Profiles

Anthony Cook

UTAS Home Associate Professor Anthony Cook

Anthony Cook

Associate Professor
Wicking Dementia Research & Education Centre

Room 417a , Medical Science 1 (MS1)

+61 3 6226 6964 (phone)

Anthony.Cook@utas.edu.au

Dr Anthony Cook researches age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and motor neurone disease. The unifying theme of his research is the study of human cell-based models.

Many researchers use animal models such as fruit flies or mice to investigate human diseases. ‘One of the advantages of studying human cells,’ explains Dr Cook, ‘is that they possess an inherent genetic variability between them that reflects human populations. Animal models of disease don’t capture this variation quite as well.’

‘At the Wicking Centre, I’ve been developing human cell-based models that complement animal-based research. The reason that we need these models is so we can see whether the findings from animal-based research are transferable to humans. If the same responses occur in human cells, then it’s a good sign that the animal model findings could be useful for developing potential therapies.’ Dr Cook notes that his research is a ‘key component of translating bench research to useful new therapies’.

Dr Cook’s laboratory uses induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology. ‘It was developed in Japan,’ he says, ‘and has revolutionised health and medical research.’ Research using iPS cell technology begins with a live person – cells, typically skin or blood cells, are obtained from a donor using ethically approved protocols, and these are ‘reprogrammed’ in the laboratory. ‘This reprogramming creates a cell that we call an induced pluripotent stem cell, which is highly similar to an embryonic stem cell.’

iPS cell technology allows researchers to study brain cells from people living with neurodegenerative diseases. ‘Once we have the iPS cells, we mimic the normal developmental processes of a human cell by introducing biochemical cues in a certain order and timing, to turn them into the cell type we’re interested in. So, if we’re studying the brain, we can turn iPS cells into neurons that we can use to model disease processes.’ Dr Cook explains that iPS cell technology is so powerful because it makes it possible to study nerve cells from large numbers of people with different genetic risk profiles.

Another exciting aspect of his research, says Dr Cook, is another technological advance known as CRISPR/Cas gene editing. ‘We can take the iPS cells from people with gene variants that cause a disease and use CRISPR/Cas technology to correct the gene sequence to that found in people without the disease.’ This produces isogenic cell lines – a pair of cell lines that are genetically identical except for the disease-causing variant. ‘These can be turned into neurons or whatever cell type is needed, and we can study how the gene variant changes the function of those cells.’

Dr Cook entered the field by following opportunities that interested him, many of which had the potential to make a difference to human health. ‘It started with a little bit of serendipity. I enrolled in engineering and found that it wasn’t for me, so I went and did a science degree. Then, having never studied biology at high school, I did first year biochemistry, and remember clearly one of the lecturers saying we can make transgenic animals. This intrigued me and set in motion my whole undergraduate degree in which I studied as much molecular and cell biology as I could, and became involved in a research group through an undergrad lab placement in my summer holidays.

‘UTAS is a great place to be doing biomedical research,’ says Dr Cook. ‘We have a highly engaged population who are genuinely interested in what we do and who are willing to participate in our research. And because the Wicking Centre is part of the College of Health and Medicine, and we are in the one building with both the Menzies Institute for Medical Research and the School of Medicine, there are many opportunities for collaboration.’

Where might this research lead? ‘There is potential for iPS cell technology to provide a pathway to precision medicine,’ says Dr Cook. ‘For example, iPS cells make it possible to conduct drug discovery experiments using nerve cells from many people, to identify drugs that are effective, and to identify those cells that respond versus those that do not. Both the development of new treatments and the possibility of tailoring those treatments on an individual basis mean that iPS cell technology has the potential to improve health outcomes for a range of conditions.’

Dr Cook is a Senior Lecturer within the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre. He research interests lie in developing and utilising human cell-based models of neurodegenerative diseases to uncover molecular pathways that contribute to disease onset and progression.

Biography

Dr Cook completed his BSc and BSc (Hons, First Class) degrees in 1999 and 2000 respectively, at The University of Queensland (UQ), majoring in biochemistry for each. He subsequently undertook research studies towards the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Assoc Prof Rick Sturm's laboratory within the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at UQ, and was awarded a PhD in the Field of Molecular Biology/Biochemistry in 2004. His thesis was awarded the Dean's commendation for Outstanding Research Higher Degree Theses 2004.

Since completion of his PhD, Dr Cook has been employed as a post-doctoral scientist at UQ, Griffith University (Queensland, Australia) and the University of Tasmania (UTas).  From 2010 - June 2015, he was the employed as a Lecturer in Human Biological Science within the School of Health Sciences, and from July 2015 as a Senior Lecturer within the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre at The University of Tasmania, where he developed an extensive teaching portfolio that includes cell biology, biochemistry/ molecular biology, and molecular genetics at all undergraduate levels.

Career summary

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Queensland, Australia. 2004 Thesis: Models of Human Neural Crest Cell Differentiation in Vitro
  • Graduate Certificate in University Learning and Teaching, University of Tasmania, Australia. 2015
  • BSc Hons (1st Class), University of Queensland, Australia 2000 Thesis: Homeobox Gene Expression in Merkel Cell Carcinoma
  • BSc, University of Queensland, Australia. 1999

Memberships

Professional practice

  • Member, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
  • Member, Australian Society for Stem Cell Research
  • Member, Australian Society for Medical Research
  • Member, Molecular and Experimental Pathology Society of Australia

Committee associations

  • Member, Institutional Biosafety Committee, University of Tasmania (2011 - present)
  • Co-ordinator, Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP), School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania (2013-2014)

Other

  • Convenor, Medical Research Week Gala Dinner, Australian Society for Medical Research (Tasmanian Branch), for 2011, 2012 and 2014.

Teaching

Cell biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, molecular genetics, dementia, neurobiology, neuroscience

Teaching expertise

Dr Cook has a teaching portfolio that includes design, delivery and assessment within Units encompassing cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology, and molecular genetics at all undergraduate levels, and in flexible delivery modes (face-to-face and fully online). Furthermore, he has taught these topics to students undertaking health-related degrees in fields other than with biochemistry/molecular biology majors, including biomedical science (pathology), exercise science, and dementia studies. He is interested in pedagogical approaches to teaching and learning that are inquiry driven and which teach science as science is practiced.

