Profiles

Mark Hinder

UTAS Home Dr Mark Hinder
Mark Hinder

Mark Hinder

Senior Research Fellow

Humanities Building , Sandy Bay Campus

(03)6226 2945 (phone)

Mark.Hinder@utas.edu.au

As people age, they experience changes in motor control (such as the coordination of their limbs as well as the dexterous control of hand and finger movements) and in their cognitive abilities (skills like decision-making, problem-solving, learning and memory).

Dr Mark Hinder's research looks at how changes in the structure and functioning of the brain affect our ability to do these everyday motor and cognitive tasks. He examines how these changes are related to the fact that some older adults show more deterioration of these abilities while others retain a high level of motor and cognitive function late into senescence.

As a motor neuroscientist, a focus of his research is to determine which areas of the brain are critically involved in the performance of everyday tasks and how these areas communicate with each other during various components of the task. He uses a technique known as transcranial magnetic stimulation (or TMS) to investigate the level of activation of different brain regions, and how different brain regions communicate, while participants perform tasks in the laboratory. By comparing the results from younger subjects, healthy older adults, and older people with mild cognitive impairment, he evaluates how the different patterns of connections in the brain relate to how well people are able to do at different tasks.

‘It seems that those people who maintain better functional connectivity between different brain regions show better function into older age,’ Dr Hinder says.

With Australia’s population ageing rapidly, his results could be important to the development of interventions aimed at maintaining motor and cognitive function, or delaying the deleterious effects of cognitive decline. One aspect of his research is to look at the role changes in brain structure and function play in dementia and other age-related conditions where people experience accelerated declines in cognition or motor function. He is also examining how the brain compensates through a process known as plasticity, for example in response to declines in function caused by dementia or stroke.

‘Essentially, we are asking: when there is damage to one area of the brain, is the brain able to compensate by recruiting other areas to maintain the ability to undertake certain tasks?’

Ultimately, Dr Hinder’s research may lead to new therapeutic procedures that use brain stimulation to help people recover motor and cognitive function. There is already some evidence to suggest an association between brain stimulation and short-term improvements in performance.

‘Our goal is to understand this better and see whether we can develop therapeutic protocols that lead to sustained improvements in performance.’

In his research, Dr Hinder has collaborated with researchers at the School of Medicine, Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre. ‘The University has great facilities for doing ageing-related research,’ Dr Hinder says. ‘One of the major benefits of working here is the ease with which you can establish collaborations with world-renowned researchers in their respective fields.’

Biography

Dr Hinder completed a MSc in Neuro-mechanics at Simon Fraser University (Canada) in 2003 before undertaking a PhD (Behavioural Neuroscience) at the University of Queensland. He joined the University of Tasmania in 2008 as a post-doc fellow in Professor Jeffery Summers' Human Motor Control Laboratory.

Since 2012 he has been working as an ARC DECRA fellow on a project investigating the neural mechanisms underlying changes in motor control in healthy ageing. His research is conducted in collaboration with international colleagues at Trinity College Dublin as well as colleagues at University of Queensland and University of Western Australia.

Teaching Interests

Dr Hinder is currently engaged in a full-time research position, but has delivered guest lectures on Neuroscience and taught Biomechanics at University of Queensland prior to joining the University of Tasmania.

Research Interests

Dr Hinder's research interests include determining how changes in motor and cognitive behaviour occur in older age are related to changes in brain structure and function, with a particular focus on investigating why some older adults show age-related degradation of motor and cognition function in their 5th decade, while others remain highly functioning late in senescence.

Research Expertise and Specific Skills

  • Use of behavioural paradigms to investigate changes in motor and cognitive function in older age
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

View more on Dr Mark Hinder in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance (170112)
  • Motor Control (110603)
  • Neurosciences (110999)
  • Central Nervous System (110903)
  • Developmental Psychology and Ageing (170102)
  • Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology) (170101)
  • Decision Making (170202)
  • Gender Psychology (170105)
  • Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases (110904)
  • Sensory Systems (110906)
  • Cognitive Science (170299)

Research Objectives

  • Health Related to Ageing (920502)
  • Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences (970117)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences (970111)
  • Health (929999)
  • Nervous System and Disorders (920111)
  • Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
  • Neurodegenerative Disorders Related to Ageing (920112)
  • Women's Health (920507)

