Profiles

Heinrich Weber

UTAS Home Assoc Prof Heinrich Weber

Heinrich Weber

Associate Professor in Paediatrics

RCS NW Hospitals Campus, Burnie

+61 3 6430 4550 (phone)

Heinrich.Weber@utas.edu.au

View more on Dr Heinrich Weber in WARP

Fields of Research

  • Respiratory diseases (320103)
  • Cardiology (incl. cardiovascular diseases) (320101)
  • Health promotion (420603)
  • Medical biochemistry - amino acids and metabolites (320501)
  • Community child health (420601)
  • Clinical sciences (320299)
  • Medical virology (320705)
  • Paediatrics (321399)
  • Other psychology (529999)
  • Preventative health care (420605)
  • Nutrition and dietetics (321099)
  • Medical bacteriology (320701)
  • Obstetrics and gynaecology (321502)
  • Innate immunity (320407)
  • Endocrinology (320208)

Research Objectives

  • Clinical health (200199)
  • Diagnosis of human diseases and conditions (200101)
  • Health education and promotion (200203)
  • Prevention of human diseases and conditions (200104)
  • Expanding knowledge in the health sciences (280112)
  • Preventive medicine (200412)
  • Rural and remote area health (200508)
  • Behaviour and health (200401)
  • Treatment of human diseases and conditions (200105)
  • Neonatal and child health (200506)

Publications

Total publications

12

Journal Article

(10 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2021Asrani P, Eapen MS, Chia C, Haug G, Weber HC, et al., 'Diagnostic approaches in COVID-19: clinical updates', Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, 15, (2) pp. 197-212. ISSN 1747-6348 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1080/17476348.2021.1823833 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 7Web of Science - 10

Co-authors: Eapen MS; Haug G; Sohal SS

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2021Eapen MS, Lu W, Hackett TL, Singhera GR, Thompson IE, et al., 'Dysregulation of endocytic machinery and ACE2 in small airways of smokers and COPD patients can augment their susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) infections', American Journal of Physiology, 320, (1) pp. L158-L163. ISSN 1040-0605 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1152/ajplung.00437.2020 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2

Co-authors: Eapen MS; Lu W; Thompson IE; McAlinden KD; Hardikar A; Haug G; Sohal SS

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2021McAlinden KD, Barnsley K, Weber HC, Haug G, Chia C, et al., 'Cochrane review update leaves big questions unanswered regarding vaping: implications for medical practitioners', The European Respiratory Journal, 57, (5) pp. 1-4. ISSN 0903-1936 (2021) [Letter or Note in Journal]

DOI: 10.1183/13993003.00022-2021 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1

Co-authors: McAlinden KD; Barnsley K; Haug G; Eapen MS; Sohal SS

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2021McAlinden KD, LU W, Vahidi Ferdowsi P, Myers S, Markos J, et al., 'Electronic cigarette aerosol is cytotoxic and increases ACE2 expression on human airway epithelial cells: Implications for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19)', Journal of Clinical Medicine, 10, (5) pp. 1-18. ISSN 2077-0383 (2021) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3390/jcm10051028 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: McAlinden KD; LU W; Myers S; Larby J; Haug G; Eapen MS; Sohal SS

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2020Bhattarai P, Myers S, Chia C, Weber HC, Young S, et al., 'Clinical application of forced oscillation technique (FOT) in early detection of airway changes in smokers', Journal of Clinical Medicine, 9 pp. 1-12. ISSN 2077-0383 (2020) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.3390/jcm9092778 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Web of Science - 3

Co-authors: Bhattarai P; Myers S; Williams AD; Sohal SS

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2019Atto B, Eapen MS, Sharma P, Frey U, Ammit AJ, et al., 'New therapeutic targets for the prevention of infectious acute exacerbations of COPD: role of epithelial adhesion molecules and inflammatory pathways', Clinical Science, 133, (14) pp. 1663-1703. ISSN 0143-5221 (2019) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1042/CS20181009 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 16Web of Science - 20