Teaching responsibility

Dr Cook acts as co-ordinator for several Units within the Bachelor of Dementia Care, including Advanced Topics in Neurobiology of Dementia (CAD302).

Research Appointments

Dr Cook was a participant in the Theo Murphy High Flyers Think Tank 2015 on the topic the Stem Cell Revolution – lessons and imperatives for Australia, an event organised by the Australian Academy of Science.

View more on AssocProf Tony Cook in WARP

Expertise

  • Modelling of human disease and phenotypic traits using donor-specific cell lines
  • Mammalian cell culture techniques (including establishing primary cell cultures, and in maintenance and differentiation of stem cell cultures)
  • Cell and molecular biology  techniques

Research Themes

Dr Cook's research aligns to the University's Better Health research theme. His research interests include development of human cell-based models of disease that facilitate studying the underlying biology of disease onset or progression. These interests stem from solid doctoral and post-doctoral training in the development of human cell-based models to study the molecular and cellular biology of genetic traits and disease mechanisms (natural variation in pigmentation, and Parkinson's disease [PD], respectively). Since joining the University of Tasmania, Dr Cook has focused his research on human stem cell-based models of two age-related chronic neurodegenerative diseases: dementia, and the blinding eye disease glaucoma. By directly studying the biology of human cells from people with disease, Dr Cook's research will help to identify new possibilities for prevention or treatment, and which may ultimately translate to improved healthcare outcomes.

Collaboration

Dr Cook has active collaborations with other scientists within the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, with the Faculty of Health at the University of Tasmania, with Tasmanian-based ophthalmologists, and nationally with stem cell researchers.

Current projects

  1. Stem cell derived models of age-related degenerative diseases:
    1. Dementia In this project, we are using donor-specific cells derived from participants from the Tasmanian Healthy Brain Project. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) corresponding to each donor are matured into neurons in the laboratory for molecular charaterisation and functional assays. This work is collaboration involving a large number of researchers within the wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre, and other local and national scientists.
    2. Glaucoma In this project, we are investigating the cellular and molecular changes that occur within various cell types within the eye, including retinal ganglion cells, astrocytes, and trabecular meshwork cells, that contribute to the blinding disease glaucoma. This work is being done in collaboration with Assoc. Prof. Alex Hewitt (School of Medicine, UTas / Menzies) and Dr Alice Pebay (Centre for Eye Research Australia).
  2. Molecular analysis of clinical samples obtained from glaucoma patients during surgical treatment for advanced disease. This involves collection of aqueous humor for cytokine and growth factor profiling. This work is being done in collaboration with Dr Tze'Yo Toh, a glaucoma and cataract specialist at the Launceston Eye Institute.

Fields of Research

  • Cancer genetics (321103)
  • Cell development, proliferation and death (310102)
  • Cellular nervous system (320902)
  • Ophthalmology and optometry (321299)
  • Ophthalmology (321201)
  • Cell metabolism (310103)
  • Epigenetics (incl. genome methylation and epigenomics) (310504)
  • Neurology and neuromuscular diseases (320905)
  • Genetic immunology (310507)
  • Biochemistry and cell biology (310199)
  • Signal transduction (310111)
  • Vision science (321204)
  • Gene and molecular therapy (320601)
  • Animal physiology - systems (310910)
  • Medical biochemistry and metabolomics (320599)
  • Nutrition and dietetics (321099)
  • Nutritional science (321004)
  • Neurosciences (320999)
  • Regenerative medicine (incl. stem cells) (320606)
  • Cancer cell biology (321101)
  • Central nervous system (320903)
  • Molecular medicine (340406)
  • Science, technology and engineering curriculum and pedagogy (390113)
  • Nanotoxicology, health and safety (320605)
  • Education assessment and evaluation (390402)
  • Gastroenterology and hepatology (320209)
  • Animal physiology - cell (310909)
  • Health psychology (520304)
  • Health services and systems (420399)
  • Peripheral nervous system (320906)
  • Sensory systems (320907)
  • Cell neurochemistry (310104)
  • Biomechanical engineering (400303)
  • Cellular immunology (320404)
  • Separation science (340109)
  • Analytical chemistry (340199)
  • Genomics (310509)
  • Animal immunology (310905)
  • Other chemical sciences (349999)
  • Cell physiology (320801)

Research Objectives

  • Clinical health (200199)
  • Expanding knowledge in the health sciences (280112)
  • Other health (209999)
  • Expanding knowledge in the biomedical and clinical sciences (280103)
  • Terrestrial biodiversity (180606)
  • Other education and training (169999)
  • Behaviour and health (200401)
  • Public health (excl. specific population health) (200499)
  • Learner and learning (160199)
  • Expanding knowledge in the biological sciences (280102)
  • Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions (200101)
  • Health status (incl. wellbeing) (200407)
  • Expanding knowledge in the chemical sciences (280105)
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander determinants of health (210301)

Publications

All of Dr Cook's papers have been published in peer-reviewed international journals that are well-regarded journals in their area of research. His publication record reflects his skills and experience in development of novel human cell culture models, and their use to model human diseases and phenotypic traits.