Publications

Total publications

50

Highlighted publications

(4 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2012Journal ArticleFujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'Age-related differences in corticospinal excitability and inhibition during coordination of upper and lower limbs', Neurobiology of Aging, 33, (7) pp. 1484.e1-1484.e14. ISSN 0197-4580 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.12.019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 46

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Schmidt MW; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2012ReviewHinder MR, 'Interhemispheric connectivity between distinct motor regions as a window into bimanual coordination', Journal of Neurophysiology, 107, (7) pp. 1791-1794. (2012) [Review Several Works]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00822.2011 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9

Tweet

2011Journal ArticleHinder MR, Schmidt MW, Garry MI, Carroll TJ, Summers JJ, 'Absence of cross-limb transfer of performance gains following ballistic motor practice in older adults', Journal of Applied Physiology, 110, (1) pp. 166-175. ISSN 8750-7587 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00958.2010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 50Web of Science - 48

Co-authors: Schmidt MW; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2010Journal ArticleLee M, Hinder MR, Gandevia SC, Carroll TJ, 'The ipsilateral motor cortex contributes to cross-limb transfer of performance gains after ballistic motor practice', Journal of Physiology, 588, (1) pp. 201-212. ISSN 0022-3751 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2009.183855 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 116Web of Science - 111

Tweet

Journal Article

(42 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Garton R, Reynolds AR, Hinder MR, Heathcote A, 'Equally Flexible and Optimal Response Bias in Older Compared to Younger Adults', Psychology and Aging, 34, (6) pp. 821-835. ISSN 0882-7974 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1037/pag0000339 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Garton R; Reynolds AR; Heathcote A

Tweet

2019Vallence AM, Hinder MR, Fujiyama H, 'Data-driven selection of conference speakers based on scientific impact to achieve gender parity', PLoS ONE, 14, (7) pp. 1-10. ISSN 1932-6203 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0220481 [eCite] [Details]

Tweet

2018Hinder MR, Puri R, Kemp S, Waitzer S, Reissig P, et al., 'Distinct modulation of interhemispheric inhibitory mechanisms during movement preparation reveals the influence of cognition on action control', Cortex, 99 pp. 13-29. ISSN 0010-9452 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.10.002 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4

Co-authors: Puri R; Kemp S; Reissig P

Tweet

2018Tang AD, Bennett W, Hadrill C, Collins J, Fulopova B, et al., 'Low intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation modulates skilled motor learning in adult mice', Scientific Reports, 8 Article 4016. ISSN 2045-2322 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-22385-8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Bennett W; Hadrill C; Collins J; Fulopova B; Wills K; Bindoff A; Puri R; Garry MI; Summers JJ; Canty AJ

Tweet

2017Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Barzideh A, Van de Vijver C, Badache AC, et al., 'Preconditioning tDCS facilitates subsequent tDCS effect on skill acquisition in older adults', Neurobiology of Aging, 51 pp. 31-42. ISSN 0197-4580 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2016.11.012 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Reissig P; Summers JJ

Tweet

2017Hinder MR, Fujiyama H, Vallence A-M, 'Response to 'Response to Hoy, Gender imbalance and brain stimulation conferences: We have a problem and it is everyone's problem''', Brain Stimulation, 10, (1) pp. 158-159. ISSN 1935-861X (2017) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brs.2016.11.014 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

Tweet

2017Kruger M, Hinder MR, Puri R, Summers JJ, 'Influence of cognitive functioning on age-related performance declines in visuospatial sequence learning', Frontiers in Psychology, 8 Article 919. ISSN 1664-1078 (2017) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00919 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Kruger M; Puri R; Summers JJ

Tweet

2016Mehrkanoon S, Boonstra TW, Breakspear M, Hinder M, Summers JJ, 'Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning', NeuroImage, 128 pp. 252-263. ISSN 1053-8119 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.12.052 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 17Web of Science - 19

Co-authors: Mehrkanoon S; Summers JJ

Tweet

2016Puri R, Hinder MR, 'Response: 'Commentary: Duration-dependent effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on anodal tDCS induced motor cortex plasticity in older adults: a group and individual perspective'', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 8 Article 28. ISSN 1663-4365 (2016) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2016.00028 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Puri R

Tweet

2016Puri R, Hinder MR, Canty AJ, Summers JJ, 'Facilitatory non-invasive brain stimulation in older adults: the effect of stimulation type and duration on the induction of motor cortex plasticity', Experimental Brain Research, 234, (12) pp. 3411-3423. ISSN 0014-4819 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-016-4740-3 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Puri R; Canty AJ; Summers JJ

