataset for Tasmania at 3 km grid spacingwith 1 hour time steps for 1980-2014. Project partners will evaluate the dataset, both at the broad scale and for specific sub regions and time periods in considerable detail to ensure the quality of the data, with the resulting approximately 70 terabytes of data stored by TPAC. A user interface will be constructed for data access, and partners will engage with stakeholders to highlight the implications of the results for emergency management in Tasmania. On completion, project and technical reports will be presented, and peer-review journal articles prepared.
Funding
Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management [TAS] ($160,000)
Scheme
Grant-NDRGP
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
White CJ; Bindoff NL; Corney SP; Remenyi TA; Harris R; Fox-Hughes P; Jakob D; Steinle P
Period
2015 - 2016

Research Supervision

Chris is currently co-supervising Tim Ramm who is researching coastal adaptation measures under climate change including cost-benefit analysis.

Current

1

Completed

1

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDUnderstanding Current and Future Impacts of Extreme Heat Events on the Health of Vulnerable Tasmanians2017

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDImproving Adaptation Planning for Future Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding
Candidate: Timothy David Ramm
2018