Total publications

49

Highlighted publications

(5 outputs)
YearTypeCitationAltmetrics
2020Journal ArticleOoi L, Dottori M, Cook AL, Engel M, Gautam V, et al., 'If human brain organoids are the answer to understanding dementia, what are the questions?', The Neuroscientist, 26, (5-6) pp. 438-454. ISSN 1073-8584 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/1073858420912404 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: King AE

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2015Journal ArticleAshworth Briggs EL, Toh TY, Eri RD, Hewitt A, Cook AL, 'TIMP1, TIMP2, and TIMP4 are increased in aqueous humor from primary open angle glaucoma patients', Molecular Vision, 21 pp. 1162-1172. ISSN 1090-0535 (2015) [Refereed Article]

PMID: 26539028 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Ashworth Briggs EL; Eri RD; Hewitt A

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2010Journal ArticleMatigian N, Abrahamsen G, Sutharsan R, Cook AL, Vitale AM, et al., 'Disease-specific, neurosphere-derived cells as models for brain disorders', Disease models & mechanisms, 3, (11) pp. 785-798. ISSN 1754-8403 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1242/dmm.005447 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 127Web of Science - 116

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2009Journal ArticleCook AL, Chen W, Thurber AE, Smit DJ, Smith AG, et al., 'Analysis of cultured human melanocytes based on polymorphisms within the SLC45A2/MATP, SLC24A5/NCKX5 and OCA2/P loci', The Journal of Investigative Dermatology: An International Journal for Research in Cutaneous Biology, 129, (2) pp. 392-405. ISSN 0022-202X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/jid.2008.211 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 82Web of Science - 75

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2003Journal ArticleCook AL, Donatien PD, Smith AG, Murphy M, Jones MK, et al., 'Human Melanoblasts in Culture: Expression of BRN2 and Synergistic Regulation by Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, Stem Cell Factor and Endothelin-3', The Journal of Investigative Dermatology: An International Journal for Research in Cutaneous Biology, 121, (5) pp. 1150-1159. ISSN 0022-202X (2003) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12562.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 77Web of Science - 70

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Journal Article

(40 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Wang Q, Chear S, Wing K, Stellon D, Tran MTN, et al., 'Use of CRISPR/Cas ribonucleoproteins for high throughput gene editing of induced pluripotent stem cells', Methods pp. 1-12. ISSN 1046-2023 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.ymeth.2021.02.009 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wing K; Stellon D; Talbot J; Hewitt AW

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2020Li F, Wing K, Wang J-H, Luu CD, Bender JA, et al., 'Comparison of CRISPR/Cas endonucleases for in vivo retinal gene editing', Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 14 Article 570917. ISSN 1662-5102 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3389/fncel.2020.570917 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Wing K; Bender JA; Lu Q; Young KM; Liu G-S; Hewitt AW

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2020Munoz SS, Engel M, Balez R, Do-Ha D, Cabral-da-Silva MC, et al., 'A simple differentiation protocol for generation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived basal forebrain-like cholinergic neurons for Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia disease modeling', Cells, 9, (9) Article E2018. ISSN 2073-4409 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3390/cells9092018 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Hewitt AW

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2020Ooi L, Dottori M, Cook AL, Engel M, Gautam V, et al., 'If human brain organoids are the answer to understanding dementia, what are the questions?', The Neuroscientist, 26, (5-6) pp. 438-454. ISSN 1073-8584 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1177/1073858420912404 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: King AE

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2019Li F, Hung SSC, Mohd Khalid MKN, Wang J-H, Chrysostomou V, et al., 'Utility of self-destructing CRISPR/Cas constructs for targeted gene editing in the retina', Human Gene Therapy, 30, (11) pp. 1349-1360. ISSN 1043-0342 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1089/hum.2019.021 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8

Co-authors: Wing K; Bender JA; King AE; Hewitt AW; Liu G-S

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2019Nguyen Tran MT, Mohd Khalid MKN, Pebay A, Cook AL, Liang HH, et al., 'Screening of CRISPR/Cas base editors to target the AMD high-risk Y402H complement factor H variant', Molecular Vision, 25 pp. 174-182. ISSN 1090-0535 (2019) [Refereed Article]

PMID: 30996586 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Liu G-S; Hewitt AW

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2019Ranson N, Veldhuis M, Mitchell B, Fanning S, Cook AL, et al., 'NLRP3-dependent and -independent processing of interleukin (IL)-1β in active ulcerative colitis', International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 20, (1) pp. 1-15. ISSN 1422-0067 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3390/ijms20010057 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 12

Co-authors: Ranson N; Kunde D; Eri R

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2018Ashworth Briggs EL, Toh T, Eri R, Hewitt AW, Cook AL, 'Uteroglobin and FLRG concentrations in aqueous humor are associated with age in primary open angle glaucoma patients', BMC Ophthalmology, 18, (1) pp. 1-8. ISSN 1471-2415 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/s12886-018-0723-4 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Ashworth Briggs EL; Eri R; Hewitt AW

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2018Ranson N, Veldhuis M, Mitchell B, Fanning S, Cook AL, et al., 'Nod-like receptor pyrin-containing protein 6 (NLRP6) is up-regulated in ileal Crohn's disease and differentially expressed in goblet cells', Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 6, (1) pp. 110-112. ISSN 2352-345X (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcmgh.2018.03.001 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8

Co-authors: Ranson N; Kunde D; Eri R

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2016Gill KP, Hung SSC, Sharov A, Lo CY, Needham K, et al., 'Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells', Scientific Reports, 6 Article 30552. ISSN 2045-2322 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/srep30552 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 44Web of Science - 42

Co-authors: Hewitt AW

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2016Hewitt AW, Cook AL, Pebay A, 'Peeking into the molecular trove of discarded surgical specimens', Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 44, (8) pp. 661-662. ISSN 1442-6404 (2016) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1111/ceo.12837 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Hewitt AW

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2016McCaughey T, Chen CY, De Smit E, Rees G, Fenwick E, et al., 'Participant understanding and recall of informed consent for induced pluripotent stem cell biobanking', Cell and Tissue Banking, 17, (3) pp. 449-456. ISSN 1389-9333 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s10561-016-9563-8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9

Co-authors: Mackey DA; Hewitt AW

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2016Murtaza M, Shan J, Matigian N, Todorovic M, Cook AL, et al., 'Rotenone susceptibility phenotype in olfactory derived patient cells as a model of idiopathic Parkinson's disease', PloS One, 11, (4) Article e0154544. ISSN 1932-6203 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154544 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5

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2016Randall-Demllo S, Fernando R, Brain T, Sohal SS, Cook AL, et al., 'Characterisation of colonic dysplasia-like epithelial atypia in murine colitis', World Journal of Gastroenterology, 22, (37) pp. 8334-8348. ISSN 1007-9327 (2016) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v22.i37.8334 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Randall-Demllo S; Sohal SS; Guven N; Kunde D; Eri R