Tweet

2016Stockel T, Carroll TJ, Summers JJ, Hinder MR, 'Motor learning and cross-limb transfer rely upon distinct neural adaptation processes', Journal of Neurophysiology, 116, (2) pp. 575-586. ISSN 0022-3077 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00225.2016 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Summers JJ

Tweet

2016Tang AD, Lowe AS, Garrett AR, Woodward R, Bennett W, et al., 'Construction and evaluation of rodent-specific rTMS coils', Frontiers in Neural Circuits, 10 Article 47. ISSN 1662-5110 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fncir.2016.00047 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 21Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Bennett W; Canty AJ; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2015Puri R, Hinder MR, Fujiyama H, Gomez R, Carson RG, et al., 'Duration-dependent effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on anodal tDCS induced motor cortex plasticity in older adults: a group and individual perspective', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7 Article 107. ISSN 1663-4365 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00107 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 36Web of Science - 36

Co-authors: Puri R; Fujiyama H; Summers JJ

Tweet

2015Reissig P, Puri R, Garry MI, Summers JJ, Hinder MR, 'The influence of mirror-visual feedback on training-induced motor performance gains in the untrained hand', PLoS One, 10, (10) Article e0141828. ISSN 1932-6203 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0141828 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 6

Co-authors: Reissig P; Puri R; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2015Reissig P, Stockel T, Garry MI, Summers JJ, Hinder MR, 'Age-specific effects of mirror-muscle activity on cross-limb adaptations under mirror and non-mirror visual feedback conditions', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 7 Article 222. ISSN 1663-4365 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2015.00222 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5

Co-authors: Reissig P; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2015Stockel T, Summers JJ, Hinder MR, 'Reversed effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation following motor training that vary as a function of training-induced changes in corticospinal excitability', Neural Plasticity, 2015 Article 578620. ISSN 2090-5904 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1155/2015/578620 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Summers JJ

Tweet

2014Fujiyama H, Hyde J, Hinder MR, Kim S-J, McCormack GH, et al., 'Delayed plastic responses to anodal tDCS in older adults', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 6 Article 115. ISSN 1663-4365 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00115 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 56Web of Science - 52

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Hyde J; McCormack GH; Vickers JC; Summers JJ

Tweet

2014Hinder MR, Goss EL, Fujiyama H, Canty AJ, Garry MI, et al., 'Inter- and intra-individual variability following intermittent theta burst stimulation: implications for rehabilitation and recovery', Brain Stimulation, 7, (3) pp. 365-371. ISSN 1935-861X (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brs.2014.01.004 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 83Web of Science - 83

Co-authors: Goss EL; Fujiyama H; Canty AJ; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2014Reissig P, Garry MI, Summers JJ, Hinder MR, 'Visual feedback-related changes in ipsilateral cortical excitability during unimanual movement: Implications for mirror therapy', Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 24, (6) pp. 936-957. ISSN 1464-0694 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2014.922889 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 11

Co-authors: Reissig P; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2013Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'Slow and steady is not as easy as it sounds: interlimb coordination at slow speed is associated with elevated attentional demand especially in older adults', Experimental Brain Research, 227, (2) pp. 289-300. ISSN 0014-4819 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-013-3511-7 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 12Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2013Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Summers JJ, 'Functional role of left PMd and left M1 during preparation and execution of left hand movements in older adults', Journal of Neurophysiology, 110, (5) pp. 1062-1069. ISSN 0022-3077 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00075.2013 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Summers JJ

Tweet

2013Hinder MR, Carroll TJ, Summers JJ, 'Transfer of ballistic motor skill between bilateral and unilateral context in young and older adults: neural adaptations and behavioural implications', Journal of Neurophysiology, 109, (12) pp. 2963-2971. ISSN 0022-3077 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00535.2012 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Summers JJ

Tweet

2013Hinder MR, Carroll TJ, Summers JJ, 'Inter-limb transfer of ballistic motor skill following non-dominant limb training in young and older adults', Experimental Brain Research, 227, (1) pp. 19-29. ISSN 0014-4819 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-013-3481-9 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 23

Co-authors: Summers JJ

Tweet

2012Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'Age-related differences in corticospinal excitability and inhibition during coordination of upper and lower limbs', Neurobiology of Aging, 33, (7) pp. 1484.e1-1484.e14. ISSN 0197-4580 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2011.12.019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 46