Co-authors: Atto B; Eapen MS; Larby J; Haug G; Mabeza G; Tristram S; Myers S; Geraghty DP; Flanagan K; Sohal SS

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2018Eapen MS, Hansbro PM, Larssona-Callerfelt AK, Jolly MK, Myers S, et al., 'Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: underlying pathophysiology and new therapeutic modalities', Drugs, 78, (16) pp. 1717-1740. ISSN 0012-6667 (2018) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.1007/s40265-018-1001-8 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 24

Co-authors: Eapen MS; Myers S; Larby J; Haug G; Hardikar A; Sohal SS

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2017Shee A, Weber H, 'Human Parechovirus Infection in Neonates and Children: An Overview', Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, 12, (2) pp. 99-103. ISSN 1305-7707 (2017) [Contribution to Refereed Journal]

DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1602384 [eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Shee A

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2015Weber HC, Gie RP, Wills K, Cotton MF, 'Clinical features and lung function in HIV-infected children with chronic lung disease', South African Journal of Child Health, 9, (3) pp. 72-75. ISSN 1994-3032 (2015) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.7196/SAJCH.7940 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1

Co-authors: Wills K

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2013Weber HC, Gie RP, Cotton MF, 'The challenge of chronic lung disease in HIV-infected children and adolescents', International AIDS Society. Journal, 16 Article 18633. ISSN 1758-2652 (2013) [Refereed Article]

DOI: 10.7448/IAS.16.1.18633 [eCite] [Details]

Citations: Scopus - 18Web of Science - 20

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Conference Publication

(2 outputs)
YearCitationAltmetrics
2017Weber HC, Bartel D, Yusof MF, Frandsen M, Bassett G, 'mproving adherence to paediatric asthma guidelines in a regional emergency department', Australasian Asthma Conference, 16-17 October 2017, Adelaide (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Yusof MF; Frandsen M

2017Weber HC, Walters H, Frandsen M, Dharmage S, 'A high prevalence of asthma and allergic disorders among children aged 6 to 8 in regional Tasmania', Australasian Asthma Conference 2017, 16 - 17 October 2017, Adelaide, Australia (2017) [Conference Extract]

[eCite] [Details]