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2015Ashworth Briggs EL, Toh TY, Eri RD, Hewitt A, Cook AL, 'TIMP1, TIMP2, and TIMP4 are increased in aqueous humor from primary open angle glaucoma patients', Molecular Vision, 21 pp. 1162-1172. ISSN 1090-0535 (2015) [Refereed Article]

PMID: 26539028 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 22

Co-authors: Ashworth Briggs EL; Eri RD; Hewitt A

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2015Cook AL, Snow ET, Binns HA, Cook PS, 'Self-reported Student Confidence in Troubleshooting Ability Increases After Completion of an Inquiry-Based PCR Practical', Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education, 43, (5) pp. 316-323. ISSN 1470-8175 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/bmb.20881 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Snow ET; Binns HA; Cook PS

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2014Eri R, Cook A, Brown N, 'Reflections on the value of mapping the final theory examination in a molecular biochemistry unit', Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education, 15, (1) pp. 53-54. ISSN 1935-7885 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i1.679 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Eri R; Brown N

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2014Herbert KJ, Cook AL, Snow ET, 'SIRT1 modulates miRNA processing defects in p53-mutated human keratinocytes', Journal of Dermatological Science, 74, (2) pp. 142-149. ISSN 0923-1811 (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2014.01.008 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Herbert KJ; Snow ET

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2014Herbert KJ, Cook AL, Snow ET, 'SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes', Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 277, (3) pp. 288-297. ISSN 0041-008X (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2014.04.001 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 14Web of Science - 13

Co-authors: Herbert KJ; Snow ET

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2014Herbert KJ, Holloway A, Cook AL, Chin SP, Snow ET, 'Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes', Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, 281, (1) pp. 136-145. ISSN 0041-008X (2014) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.taap.2014.09.012 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 23Web of Science - 17

Co-authors: Herbert KJ; Holloway A; Chin SP; Snow ET

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2013Osmond-McLeod MJ, McLeod RIW, Oytam Y, McCall MJ, Feltis B, et al., 'Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells', Particle and Fibre Toxicology, 10, (54) pp. 1-18. ISSN 1743-8977 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1186/1743-8977-10-54 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 29Web of Science - 26

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2013Shabala L, Walker EJ, Eklund A, Randall-Demllo S, Shabala S, et al., 'Exposure of colonic epithelial cells to oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress causes rapid potassium efflux and calcium influx', Cell Biochemistry and Function, 31, (7) pp. 603-611. ISSN 1099-0844 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/cbf.2946 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7

Co-authors: Shabala L; Walker EJ; Randall-Demllo S; Shabala S; Guven N; Eri RD

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2011Beaumont KA, Hamilton NA, Moores MT, Cairncross O, Cook AL, et al., 'The Recycling Endosome Protein Rab17 Regulates Melanocytic Filopodia Formation and Melanosome Trafficking', Traffic: The International Journal of Intracellular Transport, 12, (5) pp. 627-43. ISSN 1398-9219 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0854.2011.01172.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 55Web of Science - 53

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2011Boyle GM, Woods SL, Bonazzi VF, Stark MS, Hacker E, et al., 'Melanoma cell invasiveness is regulated by miR-211 suppression of the BRN2 transcription factor', Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, 24, (3) pp. 525-537. ISSN 1755-148X (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1111/j.1755-148X.2011.00849.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 117Web of Science - 117

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2011Cook AL, Vitale AM, Ravishankar S, Matigian N, Sutherland GT, et al., 'NRF2 Activation Restores Disease Related Metabolic Deficiencies in Olfactory Neurosphere-Derived Cells from Patients with Sporadic Parkinson's Disease', PLoS ONE, 6, (7) Article E21907. ISSN 1932-6203 (2011) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021907 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 64Web of Science - 59

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2010Matigian N, Abrahamsen G, Sutharsan R, Cook AL, Vitale AM, et al., 'Disease-specific, neurosphere-derived cells as models for brain disorders', Disease models & mechanisms, 3, (11) pp. 785-798. ISSN 1754-8403 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1242/dmm.005447 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 127Web of Science - 116

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2010Stark MS, Tyagi S, Nancarrow DJ, Boyle GM, Cook AL, et al., 'Characterization of the Melanoma miRNAome by Deep Sequencing', PLoS One, 5:e9685, (3) ISSN 1932-6203 (2010) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009685 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 165Web of Science - 155

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2009Cook AL, Chen W, Thurber AE, Smit DJ, Smith AG, et al., 'Analysis of cultured human melanocytes based on polymorphisms within the SLC45A2/MATP, SLC24A5/NCKX5 and OCA2/P loci', The Journal of Investigative Dermatology: An International Journal for Research in Cutaneous Biology, 129, (2) pp. 392-405. ISSN 0022-202X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/jid.2008.211 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 82Web of Science - 75

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2009Flammiger A, Besch R, Cook AL, Maier T, Sturm RA, et al., 'SOX9 and SOX10 but Not BRN2 Are Required for Nestin Expression in Human Melanoma Cells', The Journal of Investigative Dermatology: An International Journal for Research in Cutaneous Biology, 129, (4) pp. 945-953. ISSN 0022-202X (2009) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/jid.2008.316 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 39Web of Science - 38

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2008Beaumont KA, Shekar SN, Cook AL, Duffy DL, Sturm RA, 'Red hair is the null phenotype of MC1R', Human Mutation, 29, (8) pp. E88-E94. ISSN 1098-1004 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/humu.20788 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 60

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2008Smith AG, Beaumont KA, Smit DJ, Thurber AE, Cook AL, et al., 'PPAR gamma agonists attenuate proliferation and modulate Wnt/a-catenin signalling in melanoma cells', International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, 41, (4) pp. 844-852. ISSN 1357-2725 (2008) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.biocel.2008.08.037 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 29Web of Science - 22

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2007Newton RL, Cook AL, Roberts DW, Leonard JH, Sturm RA, 'Post-transcriptional regulation of melanin biosynthetic enzymes by cAMP and resveratrol in human melanocytes', Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 127, (9) pp. 2216-2227. ISSN 0022-202X (2007) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/sj.jid.5700840 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 83Web of Science - 75