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Schmidt MW; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2012Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Tandonnet C, Garry MI, et al., 'Age-related Differences in Corticomotor Excitability and Inhibitory Processes during a Visuomotor RT Task', Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 24, (5) pp. 1253-1263. ISSN 0898-929X (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1162/jocn_a_00201 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 37Web of Science - 40

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Schmidt MW; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2012Hinder MR, Fujiyama H, Summers JJ, 'Premotor-Motor Interhemispheric Inhibition is Released during Movement Initiation in Older but Not Young Adults', PL o S One, 7, (12) Article e52573. ISSN 1932-6203 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052573 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Summers JJ

Tweet

2012Riek S, Hinder MR, Carson RG, 'Primary motor cortex involvement in initial learning during visuomotor adaptation', Neuropsychologia: An International Journal in Behavioural Neuroscience, 50, (10) pp. 2515-2523. ISSN 0028-3932 (2012) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2012.06.024 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 11

Tweet

2011Hinder MR, Schmidt MW, Garry MI, Carroll TJ, Summers JJ, 'Absence of cross-limb transfer of performance gains following ballistic motor practice in older adults', Journal of Applied Physiology, 110, (1) pp. 166-175. ISSN 8750-7587 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00958.2010 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 50Web of Science - 48

Co-authors: Schmidt MW; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2011Schmidt MW, Hinder MR, Summers JJ, Garry MI, 'Long-Lasting Contralateral Motor Cortex Excitability is Increased by Unilateral Hand Movement That Triggers Electrical Stimulation of Opposite Homologous Muscles', Neurorehabilitation and Neuro Repair, 25, (6) pp. 521-530. ISSN 1545-9683 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/1545968310397202 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 9Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Schmidt MW; Summers JJ; Garry MI

Tweet

2010Hinder MR, Riek S, Tresilian JR, de Rugy A, Carson RG, 'Real-time error detection but not error correction drives automatic visuomotor adaptation ', Experimental Brain Research, 201, (2) pp. 191-207. ISSN 0014-4819 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-009-2025-9 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 44Web of Science - 42

Tweet

2010Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'The effect of ballistic thumb contractions on the excitability of the ipsilateral motor cortex', Experimental Brain Research, 201, (2) pp. 229-238. ISSN 0014-4819 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-009-2029-5 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 18

Co-authors: Schmidt M; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2010Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'Unilateral contractions modulate interhemispheric inhibition most strongly and most adaptively in the homologous muscle of the contralateral limb', Experimental Brain Research, 205, (3) pp. 423-433. ISSN 0014-4819 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-010-2379-z [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 50Web of Science - 45

Co-authors: Schmidt M; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Tweet

2010Lee M, Hinder MR, Gandevia SC, Carroll TJ, 'The ipsilateral motor cortex contributes to cross-limb transfer of performance gains after ballistic motor practice', Journal of Physiology, 588, (1) pp. 201-212. ISSN 0022-3751 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2009.183855 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 116Web of Science - 111

Tweet

2009de Rugy A, Hinder MR, Woolley DG, Carson RG, 'The Synergistic Organization of Muscle Recruitment Constrains Visuomotor Adaptation', Journal of Neurophysiology, 101, (5) pp. 2263-2269. ISSN 0022-3077 (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.90898.2008 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 19Web of Science - 19

Tweet

2008Hinder MR, Tresilian JR, Riek S, Carson RG, 'The contribution of visual feedback to visuomotor adaptation: How much and when?', Brain Research, 1197 pp. 123-134. ISSN 0006-8993 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainres.2007.12.067 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 46Web of Science - 46

Tweet

2008Hinder MR, Woolley DG, Tresilian JR, Riek S, Carson RG, 'The efficacy of colour cues in facilitating adaptation to opposing visuomotor rotations', Experimental Brain Research, 191, (2008) pp. 143-155. ISSN 0014-4819 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-008-1513-7 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 15

Tweet

2007Hinder MR, Milner TE, 'Rapid adaptation to scaled changes of the mechanical environment', Journal of Neurophysiology, 98, (5) pp. 3072-3080. ISSN 0022-3077 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00269.2007 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6

Tweet

2007Hinder MR, Walk L, Woolley DG, Riek S, Carson RG, 'The interference effects of non-rotated versus counter-rotated trials in visuomotor adaptation', Experimental Brain Research, 180, (4) pp. 629-640. ISSN 0014-4819 (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-007-0888-1 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 24Web of Science - 24