Co-authors: Walters H; Frandsen M

Grants & Funding

Funding Summary

Number of grants

9

Total funding

$537,033

Projects

Are newly introduced electronic smoking devices safe for smoking cessation and implications for SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) (2021 - 2022)$80,000
Description
The damaging health effects of active and second-hand cigarette smoking are well documented. Tobacco smoke exposure is the primary cause of COPD and lung cancer. However, the prevalence of tobacco smoking is on the gradual decline. In response to this, the tobacco industry is currently changing strategies, shifting the focus from tobacco cigarettes and promoting the safer alternative in e-cigarettes. e-cigarettes still deliver nicotine and the number of dual users (traditional cigarettes and e-cigarettes) is alarming.We aim to evaluate the effects of e-cigarettes on:1.Promoting airway inflammation.2.Airway remodelling changes.3.Increasing respiratory infections.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($80,000)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sohal SS; Chia Collin; Larby J; Haug G; Barnsley KI; Tristram SG; Myers SA; Eapen MS; Lu W; Weber HC
Period
2021 - 2022
Improving outcomes for babies born in North West Tasmania: a quality improvement study (2021)$79,927
Description
The wellbeing of women during pregnancy affects the health of the unborn baby. This can also have lasting effects, for example abnormal lung function tests in early life persist into adulthood and could result in COPD in later life. Pregnant mothers in NW Tasmania are more commonly overweight and obese, and a higher proportion of pregnant women smoke compared to the rest of Tasmania and Australia. Both these problems during pregnancy could result in problems during pregnancy, birth complications, medical problems in early life, and ultimately affect chronic diseases in adulthood. This led to two current research projects to address both excessive weight gain and smoking during pregnancy. The first is - 14 - CCF Application for Research Grant aimed at minimising excessive weight gain during pregnancy and the other is to monitor carbon monoxide during pregnancy, ultimately hoping to reduce smoking during pregnancy. This study proposes to look at how these interventions in pregnancy will impact the health of the babies. If found to be successful, these low-cost interventions could lead to immediate improved health outcomes, affect chronic disease in later life and it could easily be introduced in similar regional and socio-economically disadvantaged areas of the world.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($79,927)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Weber HC; Prior SJ; Luccisano S; Robertson IK; Gleeson M; Sohal SS; Young S
Year
2021
Antenatal Carbon Monoxide (CO) Monitoring Opt-out Referral Trial (2020)$40,000
Description
The project will entail the introduction of routine carbon monoxide (CO) screening for all pregnant mothers attendingantenatal clinics in North West Tasmania to identify mothers and babies who are at high risk during pregnancy. An opt-out recruitment method, usedsuccessfully previously, will be used to maximise the participation of pregnant mothers. It is known that a substantial proportion of pregnant mothersunderreport exposure to tobacco smoke, and the under recognition of this and the subsequent lack of referral to a smoking cessation service are likelyto affect the mother's health as well as resulting in lifelong health consequences for the unborn baby.
Funding
Department of Health (Cth) ($40,000)
Scheme
Contract Research
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Weber HC; Sohal SS; Frandsen M; Gleeson M
Year
2020
Establishment of a Tasmanian lung cancer registry: a north and north-west collaborative initiative. (2020 - 2021)$72,727
Description
Despite the health initiatives in tobacco control, Tasmania continues to have the second highest smoking rates in the nations after Northern Territory. According to the Cancer Council Tasmania, current smoking rates for the state is 18.9% compared to national current smoking rate of 16.0%. Due to high smoking rates lung cancer is now one of the major killers in Tasmania. Smoking also leads to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which is a major risk factor for lung cancer. Nearly 70% of lung cancer occurs in early COPD. So, in Tasmania we have high prevalence of lung cancer but also a high-risk current smoking population with or without COPD. According to Lung Foundation Australia, lung cancer currently is Australias biggest cancer killer. It kills more people than breast, prostate and ovarian cancers combined. One Australian dies every hour from lung cancer. Australians diagnosed with lung cancer in 2017 were 12,500 i.e. 34 people per day and it is on an upward trajectory. We aim to establish a Tasmanian Lung Cancer Registry.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($72,727)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sohal SS; Chia Collin; Larby J; Haug G; Mabeza G; Weber HC; Young S; Hardikar AA; Eapen MS; Lu W
Period
2020 - 2021
Multidisciplinary approach to antenatal care to improve the health of pregnant women and their offspring: Healthy Outcomes for the Future (HOFF) program. (2019 - 2021)$62,606
Description