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2005Cook AL, Smith AG, Smit DJ, Leonard JH, Sturm RA, 'Co-expression of SOX9 and SOX10 during melanocytic differentiation in vitro. Experimental Cell Research', Experimental Cell Research, 308, (1) pp. 222-235. ISSN 0014-4827 (2005) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1016/j.yexcr.2005.04.019 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 54Web of Science - 52

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2004Ven Gele M, Boyle GM, Cook AL, Vandesompele J, Boonefaes T, et al., 'Gene expression profiling reveals distinct expression patterns for Classic versus Variant Merkel cell phenotypes and new classifier genes to distinguish Merkel cell from small cell lung carcinoma', Oncogene, 23, (15) pp. 2732-2742. ISSN 0950-9232 (2004) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1038/sj.onc.1207421 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 47Web of Science - 39

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2003Cook AL, Donatien PD, Smith AG, Murphy M, Jones MK, et al., 'Human Melanoblasts in Culture: Expression of BRN2 and Synergistic Regulation by Fibroblast Growth Factor-2, Stem Cell Factor and Endothelin-3', The Journal of Investigative Dermatology: An International Journal for Research in Cutaneous Biology, 121, (5) pp. 1150-1159. ISSN 0022-202X (2003) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12562.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 77Web of Science - 70

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2003Leonard JH, Marks LH, Chen W, Cook AL, Boyle GM, et al., 'Screening of human primary melanocytes of defined melanocortin-1 receptor genotype: pigmentation marker, ultrastructural and UV-survival studies', Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, 16, (3) pp. 198-207. ISSN 1755-148X (2003) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1034/j.1600-0749.2003.00033.x [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 37Web of Science - 36

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2002Leonard JH, Cook AL, Van Gele M, Boyle GM, Inglis KJ, et al., 'Proneural and Proneuroendocrine Transcription Factor Expression In Cutaneous Mechanoreceptor (Merkel) Cells and Merkel Cell Carcinoma', International Journal of Cancer, 101, (2) pp. 103-110. ISSN 1097-0215 (2002) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ijc.10554 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 61Web of Science - 63

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2001Cook AL, Pollock PM, Welch J, Walsh MD, Bowman RV, et al., 'CDKN2A is not the principle target of deletions on the short arm of chromosome 9 in neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinoma of the skin', International Journal of Cancer, 93, (3) pp. 361-367. ISSN 1097-0215 (2001) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ijc.1352 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10

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2001Van Gele M, Leonard JH, Van Roy N, Cook AL, De Paepe A, et al., 'Frequent allelic loss at 10q23 but low incidence of PTEN mutations in Merkel cell carcinoma', International Journal of Cancer, 92, (3) pp. 409-413. ISSN 1097-0215 (2001) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1002/ijc.1209 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 49Web of Science - 48

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2000Leonard JH, Cook AL, Nancarrow D, Hayward N, Van Gele M, et al., 'Deletion mapping on the short arm of chromosome 1 in Merkel cell carcinoma', Cancer Detection and Prevention, 24, (6) pp. 620-627. ISSN 0361-090X (2000) [Refereed Article]

[eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 26

Chapter in Book

(3 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2005Cook AL, Boyle GM, Leonard JH, Parsons PG, Sturm RA, 'BRN2 in melanocytic cell development, differentiation and transformation', From Melanocytes to Melanoma: The Progression of Malignancy, Humana Press Inc, Hearing, VJ, & Leong, APL (ed), Tolowa, New Jersey, pp. 149-168. ISBN 1-58829-459-5 (2005) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2003Leonard JH, Cook AL, Van Gele M, Speleman F, Sturm RA, 'Expression of developmentally regulated transcription factors in Merkel cell carcinoma', The Merkel Cell Structure-Development-Function-Cancerogenesis, Springer-Verlag, Bauman, KI, Halata, Z & Moll, I (ed), Germany, pp. 203-218. ISBN 978-3-642-05574-4 (2003) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

2003Van Gele M, Boyle GM, Cook AL, Boonefaes T, Rottiers P, et al., 'Gene expression profiling reveals two distinct subtypes of Merkel Cell Carcinoma', In: The Merkel Cell Structure-Development-Function-Cancerogensesis, Springer-Verlag, Bauman, KI, Halata, Z & Moll, I (ed), Germany, pp. 195-202. ISBN 978-3-642-05574-4 (2003) [Research Book Chapter]

[eCite] [Details]

Review

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2008Cook AL, Sturm RA, 'POU domain transcription factors: BRN2 as a regulator of melanocytic growth and tumourigenesis', Pigment Cell and Melanoma Research, 21, (6) pp. 611-626. (2008) [Substantial Review]

[eCite] [Details]

Conference Publication

(4 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2014Cook AL, 'Defining conditions to direct human pluripotent stem cells towards the glaucoma-affected trabecular meshwork cell lineage', Australian Health & Medical Research Congress, 16-19 November, 2014, Melbourne, Australia (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

2014Cook AL, Ashworth Briggs EL, Toh T, Eri RD, Hewitt A, 'Defining conditions to direct human pluripotent stem cells towards the glaucoma-affected trabecular meshwork cell lineage', 2014 Australian Health and Medical Research Congress (AHMRC), 16-19 November, 2014, Melbourne, Australia (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Ashworth Briggs EL; Eri RD; Hewitt A

2014Keith LJ, Briggs ELA, Davidson KC, Wong RCB, Pebay A, et al., 'Defining conditions to direct human pluripotent stem cells towards the glaucoma-affected trabecular meshwork cell lineage', Narrowing the Gap Between Stem Cell Science and Cell Therapy, 9-11 November, 2014, Victoria, Australia (2014) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Keith LJ; Hewitt A

2012Cook AL, Walker EJ, Shan J, Matigian N, Wells CA, et al., 'Nrf2 dysfunction in patient-derived cell lines in a new model of sporadic Parkinsons disease', Proceedings of Keystone Symposium in Molecular and Cellular Biology, 22-27 October 2012, Tokyo, Japan (2012) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Walker EJ

Other Public Output

(1 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2015Cook AL, 'Researchers see hope for glaucoma sufferers using stem cells', The Mercury, The Mercury, AUGUST 17, 2015 (2015) [Media Interview]

[eCite] [Details]

Grants & Funding

Dr Cook has extensive research experience as a lead or co-investigator on past and current grants from NHMRC, Clifford Craig Medical Research Trust, Cancer Council Tasmania, Cancer Council Queensland, Brain Foundation, and the University of Tasmania.