Tweet

2006Milner TE, Hinder MR, 'Position information but not force information is used in adapting to changes in environmental dynamics', Journal of Neurophysiology, 96, (2) pp. 526-534. ISSN 0022-3077 (2006) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00022.2006 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

Tweet

2005Hinder MR, Milner TE, 'Novel strategies in feedforward adaptation to a position-dependent perturbation', Experimental Brain Research, 165, (2) pp. 239-249. ISSN 0014-4819 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s00221-005-2294-x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

Tweet

2003Hinder MR, Milner T, 'Investigating schemes for control of human movement', Physiology News ISSN 1476-7996 (2003) [Professional, Non Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

2003Hinder MR, Milner TE, 'The case for an internal dynamics model versus equilibrium point control in human movement', Journal of Physiology, 549, (3) pp. 953-963. ISSN 0022-3751 (2003) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1113/jphysiol.2002.033845 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 68Web of Science - 58

Tweet

Chapter in Book

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2007Milner TE, Hinder MR, Franklin DW, 'How is somatosensory information used to adapt to changes in the mechanical environment?', Computational Neuroscience: Theoretical Insights into Brain Function, Elsevier, United States, pp. 363-372. ISBN 978-0-444-52823-0 (2007) [Research Book Chapter]

DOI: 10.1016/S0079-6123(06)65022-X [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4

Tweet

Review

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2019Tan J, Iyer KK, Tang AD, Jamil A, Martins RN, et al., 'Modulating functional connectivity with non-invasive brain stimulation for the investigation and alleviation of age-associated declines in response inhibition: A narrative review', Neuroimage, 185 pp. 490-512. ISSN 1053-8119 (2019) [Substantial Review]

DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.10.044 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2

Tweet

2014Hinder MR, Reissig P, Fujiyama H, 'Non-invasive brain stimulation can elucidate and interact with the mechanisms underlying motor learning and retention: implications for rehabilitation', Journal of Neurophysiology, online before print, (online before print) (2014) [Review Several Works]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00766.2013 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Reissig P; Fujiyama H

Tweet

2012Hinder MR, 'Interhemispheric connectivity between distinct motor regions as a window into bimanual coordination', Journal of Neurophysiology, 107, (7) pp. 1791-1794. (2012) [Review Several Works]

DOI: 10.1152/jn.00822.2011 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9

Tweet

Conference Publication

(4 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2015Tang A, Bennett WR, Garry MI, Hinder MR, Summers JJ, et al., 'Investigating the mechanisms of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation using motor learning paradigms and in vivo 2 photon imaging', 1st International Brain Stimulation Conference, 2-4 March, 2015, Singapore (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bennett WR; Garry MI; Summers JJ; Canty A

2015Tang G, Garrett A, Woodward R, Bennett WR, Hadrill CE, et al., 'Construction and evaluation of rodent-specific TMS coils', 1st International Brain Stimulation Conference, 2-4 March, 2015, Singapore (2015) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Bennett WR; Hadrill CE; Canty A; Garry MI; Summers JJ

2011Fujiyama H, Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Tandonnet C, Garry MI, et al., 'Age-related differences in corticospinal excitability and inhibitory processes during a Go/NoGo reaction time task', Clinical Neurophysiology, 21-25 July 2011, Rome, Italy, pp. S21. ISSN 1388-2457 (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Fujiyama H; Schmidt M; Garry MI; Summers JJ

2011Hinder MR, Schmidt M, Carroll T, Garry MI, Summers JJ, 'The neural correlates of ballistic motor learning and cross-limb transfer in young and older adults', Clinical Neurophysiology, 21-25 July 2011, Rome, Italy, pp. S43. ISSN 1388-2457 (2011) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Schmidt M; Garry MI; Summers JJ