: The primary objective of this project is to implement an evidence based, multidisciplinary, effective model of care and lifestyle interventions (Healthy Outcomes for the Future (HOFF) program) as part of routine care provided at antenatal clinics in the rural North West (NW) Tasmania to improve the health of mothers and their offspring. It is intended that the implementation of a suite of dietary, exercise and mental health interventions will curtail frequent occurrences of excess gestational weight gain (GWG), attenuate the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and reduce adverse outcomes at birth (for both mother and child). The proposed research will utilise a co-design approach, amalgamating contributions from clinicians, research and primary care staff from North West Regional Hospital (NWRH), obesity researchers from University of Tasmania (UTAS) and all women who present at antenatal clinics in NWRH and Mersey Community Hospital (MCH). Implementation of the proposed research will primarily be guided by the recent findings of the scoping research conducted into the status of the antenatal care in NW Tasmania (Unpublished data Sharon L). Further to this, a blueprint for a sustainable antenatal care program will be generated in partnership with key stakeholders at NWRH, UTAS and the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH). Pertinent implementation strategies will be adopted from the Health in Preconception, Pregnancy and Post-Birth (HIPPP) currently in practice at RHH, with the overarching view of strategically prioritising implementation research, translation of research to practice, capacity building and collaboration between clinicians, researchers and patients. Specific Aims of the proposed research include: 1. Continuous monitoring and improvement of antenatal care practices regarding lifestyle risk factors and maternal obesity during pregnancy in the NW. 2. Develop a pathway to improve the rate of glucose tolerance tests (GTT) not done during pregnancy and identify alternative diagnostic methods for those at high risk. 3. Intervene on the already identified implementation enablers and barriers of integrated antenatal care within the NWRH and MCH settings. 4. Comparing the effectiveness of providing multidisciplinary lifestyle support in early pregnancy with standard care, in the context of reducing GWG, birth complications, postnatal outcomes and GDM (including GDM diagnosis). 5. Implementation of meaningful and applicable modifications in the antenatal care program, while lowering (or at least not increasing) the burden on clinicians at NWRH and MCH. 6. To determine if GWG is associated with infant weight and body composition (during the first 6 months of life), and immediate and long-term adverse outcomes in the babies. 7. To determine whether the lifestyle interventions will lead to sustained improvement postnatal dietary intake and physical activity. 8. Co-design a blueprint for the sustainable best-practice model to promote a healthy lifestyle and facilitate healthy weight gain during pregnancy. 9. Evaluate the lifestyle intervention implementation and patient outcomes, and provide detailed knowledge on the adoption, reach, engagement, and maintenance of the intervention elements within clinical practice.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($62,606)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
Tasmanian Health Service - North West
Research Team
Luccisano S; Weber HC; Robertson IK; Murfet Giuliana; Choudheri S; Jayasinghe SU; Ahuja KDK; Gleeson M
Period
2019 - 2021
Prevalence of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS) in north-west Tasmanian population: understanding and translation to early therapy (2019 - 2020)$105,868
Description
Asthma and COPD are typically characterised as separate diseases with different clinical features, pathophysiological mechanisms and strategies for treatment. Some respiratory patients appear to have features of both diseases, i.e. a history of asthma and usually smoking, with marked fixed airflow obstruction, which is termed asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS). Exacerbation rates are also quite high in ACOS patients compared to asthma or COPD alone. There is very little known about the disease and it is difficult to manage clinically because the underlying disease mechanisms and prevalence is poorly understood. There is high prevalence of undiagnosed asthma, COPD and even more for ACOS in the North-West (NW) Tasmanian population, where smoking rates are quite high. People from the low socio-economic population in particular experience considerably greater mortality and morbidity from such respiratory diseases compared to rest of the community. Respiratory lung function lab has now been established in the NW for identification of lung diseases. We now wish to apply for funding with an objective to identify the burden of ACOS in the NW population to inform clinical practice for better management of this ill-understood condition.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($105,868)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Sohal SS; Frandsen M; Ahuja KDK; Beckett JM; Mabeza FG; Weber HC; Young S; Eapen MS
Period
2019 - 2020
Childhood asthma in North West Tasmania - a follow up study (2019 - 2020)$49,500
Description
The aim of this project to examine the associations with the higher childhood asthma prevalence in North West Tasmania as determined in an earlier study. We plan to confirm this asthma prevalence with objective tests, such as lung function tests. We further which to determine the association of childhood asthma with allergens, environmental factors and prenatal factors.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($49,500)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Weber HC; Sohal SS
Period
2019 - 2020
What perinatal risk factors are associated with impaired lung function in children at the age of 6 to 8 years? (2016)$14,601
Description
The aim of the study is to determine perinatal risk factors that are associated with impaired lung function in early childhood years (6 to 8 years).
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($14,601)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Weber HC; Shires SE; Walters EH; Dharmage SC
Year
2016
The prevalence of asthma in 6 to 8 year old children in rural Tasmania (2013)$31,804
Description
This study aims to determine the prevalence of asthma in children in North West Tasmania. It will assist in identifying risk factors and informing appropriate provision of health services.
Funding
Clifford Craig Foundation ($31,804)
Scheme
Grant
Administered By
University of Tasmania
Research Team
Weber HC; Wilson D; Shires SE; Cheek CG
Year
2013