Funding Summary

Number of grants

30

Total funding

$5,487,490

Projects

Isogenic iPSC models with CLN3 variants for high throughput drug screening (2021)$49,400
Description
To advance therapeutic strategies for Batten disease, we will use our existing isogenic iPSC models with CLN3 variants to:Aim 1: Measure CLN3-dependent changes in neuronal network activity using multielectrode arrays.Aim 2: Quantify CLN3-dependent changes in lysosomal, mitochondrial and autophagy function in neurons.Aim 3: Identify CNS-penetrant drugs that exhibit efficacy against CLN3-variant associated neuron changes.
Funding
Batten Disease Support and Research Association ($49,400)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt A; King AE; Perry SE
Year
2021
Microfluidic models of the CNS: Understanding cells, circuits & synapses (2020 - 2022)$545,563
Description
The critical importance of understanding how the brain functions is evidenced by international investment in thisarea of research. For example, in the US, BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing InnovativeNeurotechnologies) has been supported with $1-3 billion, while in Europe the Human Brain Project is supportedwith $1.5 billion. This proposal falls directly within the scope of these with its focus on new platform technology tounderpin fundamental molecular studies of neuronal circuits. It is in the national interest of Australia to undertakeinternationally leading cross-disciplinary research in this area, a position confirmed in the Academy of Sciencecoordinated Think Tank on Inspiring smarter brain research in Australia. Being the first to develop this newplatform technology, will allow Australian researchers to be at the forefront of determining the mechanismsunderlying neurodegenerative diseases, and the development of new treatments. In addition, direct financialbenefit could be obtained through the technology, for example, through licensing novel microchamber designs.
Funding
Australian Research Council ($545,563)
Scheme
Grant-Discovery Projects
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Dickson TC; King AE; Cook AL
Period
2020 - 2022
Grant Reference
DP200103193
Why do we have SARM 1 protein if knocking it out prevents axons degenerating? (2020 - 2022)$597,651
Description
Loss of axonal connections between nerve cells results in reduced cognitive function and memory loss. Axons, like cells, can orchestrate their own death mechanisms and the SARM1 protein mediates Wallerian degeneration the best known axon death pathway. It is not yet understood, why neurons have evolved to have this axon degeneration pathway; whether it is aberrantly activate in neurodegenerative disease or whether it protects the nervous system from adverse nerve cell connections. By using a combination of methods, including axon injury and neurodegeneration mouse models, and human stem cell research, we will identify the exact role of SARM1 in the response to injury and neurodegeneration and determine whether blocking axons from this protein is beneficial or harmful. Our team is comprised of world leaders in investigating axon pathology, degeneration and regeneration in neurodegenerative disease and injury, and outcomes of this research will advance treatment of diseases such as dementia and motor-neuron disease.
Funding
National Health & Medical Research Council ($597,651)
Scheme
Grant-Ideas
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Canty A; Cook AL; Perry SE
Period
2020 - 2022
Grant Reference
1187156
Proteomic analysis of exosomes from iPS cell-derived neurons with mislocalised TDP-43 (2019)$99,665
Description
Our overarching hypothesis is that TDP-43 mislocalisation leads to altered axonal and exosomal protein expression, and which may underpin the mechanism of TDP-43 pathological spread leading to neurodegeneration of motor circuits in ALS. To begin testing this hypothesis, we have designed experiments to address three Specific Aims:Aim 1: To characterize human iPS cell-based models of TDP-43 mislocalisationAim 2: To quantify proteins differentially expressed in axons and exosomes of iPS cell-derived neurons with and without TDP-43 mislocalisationAim 3: To quantify transmission of TDP-43 mislocalisation and altered phosphorylation in a human cerebral organoid model
Funding
Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia Inc ($99,665)
Scheme
Grant - Innovator
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; King AE; Atkinson RAK; Perry SE; Hewitt A
Year
2019
Differentiation of inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pericytes to investigate neuron-pericyte interactions (2019)$9,980
Description
iPSCs can be differentiated into multiple cell types, including neurons and pericytes. We wish to differentiate iPSCs from the same parental lineage into pericytes, a vascular cell with roles in blood-brain barrier maintenance and regulation of cerebral blood flow. The interaction between pericytes and neurons has not been extensively studied, and these models will allow the determination of how these cells interact leading to novel research with relevance to understanding normal brain function and how this contributes to neurodegenerative diseases.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($9,980)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Sutherland BA
Year
2019
Pre-clinical validation, optimisation, and safety profiling of CRISPR/Cas-base editing for PCDH15-related disease. (2019)$733,314
Description
The overriding hypothesis of this work is that Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) technology can be used as an anticipatory cure to well-defined inherited retinal diseases caused by single nucleotide substitutions. The aim of this proposal is to use patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of CRISPR/Cas-base editing constructs for the anticipatory cure of Usher Syndrome. In preparation for a Phase 1, first in human clinical trial, we will construct and test single vector plasmids to deliver SaCas9 with an appropriate promoter, single guided RNA (sgRNA) and an optimised adenine base editor (ABE) to correct the Arg245Ter PCDH15 disease causing variant.
Funding
Medical Research Future Fund ($733,314)
Scheme
Grant - Accelerated Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hewitt A; Pebay A; Cook AL
Year
2019
HDAC6 inhibition to rescue axon degeneration in ALS (2019 - 2022)$997,046
Description
We will test an HDAC6 inhibitor in models of ALS. We will investigate the HDA6 inhibitor activity of novel compounds
Funding
FightMND ($997,046)
Scheme
Grant - Drug Development Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
King AE; Cook AL; Guven N; Van Den Bosch L; Dickson TC; Blizzard C; Vickers JC; Smith JA; Alty JE; Leung JY; Perry SE
Period
2019 - 2022
Developing isogenic iPSC lines to understand the role of stress hormones in Alzheimer s disease (2019)$20,000
Description
The aim of this project is to generate and characterize an isogenic control line from a famifia) AD iPSC line using CRISPR/Cas gene editing. This will yield a powerful tool to study impacts of intracellular AD processes on stress signaling and for future studies of AD pathology at the WickingCentre.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($20,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sinclair D; Cook AL
Year
2019
High-Content and High-Throughput Platforms for Analysis of Stem Cells and their Derivatives (2019)$1,700,000
Description
This proposal is for strategic and specialised equipment underpinned by basic infrastructure required tosupport neurodegenerative disease research within the CHM.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,700,000)
Scheme
null
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hewitt A; Cook AL; Dickson TC
Year
2019
A Multi-donor iPS Cell Line Pool for Rapid Screening of Genotype-specific Neuroprotective Strategies (2018)$24,443
Description
The goal of this research is to find which genes and proteins are responsible for our abilities to form memories, understand language and make decisions. By using stem cells from many different people, we will make nerve cells in the laboratory and study how these nerve cells function. We can than relate our results from the laboratory to the ability of our study participants to form memories, understand language and make decisions. The genes and proteins we identify in this way may indicate new ways to delay the onset or progression of dementia in people.
Funding
University of Tasmania ($24,443)
Scheme
Grant- Research Enhancement Program
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL
Year
2018
Investigating Batten disease-causing CLN3 mutations in patient-specific stem cells and neurons (2017)$24,898
Description
Batten disease is a rare childhood disease that results in dementia and a progressive loss of vision, and which can be due to mutation of the CLN3 gene. Using advances in stem cell technologies, we will study how the Batten disease-causing mutations in CLN3 differently affect nerve health.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($24,898)
Scheme
Grant-Establishment
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt A; King AE; Ware T
Year
2017
CRISPR/Cas gene editing of Batten disease genes in patient-specific stem cells (2017)$51,411
Description