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

9

Total funding

$2,399,171

Projects

How do we cancel or modify movements? (2020 - 2022)$366,310
Description
The combined effect of Australias population growth and ageing demographics will result in the number ofAustralians > 65 years old increasing by 5.9 million by 2051 relative to 2012 numbers. Not only will this result incosts related to ageing rising exponentially but will also result in a significant older workforce. The current projectwill provide fundamental new knowledge about the mechanisms of inhibitory control, and how this facilitydegrades during later life. This knowledge may lead to future interventions aimed at maintaining efficient inhibitorycontrol in later life, and thus assumes significant economic and social benefits.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($366,310)
Scheme
Grant-Discovery Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hinder MR; Matzke D
Period
2020 - 2022
Grant Reference
DP200101696
Clinical safety assessment of rTMS application for the treatment of MS (2019)$16,000
Description
Oligodendrocytes are brain cells that die in MS, but non-invasive brain stimulation (rTMS) can promote their generation in preclinical models of disease. This project will take an important role in the clinical translation of this treatment and determine whether this type of stimulation can be safely delivered to people with MS.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($16,000)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cullen CL; Young Kaylene; Taylor BVM; Hinder MR
Year
2019
Rapid motor responses in young and older adults (2016 - 2019)$660,751
Description
1 in 4 Australians will be over the age of 65 by the year 2056. This project aims to develop fundamental newknowledge of the natural processes that characterise age-related changes in rapid motor actions by combiningnon-invasive brain stimulation with novel behavioural experiments and computational modelling techniques. It willaddress how changes in brain structure and function, as well as alterations in cognitive processing abilities, thatoccur in older age, affect rapid choices between various alternative motor actions as well as our ability stop motorresponses once they are planned.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($660,751)
Scheme
Fellowship-Future
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hinder MR
Period
2016 - 2019
Grant Reference
FT150100406
A Translational Approach to Understanding the Effects of Brain Stimulation (2014)$34,000
Description
Brain function is underpinned by electrical activity that is vital for communication between cells, and for establishing and maintaining normal brain structure and function. Modulation of electrical activity by repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is becoming widely recognised as a clinically applicable non-invasive intervention to improve and repair neural function in humans.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($34,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Canty A; Hinder MR
Year
2014
The Ageing Brain: Plasticity and Training (2013 - 2015)$340,739
Description
Normal ageing is associated with progressive decline in cognitive and motor functions. Much recent research interest has focused on whether specific motor and cognitive skills training programs for older adults can slow, or even reverse, functional decline. A feature of ageing, however, is the large variation across individuals in level of performance, rate of decline, and response to training programs. The aims of this research are to provide novel insights into how brain plasticity mechanisms influence individual differences in cognitive and motor function and training responsiveness. The outcomes will aid the development of more effective training programs for older adults.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($340,739)
Scheme
Grant-Discovery Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Summers JJ; Hinder MR; Gomez R
Period
2013 - 2015
Grant Reference
DP130104317
The mechanisms of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: A translational approach (2013 - 2015)$603,366
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($603,366)
Scheme
Grant-Project
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Summers JJ; Canty A; Hinder MR; Rodger Jennifer; Garry MI
Period
2013 - 2015
Grant Reference
1050261
Brain Connectivity During Movement Planning and Execution in Young and Older Adults (2012 - 2014)$375,000
Description
Advancing age is associated with a decline in the ability to make accurate movements which can have profound consequences on older adults ability to live independently, and likely contributes to the fact that over a third of those older adults living at home experience at least one fall annually. The research described within this proposal will improve our knowledge of the brain mechanisms associated with motor control across the lifespan. The outcomes of the research will potentially lead to interventions to better maintain coordinated movement into later life, and therefore assume great significance for the health and well-being of individuals while reducing the significant health care costs associated with an ageing population.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($375,000)
Scheme
Fellowship-Discovery Early Career Researcher Award
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hinder MR
Period
2012 - 2014
Grant Reference
DE120100729
2012: Neural Control of Movement and Magtism Nueroscience conferences, Venice and Oxford. (2012)$1,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,500)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hinder MR
Year
2012
European Congress of Clinical Neurophysiology 21 to 25 June 2011 Italy (May 2011) (2011)$1,505
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,505)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hinder MR
Year
2011

Research Supervision

Current

5

Completed

1

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDA Quantitative Model of Decision Making in Complex Environments2016
PhDModelling Rapid Motor Responses in Young and Older Adults2016
PhDRapid-Choice Motor Actions: The influence of age, brain connectivity, and cognitive processing2016
PhDInvestigating Inhibitory Control Using Neurophysiological Methods and Computational Modelling2018
PhDInvestigating the Neural Dynamics of Inhibitory Cueing Effects in Visual Search Behaviour2018

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDThe Role of Mirror-Visual Feedback in Modulating Bilateral Corticospinal Excitability and Bilateral Performance Gains Following Unilateral Training Across the Lifespan
Candidate: Paola Reissig
2015