Batten disease is a rare childhood disease that results in dementia and a progressive loss of vision, and which can be due to mutation of the several genes, including CLN2 and CLN3. Using advances in stem cell technologies, we will study how the Batten disease-causing mutations in these genes differently affect nerve health.
Funding
Batten Disease Support and Research Association ($51,411)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt A; King AE; Pebay A; Grubman A
Year
2017
Investigating the utility of retinal Base-Editing (2017)$25,000
Description
The CRISPR/Cas system, used by bacteria to counter viral intrusion, can edit DNA in specific sites. The application of this technology opens the very real prospect of anticipatory cures to well-defined inherited retinal diseases and we propose to expand the pre-clinical investigation of DNA editing of cells in the retina.
Funding
Royal Hobart Hospital Research Foundation ($25,000)
Scheme
Grant-Establishment
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hewitt A; Liu R; Cook AL
Year
2017
CRISPR screen to identify key genes driving DFTD (2017)$33,500
Description
We will apply leading genomic techniques to identify the genes essential for the proliferation of the Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour. By systematically disrupting each gene in the cancer, we will also identify genes which help the tumour evade the immune system.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($33,500)
Scheme
Grant-Dr Eric Guiler Tasmanian Devil Research Gran
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hewitt A; Liu G; Woods GM; Flies AS; Cook AL
Year
2017
Developing CRISPR/Cas Library Screens for identifying Novel Cancer Therapies (2017)$63,845
Description
Our understanding of many cancers has improved dramatically over the past decade predominantly due to our ability to sequence entire genomes, at scale. Yet, we still require a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that initiate and perpetuate cancers, as well as gene-based factors that initiate the transition from indolent to aggressive cancers with a propensity to metastasize. CRISPR/Cas is proving a robust, powerful and necessary tool in the laboratory that will undoubtedly underpin the next breakthrough in the field of cancer. As such, it is essential that we develop this capability at the University of Tasmania in a timely manner.The specific AIMS of this proposal are to:Aim 1: Establish CRISPR/Cas screening at the University of Tasmania as a tool to identify genesthat drive aggressive and metastatic cancers.Aim 2: Perform a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas negative selection (loss-of-function) screen toidentify genes essential for proliferation and survival, as well as metastatic behaviour.
Funding
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc ($63,845)
Scheme
Grant-Cancer Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Taberlay PC; Hewitt A; Holloway AF; Liu G; Dickinson JL; Brettingham-Moore KH; Fitzgerald L; Eri RD; Cook AL
Year
2017
Using stem cells to understand glaucoma (2016)$50,000
Description
Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide and there is currently no definitive treatment for this common disease. We have recently identified a number of genes associated with glaucoma, and we now seek to use this new genetic insight to test potentialdrug targets. This work will provide data that will lead directly to pre-clinical testing of FDAapproved drugs, and which may ultimately identify novel treatments for this devastating disease.
Funding
Ophthalmic Research Institute of Australia ($50,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt A
Year
2016
Optimisation of CRISPR/Cas gene editing in the retina. (2016 - 2017)$72,634
Description
Investigate the efficacy of single Clustered Regularly Interspersed Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) plasmids for gene editing in the retina.Validate our novel self-destructing CRISPR/Cas system and ensure, after initial activity, no functional CRISPR/Cas protein is produced.
Funding
Bayer Pharma AG ($72,634)
Scheme
Award-Global Ophthalmology Awards
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Hewitt A; Cook AL
Period
2016 - 2017
Towards a patient-specific stem cell model of the blinding eye disease glaucoma (2015)$71,000
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($71,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Hewitt Alex; Pebay A; Keith LJ
Year
2015
The landscape of gene expression changes in the aqueous humor drainage pathway of glaucoma patients (2015)$36,300
Description
The aims of this project are to: 1) define the entirety of genes expressed within the trabecular meshwork samples of glaucoma patients and controls; 2) correlate glaucoma-specific trabecular meshwork gene expression signatures to clinical parameters.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($36,300)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Toh TY; Kunde DA; Hewitt Alex
Year
2015
Extracellular matrix remodelling in the glaucomatous trabecular meshwork (2014)$36,235
Description
Glaucoma is a degenerative disease attributed to progressive loss of neurons within the optic nerve. There is no cure for this disease, with treatment strategies predominantly focused on reducing intraocular pressure (IOP), which remains the only modifiable risk factor. IOP is generally considered to be due to inhibited outflow of aqueous humor, the fluid within the eye, through a specialised tissue known as the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is highly fibrous, consisting of several layers of cells overlying extracellular matrix (ECM) structures. During normal ageing, increased ECM deposition occurs in the deeper layers of the trabecular meshwork, and this appears to be increased in glaucoma. It is not known how this occurs, but it has been speculated that changes in expression and activity of ECM remodelling proteins, typified by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), may be responsible. Several studies have examined gene expression and the ECM structure in normal and glaucomatous trabecular meshwork, as well as the presence of MMPs and TIMPS in aqueous humor, but no study has attempted to correlate the extent of ECM deposition with MMP or TIMP activity using trabecular meshwork tissue and aqueous humor from the same patient.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($36,235)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Toh TY; Hewitt Alex; Eri RD
Year
2014
Optimizing trabecular meshwork differentiation (2014)$14,500
Funding
University of Tasmania ($14,500)
Scheme
Grant-Research Enhancement (REGS)
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL
Year
2014
Investigation of carcinogenesis pathways in colitis-associated colorectal cancer (2014)$24,409
Description
The aims of the project are: to study the expression levels of different inflammation molecules and inflammasome components in ulcerative colities patients, UC-associated-colorectal patients, sporadic colorectal patients compared to controls; to identify the cell populations where different inflammasome components are localised.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($24,409)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Eri RD; Lloyd D; Mitchell B; Fanning S; Ahuja KDK; Cook AL
Year
2014
The INK4 locus in glaucoma - functional assessment of the non-coding RNA gene ANRIL in patient-specific cells (2013)$27,273
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($27,273)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Eri RD; Hewitt Alex; Toh TY
Year
2013
Understanding the role of inflammasomes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (2013 - 2014)$54,546
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($54,546)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Eri RD; Cook AL; Mitchell B; Wilson Raymond
Period
2013 - 2014
Investigation of carcinogenesis pathways in colitis-associated colorectal cancer (Scholarship Sarron Randall-Demllo) (2013 - 2015)$54,000
Funding
Australian Rotary Health Research Fund ($54,000)
Scheme
Scholarship-Funding Partners
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Eri RD; Spring K; Cook AL
Period
2013 - 2015
Glaucoma Fibroblast Cultures (2012)$10,000
Description
The project aims to establish and bank glaucoma patient-specific fibroblast cell lines and conduct molecular analyses on these cell lines.
Funding
Centre for Eye Research Aust Ltd ($10,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Eri RD
Year
2012
2012: Ageing and Diseases of Ageing, Japan (2012)$1,300
Funding
University of Tasmania ($1,300)
Scheme
Grant-Conference Support Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL
Year
2012
Epigenetic Regulation of Tumour Supressors in Skin Cancer (2012)$22,300
Funding
Cancer Council of Tasmania ($22,300)
Scheme
Grant-Small
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL; Snow ET; Holloway AF
Year
2012
Protein recycling is disrupted in Parkinson's disease (2011)$15,277
Funding
University of Tasmania ($15,277)
Scheme
Grant-Institutional Research Scheme
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL
Year
2011
Protein Recycling is Disrupted in Parkinson's Disease (2010)$22,000
Funding
Brain Foundation ($22,000)
Scheme
Grant-Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Cook AL
Year
2010

Research Supervision

Dr Cook has successfully supervised one PhD student to completion (now at Oxford University, UK) as well as a Masters and several Honours students. He currently supervises several PhD candidates both in a primary and co-supervisory capacity. Dr Cook is interested in hearing from high performing prospective students eager to gain experience in stem cell-based approaches to modelling of neurodegenerative diseases.

Current

8

Completed

9

Current

DegreeTitleCommenced
PhDPatient-specific Stem Cell Models of Batten Disease2018
PhDGenome-Wide Analysis Of Gene Regulatory Networks In Primary Open Angle Glaucoma2018
PhDStem Cell Models of Dementia Risk and Related Neurodegenerative Diseases2019
PhDHow Does Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Contribute Towards Vascular and Pericyte Dysfunction in Alzheimers Disease?2019
PhDCRISPR/Cas-Base Editing Applications for Eye Disease2020
PhDDeveloping Drugs to Protect Neuronal Connections in Neurodegenerative Diseases2020
PhDInvestigating Stress-related Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease in Human Neuronal Cells2020
PhDInvestigating the Role of SARM1 in Axon Degeneration using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells2021

Completed

DegreeTitleCompleted
PhDHarnessing Trabecular Meshwork Cells for the Molecular Profiling of Primary Open-angle Glaucoma
Candidate: Qinyi Lu
2020
PhDApplying Bioinformatic Tools to Better Understand Eye Diseases
Candidate: Vikrant Singh
2020
PhDA CRISPR Way to Treat Usher Syndrome
Candidate: Qi Wang
2020
PhDDevelopment of CRISPR/Cas-Mediated Gene Editing in the Retina
Candidate: Fan Li
2020
PhDAqueous Humour Protein Imbalances in Primary Open-angle Glaucoma and Their Effects on Trabecular Meshwork Cell Function
Candidate: Esther Lara Ashworth Briggs
2018
PhDInflammasome Activity in the Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Candidate: Nicole Maree Ranson
2018
PhDGenetic Ablation of CCR6 Confers Differential Exacerbation in a Spontaneous Colitis Model
Candidate: Waheedha Fathima Basheer
2017
PhDInvestigation of Neoplastic Transition of the Colonic Epithelium in the Winnie Mouse Model of Chronic Colitis
Candidate: Sarron Yael Randall-Demllo
2017
PhDEpigenetic mechanisms of arsenic-induced transformation in human keratinocytes
Candidate: Katharine Jane Herbert
2014